Attached files

file filename
EX-4.1 - AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibit4.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - UTG INCexhibit321.htm
EX-10.12 - REINSURANCE AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibi1012.htm
EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION - UTG INCexhibit322.htm
EX-10.14 - AIRCRAFT LEASE - UTG INCexhibi1014.htm
EX-21.1 - LIST OF SUBSIDARIES - UTG INCexhibit211.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION - UTG INCexhibit312.htm
EX-10.11 - REINSURANCE AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibit1011.htm
EX-10.13 - REINSURANCE AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibit1013.htm
EX-10.16 - LOAN PARTICIPATION AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibit1016.htm
EX-10.15 - MORTGAGE LOAN AGREEMENT - UTG INCexhibit1015.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - UTG INCexhibit311.htm


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

[X]
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D)
 
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
 
or
[  ]
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D
 
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from _____________ to ______________

Commission File Number 0-16867

 
UTG, INC.
 
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
 
20-2907892
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
 
Identification No.)

5250 South Sixth Street, Springfield, IL
 
62703
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (217) 241-6300

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
       None
None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Title of class
Common Stock, stated value $.001 per share

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes [ ]  No [X]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes [ ]  No [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes [X]  No [ ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulations S-T (232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes [X]    No [  ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10- K. [  ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is large accelerated filer, an accelerator filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated Filer
[  ]
Accelerated Filer
[  ]
Non Accelerated Filer
[  ]
Smaller Reporting Company
[X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Act).   Yes [  ]    No [X]

As of June 30, 2010, shares of the Registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates (based upon the price of the last sale of $9.75 per share), had an aggregate market value of approximately $13,051,506.

At February 15, 2011 the Registrant had 3,850,680 outstanding shares of Common Stock, stated value $.001 per share.

Documents incorporated by reference:  None


UTG, INC.
FORM 10-K
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010


 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...................................................................................................….
3
 
   ITEM 1.   BUSINESS………………………………………………………………………………………………...................................................................................................................…..
 
3
   ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS……………………………………………………………………………….………....................................................................................................................…
15
   ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS………………………………………………………………….................................................................................................................….
16
   ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES……………………………………………………………………………………………...................................................................................................................….
16
   ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS………………………………………………………………………………….......................................................................................................................
17
   ITEM 4.   SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS……………………………..................................................................................................................….
17
 
PART II…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...................................................................................................…
 
18
 
   ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER
                   MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUTY SECURITIES……………………………….....................................................................................................................….
 
 
18
   ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA…………………………………………………………………………...............................................................................................................…
19
   ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND
                   RESULTS OF OPERATIONS……………………………………………………………………………......................................................................................................................
 
20
   ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK………………….........................................................................................................….
33
   ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA………………………………………...........................................................................................................….
35
   ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING
                   AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE………………………………………………………………………................................................................................................................….
 
67
   ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES……………………………………………………………………..................................................................................................................….
67
   ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION……………………………………………………………………………….................................................................................................................…..
68
 
PART III………………………………………………………………………………………………………………....................................................................................................…..
 
69
 
   ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE…………………......................................................................................................................….
 
69
   ITEM 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION………………………………………………………………………......................................................................................................................
73
   ITEM 12.  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT
                    AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS………………………………………………………...................................................................................................................…
 
78
   ITEM 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND
                    DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE……………………………………………………………………….......................................................................................................................….
 
80
   ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES……………………………………………….....................................................................................................................…
81
 
PART IV…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….....................................................................................................……
 
83
 
   ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.………………………………..………...............................................................................................................…
 
83

 
PART I

ITEM 1.  BUSINESS

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

Any forward-looking statement contained herein or in any other oral or written statement by the Company or any of its officers, directors or employees is qualified by the fact that actual results of the Company may differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements.  Additional information concerning factors that could cause actual results to differ from those in the forward-looking statements is contained in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations".

OVERVIEW

UTG, Inc. (the "Registrant" or “UTG”) was originally incorporated in 1984, under the name United Trust, Inc. under the laws of the State of Illinois, to serve as an insurance holding company.  The Registrant and its subsidiaries (the "Company") have only one significant industry segment - insurance.  The current name, UTG, Inc., and state of incorporation, Delaware, were adopted during 2005 through a merger transaction.  The Company's dominant business is individual life insurance, which includes the servicing of existing insurance business in force, the acquisition of other companies in the insurance business, and the administration processing of life insurance business for other entities.

At December 31, 2010, significant majority-owned subsidiaries of the Registrant were as depicted on the following organizational chart:


organizational chart



This document at times will refer to the Registrant’s largest shareholder, Mr. Jesse T. Correll and certain companies controlled by Mr. Correll.  Mr. Correll holds a majority ownership of First Southern Funding LLC, a Kentucky corporation, (FSF) and First Southern Bancorp, Inc. (FSBI), a financial services holding company.  FSBI operates through its 100% owned subsidiary bank, First Southern National Bank (FSNB).  Banking activities are conducted through multiple locations within south-central and western Kentucky.  Mr. Correll is Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors of UTG and is currently UTG’s largest shareholder through his ownership control of FSF, FSBI and affiliates.  At December 31, 2010, Mr. Correll owns or controls directly and indirectly approximately 60% of UTG’s outstanding stock.

UTG is a life insurance holding company.  The focus of UTG is the acquisition of other companies in similar lines of business and management of the insurance subsidiaries.  UTG has no activities outside the life insurance focus. UTG has a history of acquisitions and consolidation in which life insurance companies are involved.

UG is a wholly-owned life insurance subsidiary of UTG domiciled in the State of Ohio, which operates in the individual life insurance business.  The primary focus of UG has been the servicing of existing insurance business in force.  In addition, UG provides insurance administrative services for other non-related entities.

ACAP is an insurance holding company that is 73% owned by UG.  ACAP has no day-to-day operations of its own.  Its only significant asset is its investment in AC.

AC is a wholly-owned life insurance subsidiary of ACAP domiciled in the State of Texas, which operates in the individual life insurance business. The primary focus of AC has been the servicing of existing insurance business in force.

REC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of UTG, which was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on June 1, 1971, as a securities broker dealer.  REC was established as an aid to life insurance sales.  Policyholders could have certain policy benefits such as annual dividends automatically transferred to a mutual fund if they elected.  REC acts as an agent for its customers by placing orders of mutual funds and variable annuity contracts, which are placed in the customers’ names. The mutual fund shares and variable annuity accumulation units are held by the respective custodians. The only financial involvement of REC is through receipt of commission (load).  REC functions at a minimum broker-dealer level. It does not maintain any of its customer accounts nor receives customer funds directly. Operating activity of REC accounted for approximately $12,700 in losses in the current year.

HPG is a 74% owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, commercial property located in downtown Midland, Texas.  The property includes three commercial office buildings with a total of approximately 530,000 square feet and adjoining parking with 280 spaces.

SWR is a wholly-owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, commercial real estate located in downtown Stanford, Kentucky.  Future plans for these properties include a rehabilitation of the buildings and will include commercial/retail space once completed.

CW is a wholly-owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, approximately 15,000 acres of land in Kentucky and a 50% partnership interest in an additional 11,000 acres of land in Kentucky.

Lexington is a 51% owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, approximately 3,150 acres of land located near Lexington, Kentucky.

Sun Valley is a 67% owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, residential real estate in Phoenix, Arizona. Sun Valley has been acquiring foreclosed residential properties in the Phoenix area with the intent to rehab and sell over a short period of time. Sun Valley is currently in a wind down phase.

Sand Lake is a wholly-owned subsidiary of UG, which owns for investment purposes, approximately 98.85 acres of vacant land in Flagler County, Florida.

HISTORY

UTG was incorporated December 14, 1984, as an Illinois corporation through an intrastate public offering under the name United Trust, Inc. (UTI). Over the years, UTG acquired several additional holding and life insurance companies.  UTG streamlined and simplified the corporate structure following the acquisitions through dissolution of intermediate holding companies and mergers of several life insurance companies.
In March 2005, UTG’s Board of Directors adopted a proposal to change the state of incorporation of UTG from Illinois to Delaware by merging UTG with and into a wholly-owned Delaware subsidiary (the “reincorporation merger”).  The reincorporation merger effected only a change in UTG’s legal domicile and certain other changes of a legal nature.  The Board of Directors submitted the reincorporation proposal to its shareholders for approval at the 2005 annual meeting of shareholders, which was approved subsequently and affected on July 1, 2005.

In December 2006, the Company completed an acquisition transaction whereby it acquired a controlling interest in ACAP Corporation, which owned two life insurance subsidiaries. The acquisition resulted in an increase of approximately $90,000,000 in invested assets, $160,000,000 in total assets and 200,000 additional policies to administer.  The administration of the acquired entities was moved to Springfield, Illinois during December 2006.  The Company believes this acquisition was a good fit with its existing administration and operations.  Significant expense savings were realized as a result of the combining of operations compared to costs of the two entities operating separately.

