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EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - CYTOKINETICS INCcytk-ex321_6.htm
EX-31.3 - EX-31.3 - CYTOKINETICS INCcytk-ex313_7.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - CYTOKINETICS INCcytk-ex312_8.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - CYTOKINETICS INCcytk-ex311_9.htm
EX-10.1 - EX-10.1 - CYTOKINETICS INCcytk-ex101_770.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number: 000-50633

 

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware

94-3291317

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

280 East Grand Avenue

South San Francisco, California

94080

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (650) 624-3000

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

◻  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

Number of shares of common stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding as of July 27, 2017: 53,666,761

 

 

 

2


 

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR FORM 10-Q

FOR THE QUARTER ENDED June 30, 2017

 

 

Page

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

3

Item 1. Financial Statements

3

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (Unaudited)

3

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)

4

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 (Unaudited)

5

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

6

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

20

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

33

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

33

 

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

34

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

34

Item 1A. Risk Factors

34

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

57

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

57

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

57

Item 5. Other Information

57

Item 6. Exhibits

57

 

 

SIGNATURES

58

 

 

EXHIBIT INDEX

59

 

2


 

 PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share data) (Unaudited)

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

100,711

 

 

$

66,874

 

Short-term investments

 

 

211,340

 

 

 

89,375

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

-

 

 

 

24

 

Prepaid and other current assets

 

 

4,945

 

 

 

2,360

 

Total current assets

 

 

316,996

 

 

 

158,633

 

Long-term investments

 

 

20,087

 

 

 

7,672

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

3,268

 

 

 

3,637

 

Other assets

 

 

279

 

 

 

200

 

Total assets

 

$

340,630

 

 

$

170,142

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

1,783

 

 

$

4,236

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

13,545

 

 

 

18,047

 

Deferred revenue, current

 

 

7,942

 

 

 

8,060

 

Current portion of long-term debt

 

 

7,315

 

 

 

2,500

 

Other current liabilities

 

 

474

 

 

 

415

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

31,059

 

 

 

33,258

 

Long-term debt, net

 

 

22,844

 

 

 

27,381

 

Liability related to the sale of future royalties, net

 

 

96,657

 

 

 

 

Deferred revenue, non-current

 

 

15,067

 

 

 

15,000

 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

2

 

 

 

142

 

Total liabilities

 

 

165,629

 

 

 

75,781

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Authorized: 10,000,000 shares;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issued and outstanding: Series A Convertible Preferred Stock — zero shares at

   June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Authorized: 163,000,000 shares;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issued and outstanding: 53,457,091 shares at June 30, 2017 and 40,646,595

   shares at December 31, 2016

 

 

53

 

 

 

41

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

748,273

 

 

 

612,474

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

(86

)

 

 

137

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(573,239

)

 

 

(518,291

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

175,001

 

 

 

94,361

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

340,630

 

 

$

170,142

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3


 

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(In thousands, except per share data) (Unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development, grant and other revenues, net

 

$

(1,889

)

 

$

3,852

 

 

$

818

 

 

$

8,299

 

License revenues

 

 

4,942

 

 

 

1,950

 

 

 

6,388

 

 

 

5,923

 

Total revenues

 

$

3,053

 

 

$

5,802

 

 

$

7,206

 

 

$

14,222

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

19,809

 

 

 

9,723

 

 

$

39,098

 

 

 

23,256

 

General and administrative

 

 

8,438

 

 

 

7,090

 

 

 

16,553

 

 

 

13,931

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

28,247

 

 

 

16,813

 

 

 

55,651

 

 

 

37,187

 

Operating loss

 

 

(25,194

)

 

 

(11,011

)

 

 

(48,445

)

 

 

(22,965

)

Interest expense

 

 

(782

)

 

 

(707

)

 

 

(1,540

)

 

 

(1,271

)

Non-cash interest expense on liability related to sale of future royalties

 

 

(3,717

)

 

 

-

 

 

 

(6,012

)

 

 

-

 

Interest and other income, net

 

 

612

 

 

 

107

 

 

 

1,049

 

 

 

170

 

Net loss

 

 

(29,081

)

 

 

(11,611

)

 

 

(54,948

)

 

 

(24,066

)

Net loss per share - basic and diluted

 

$

(0.60

)

 

$

(0.29

)

 

$

(1.22

)

 

$

(0.61

)

Weighted-average number of shares used in computing net loss per

   share — basic and diluted

 

 

48,218

 

 

 

39,666

 

 

 

44,910

 

 

 

39,629

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized (loss) gain on available-for-sale securities, net

 

 

(78

)

 

 

73

 

 

 

(223

)

 

 

80

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(29,159

)

 

$

(11,538

)

 

$

(55,171

)

 

$

(23,986

)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4


 

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands) (Unaudited)

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(54,948

)

 

$

(24,066

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment

 

 

860

 

 

 

340

 

Gain on disposal of equipment

 

 

(82

)

 

 

(2

)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

4,141

 

 

 

3,400

 

Non-cash interest expense related to long-term debt

 

 

278

 

 

 

257

 

Non-cash interest expense on liability related to sale of future royalties

 

 

6,036

 

 

 

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

24

 

 

 

(14

)

Prepaid and other assets

 

 

(2,663

)

 

 

(4,600

)

Accounts payable

 

 

(1,888

)

 

 

841

 

Accrued and other liabilities

 

 

(3,912

)

 

 

1,143

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

(51

)

 

 

(6,024

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(52,205

)

 

 

(28,725

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of investments

 

 

(201,531

)

 

 

(70,709

)

Proceeds from sales and maturities of investments

 

 

66,928

 

 

 

47,036

 

Proceeds from sale of property and equipment

 

 

-

 

 

 

32

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(1,646

)

 

 

(436

)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(136,249

)

 

 

(24,077

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from public offerings of common stock, net of issuance costs

 

 

112,232

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of future royalties, net of issuance costs

 

 

90,621

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock related to sale of future royalties,

   net of issuance costs

 

 

7,560

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from long term debt, net of debt discount and issuance costs

 

 

-

 

 

 

14,996

 

Proceeds from stock based award activities and warrants, net

 

 

11,878

 

 

 

454

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

222,291

 

 

 

15,450

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

33,837

 

 

 

(37,352

)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

 

 

66,874

 

 

 

65,076

 

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

 

$

100,711

 

 

$

27,724

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5


 

CYTOKINETICS, INCORPORATED

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 1 — Organization and Significant Accounting Policies

Cytokinetics, Incorporated (the “Company”, “we” or “our”) was incorporated under the laws of the state of Delaware on August 5, 1997. The Company is a late stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of novel small molecule therapeutics that modulate muscle function for the potential treatment of serious diseases and medical conditions.

The Company’s financial statements contemplate the conduct of the Company’s operations in the normal course of business. The Company has incurred an accumulated deficit of $573.2 million since inception and there can be no assurance that the Company will attain profitability. The Company had a net loss of $54.9 million and net cash used in operations of $52.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017. Cash, cash equivalents and investments increased to $332.1 million at June 30, 2017 from $163.9 million at December 31, 2016. The Company anticipates that it will have operating losses and net cash outflows in future periods.

The Company is subject to risks common to late stage biopharmaceutical companies including, but not limited to, development of new drug candidates, dependence on key personnel, and the ability to obtain additional capital as needed to fund its future plans. The Company’s liquidity will be impaired if sufficient additional capital is not available on terms acceptable to the Company. To date, the Company has funded its operations primarily through sales of its common stock, contract payments under its collaboration agreements, sale of future royalties, debt financing arrangements, sales of its convertible preferred stock, government grants and interest income. Until it achieves profitable operations, the Company intends to continue to fund operations through payments from strategic collaborations, additional sales of equity securities, grants and debt financings. The Company has never generated revenues from commercial sales of its drugs and may not have drugs to market for at least several years, if ever. The Company’s success is dependent on its ability to enter into new strategic collaborations and/or raise additional capital and to successfully develop and market one or more of its drug candidates. As a result, the Company may choose to raise additional capital through equity or debt financings to continue to fund its operations in the future. The Company cannot be certain that sufficient funds will be available from such a financing or through a collaborator when required or on satisfactory terms. Additionally, there can be no assurance that the Company’s drug candidates will be accepted in the marketplace or that any future products can be developed or manufactured at an acceptable cost. These factors could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s future financial results, financial position and cash flows.

Based on the current status of its research and development plans, the Company believes that its existing cash, cash equivalents and investments will be sufficient to fund its cash requirements for at least the next 12 months, from the filing date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. If, at any time, the Company’s prospects for financing its research and development programs decline, the Company may decide to reduce research and development expenses by delaying, discontinuing or reducing its funding of one or more of its research or development programs. Alternatively, the Company might raise funds through strategic collaborations, public or private financings or other arrangements. Such funding, if needed, may not be available on favorable terms, or at all. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Basis of Presentation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Cytokinetics and its wholly owned subsidiary. The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and the instructions to Form 10-Q and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X. The financial statements include all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) that management believes are necessary for the fair statement of the Company’s position at June 30, 2017, and the results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and the cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2017. These interim financial statement results are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the full fiscal year or any future interim period. The balance sheet at December 31, 2016 has been derived from the audited financial statements at that date, but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. The financial statements and related disclosures have been prepared with the presumption that users of the interim financial statements have read or have access to the audited

6


 

financial statements for the preceding fiscal year. Accordingly, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, as filed with the SEC on March 6, 2017.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based payment awards made to employees and directors, including employee stock options and employee stock purchases by measuring the stock-based compensation cost at the grant date based on the calculated fair value of the award, and recognizing expense on a straight-line basis over the employee’s requisite service period, generally the vesting period of the award. Stock compensation for non-employees is measured at the fair value of the award for each period until the award is fully vested. Compensation cost for restricted stock awards that contain performance conditions is based on the grant date fair value of the award and compensation expense is recorded over the implicit or explicit requisite service period based on management’s best estimate as to whether it is probable that the shares awarded are expected to vest.