On December 30, 2009 the Company completed the sale transaction of its previously 100% owned subsidiary, Texas Imperial Life Insurance Company. The subsidiary was sold to United Funeral Directors Benefit Life Insurance Company, an unaffiliated third party. The sale price was $6,415,169 which was paid in cash. The sale resulted in an increase in statutory capital of $3,800,000 before taxes in the Company. The transaction was entered into to further streamline operations of the affiliate group. Texas Imperial was a stipulated premium company, a unique status under Texas rules.

PRODUCTS

UG’s current product portfolio consists of a limited number of life insurance product offerings. All of the products are individual life insurance products, with design variations from each other to provide choices to the customer. These variations generally center around the length of the premium paying period, length of the coverage period and whether the product accumulates cash value or not. The products are designed to be competitive in the marketplace.

Effective January 1, 2009, the Company began using as required the 2001 CSO reserve table for new issues on a Statutory basis.

UG offers a universal life policy referred to as the “Legacy” product.  This product was designed for use with several distribution channels including the Company’s own internal agents, bank agent/employees and through personally producing general agents “PPGA”.  This policy is issued for ages 0 – 65, in face amounts with a minimum of $25,000.  The Legacy product has a current declared interest rate of 4.0%, which is equal to its guaranteed rate.  After five years the guaranteed rate drops to 3.0%.  During the first five years the policy fee is $6.00 per month on face amounts less than $50,000 and $5.00 per month for larger amounts.  After the first five years the Company may increase this rate but not more than $8.00 per month.  The policy has other loads that vary based upon issue age and risk classification. Partial withdrawals, subject to minimum $500 cash surrender value and $25 fee, are allowed once a year after the first duration. Policy loans are available at 7.4% interest in advance. The policy's accumulated fund will be credited the guaranteed interest rate in relation to the amount of the policy loan. Surrender charges are based on a percentage of target premiums starting at 100% for years 1 and 2 then grading downward to 0 in year 5.

Also available are a number of traditional whole life policies.  UG’s “Ten Pay Whole Life” insurance product has a level face amount.  The level premium is payable for the first ten policy years.  This policy is available for issue ages 0-65, and has a minimum face amount of $10,000.  This policy can be used in conversion situations, where it is available up to age 75 and at a minimum face amount of $5,000.   There is no policy fee.

The “Preferred Whole Life” insurance product also has a level face amount and level premium, although the premiums are payable for the insured’s life on this product.  Issue ages are 0-65 and the minimum face amount is $25,000.  There is no policy fee.  Unlike the Ten Pay, this product has several optional riders available: Accidental Death rider, Children’s Term Insurance rider, Terminal Illness rider and/or Waiver of Premium rider.

The “Tradition” is a fixed premium whole life insurance policy.  Premiums are level and payable for life.  Issue ages are 0-80.  The minimum face amount is the greater of $10,000 or the amount of coverage provided by a $100 annual premium.  There is a $30 annual policy fee.   This product has the same optional riders as the Preferred Whole Life, listed above.

Kid Kare is a single premium level term policy to age 21.   The product is sold in units, with one unit equal to a face amount of $5,000 for a single premium of $250.  The policy is issued from ages 0-15 and has conversion privileges at age 21.  There is no policy fee.

The “First Annuity” is the only active annuity product in UG’s portfolio.  This product is issued for ages 0-80.  The minimum annual premium in the first year is $5,000, with premiums being optional in all other years. This policy has a decreasing surrender charge during the first five years of the contract.

The “Full Circle” is a decreasing term product available in 10, 15, 20, 25 or 30 year terms.  The product is generally issued to ages 20 to 65, with a minimum face amount of $10,000.

The “Sentinel” is a level term product available in 10, 15, 20, 25 or 30 year terms.  The product is generally issued to ages 18 to 65, with a minimum face amount of $25,000.

AC has no currently available product offerings.

The Company's actual experience for earned interest, persistency and mortality varies from the assumptions applied to pricing and for determining premiums.  Accordingly, differences between the Company's actual experience and those assumptions applied may impact the profitability of the Company. The Company monitors investment yields, and when necessary adjusts credited interest rates on its insurance products to preserve targeted interest spreads.  Credited rates are reviewed and established by the Board of Directors of UG.  Currently, all crediting rates have been reduced to the respective product guaranteed interest rate.

The Company has a variety of policies in force different from those being marketed.  Interest sensitive products, including universal life and excess interest whole life (“fixed premium UL”), account for 55% of the insurance in force.  Approximately 10% of the insurance in force is participating business, which represents policies under which the policy owner shares in the insurance company’s statutory divisible surplus.  The Company's average persistency rate for its policies in force for 2010 and 2009 has been 96.0% and 96.1%, respectively.

Interest sensitive life insurance products have characteristics similar to annuities with respect to the crediting of a current rate of interest at or above a guaranteed minimum rate and the use of surrender charges to discourage premature withdrawal of cash values.  Universal life insurance policies also involve variable premium charges against the policyholder's account balance for the cost of insurance and administrative expenses.  Interest sensitive whole life products generally have fixed premiums.  Interest sensitive life insurance products are designed with a combination of front-end loads, periodic variable charges, and back-end loads or surrender charges.

Traditional life insurance products have premiums and benefits predetermined at issue; the premiums are set at levels that are designed to exceed expected policyholder benefits and insurance company expenses.  Participating business is traditional life insurance with the added feature that the policyholder may share in the divisible surplus of the insurance company through policyholder dividend.  This dividend is set annually by the Board of Directors of UG and is completely discretionary.


MARKETING

The Company has not actively marketed life products in the past several years.  Management currently places little emphasis on new business production, believing resources could be better utilized in other ways.  Current sales primarily represent sales to existing customers through additional insurance needs or conservation efforts.  The Company currently places emphasis on policy retention in an attempt to maintain or improve current persistency levels.  In this regard, several of the home office staff have become licensed insurance agents enabling them broader abilities when dealing with the customer in regard to his/her existing policies and possible alternatives.  The conservation efforts described above have been generally positive.  Management will continue to monitor these efforts and make adjustments as seen appropriate to enhance the future success of the program.

Excluding licensed home office personnel, UG has 15 general agents.  These agents primarily service their existing clients.  New sales for UG are primarily in the Midwest region with most sales in the states of Ohio, Illinois and West Virginia.  UG is licensed to sell life insurance in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

AC has no licensed agents.  AC is licensed to sell life insurance in Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.

In 2010, approximately $10,924,000 of total direct premium was collected by UG.  Ohio accounted for 30%, Illinois accounted for 16%, and West Virginia accounted for 9% of total direct premiums collected.  No other state accounted for more than 5% of direct premiums collected.

In 2010, approximately $2,890,000 of total direct premium was collected by AC.  Texas accounted for 32%, Louisiana accounted for 10%, Tennessee accounted for 9%, and Mississippi accounted for 7% of total direct premiums collected.  No other state accounted for more than 5% of direct premiums collected.


UNDERWRITING

The underwriting procedures of the insurance subsidiaries are established by Management.  Insurance policies are issued by the Company based upon underwriting practices established for each market in which the Company operates.  Most policies are individually underwritten.  Applications for insurance are reviewed to determine additional information required to make an underwriting decision, which depends on the amount of insurance applied for and the applicant's age and medical history.  Additional information may include inspection reports, medical examinations, and statements from doctors who have treated the applicant in the past and, where indicated, special medical tests.  After reviewing the information collected, the Company either issues the policy as applied for, issues with an extra premium charge because of unfavorable factors, or rejects the application.  Substandard risks may be referred to reinsurers for full or partial reinsurance of the substandard risk.

The Company requires blood samples to be drawn with individual insurance applications for coverage over $45,000 (age 46 and above) or $95,000 (ages 16-45).  Blood samples are tested for a wide range of chemical values and are screened for antibodies to the HIV virus.  Applications also contain questions permitted by law regarding the HIV virus, which must be answered by the proposed insureds.


RESERVES

The applicable insurance laws under which the insurance subsidiaries operate require that the insurance company report policy reserves as liabilities to meet future obligations on the policies in force.  These reserves are the amounts which, with the additional premiums to be received and interest thereon compounded annually at certain assumed rates, are calculated in accordance with applicable law to be sufficient to meet the various policy and contract obligations as they mature.  These laws specify that the reserves shall not be less than reserves calculated using certain mortality tables and interest rates.

The liabilities for traditional life insurance and accident and health insurance policy benefits are computed using a net level method.  These liabilities include assumptions as to investment yields, mortality, withdrawals, and other assumptions based on the life insurance subsidiaries’ experience adjusted to reflect anticipated trends and to include provisions for possible unfavorable deviations.  The Company makes these assumptions at the time the contract is issued or, in the case of contracts acquired by purchase, at the purchase date.  Future policy benefits for individual life insurance and annuity policies are computed using interest rates ranging from 2% to 6% for life insurance and 2.5% to 9.25% for annuities.  Benefit reserves for traditional life insurance policies include certain deferred profits on limited-payment policies that are being recognized in income over the policy term.  Policy benefit claims are charged to expense in the period that the claims are incurred.  Current mortality rate assumptions are based on 1975-80 select and ultimate tables.  Withdrawal rate assumptions are based upon Linton B or Linton C, which are industry standard actuarial tables for forecasting assumed policy lapse rates.