The Company reviews the valuation assumptions at each grant date and, as a result, from time to time it will likely change the valuation assumptions it uses to value stock based awards granted in future periods. The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards represent management’s best estimates at the time, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management judgment. As a result, if conditions change and the management uses different assumptions, the Company’s stock-based compensation expense could be materially different in the future. In addition, the Company will continue to maintain the current forfeiture policy to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and recognize expense only for those shares expected to vest. If the actual forfeiture rate is materially different from management’s estimate, stock-based compensation expense could be significantly different from what has been recorded in the current period.

Non-Cash Interest Expense on Liabilities Related to Sale of Future Royalties

The Company accounted for Liabilities related to sale of future royalties as a debt financing for accounting purposes, to be amortized under the effective interest rate method over the life of the related royalty stream when the Company has a significant continuing involvement in the generation of royalty streams.

 

          Liabilities related to sale of future royalties and the debt amortization are based on the Company’s current estimates of future royalties expected to be paid over the life of the arrangement. The Company will periodically assess the expected royalty payments using a combination of internal projections and forecasts from external sources. To the extent the Company’s future estimates of future royalty payments are greater or less than its previous estimates or the estimated timing of such payments is materially different than its previous estimates, the Company will adjust the liabilities related to sale of future royalties and prospectively recognize related non-cash interest expense.

Prior Year’s Presentations

Certain amounts in the prior year’s presentations have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on previously reported net income.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting to clarify when to account for a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award as a modification. Under this new guidance, modification accounting is required if the fair value, vesting conditions, or classification of the award changes as a result of the change in terms or conditions. ASU 2017-09 is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within each annual reporting period. The Company does not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on its financial statements or disclosures.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, ‘Statement of cash flows (Topic 230): Classification of certain cash receipts and cash payments’. ASU 2016-15 issued guidance to clarify how certain cash receipts and payments should be presented in the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-15 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and

7


 

early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to have a material effect on its financial statements or disclosures.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, ‘Financial Instruments — Credit Losses — Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. ASU 2016-13 changes the impairment model for most financial assets and certain other instruments. ASU 2016-13 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on its financial statements and disclosures.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09 — Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting which simplifies various aspects of accounting for share-based payments and presentation in the financial statements. ASU 2016-09 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016 and early adoption is permitted. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company adopted ASU No. 2016-09 on a modified retrospective approach. The guidance requires us to recognize all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies as income tax expense or benefit in the income statement and recognize previously unrecognized excess tax benefits upon adoption as a cumulative-effect adjustment in retained earnings, which eliminates the need to track unrecognized excess tax benefits for both new and existing awards. As of January 1, 2017, the Company recognized excess tax benefit of $0.7 million as an increase to deferred tax assets related to tax loss carryover. However, the entire amount was offset by a full valuation allowance. Accordingly, no cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings was recorded as of June 30, 2017. The Company will maintain its current forfeiture policy to estimate forfeitures expected to occur to determine stock-based compensation expense. The adoption of this aspect of the guidance did not have a material impact on our financial statements and disclosures.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2016-02 requires management to record right-to-use asset and lease liability on the statement of financial position for operating leases. ASU 2016-02 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2018 and the modified retrospective approach is required. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on its financial statements and disclosures.

In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, Financial instruments (Subtopic 825-10). ASU 2016-01 requires management to measure equity investments at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income. ASU 2016-01 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2017 and early adoption is not permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2016-01 to have a material effect upon its financial statements or disclosures.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective. In March 2016, the FASB amended the principal-versus-agent implementation guidance and illustrations in the new standard. In April 2016, the FASB amended the guidance on identifying performance obligations and the implementation guidance on licensing in the new standard. In May 2016, the FASB amended the guidance on collectability, noncash consideration, presentation of sales tax and transition in the new standard. In December 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-20, Technical Corrections and Improvements to Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which amends certain narrow aspects of the guidance issued in ASU 2014-09. The new standard will become effective starting on January 1, 2018. Early application is permitted to the original effective date of January 1, 2017. The Company will adopt the standard on January 1, 2018. The standard permits the use of either the modified retrospective method or full retrospective approach for all periods presented. While the Company is continuing to assess all potential impacts of the standard, the Company believes the most significant accounting impact will relate to the timing of the recognition of our license, collaboration, and milestone revenues.

 

Note 2 — Net Loss Per Share

The following is the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share (in thousands, except per share data):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Net loss

 

$

(29,081

)

 

$

(11,611

)

 

$

(54,948

)

 

$

(24,066

)

Weighted-average shares used in computing net loss

   per share — basic and diluted

 

 

48,218

 

 

 

39,666

 

 

 

44,910

 

 

 

39,629

 

Net loss per share — basic and diluted

 

$

(0.60

)

 

$

(0.29

)

 

$

(1.22

)

 

$

(0.61

)

 

Basic net loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of vested common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per share is computed by giving effect to all potentially dilutive common shares, including

8


 

outstanding stock options, unvested restricted stock units, warrants, and shares issuable under the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), by applying the treasury stock method, if they have a dilutive effect. The following instruments were excluded from the computation of diluted net income (loss) per share because their effect would have been antidilutive (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three and Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

 

6,170

 

 

 

5,996

 

Warrants to purchase common stock

 

 

310

 

 

 

5,710

 

Restricted and Performance stock units

 

 

461

 

 

 

757

 

Shares issuable related to the ESPP

 

 

18

 

 

 

24

 

Total shares

 

 

6,959

 

 

 

12,487

 

 

Note 3 — Supplemental Cash Flow Data

Supplemental cash flow data was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Cash paid for interest

 

$

1,270

 

 

$

951

 

Cash paid for taxes

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

Significant non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debt discount netted against proceeds from long term debt,

   recorded in equity

 

 

 

 

288

 

Interest paid on the long-term debt, at inception

 

 

 

 

63

 

Purchases of property and equipment through accounts

   payable

 

 

484

 

 

 

234

 

Purchases of property and equipment through accrued

   liabilities

 

 

670

 

 

 

(76

)

 

Note 4 — Research and Development Arrangements

Amgen Inc. (“Amgen”)

The Company and Amgen continue activities to discover, develop and commercialize novel small molecule therapeutics, including omecamtiv mecarbil, that activate cardiac muscle contractility for potential applications in the treatment of heart failure under the collaboration and option agreement between the Company and Amgen, as amended (the “Amgen Agreement”). The Company has recognized research and development revenue from Amgen for reimbursements of internal costs of certain full-time employee equivalents, supporting a collaborative research program directed to the discovery of next-generation cardiac sarcomere activator compounds and the development program for omecamtiv mecarbil, and other costs related to the research and development program.

 In December 2016, the Company provided notice of its exercise of its option under the Amgen Agreement to co-invest in the Phase 3 development program of omecamtiv mecarbil at the level of $10.0 million in exchange for an incremental royalty from Amgen of up to 1% on increasing worldwide sales of omecamtiv mecarbil outside Japan. In February 2017, the Company provided notice to Amgen of its further exercise of its co-invest option in the additional amount of $30.0 million (i.e. to fully co-invest $40.0 million) in the Phase 3 development program of omecamtiv mecarbil in exchange for a total incremental royalty from Amgen of up to 4% on increasing worldwide sales of omecamtiv mecarbil outside Japan.

The Company made co-investment payments of $6.3 million and $7.5 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively. Because these payments are contingent on Amgen continuing the Phase 3 development program of omecamtiv mecarbil and the benefit to be received in exchange for the payments is not sufficiently separable from the Amgen Agreement the Company reduced research and development revenues by the amount of these payments.

9


 

Revenue from Amgen was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

June 30, 2016

 

Research and development revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reimbursement of internal costs

 

$

388

 

 

$

616

 

 

$

1,279

 

 

$

1,233

 

Co-investment option payment

 

 

(6,250

)

 

 

 

 

 

(7,500

)

 

 

 

Total revenues from Amgen

 

$

(5,862

)

 

$

616

 

 

$

(6,221

)

 

$

1,233

 

 

There were no accounts receivables due from Amgen as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.

 

Under the Amgen Agreement, the Company is eligible to receive over $300.0 million in additional development milestone payments which are based on various clinical milestones, including the initiation of certain clinical studies, the submission of an application for marketing authorization for a drug candidate to certain regulatory authorities and the receipt of such approvals. Additionally, the Company is eligible to receive up to $300.0 million in commercial milestone payments provided certain sales targets are met. Due to the nature of drug development, including the inherent risk of development and approval of drug candidates by regulatory authorities, it is not possible to estimate if and when these milestone payments could be achieved or become due. The achievement of each of these milestones is dependent solely upon the results of Amgen’s development and commercialization activities.

In 2013, in conjunction with the Amgen Agreement, the Company sold 1,404,100 shares of its common stock to Amgen, subject to certain trading restrictions. In prior periods, the Company considered Amgen to be a related party, due in part to Amgen’s equity ownership percentage, and reported revenue under the Amgen Agreement to be revenues from a related party. Effective April 1, 2017, in part due to a decrease in Amgen’s equity ownership percentage, the Company no longer considers Amgen to be a related party.

Astellas Pharma Inc. (“Astellas”)

The Company and Astellas continue activities focused on the research, development, and commercialization of skeletal muscle activators, including CK-2127107, as novel drug candidates for diseases and medical conditions associated with muscle weakness under the Amended and Restated License and Collaboration Agreement dated December 22, 2014, as amended (the “Astellas Agreement”). The Astellas Agreement was further amended effective April 1, 2017 to adjust the payment mechanism under the Astellas Agreement because Astellas will also be incurring a portion of the development costs for ALS. This amendment had no effect on the accounting for the Astellas Agreement.

The Company has recognized research and development revenue from Astellas for reimbursements of internal costs of certain full-time employee equivalents, supporting collaborative research and development programs, and of other costs related to those programs.

In connection with the Astellas Agreement, in 2015, Astellas paid the Company a $30 million non-refundable upfront license fee and a $15.0 million milestone payment relating to Astellas’ decision to advance CK-2127107 into Phase 2 clinical development. The Company determined that the license and the research and development services relating to the Astellas Agreement are a single unit of accounting as the license was determined to not have stand-alone value. Accordingly, the Company is recognizing this revenue over the research term of the Astellas Agreement using the proportional performance model.