Benefit reserves for universal life insurance and interest sensitive life insurance products are computed under a retrospective deposit method and represent policy account balances before applicable surrender charges.  Policy benefits and claims that are charged to expense include benefit claims in excess of related policy account balances. Interest crediting rates for universal life and interest sensitive products range from 4.0% to 5.5%, for the years ended, December 31, 2010 and 2009.


REINSURANCE

As is customary in the insurance industry, the insurance subsidiaries cede insurance to, and assume insurance from, other insurance companies under reinsurance agreements.  Reinsurance agreements are intended to limit a life insurer's maximum loss on a large or unusually hazardous risk or to obtain a greater diversification of risk.  The ceding insurance company remains primarily liable with respect to ceded insurance should any reinsurer be unable to meet the obligations assumed by it.  However, it is the practice of insurers to reduce their exposure to loss to the extent that they have been reinsured with other insurance companies.  The Company sets a limit on the amount of insurance retained on the life of any one person.  The Company will not retain more than $125,000, including accidental death benefits, on any one life.  At December 31, 2010, the Company had gross insurance in force of $1.767 billion of which approximately $433 million was ceded to reinsurers.

The Company's reinsured business is ceded to numerous reinsurers.  The Company monitors the solvency of its reinsurers in seeking to minimize the risk of loss in the event of a failure by one of the parties.  The Company is primarily liable to the insureds even if the reinsurers are unable to meet their obligations.  The primary reinsurers of the Company are large, well capitalized entities.

Currently, UG is utilizing reinsurance agreements with Optimum Re Insurance Company, (Optimum) and Swiss Re Life and Health America Incorporated (SWISS RE).  Optimum and SWISS RE currently hold an “A-” (Excellent) and "A" (Excellent) rating, respectively, from A.M. Best, an industry rating company.  The reinsurance agreements were effective December 1, 1993, and covered most new business of UG.  Under the terms of the agreements, UG cedes risk amounts above its retention limit of $100,000 with a minimum cession of $25,000.  Ceded amounts are shared equally between the two reinsurers on a yearly renewable term (YRT) basis, a common industry method.  The treaty is self-administered; meaning the Company records the reinsurance results and reports them to the reinsurers.

In addition to the above reinsurance agreements, UG entered into reinsurance agreements with Optimum Re Insurance Company (Optimum) during 2004 to provide reinsurance on new products released for sale in 2004.  The agreements are yearly renewable term (YRT) treaties where UG cedes amounts above its retention limit of $100,000 with a minimum cession of $25,000 as has been a practice for the last several years with its reinsurers.  Also, Optimum is the reinsurer of 100% of the accidental death benefits (ADB) in force of UG.  This coverage is renewable annually at the Company’s option.  Optimum specializes in reinsurance agreements with small to mid-size carriers such as UG.  Optimum currently holds an “A-” (Excellent) rating from A.M. Best.

UG entered into a coinsurance agreement with Park Avenue Life Insurance Company (PALIC) effective September 30, 1996.  Under the terms of the agreement, UG ceded to PALIC substantially all of its then in-force paid-up life insurance policies.  Paid-up life insurance generally refers to non-premium paying life insurance policies.  Under the terms of the agreement, UG sold 100% of the future results of this block of business to PALIC through a coinsurance agreement.  UG continues to administer the business for PALIC and receives a servicing fee through a commission allowance based on the remaining in-force policies each month.  PALIC has the right to assumption reinsure the business, at its option, and transfer the administration.  The Company is not aware of any such plans.  PALIC and its ultimate parent, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), currently hold an “A” (Excellent) and "A++" (Superior) rating, respectively, from A.M. Best.  The PALIC agreement accounts for approximately 64% of UG’s reinsurance reserve credit, as of December 31, 2010.

On September 30, 1998, UG entered into a coinsurance agreement with The Independent Order of Vikings, (IOV) an Illinois fraternal benefit society.  Under the terms of the agreement, UG agreed to assume, on a coinsurance basis, 25% of the reserves and liabilities arising from all in-force insurance contracts issued by the IOV to its members.  At December 31, 2010, the IOV insurance in-force assumed by UG was approximately $1,612,000, with reserves being held on that amount of approximately $374,000.

On June 7, 2000, UG assumed an already existing coinsurance agreement, dated January 1, 1992, between Lancaster Life Reinsurance Company (LLRC), an Arizona corporation and Investors Heritage Life Insurance Company (IHL), a corporation organized under the laws of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  Under the terms of the agreement, LLRC agreed to assume from IHL a 90% quota share of new issues of credit life and accident and health policies that have been written on or after January 1, 1992 through various branches of the First Southern National Bank.  The maximum amount of credit life insurance that can be assumed on any one individual’s life is $15,000.  UG assumed all the rights and obligations formerly held by LLRC as the reinsurer in the agreement.  LLRC liquidated its charter immediately following the transfer.  At December 31, 2010, the IHL agreement has insurance in-force of approximately $836,000, with reserves being held on that amount of approximately $11,000.

At December 31, 1992, AC entered into a reinsurance agreement with Canada Life Assurance Company (“the Canada Life agreement”) that fully reinsured virtually all of its traditional life insurance policies. The reinsurer’s obligations under the Canada Life agreement were secured by assets withheld by AC representing policy loans and deferred and uncollected premiums related to the reinsured policies. AC continues to administer the reinsured policies, for which it receives an expense allowance from the reinsurer. At December 31, 2010, the Canada Life agreement has insurance in-force of approximately $57,337,000, with reserves being held on that amount of approximately $35,510,000. As of December 31, 2010, there remains $634,467 in profits to be generated under this treaty. Should future experience under the treaty match the experience of recent years, which cannot reliably be predicted to occur, it should take until late 2012 to generate the remaining profits. However, regarding the uncertainty as to when the specified level may be reached, it should be noted that the experience has been erratic from year to year and the number of policies in force that are covered by the treaty diminishes each year.

During 1997, AC acquired 100% of the policies in force of World Service Life Insurance Company through a combination of assumption reinsurance and coinsurance.  While 91.42% of the acquired policies are coinsured under the Canada Life agreement, AC did not coinsure the balance of the policies.  AC retains the administration of the reinsured policies, for which it receives an expense allowance from the reinsurer.  Canada Life currently holds an "A+" (Superior) rating from A.M. Best.

Reinsurance agreements such as the Canada Life treaty described above are often referred to as financial reinsurance arrangements and are utilized within the insurance industry as a method of borrowing funds or statutory capital for an acquisition of a block of business or company.  The borrowed funds are generally in the form of an initial ceding commission received from the reinsurer.  The original borrowed amount is then repaid in future periods from the profits generated by the acquired block or company.  Values of the target are determined based upon an actuarial valuation and future projections.  Actual results may vary from year to year based upon the performance of the business relative to the assumptions used in the projections.  Under the terms of this agreement, all financial activity relating to the policies covered by the agreement are utilized to repay the remaining outstanding balance, which was $634,467 as of December 31, 2010.  Results under this agreement are included in various line items of the income statement, with an overall impact to net income of approximately $20,700 and $19,000 in 2010 and 2009, respectively.  The net result of the activity represents the fee paid to the reinsurer for the use of their funds or statutory capital during the duration of the agreement.

During 1998, AC closed a coinsurance transaction with Universal Life Insurance Company (“Universal”). Pursuant to the coinsurance agreement, AC coinsured 100% of the individual life insurance policies of Universal in force at January 1, 1998.  During 2010, this block of business was assumption reinsured into AC and is now considered direct business of AC.  AC is now directly liable for any and all claims against these policies.

The Company does not have any short-duration reinsurance contracts.  The effect of the Company's long-duration reinsurance contracts on premiums earned in 2010 and 2009 were as follows:


   
Shown in thousands
         
   
2010
Premiums Earned
 
2009
Premiums Earned
         
Direct
$
16,463
$
17,271
Assumed
 
36
 
163
Ceded
 
(4,108)
 
(3,932)
Net Premiums
$
12,391
$
13,502



INVESTMENTS

Investment income represents a significant portion of the Company's total income.  Investments are subject to applicable state insurance laws and regulations, which limit the concentration of investments in any one category or class and further limit the investment in any one issuer.  Generally, these limitations are imposed as a percentage of statutory assets or percentage of statutory capital and surplus of each company.
The following table reflects net investment income by type of investment:


   
December 31,
         
   
2010
 
2009
         
Fixed Maturities Held for Sale
$
5,577,292
$
8,464,738
Equity Securities
 
891,777
 
970,778
Trading Securities
 
5,143,204
 
13,661
Mortgage Loans
 
1,176,747
 
2,442,908
Discounted Mortgage Loans
 
12,897,978
 
987,387
Real Estate
 
6,600,327
 
6,086,901
Policy Loans
 
864,416
 
868,114
Short-term Investments
 
57,339
 
55,375
Cash
 
10,761
 
44,368
Total Consolidated Investment Income
 
33,219,841
 
19,934,230
Investment Expenses
 
(8,361,004)
 
(5,693,437)
Consolidated Net Investment Income
$
24,858,837
$
14,240,793


At December 31, 2010, the Company had a total of $18,092,527 in investment real estate, which did not produce income during 2010.

The following table summarizes the Company's fixed maturities distribution at December 31, 2010 and 2009 by ratings category as issued by Standard and Poor's, a leading ratings analyst.