In 2016, in connection with an amendment to the Astellas Agreement (the “2016 Astellas Amendment”). Astellas paid the Company a $35.0 million non-refundable upfront amendment fee and an accelerated $15.0 million milestone payment for the initiation of the first Phase 2 clinical trial of CK-2127107 in ALS that was otherwise provided for in the Astellas Agreement, as if such milestone had been achieved upon the execution of the 2016 Astellas Amendment, and committed research and development consideration of $44.2 million (total consideration of $94.2 million), which the Company allocated between units of accounting for license fees and research and development services. The Company allocated $24.9 million of research and development consideration to the license and $19.3 million of the research and development consideration to research and development services, to be recognized as revenue as research and development services are performed.

 

10


 

Astellas’ Option on Tirasemtiv

In 2016, in connection with the 2016 Astellas Amendment, Astellas paid the Company a $15.0 million non-refundable option fee for an option for a global collaboration for the development and commercialization of tirasemtiv (the “Option on Tirasemtiv”). Unless exercised, the Option on Tirasemtiv expires following the receipt of the approval letter for tirasemtiv from the FDA.

Prior to Astellas’ exercise of the Option on Tirasemtiv, the Company will continue the development of tirasemtiv, including VITALITY-ALS, at its own expense to support regulatory approval in the U.S., EU and certain other jurisdictions and will retain the final decision making authority on the development of tirasemtiv. Therefore, the Company concluded that there was no obligation related to any development services during the option period.

If Astellas exercises the Option on Tirasemtiv:

 

the Company will grant Astellas an exclusive license to develop and commercialize tirasemtiv outside the Company’s own commercialization territory of North America, Europe and other select countries under a license and collaboration agreement for tirasemtiv (the “License on Tirasemtiv”). Each party would be primarily responsible for the further development of tirasemtiv in its territory and have the exclusive right to commercialize tirasemtiv in its territory.

 

the Company will receive an option exercise payment ranging from $25.0 million (if exercise occurs following receipt of data from VITALITY-ALS) to $80.0 million (if exercise occurs following receipt of FDA approval) and a milestone payment of $30.0 million from Astellas associated with the Company’s initiation of the open-label extension trial for tirasemtiv (VIGOR-ALS). If Astellas exercises the option after the defined review period following receipt of data from VITALITY-ALS, Astellas will at the time of option exercise reimburse the Company for a share of any additional costs incurred after such review period.

 

the parties will share the future development costs of tirasemtiv in North America, Europe and certain other countries (with Cytokinetics bearing 75% of such shared costs and Astellas bearing 25% of such costs), and Astellas will be solely responsible for the development costs of tirasemtiv specific to its commercialization territory.

Contingent upon the successful development of tirasemtiv, the Company may receive from Astellas milestone payments up to $100.0 million for the initial indication and up to $50.0 million for each subsequent indication. If tirasemtiv is commercialized, Astellas will pay the Company royalties (at rates ranging from the mid-teens to twenty percent) on sales of tirasemtiv in Astellas’ territory, and the Company will pay Astellas royalties (at rates up to the mid-teens) on sales of tirasemtiv in the Company’s territory, in each case subject to various possible adjustments.

The Company concluded that the Option on Tirasemtiv is a substantive option, and is therefore not considered a deliverable at the execution of the 2016 Astellas Amendment. The Company determined that the License on Tirasemtiv is contingent upon the exercise of the Option on Tirasemtiv, and is therefore not effective during the periods presented, since the option has not been exercised as of the latest balance sheet date. In addition, the Company did evaluate the consideration set to be received for the License on Tirasemtiv in relation to the fair value of the License on Tirasemtiv, and determined that it was not being provided at a significant incremental discount.

The Company further determined that the option fee of $15.0 million was deemed to be a prepayment towards the License on Tirasemtiv, and therefore deferred revenue recognition of the option fee either until the Option on Tirasemtiv is exercised or expires unexercised. Unless exercised, the Option on Tirasemtiv expires following the receipt of the approval letter for tirasemtiv from the FDA. If the Option on Tirasemtiv expires unexercised, the $15.0 million received would be added to the 2016 Astellas Amendment consideration, to be allocated to the units of accounting.

Revenue and deferred revenue from Astellas

Research and development revenue from Astellas was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months

Ended

June 30,

2017

 

 

Three Months

Ended

June 30,

2016

 

 

Six Months

Ended

June 30,

2017

 

 

Six Months

Ended

June 30,

2016

 

License revenues

 

$

4,942

 

 

$

1,950

 

 

$

6,388

 

 

$

5,923

 

Research and development revenues

 

 

3,973

 

 

 

2,898

 

 

 

6,698

 

 

 

6,578

 

Total Revenue from Astellas

 

$

8,915

 

 

$

4,848

 

 

$

13,086

 

 

$

12,501

 

11


 

 

Deferred Revenue reflecting the unrecognized portion of the license revenue, option fee and payment of expenses from the Astellas Agreement was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

Deferred revenue, current

 

$

7,942

 

 

$

8,060

 

Deferred revenue, non-current

 

$

15,067

 

 

$

15,000

 

 

There were no accounts receivable due from Astellas at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016. 

Under the Astellas Agreement, additional research and early and late state development milestone payments which are based on various research and clinical milestones, including the initiation of certain clinical studies, the submission of an application for marketing authorization for a drug candidate to certain regulatory authorities and the commercial launch of collaboration products could total over $600.0 million, including up to $95.0 million relating to CK-2127107 in non-neuromuscular indications, and over $100.0 million related to CK-2127107 in each of spinal muscular atrophy (“SMA”), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (“ALS”) and other neuromuscular indications. Additionally, $200.0 million in commercial milestones could be received under the Astellas Agreement provided certain sales targets are met. The achievement of each of the late stage development milestones and the commercialization milestones are dependent solely upon the results of Astellas’ development activities and therefore these potential milestone payments were not deemed to be substantive. The Company is eligible to receive up to $2.0 million in research milestone payments under the collaboration for each future potential drug candidate. The Company believes that each of the milestones related to research under the Astellas Agreement is substantive and can only be achieved with the Company’s past and current performance and each milestone will result in additional payments to the Company. Due to the nature of drug development, including the inherent risk of development and approval of drug candidates by regulatory authorities, it is not possible to estimate if and when these milestone payments could be achieved or become due.

In conjunction with the Astellas Agreement in December 2014, the Company also sold 2,040,816 shares of its common stock to Astellas at a price per share of $4.90 and an aggregate purchase price of $10.0 million, subject to certain trading restrictions. In prior periods, the Company considered Astellas to be a related party, due in part to Astellas’ equity ownership percentage, and reported revenue under the Astellas Agreement to be revenues from a related party. Effective April 1, 2017, in part due to a decrease in Astellas’ equity ownership percentage, the Company no longer considers Astellas to be a related party.

12


 

Note 5 — Cash Equivalents and Investments

Cash Equivalents and Available for Sale Investments

The amortized cost and fair value of cash equivalents and available for sale investments at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Maturity

Dates

Cash equivalents — U.S. Treasury and money market funds

 

$

93,824

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

 

 

$

93,825

 

 

 

Short-term investments — U.S. Treasury

   securities and Agency bonds

 

$

211,564

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

(225

)

 

$

211,340

 

 

7/2017 - 6/2018

Long-term investments — Equity, U.S.

   Treasury securities and Agency bonds

 

$

19,950

 

 

$

180

 

 

$

(43

)

 

$

20,087

 

 

7/2018 - 8/2018

 

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Maturity

Dates

Cash equivalents — U. S. Treasury securities

   and money market funds

 

$

55,658

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

55,658

 

 

 

Short-term investments — U.S. Treasury

   securities

 

$

89,396

 

 

$

2

 

 

$

(23

)

 

$

89,375

 

 

1/2017 – 12/2017

Long-term investments — Equity and U.S.

   Treasury securities

 

$

7,513

 

 

$

176

 

 

$

(17

)

 

$

7,672

 

 

2/2018 – 3/2018

 

At June 30, 2017 there were no investments that had been in a continuous unrealized loss position for 12 months or longer.

 

Interest income was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

June 30,

2016

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

June 30,

2016

 

Interest income

 

$

694

 

 

$

105

 

 

$

1,183

 

 

$

168

 

 

Note 6 — Fair Value Measurements

The Company follows the fair value accounting guidance to value its financial assets and liabilities. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received for assets when sold or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date (exit price). The Company utilizes market data or assumptions that the Company believes market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk and the risks inherent in the inputs to the valuation technique. These inputs can be readily observable, market corroborated or generally unobservable.

The Company primarily applies the market approach for recurring fair value measurements and endeavors to utilize the best information reasonably available. Accordingly, the Company utilizes valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs to the extent possible, and considers the security issuers’ and the third-party insurers’ credit risk in its assessment of fair value.

The Company classifies the determined fair value based on the observability of those inputs. Fair value accounting guidance establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurement) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurement). The three defined levels of the fair value hierarchy are as follows:

Level 1 — Observable inputs, such as quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

13


 

Level 2 — Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or through corroboration with observable market data; and

Level 3 — Unobservable inputs, for which there is little or no market data for the assets or liabilities, such as internally-developed valuation models.

 

Fair value of financial assets:

Financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 are classified in the table below in one of the three categories described above (in thousands):

 

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements Using

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

 

Assets

At Fair Value

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

43,829

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

43,829

 

U.S. Treasury securities

 

 

179,411

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

179,411

 

Agency bonds

 

 

 

 

 

101,834

 

 

 

 

 

 

101,834

 

Equity securities

 

 

178

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

178

 

Total

 

$

223,418

 

 

$

101,834

 

 

$

 

 

$

325,252

 

Amounts included in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

93,825

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

 

 

$

93,825

 

Short-term investments

 

 

114,481

 

 

 

96,859

 

 

 

 

 

 

211,340

 

Long-term investments

 

 

15,112

 

 

 

4,975

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,087

 

Total

 

$

223,418

 

 

$

101,834

 

 

$

 

 

$

325,252

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements Using

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Level 1

 

 

Level 2

 

 

Level 3

 

 

Assets

At Fair Value

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

52,657

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

52,657

 

U.S. Treasury securities

 

 

99,872

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99,872

 

Equity securities

 

 

176

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

176

 

Total

 

$

152,705

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

152,705

 

Amounts included in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

55,658

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

55,658

 

Short-term investments

 

 

89,375

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

89,375

 

Long-term investments

 

 

7,672

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,672

 

Total

 

$

152,705

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

152,705

 

 

The valuation technique used to measure fair value for the Company’s Level 1 assets is a market approach, using prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving identical assets. When quoted market prices are not available for the specific security, then the Company estimates fair value by using benchmark yields, reported trades, broker/dealer quotes, and issuer spreads; these securities are classified as Level 2. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the Company had no financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant Level 3 inputs. The carrying amount of the Company’s accounts receivable and accounts payable approximates fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments.