Fixed Maturities
   
 
% of Portfolio
Rating
       
   
2010
 
2009
Investment Grade
       
AAA
 
74%
 
76%
AA
 
4%
 
4%
A
 
9%
 
13%
BBB
 
13%
 
6%
Below Investment Grade
 
0%
 
1%
   
100%
 
100%


The following table summarizes the Company's fixed maturities held for sale by major classification:


   
Carrying Value
         
   
2010
 
2009
U.S. Government and government agencies and authorities
$
79,023,933
$
73,697,038
States, municipalities and political subdivisions
 
335,198
 
2,419,148
Collateralized mortgage obligations
 
16,674,262
 
18,821,461
Public utilities
 
987,025
 
0
All other corporate bonds
 
50,885,530
 
44,767,046
 
$
147,905,948
$
139,704,693



The following table shows the composition, average maturity and yield of the Company's investment portfolio at December 31, 2010.

   
Average
       
   
Carrying
 
Average
 
Average
Investments
 
Value
 
Maturity
 
Yield
             
Fixed maturities held for sale
$
143,806,000
 
14 years
 
3.88%
Equity securities
 
13,604,000
 
Not applicable
 
6.56%
Trading securities
 
28,321,000
 
Not applicable
 
12.80%
Mortgage loans
 
19,726,000
 
1 year
 
5.97%
Discounted mortgage loans
 
40,877,000
 
6 years
 
31.55%
Investment real estate
 
49,353,000
 
Not applicable
 
13.37%
Policy loans
 
14,160,000
 
Not applicable
 
6.10%
Short-term investments and Cash and cash equivalents
 
28,338,000
 
On demand
 
0.24%
Total Investments and Cash and Cash equivalents
$
338,185,000
     
9.82%


Management monitors its investment maturities, which in their opinion is sufficient to meet the Company's cash requirements.  Fixed maturities of $10,113 mature in one year and $19,029,622 mature in two to five years.

The Company, from time to time, acquires mortgage loans through participation agreements with FSNB.  FSNB has been able to provide the Company with additional expertise and experience in underwriting commercial and residential mortgage loans, which provide more attractive yields than the traditional bond market.  The Company is able to receive participations from FSNB for three primary reasons:  1) FSNB has already reached its maximum lending limit to a single borrower, but the borrower is still considered a suitable risk; 2) the interest rate on a particular loan may be fixed for a long period that is more suitable for UG given its asset-liability structure; and 3) FSNB’s loan growth might at times outpace its deposit growth, resulting in FSNB participating such excess loan growth rather than turning customers away.  For originated loans, the Company’s management is responsible for the final approval of such loans after evaluation.  Before a new loan is issued, the applicant is subject to certain criteria set forth by Company management to ensure quality control.  These criteria include, but are not limited to, a credit report, personal financial information such as outstanding debt, sources of income, and personal equity.  Once the loan is approved, the Company directly funds the loan to the borrower.  The Company bears all risk of loss associated with the terms of the mortgage with the borrower.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company began purchasing discounted commercial mortgage loans.  Management has extensive background and experience in the analysis and valuation of commercial real estate and believes there are significant opportunities currently available in the discounted mortgage loan arena.  Experienced personnel of FSNB have also been utilized in the analysis phase.  This experience dates back to discounted loans during the Resolution Trust days where such loans were being sold from defunct savings and loans in the early 1990’s.  The discounted loans are available through the FDIC sale of assets of closed banks and from banks wanting to reduce their loan portfolios.  The loans are available on a loan by loan bid process.  Prior to placing a bid, each loan is reviewed to determine interest level utilizing such information as type of collateral, location of collateral, interest rate, current loan status and available cashflows or other sources of repayment.  Once it is determined interest in the loan remains, the collateral is physically inspected.  Following physical inspection, if interest still remains, a bid price is determined and a bid is submitted.  Once a loan has been acquired, contact is made with the appropriate individuals to begin a dialog with a goal of determining the borrower’s willingness to work together.  There are generally three paths a discounted loan will take:  the borrowers pay as required; a settlement is reached with the loan being paid off at a discounted value; or the loan is foreclosed.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company had acquired $118,368,661 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $35,224,022, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 29.8%. During 2009, the Company recorded approximately $1,000,000 in income from this loan activity. During 2010, the Company acquired an additional $111,258,867 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $36,283,278, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 32.6%.  Additionally, during 2010, the Company settled, sold or had paid off mortgage loans totaling $40,038,789.  During 2010, the Company recorded approximately $12,898,000 in income from the discounted mortgage loan activity, including $7,645,258 in discount accruals.  The Company is currently projecting a very positive return from on-going mortgage loan payments from the discounted commercial mortgage loan portfolio.

During 2010 and 2009, the Company acquired approximately $37,080,000 and $36,221,000 in both regular participation mortgage loans as well as discounted mortgage loans, respectively.  FSNB services the mortgage loan portfolio of the Company.  The Company pays FSNB a .25% servicing fee on these loans and a one-time fee at loan origination of .50% of the original loan amount to cover costs incurred by FSNB relating to the processing and establishment of the loan.  The Company paid $190,297 and $74,153 in servicing fees and $508,283 and $558,843 in origination fees to FSNB during 2010 and 2009, respectively.

At December 31, 2010, the Company holds $59,935,447 in mortgage loans in total, which represents approximately 14% of the total assets.  Most mortgage loans are first position loans.  Loans issued are limited to no more than 80% of the appraised value of the property with the exception of one loan whose value of the security to the loan was 100%.  During 2010, the Company recognized an other-than-temporary impairment of $128,867 on this loan as a result of its appraisal valuation.

The Company has in place a monitoring system to provide management with information regarding potential troubled loans.  Letters are sent to each mortgagee when the loan becomes 30 days or more delinquent.  Management is provided with a monthly listing of loans that are 60 days or more past due along with a brief description of what steps are being taken to resolve the delinquency.  All loans 90 days or more past due are placed on a non-performing status and classified as delinquent loans.  Quarterly, coinciding with external financial reporting, the Company reviews each delinquent loan and determines how each delinquent loan should be classified.  Management believes the current internal controls surrounding the mortgage loan selection process provide a quality portfolio with minimal risk of foreclosure and/or negative financial impact.

While management believes the discounted loans will continue to have favorable earnings and outcomes as they are worked through, there can be no assurance this will remain true in future periods.  Changes in the current economy such as an even greater downturn than recently experienced could have a negative impact on the loans, including the financial stability of the borrowers, the borrowers’ ability to pay or to refinance, the value of the property held as collateral and the ability to find purchasers at favorable prices. As such, management has taken a conservative approach with these investments and has classified all discounted mortgage loans held as non-accrual.  In such status, the Company is not recording any accrued interest income nor is it recording any accrual of discount on the loans held.  Discount accruals reported during 2010 were the result of the loan basis already being fully paid.

On the remainder of the mortgage loan portfolio, interest accruals are analyzed based on the likelihood of repayment.  In no event will interest continue to accrue when accrued interest along with the outstanding principal exceeds the net realizable value of the property.  The Company does not utilize a specified number of days delinquent to cause an automatic non-accrual status.

A mortgage loan reserve is established and adjusted based on management's quarterly analysis of the portfolio and any deterioration in value of the underlying property which would reduce the net realizable value of the property below its current carrying value.  The Company acquired the discounted mortgage loans at below fair value, therefore no reserve for delinquent loans is deemed necessary.  The loan portfolio since purchase is performing very well.  Those loans not currently paying are being vigorously worked by management.  The current discounted commercial mortgage loan portfolio has an average price of 30.5% of face value and management has determined that this deep discount provides a financial cushion or built in allowance for any of the loans that are not currently performing within the portfolio of loans purchased.  The mortgage loan reserve was $0 and $12,730 at December 31, 2010 and 2009 respectively.

As of December 31, 2010, the Company’s discounted mortgage loan portfolio contained 131 loans with a carrying value of $47,523,860.  The loans’ payment performance during the past year is shown as follows:


 
Payment Frequency
 
Number of
 Loans
 
Carrying
Value
         
No payments received
 
47
$
26,731,110
One-time payment received
 
20
 
562,919
Irregular payments received
 
19
 
7,166,669
Periodic payments received
 
45
 
13,063,162
Total
 
131
$
47,523,860


The following table shows a distribution of the Company’s mortgage loans and discounted mortgage loans by type:


Mortgage Loans
 
Amount
 
% of Total
         
Commercial – all other
$
58,568,145
 
98%
Residential – all other
 
1,367,302
 
2%
Total
$
59,935,447
 
100%


The following table shows a geographic distribution of the Company’s mortgage loan portfolio including discounted mortgage loans and investment real estate:

 
Mortgage Loans
 
Real Estate
       
Alabama
1%
 
0%
Arizona
7%
 
1%
California
2%
 
4%
Florida
39%
 
1%
Georgia
6%
 
10%
Illinois
0%
 
2%
Kentucky
7%
 
45%
Maryland
3%
 
0%
Michigan
1%
 
1%
Minnesota
3%
 
0%
Nevada
3%
 
0%
North Carolina
2%
 
0%
Ohio
9%
 
2%
Pennsylvania
4%
 
0%
Tennessee
2%
 
0%
Texas
7%
 
28%
Utah
0%
 
1%
Washington
0%
 
2%
West Virginia
4%
 
3%
Total
100%
 
100%


The following table summarizes discounted mortgage loan holdings of the Company:


Category
 
2010
 
2009
         
In good standing
$
9,665,059
$
7,311,982
Overdue interest over 90 days
 
16,192,815
 
26,917,956
Restructured
 
4,306,800
 
0
In process of foreclosure
 
17,359,186
 
0
Total discounted mortgage loans
$
47,523,860
$
34,229,938
         
Total foreclosed discounted mortgage loans
$
8,939,548
$
2,262,352


At December 31, 2010, the Company has 26 discounted mortgage loans totaling $17,359,189 in the process of foreclosure and 19 discounted mortgage loans totaling $4,306,800 under a repayment plan or restructuring.