Fair value of financial liabilities:

As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the fair value of the long-term debt, payable in installments through year ended 2020, approximated its carrying value of $30.0 million and $29.9 million, respectively, because it is carried at a market observable interest rate, which are considered Level 2.

14


 

As of June 30, 2017, the fair value of liabilities related to the sale of future royalties is based on the Company’s current estimates of future royalties expected to be paid to RPI over the life of the arrangement, which are considered Level 3 (See Note 9 – “Liability Related to Sale of Future Royalties”).

 

 

Note 7 — Balance Sheet Components

Accrued liabilities were as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

December 31,

2016

 

Accrued liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical and preclinical costs

 

$

6,782

 

 

$

10,092

 

Bonus

 

 

2,311

 

 

 

3,800

 

Other payroll related

 

 

2,145

 

 

 

1,888

 

Consulting and professional fees

 

 

1,605

 

 

 

698

 

Other accrued expenses

 

 

702

 

 

 

897

 

Leasehold improvements

 

 

 

 

672

 

Total accrued liabilities

 

$

13,545

 

 

$

18,047

 

 

Note 8 — Long-Term Debt

Long-term debt and unamortized debt discount balances are as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

December 31

2016

 

Notes payable, gross

 

$

30,000

 

 

$

30,000

 

Less: Unamortized debt discount

 

 

(372

)

 

 

(472

)

Accretion of final payment fee

 

 

531

 

 

 

353

 

Carrying value of notes payable

 

$

30,159

 

 

$

29,881

 

Less: Current portion of long-term debt

 

 

(7,315

)

 

 

(2,500

)

Long-term debt

 

$

22,844

 

 

$

27,381

 

 

The Company entered into a loan and security agreement (the “Loan Agreement”) with Oxford Finance LLC (“Oxford”) and Silicon Valley Bank (“SVB”) (Oxford and SVB, collectively the “Lenders”) to fund its working capital and other general corporate needs. The Loan Agreement provides for term loans of up to $40.0 million in aggregate and warrants that are exercisable upon issuance and will remain exercisable for five years from issuance or the closing of a merger consolidation transaction in which the Company is not the surviving entity.

Under the Loan Agreement, the Company drew down $15.0 million in October 2016 and an additional $15.0 million in February 2016 and issued warrants to purchase 65,189 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $6.90 and warrants to purchase 68,285 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $6.59 per share. These draw downs bear interest at a rate of 7.5% per annum.

        The Company is required to repay the outstanding principal in 36 equal installments beginning October 2017 through October 2020 and to make a final payment fee of 4.0% of the amounts of the Term Loans drawn payable on the earlier of (i) the prepayment of the Term Loans or (ii) the Maturity Date. The loan carries prepayment penalties of 3.0% and 2.0% for prepayment within one and two years, respectively, of the loan origination and 1.0% thereafter.  

        The Company allocated a portion of the gross proceeds from each draw down under the Loan Agreement to the underlying warrants, using the relative fair value method. This resulted in the allocation of $0.6 million of the draw down proceeds to the warrants, which was accounted for as debt discount. Debt discount is being amortized over the term of the debt, and recorded in interest expense in the statement of operations. The fair value of the warrants was determined using the Black-Scholes pricing model and are classified as equity.

The Loan Agreement contains customary representations and warranties and customary affirmative and negative covenants applicable to the Company and its subsidiaries, including, among other things, restrictions on dispositions, changes in business, management, ownership or business locations, mergers or acquisitions, indebtedness, encumbrances, distributions, investments,

15


 

transactions with affiliates and subordinated debt. The Loan Agreement also includes customary events of default, including but not limited to the nonpayment of principal or interest, violations of covenants, material adverse changes, attachment, levy, restraint on business, cross-defaults on material indebtedness, bankruptcy, material judgments, misrepresentations, subordinated debt, governmental approvals, lien priority and delisting. Upon an event of default, the Lenders may, among other things, accelerate the loans and foreclose on the collateral. The Company’s obligations under the Loan Agreement are secured by substantially all of the Company’s current and future assets, other than its intellectual property.