During 2010, the Company foreclosed on 20 discounted mortgage loans with a total carrying value of $8,939,548.  Of these foreclosures, 17 loans totaling $8,411,458 were transferred to real estate while one loan is now UG’s wholly owned subsidiary, Sand Lake, LLC.  Subsequent to the foreclosures, two foreclosed loans were sold with the Company realizing a gain of $51,949 upon the sale.


COMPETITION

The insurance business is a highly competitive industry and there are a number of other companies, both stock and mutual, doing business in areas where the Company operates.  Many of these competing insurers are larger, have more diversified and established lines of insurance coverage, have substantially greater financial resources and brand recognition, as well as a greater number of agents.  Other significant competitive factors in the insurance industry include policyholder benefits, service to policyholders, and premium rates.

In recent years, the Company has not placed an emphasis on new business production.  Costs associated with supporting new business can be significant.  The insurance industry as a whole has experienced a decline in the total number of agents who sell insurance products; therefore competition has intensified for top producing sales agents.  The relatively small size of the Company, and the resulting limitations, has made it challenging to compete in this area.  The number of agents marketing the Company’s products is a negligible number.

The Company performs administrative work as a third party administrator (TPA) for unaffiliated life insurance companies.  These TPA revenue fees are included in the line item “other income” on the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.  The Company intends to continue to pursue other TPA arrangements. The Company provides TPA services to insurance companies seeking business process outsourcing solutions.  Management believes the Company is positioned to generate additional revenues by utilizing the Company’s current excess capacity and administrative services.

GOVERNMENT REGULATION

Insurance companies are subject to regulation and supervision in all the states where they do business.  Generally the state supervisory agencies have broad administrative powers relating to granting and revoking licenses to transact business, license agents, approving forms of policies used, regulating trade practices and market conduct, the form and content of required financial statements, reserve requirements, permitted investments, approval of dividends and in general, the conduct of all insurance activities.  Insurance regulation is concerned primarily with the protection of policyholders.  The Company cannot predict the impact of any future proposals, regulations or market conduct investigations.  UG is domiciled in the state of Ohio.  AC is domiciled in the state of Texas.

Insurance companies must also file detailed annual reports on a statutory accounting basis with the state supervisory agencies where each does business; (see Note 6 to the consolidated financial statements) regarding statutory equity and income from operations.  These agencies may examine the business and accounts at any time.  Under the rules of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) and state laws, the supervisory agencies of one or more states examine a company periodically, usually at three to five year intervals.

Most states also have insurance holding company statutes, which require registration and periodic reporting by insurance companies controlled by other corporations licensed to transact business within their respective jurisdictions.  The insurance subsidiaries are subject to such legislation and registered as a controlled insurer in those jurisdictions in which such registration is required.  Statutes vary from state to state but typically require periodic disclosure, concerning the corporation that controls the registered insurers and all subsidiaries of such corporation. In addition, prior notice to, or approval by, the state insurance commission of material transactions with affiliates, including transfers of assets, reinsurance agreements, management agreements (see Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements), and payment of dividends (see Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements) in excess of specified amounts by the insurance subsidiary, within the holding company system, are required.

Risk-based capital requirements and state guaranty fund laws are discussed in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”.

Information regarding the Company including recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission is available on the Company’s web site at www.utgins.com.


EMPLOYEES

At December 31, 2010, UTG and its subsidiaries had 67 full-time employees.  UTG’s operations are headquartered in Springfield, Illinois.



ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones that UTG faces.  Additional risks and uncertainties that the Company is unaware of, or currently deemed immaterial, also may become important factors that affect our business.  If any of these risks were to occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

The Company faces significant competition for insurance and third party administration clients.  Competition in the insurance industry may limit our ability to attract and retain customers.  UTG may face competition now and in the future from the following: other insurance and third party administration (TPA) providers, including larger non-insurance related companies which provide TPA services.

In particular, our competitors include insurance companies whose greater resources may afford them a marketplace advantage by enabling them to provide insurance services with lower margins.  Additionally, insurance companies and other institutions with larger capitalization and others not subject to insurance regulatory restrictions have the ability to serve the insurance needs of larger customers.  If the Company is unable to attract and retain insurance clients, continued growth, results of operations and financial condition may otherwise be negatively affected.

The main sources of income from operations are premium and net investment income.  Net investment income is equal to the difference between the investment income received from various types of investment securities and other income-producing assets and the related expenses incurred in connection with maintaining these investments.  The primary sources of income can be affected by changes in market interest rates and various economic conditions.  These conditions are highly sensitive to many factors beyond our control, including general economic conditions, both domestic and foreign, and the monetary and fiscal policies of various governmental and regulatory authorities.  The Company has adopted asset and liability management policies to try to minimize the potential adverse effects of changes in interest rates on our net interest income, primarily by altering the mix and maturity of loans, investments and funding sources.  However, even with these policies in place, the Company cannot provide assurance that changes in interest rates will not negatively impact our operating results.

An increase in interest rates also could have a negative impact on business by reducing the demand for insurance products.  Fluctuations in interest rates may result in disintermediation, which is the flow of funds away from insurance companies into direct investments that pay higher rates of return, and may affect the value of investment securities and other interest-earning assets.

Significant time has been spent internally researching the Company’s risk and communicating with outside investment advisors about the current investment environment and ways to ensure preservation of capital and mitigate any losses.  Management has put extensive efforts into evaluating its investment holdings.  Management intends to continue its close monitoring of its bond holdings and other investments for additional deterioration or market condition changes.  Future events may result in Management’s determination certain current investment holdings may need to be sold which could result in gains or losses in future periods.  Such future events could also result in other than temporary declines in value that could result in future period impairment losses.

Within the Company’s trading accounts, certain trading securities carried as liabilities represent securities sold short.  A gain, limited to the price at which the security was sold short, or a loss, potentially unlimited in size, will be recognized upon the termination of the short sale.

Because UTG serves primarily individuals located in four states, the ability of our customers to pay their insurance premiums is impacted by the economic conditions in these areas.  As of December 31, 2010, approximately 55% of our total direct premium was collected from Illinois, Ohio, Texas and West Virginia.  Thus, results of operations are heavily dependent upon the strength of these economies.

In addition, a substantial portion of our investment mortgage loans are secured by real estate located primarily in Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Ohio and Texas.  Consequently, our ability to continue to originate real estate loans may be impaired by adverse changes in local and regional economic conditions in these real estate markets or by acts of nature.  These events also could have an adverse effect on the value of our collateral and, due to the concentration of our collateral in real estate, on our financial condition.

The Company has traditionally obtained funds principally through premium deposits.  If, as a result of competitive pressures, market interest rates, general economic conditions or other events, the balance of the premium deposits decrease relative to our overall operations, the Company may have to look for ways to further reduce operating costs which could have a negative impact on results of operations or financial condition.

The Company has significant business risks in the amount of policy benefit expenses incurred each year.  The majority of these expenses are related to death claims paid on life insurance contracts.  The Company has no control over these expenses, which have a significant impact on our financial results.

Insurance holding companies operate in a highly regulated environment and are subject to supervision and examination by various federal and state regulatory agencies.  The cost of compliance with regulatory requirements may adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition.  Federal and state laws and regulations govern numerous matters including: changes in the ownership or control, maintenance of adequate capital and the financial condition of an insurance company, permissible types, amounts and terms of investments, permissible non-insurance activities, the level of policyholder reserves, and restrictions on dividend payments.

The Company will continue to consider the acquisition of other businesses.  However, the opportunities to make suitable acquisitions on favorable terms in the future may not be available, which could negatively impact the growth of business.  UTG expects that other insurance and financial companies will compete to acquire compatible businesses.  This competition could increase prices for acquisitions that we would likely pursue, and our competitors may have greater resources.  Also, acquisitions of regulated businesses such as insurance companies are subject to various regulatory approvals.  If appropriate regulatory approvals are not received, an acquisition would not be able to complete what we believe is in our best interest.

UTG has in the past acquired, and will in the future consider the acquisition of, other insurance and related businesses.  If other companies are acquired in the future, our business may be negatively impacted by risks related to those acquisitions.  These risks include the following: the risk that the acquired business will not perform in accordance with management’s expectations; the risk that difficulties will arise in connection with the integration of the operations of the acquired business with our operations; the risk that Management will divert its attention from other aspects of our business; the risk that key employees of the acquired business are lost; the risks associated with entering into geographic and product markets in which we have limited or no direct prior experience; and the risks of the acquired company assumed in connection with an acquisition.