The Company recorded interest on principal, amortization of the debt discount and debt issuance costs, and the accretion of the final payments as interest expense of $0.8 million and $0.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively and $1.5 million and $1.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, respectively. The effective interest rate on the Loan Agreement, including the amortization of the debt discount and issuance cost, and the accretion of the final payment, was 9.3% for both the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

Future minimum payments under the Loan Agreement, as of June 30, 2017 are as follows (in thousands):

 

Remainder of 2017

 

$

3,635

 

2018

 

 

11,743

 

2019

 

 

10,982

 

2020

 

 

8,938

 

Total minimum payments

 

 

35,298

 

Less: Interest and final payment

 

 

(5,298

)

Notes payable, gross

 

$

30,000

 

 

Note 9 - Liabilities Related to Sale of Future Royalties

In February 2017, the Company entered into a Royalty Purchase Agreement (the “Royalty Agreement”) with RPI Finance Trust (“RPI”), an entity related to Royalty Pharma. Under the Royalty Agreement, the Company sold a portion of the Company’s right to receive royalties on potential net sales of omecamtiv mecarbil (and potentially other compounds with the same mechanism of action) under the Amgen Agreement to RPI for a payment of $90.0 million (the “Royalty Monetization”). The Royalty Monetization is non-refundable, even if omecamtiv mecarbil is never commercialized. The Company accounts for the Royalty Monetization as a liability reported as Liabilities related to sale of future royalties, primarily because the Company has significant continuing involvement in generating the royalty stream under the Amgen Agreement, including the Company’s option to co-invest in the Phase 3 development program of omecamtiv mecarbil.

Also in February 2017, pursuant to a concurrently-executed Common Stock Purchase Agreement with RPI, the Company issued 875,656 shares of its common stock to RPI for $10.0 million (the “RPI Common Stock”).

The Company concluded that there are two units of accounting for the Royalty Monetization and the RPI Common Stock: (1) the liability related to sale of future royalties and (2) the RPI Common Stock. The Company allocated the $90 million from the Royalty Monetization and the $10 million from the RPI Common Stock among the two units of accounting on a relative fair value basis. The Company determined the fair value for the liability related to sale of future royalties at the time of the Royalty Monetization to be $96.7 million, with an effective annual non-cash interest rate of 17%. The Company determined the fair value of the RPI Common Stock at March 31, 2017 to be $8.1 million, based on the closing stock price at the transaction date and adjusted for the trading restrictions.

The Company allocated the transaction consideration on a relative fair value basis to the liability and the common stock, as follows (in millions):

 

 

 

Allocated

Consideration

 

Units of Accounting:

 

 

 

 

  Liability related to sale of future royalties

 

$

92.3

 

  Common stock

 

 

7.7

 

Total consideration

 

$

100.0

 

 

The Company allocated $1.8 million of transaction costs incurred in connection with the Royalty Monetization and the RPI Common Stock to the liability and common stock in proportion to the allocation of proceeds to those components. The transaction costs allocated to the liability will be amortized to non-cash interest expense over the estimated term of the Royalty Agreement.

16


 

The following table shows the activity within liabilities related to sale of future royalties during the six months ended June 30, 2017 (in thousands):

 

Liability related to sale of future royalties at February 1, 2017

 

$

92,300

 

Non-cash interest expense recognized

 

 

6,012

 

Liability related to sale of future royalties at June 30, 2017

 

 

98,312

 

Less: Unamortized transaction costs

 

 

(1,655

)

Carrying value of liability related to sale of future royalties at

   June 30, 2017

 

 

96,657

 

 

Note 10 — Stockholders’ Equity

During the second quarter of 2017, the Company completed a secondary offering of its common stock and issued 6,049,000 shares for net proceeds of $82.8 million, before expenses.

 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

Comprehensive loss is comprised of net loss and other comprehensive loss. Other comprehensive loss is comprised of unrealized holding gains and losses on the Company’s available-for-sale securities that are excluded from net loss and reported separately in stockholders’ equity.

In the first six months of 2017 and 2016, the Company recorded insignificant amounts of unrealized gains (losses) in available-for-sale securities in accumulated other comprehensive loss.

Warrants

In June 2012, the Company issued warrants in connection with two separate, concurrent offerings for our securities. These warrants had an expiration date of June 25, 2017. During the six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company issued 3,240,549 shares of Common stock for exercises of these warrants.

Pursuant to the Loan Agreement described in Note 8 “Long Term Debt,” the Company issued warrants to purchase 65,189 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $6.90 per share and additional warrants to purchase 68,285 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $6.59 per share. In January 2017, the Company issued 16,126 shares of common stock related to cashless exercises of some of these warrants.  

 

Committed Equity Offering

In September 2015, the Company and Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. entered into a Committed Equity Offering (the “CE Offering”) that is an at-the-market issuance sales agreement (the “Cantor Fitzgerald Agreement”) pursuant to which the Company could issue and sell shares of common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $40.0 million. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company issued 987,068 shares and 2,425,625 shares under the Cantor Fitzgerald Agreement for net proceeds totaling $12.5 million and $29.9 million, respectively, completing the sale of all common stock subject to the Cantor Fitzgerald Agreement.

Equity Incentive Plan

In May 2017, the Company’s stockholders approved an amendment to the Amended and Restated 2004 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2004 Equity Incentive Plan”) to increase the number of authorized shares reserved for issuance under the 2004 Equity Incentive Plan by 3.9 million shares. As of June 30, 2017, 3.8 million authorized shares were available for grant under the 2004 Equity Incentive Plan.