As a result of these risks, any given acquisition, if and when consummated, may adversely affect our results of operations or financial condition. In addition, because the consideration for an acquisition may involve cash, debt or the issuance of shares of our common stock and may involve the payment of a premium over book and market values, existing holders of our common stock could experience dilution in connection with the acquisition.

UTG relies heavily on communications and information systems to conduct our business.  Any failure or interruptions or breach in security of these systems could result in failures or disruptions in our customer relationship management, general ledger, or administrative servicing systems. The occurrence of any failures or interruptions could result in a loss of customer business and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Under regulatory capital adequacy guidelines and other regulatory requirements, we must meet guidelines that include quantitative measures of assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance sheet items, subject to qualitative judgments by regulators about components, risk weightings and other factors.  If we fail to meet these minimum capital guidelines and other regulatory requirements, our financial condition would be materially and adversely affected.


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.


ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

The Company owns an office complex in Springfield, Illinois, which houses the primary insurance operations.  The office buildings in this complex contain 57,000 square feet of office and warehouse space, and are carried at $1,474,424.  The facilities occupied by the Company are adequate relative to the Company's present operations.


ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

In the normal course of business the Company is involved from time to time in various legal actions and other state and federal proceedings.  Management is of the opinion that the ultimate disposition of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations or financial position.


ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

There were no matters submitted to a vote of UTG’s shareholders during the fourth quarter of 2010.


PART II

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

The Registrant is a public company whose common stock is traded in the over-the-counter market.  Over-the-counter quotations can be obtained with the UTGN.OB stock symbol.

The following table shows the high and low closing prices for each quarterly period during the past two years, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.  The quotations below were acquired from the NASDAQ web site, which also provides quotes for over-the-counter traded securities such as UTG.


   
2010
 
2009
                 
PERIOD
 
High
 
Low
 
High
 
Low
                 
First quarter
 
10.10
 
8.76
 
9.00
 
5.00
Second quarter
 
10.00
 
8.80
 
8.00
 
5.00
Third quarter
 
9.75
 
9.50
 
9.01
 
6.05
Fourth quarter
 
10.40
 
8.75
 
11.00
 
8.76


UTG has not declared or paid any dividends on its common stock in the past two fiscal years, and has no current plans to pay dividends on its common stock as it intends to retain all earnings for investment in and growth of the Company’s business.  See Note 2 in the accompanying consolidated financial statements for information regarding dividend restrictions, including applicable restrictions on the ability of the Company’s life insurance subsidiaries to pay dividends.

As of February 15, 2011 there were 7,587 record holders of UTG common stock.

On March 26, 2002, the Board of Directors of UTG adopted, and on June 11, 2002, the shareholders of UTG approved, the UTG, Inc. Employee and Director Stock Purchase Plan.  The plan’s purpose was to encourage ownership of UTG stock by eligible directors and employees of UTG and its subsidiaries by providing them with an opportunity to invest in shares of UTG common stock.  The plan was administered by the Board of Directors of UTG.  A total of 400,000 shares of common stock could have been purchased under the plan, subject to appropriate adjustment for stock dividends, stock splits or similar recapitalizations resulting in a change in shares of UTG.  The plan was not intended to qualify as an “employee stock purchase plan” under Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code.

The purchase price of shares repurchased under the stock restriction and buy-sell agreement was to be computed, on a per share basis, equal to the sum of (i) the original purchase price(s) paid to acquire such shares from the Holding Company at the time they were sold pursuant to the Plan and (ii) the consolidated statutory net earnings (loss) per share of such shares during the period from the end of the month next preceding the month in which such shares were acquired pursuant to the plan, to the end of the month next preceding the month in which the closing sale of such shares to UTG occurs.  The consolidated statutory net earnings per Share were be computed as the net income of the Holding Company and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis in accordance with statutory accounting principles applicable to insurance companies, as computed by the Holding Company, except that earnings of insurance companies or block of business acquired after the original plan date, November 1, 2002 were to be adjusted to reflect the amortization of intangibles established at the time of acquisition in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), less any dividends paid to shareholders. The calculation of net earnings per Share was to be performed on a monthly basis using the number of common shares of the Holding Company outstanding as of the end of the reporting period. The purchase price for any Shares purchased hereunder was to be paid in cash within 60 days from the date of purchase subject to the receipt of any required regulatory approvals as provided in the Agreement.
 
At the June 2009 Board of Directors meeting this program was terminated.  At the time of termination, the Company had 104,666 shares of common stock outstanding under the program.  During the third quarter 2009, the outstanding shares under the program were eliminated through either a cash payment or the issuance of additional shares of common stock at the option of the participant.  In exchange, the stock agreement was terminated and all rights under the agreement ended.  The Company repurchased 384 shares at a total cost of $6,259 and issued 65,699 additional shares of common stock of the Company to complete this exchange.

Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table provides information with respect to purchases we made of our common stock during the three months ended December 31, 2010 and total repurchases:


 
Total Number of Shares
 Purchased
 
Average Price Paid
 Per Share
 
Total Number of Shares Purchased
 as Part of Publicly Announced Program
 
Maximum Number of Shares
 That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Program
 
Approximate Dollar Value That May
 Yet Be Purchased Under the Program
Oct. 1 through Oct. 31, 2010
3,070
$
9.44
 
3,070
 
N/A
$
440,834
Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, 2010
1,428
 
9.31
 
1,428
 
N/A
 
427,535
Dec. 1 through Dec. 31, 2010
13,099
 
10.29
 
13,099
 
N/A
 
292,755
Total
17,597
 
10.06
 
17,597
       


On June 5, 2001, the Board of Directors of UTG authorized the repurchase in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions of up to $1 million of UTG's common stock.  On June 16, 2004, an additional $1 million was authorized for repurchasing shares.  On April 18, 2006, an additional $1 million was authorized for repurchasing shares.  On June 16, 2010, an additional $500,000 was authorized for repurchasing shares at current market value.  Repurchased shares are available for future issuance for general corporate purposes.  This program can be terminated at any time.  Open market purchases are generally limited to a maximum per share price of the most recent reported per share GAAP equity book value of the Company. Through February 15, 2011, UTG has spent $3,371,277 in the acquisition of 463,307 shares under this program.


ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected historical consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Item 8 – Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” and other financial information included elsewhere in this report.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
(000’s omitted, except per share data)
                     
   
2010
 
2009
 
2008
 
2007
 
2006
Premium income net of reinsurance
$
12,391
$
13,502
$
13,309
$
14,413
$
12,860
Net investment income
 
24,859
 
14,241
 
17,516
 
16,880
 
11,001
Total revenues
 
38,443
 
28,759
 
35,239
 
38,873
 
37,585
Net income (loss)
 
7,597
 
(4,290)
 
654
 
2,143
 
3,870
Basic income (loss) per share
 
1.97
 
(1.12)
 
0.17
 
0.56
 
1.00
Total assets
 
441,588
 
431,519
 
457,779
 
473,655
 
482,732
Total notes payable
 
10,372
 
14,403
 
15,617
 
19,914
 
22,990
Dividends paid per share
 
NONE
 
NONE
 
NONE
 
NONE
 
NONE


 
ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The purpose of this section is to discuss and analyze the Company's consolidated results of operations, financial condition and liquidity and capital resources for the two years ended December 31, 2010.  This analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes, which appear elsewhere in this report.  The Company reports financial results on a consolidated basis.  The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of UTG and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2010.

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

Any forward-looking statement contained herein or in any other oral or written statement by the Company or any of its officers, directors or employees is qualified by the fact that actual results of the Company may differ materially from any such statement due to the following important factors, among other risks and uncertainties inherent in the Company's business:

1.
Prevailing interest rate levels, which may affect the ability of the Company to sell its products, the market value of the Company's investments and the lapse ratio of the Company's policies, notwithstanding product design features intended to enhance persistency of the Company's products.
 
2.
 
Changes in the federal income tax laws and regulations which may affect the relative tax advantages of the Company's products.
 
3.
 
Changes in the regulation of financial services, including bank sales and underwriting of insurance products, which may affect the competitive environment for the Company's products.
 
4.
 
Other factors affecting the performance of the Company, including, but not limited to, market conduct claims, insurance industry insolvencies, insurance regulatory initiatives and developments, stock market performance, an unfavorable outcome in pending litigation, and investment performance.

Critical Accounting Policies

General
We have identified the accounting policies below as critical to the understanding of our results of operations and our financial position.  The application of these critical accounting policies in preparing our financial statements requires Management to use significant judgments and estimates concerning future results or other developments including the likelihood, timing or amount of one or more future transactions or amounts.  Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.  On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, assumptions and judgments based upon historical experience and various other information that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances.  For a detailed discussion of other significant accounting policies, see Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements.

DAC and Cost of Insurance Acquired
Deferred acquisition costs (DAC) and cost of insurance acquired reflect our expectations about the future experience of the existing business in-force.  The primary assumptions regarding future experience that can affect the carrying value of DAC and cost of insurance acquired balances include mortality, interest spreads and policy lapse rates.  Significant changes in these assumptions can impact amortization of DAC and cost of insurance acquired in both the current and future periods, which is reflected in earnings.

Investments
The Company accounts for its investments in debt and equity securities pursuant to FASB Codification 320-10 section 5, 15, 25, 30, 35, 45, 50, and 55 and 942-10 section 50, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities. The Company has classified all of its investments as available-for-sale with the exception of certain securities classified as trading securities. Available-for-sale investments are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in the Consolidated Balance Sheets for available-for-sale securities.  Trading securities are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported in income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.  Premiums and discounts on debt securities purchased at other than par value are amortized and accreted, respectively, to interest income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations, using the constant yield method over the period to maturity. Net realized gains and losses on investments are computed using the specific identification method and are reported in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Declines in value of securities available-for-sale that are judged to be other-than-temporary are determined based on the specific identification method and are reported in the Consolidated Statements of Operations as realized losses. The factors considered by management in determining when a decline is other-than-temporary include but are not limited to: the length of time and extent to which the fair value has been less than cost; the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer; adverse changes in ratings announced by one or more rating agencies; subordinated credit support; whether the issuer of a debt security has remained current on principal and interest payments; current expected cash flows; whether the decline in fair value appears to be issuer specific or, alternatively, a reflection of general market or industry conditions (including, in the case of fixed maturities, the effect of changes in market interest rates); and the Company's intent and ability to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for a recovery in fair value. For structured securities, such as mortgage-backed securities, an impairment loss is recognized when there has been a decrease in expected cash flows and/or a decline in the security's fair value below cost.

Deferred Income Taxes
The provision for deferred income taxes is based on the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred income taxes are recognized by applying enacted statutory tax rates to temporary differences between amounts reported in the Consolidated Financial Statements and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities. A valuation allowance is recognized for the portion of deferred tax assets that, in Management's judgment, is not likely to be realized. The effect on deferred income taxes of a change in tax rates or laws is recognized in income tax expense in the period that includes the enactment date.

Future Policy Benefits and Expenses
The liabilities for traditional life insurance and accident and health insurance policy benefits are computed using a net level method.  These liabilities include assumptions as to investment yields, mortality, withdrawals, and other assumptions based on the life insurance subsidiaries’ experience adjusted to reflect anticipated trends and to include provisions for possible unfavorable deviations.  The Company makes these assumptions at the time the contract is issued or, in the case of contracts acquired by purchase, at the purchase date.  Future policy benefits for individual life insurance and annuity policies are computed using interest rates ranging from 2% to 6% for life insurance and 2.5% to 9.25% for annuities.  Benefit reserves for traditional life insurance policies include certain deferred profits on limited-payment policies that are being recognized in income over the policy term.  Policy benefit claims are charged to expense in the period that the claims are incurred.  Current mortality rate assumptions are based on 1975-80 select and ultimate tables.  Withdrawal rate assumptions are based upon Linton B or Linton C, which are industry standard actuarial tables for forecasting assumed policy lapse rates.

Recognition of Revenues and Related Expenses
Premiums for traditional life insurance products, which include those products with fixed and guaranteed premiums and benefits, consist principally of whole life insurance policies, and certain annuities with life contingencies are recognized as revenues when due.  Limited payment life insurance policies defer gross premiums received in excess of net premiums, which is then recognized in income in a constant relationship with insurance in force. Accident and health insurance premiums are recognized as revenue pro rata over the terms of the policies.  Benefits and related expenses associated with the premiums earned are charged to expense proportionately over the lives of the policies through a provision for future policy benefit liabilities and through deferral and amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs.  For universal life and investment products, generally there is no requirement for payment of premium other than to maintain account values at a level sufficient to pay mortality and expense charges. Consequently, premiums for universal life policies and investment products are not reported as revenue, but as deposits.  Policy fee revenue for universal life policies and investment products consists of charges for the cost of insurance and policy administration fees assessed during the period.  Expenses include interest credited to policy account balances and benefit claims incurred in excess of policy account balances.

Results of Operations

(a)
Revenues

Premiums and policy fee revenues, net of reinsurance premiums and policy fees, decreased approximately 8% when comparing 2010 to 2009.  The Company writes very little new business.  Unless the Company acquires a block of in-force business as it did in December 2006, Management expects premium revenue to continue to decline on the existing block of business at a rate consistent with prior experience. The Company’s average persistency rate for all policies in force for 2010 and 2009 was approximately 96.0% and 96.1%, respectively. Persistency is a measure of insurance in force retained in relation to the previous year.

The Company’s primary source of new business production, which has been immaterial, comes from internal conservation efforts.  Several of the customer service representatives of the Company are also licensed insurance agents, allowing them to offer other products within the Company’s portfolio to existing customers.  Additionally, efforts continue to be made in policy retention through more personal contact with the customer including telephone calls to discuss alternatives and reasons for a customer’s request to surrender their policy.

Net investment income increased approximately 75% when comparing 2010 to 2009.  The overall gross investment yields for 2010 and 2009 are 9.82% and 5.58%, respectively.  During 2008 and 2009, Management took steps to avoid catastrophic future losses by culling its investment portfolio.  As part of this portfolio evaluation process, certain investments were subsequently sold, particularly during the third and fourth quarters of 2008 and early 2009.  This resulted in a higher cash balance through most of 2009 earning extremely low rates of interest which had an immediate impact on income.  With preservation of capital being of utmost concern, Management sat on this large cash balance waiting for the dust to settle and for opportunities with margin of safety to appear.  This patience was rewarded and the Company began to deploy cash into investments deemed appropriate during the latter part of 2009.  The majority of this money was invested in trading securities and discounted mortgage loans.  With the economy reeling, bankruptcies soaring and general credit drying-up, the banking industry has been under well-known pressure.  As bank failures increased dramatically, their loan portfolios have been auctioned off, sometimes at deep discounts.

A substantial amount of the Company’s 2010 earnings are directly related to strong results in investment income.  The majority of the increase in investment income is from the Company’s mortgage loan portfolio.  Approximately 57%, or $14,075,000, of investment income is attributable to the mortgage loan portfolio, including $7,645,000 in discount accruals.  Should any of the factors change, such as the ability to acquire additional loans at such a large discount due to increased competition or insufficient supply, the ability of borrowers to settle loans mainly through refinancing, another decline in the overall economy, and other such factors, the performance of this type of investment could abruptly end, directly affecting future net income.  While management believes the current portfolio would remain profitable in another downturn, with no source of new acquisitions of discounted loans, the future profit stream from this activity would be limited.  Alternatively, should the Company need to look at fixed maturities for additional investment if discounted loans were no longer a viable option, the rate of return would be significantly lower given the low interest rate environment also resulting in substantially lower income.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company began purchasing discounted commercial mortgage loans.  Management has extensive background and experience in the analysis and valuation of commercial real estate and believes there are significant opportunities currently available in the discounted mortgage loan arena.  Experienced personnel of FSNB have also been utilized in the analysis phase.  This experience dates back to discounted loans during the Resolution Trust days where such loans were being sold from defunct savings and loans in the early 1990’s.  The discounted loans are available through the FDIC sale of assets of closed banks and from banks wanting to reduce their loan portfolios.  The loans are available on a loan by loan bid process.  Prior to placing a bid, each loan is reviewed to determine interest level utilizing such information as type of collateral, location of collateral, interest rate, current loan status and available cashflows or other sources of repayment.  Once it is determined interest in the loan remains, the collateral is physically inspected.  Following physical inspection, if interest still remains, a bid price is determined and a bid is submitted.  Once a loan has been acquired, contact is made with the appropriate individuals to begin a dialog with a goal of determining the borrower’s willingness to work together.  There are generally three paths a discounted loan will take:  the borrowers pay as required; a settlement is reached with the loan being paid off at a discounted value; or the loan is foreclosed.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company had acquired $118,368,661 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $35,224,022, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 29.8%. During 2009, the Company recorded approximately $1,000,000 in income from this loan activity. During 2010, the Company acquired an additional $111,258,867 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $36,283,278, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 32.6%.  Additionally, during 2010, the Company settled, sold or had paid off discounted mortgage loans totaling $23,607,100.  During 2010, the Company recorded approximately $12,898,000 in income from the discounted mortgage loan activity, including $7,645,258 in discount accruals.  The Company is currently projecting a very positive return from on-going mortgage loan payments from the discounted commercial mortgage loan portfolio.

While management believes the discounted loans will continue to have favorable earnings and outcomes as they are worked through, there can be no assurance this will remain true in future periods.  Changes in the current economy such as an even greater downturn than recently experienced could have a negative impact on the loans, including the financial stability of the borrowers, the borrowers’ ability to pay or to refinance, the value of the property held as collateral and the ability to find purchasers at favorable prices. As such, management has taken a conservative approach with these investments and has classified all discounted mortgage loans held as non-accrual.  In such status, the Company is recording interest income on a cash basis and is recording any accrual of discount on the loans held when realized.  Discount accruals reported during 2010 were the result of the loan basis already being fully paid.

During 2009, the Company also contributed approximately $20,000,000 to professionally managed trading accounts as another way to combat the current low rate environment.  The accounts were established to generate a fair return while reducing risk.  Securities designated as trading are reported at fair value with gains or losses resulting from changes in fair value recognized in net investment income.  During 2010, approximately 21%, or $5,143,000, of investment income was due to this trading portfolio, yielding approximately 12.8% after fees.  This type of return should not be expected in future periods.  Volatility should be expected, as well as possible losses.  Management’s target return on these accounts is 8%.

The Company's investments are generally managed to match related insurance and policyholder liabilities.  The comparison of investment return with insurance or investment product crediting rates establishes an interest spread.  The Company monitors investment yields, and when necessary adjusts credited interest rates on its insurance products to preserve targeted interest spreads, ranging from 1% to 2%.  Interest crediting rates on adjustable rate policies have been reduced to their guaranteed minimum rates, and as such, cannot be lowered any further.  Policy interest crediting rate changes and expense load changes become effective on an individual policy basis on the next policy anniversary.  Therefore, it takes a full year from the time the change was determined for the full impact of such change to be realized.  If interest rates decline in the future, the Company won’t be able to lower rates and both net investment income and net income will be impacted negatively.

Net realized investment losses were $(640,538) and $(629,528) in 2010 and 2009, respectively.  During 2010, other-than-temporary impairments of approximately $610,000 and $740,000 were taken on bonds backed by trust preferred securities and on common stock, respectively.  The other-than-temporary impairments were due to changes in expected future cash flows.  Additionally, an other-than-temporary impairment of approximately $129,000 was taken on a mortgage loan as a result of its appraisal valuation.  These losses were partially off-set from realized gains of approximately $811,175 on bond sales.  The majority of the losses during 2009 were from bond investments.  The beginning of 2009 continued with the elimination of unwanted bonds during the portfolio evaluation process.  Losses on the sale of these bonds totaled approximately $3,500,000.  In addition to these losses, other-than-temporary impairments of just over $2,000,000 were taken on bonds backed by trust preferred securities of banks.  These losses were partially off-set from realized gains of approximately $3,800,000 from sales of mortgage backed securities at the end of 2009.  Realized gains on common stocks were mainly the result of selling the remainder of CSI for a $3,000,000 gain and the sale of another common stock realizing a $1,000,000 gain.  The gains were off-set by a loss of approximately $3,000,000 on exchange traded funds that moved inversely to the market.

Although stock markets around the world have rallied sharply from an oversold position on increased liquidity and a perceived improvement in the general economy, Management continues to view the Company’s investment portfolio with utmost priority. Significant time has been spent internally researching the Company’s risk and communicating with outside investment advisors about the current investment environment and ways to ensure preservation of capital and mitigate any losses.  Management has put extensive efforts into evaluating the investment holdings.  Additionally, members of the Company’s board of directors and investment committee have been solicited for advice and provided with information.  Management has reviewed the Company’s entire portfolio on a security level basis to be sure all understand our holdings, potential risks and underlying credit supporting the investments.  Management intends to continue its close monitoring of its bond holdings and other investments for additional deterioration or market condition changes.  Future events may result in Management’s determination that certain current investment holdings may need to be sold which could result in gains or losses in future periods.  Such future events could also result in other than temporary declines in value that could result in future period impairment losses.

There are a number of significant risks and uncertainties inherent in the process of monitoring impairments and determining if impairment is other-than-temporary. These risks and uncertainties related to Management’s assessment of other-than-temporary declines in value include but are not limited to: the risk that Company's assessment of an issuer's ability to meet all of its contractual obligations will change based on changes in the credit characteristics of that issuer; the risk that the economic outlook will be worse than expected or have more of an impact on the issuer than anticipated; the risk that fraudulent information could be provided to the Company's investment professionals who determine the fair value estimates.

In recent periods, Management’s focus has been placed on promoting and growing TPA services to unaffiliated life insurance companies.  The Company receives monthly fees based on policy in force counts and certain other activity indicators, such as number of premium collections performed, or services performed.  For the years ended 2010 and 2009, the Company received $1,724,880 and $1,875,868 for this work, respectively.  These TPA revenue fees are included in the line item “other income” on the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.  During 2010, the Company obtained an additional contract for these services, which should provide approximately $300,000 additional revenues annually.  Administration for this block of business is to begin in the first quarter of 2011.  The Company intends to continue to pursue other TPA arrangements as well. The Company provides TPA services to insurance companies seeking business process outsourcing solutions.  Management believes the Company is positioned to generate additional revenues by utilizing the Company’s current excess capacity and administrative services.  During 2009, the Company renewed the contract of the largest TPA client for an additional five year period.

In summary, the Company’s basis for future revenue growth is expected to come from the following primary sources: expansion of TPA revenues, conservation of business currently in force, the maximization of investment earnings and the acquisition of other companies or policy blocks in the life insurance business.  Management has placed a significant emphasis on the development of these revenue sources and products offered to enhance these opportunities.

(b)
Expenses

Benefits, claims and settlement expenses net of reinsurance benefits and claims, decreased $3,546,995 from 2009 to 2010.  The decrease relates primarily to changes in the Company’s death claim experience.  Death claims were approximately $1,598,000 less in 2010 as compared to 2009.  There is no single event that caused the mortality variances.  Policy claims vary from year to year and therefore, fluctuations in mortality are to be expected and are not considered unusual by management.

Changes in policyholder reserves, or future policy benefits, also impact this line item.  Reserves are calculated on an individual policy basis and generally increase over the life of the policy as a result of additional premium payments and acknowledgement of increased risk as the insured continues to age.  The short-term impact of policy surrenders is negligible since a reserve for future policy benefits payable is held which is, at a minimum, equal to and generally greater than the cash surrender value of a policy.  The benefit of fewer policy surrenders is primarily received over a longer time period through the retention of the Company’s asset base.

Commissions and amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs decreased $882,163 from 2009 to 2010.  The 2010 results were more in line with what management would consider normal for this line item.  During 2009, this line item was impacted as a result of lower commissions offset from a reinsurance agreement in AC caused by lower profits on the block of business due to bond sales.  The AC agreement is a financial reinsurance agreement.  The earnings on the block of business covered by this agreement are utilized to re-pay the original borrowed amount.  The commission allowance reported each period from this agreement represents the net earnings on the identified policies covered by the agreement in each reporting period.  Results from this agreement included in this line item were approximately $(674,816) and $107,000 for the years 2010 and 2009, respectively.  As financial reinsurance, all financial results relating to this block of business are utilized to repay the outstanding borrowed amount from the reinsurer.  Securities are specifically identified and segregated in a trust account relative to this arrangement.  Should a gain or loss occur on one of these identified securities in the trust account, the results are included in the calculation of the current period financial results of the treaty with the reinsurer.    While the agreement may result in variances in this line item, this arrangement has no material impact on net income.  The overall impact to net income was $21,000 and $19,000 for the years 2010 and 2009, respectively.  A liability for the original ceding commission was established at the origination of the agreement and is amortized through this line item as earnings on the block of business are realized.  Most of the Company’s agent agreements contained vesting provisions, which provide for continued compensation payments to agents upon their termination subject to certain minimums and often limited to a specific period of time.  Another factor affecting this line item is attributable to normal amortization of the deferred policy acquisition costs asset.  The Company reviews the recoverability of the asset based on current trends and known events compared to the assumptions used in the establishment of the original asset.  No impairments were recorded in the periods reported.

Net amortization of cost of insurance acquired decreased 68% in 2010 compared to 2009.  During 2009, a block of business of UG fully amortized, which accounted for the significantly lower amortization in 2010.  Cost of insurance acquired is established when an insurance company is acquired.  The Company assigns a portion of its cost to the right to receive future profits from insurance contracts existing at the date of the acquisition.  The cost of policies purchased represents the actuarially determined present value of the projected future profits from the acquired policies.  Cost of insurance acquired is comprised of individual life insurance products including whole life, interest sensitive whole life and universal life insurance products.  Cost of insurance acquired is amortized with interest in relation to expected future profits, including direct charge-offs for any excess of the unamortized asset over the projected future profits.  The Company utilizes a 12% discount rate on the remaining unamortized business.  The interest rates vary due to risk analysis performed at the time of acquisition on the business acquired. The amortization is adjusted retrospectively when estimates of current or future gross profits to be realized from a group of products are revised. Amortization of cost of insurance acquired is particularly sensitive to changes in interest rate spreads and persistency of certain blocks of insurance in-force. Persistency is a measure of insurance in force retained in relation to the previous year.  The Company's average persistency rate for all policies in force for 2010 and 2009 has been approximately 96.0% and 96.1%, respectively.  The Company monitors these projections to determine the adequacy of present values assigned to future profits.  No impairments were recorded in the periods reported.

Operating expenses increased approximately 14% in 2010 compared to 2009.  This increase was due to increased travel expenses primarily relating to the purchase of discount mortgage loans and an increase in charitable contributions as a result of the Company’s increased earnings in 2010.  Management continues to place significant emphasis on expense monitoring and cost containment.  Maintaining administrative efficiencies directly impacts net income.

Interest expense decreased approximately 37% during 2010 compared to 2009.  This decrease is the result of a lower outstanding balance of debt as well as the general decline in interest rates.  The Company made principal payments of $3,600,351 during 2010.  During 2009, no principal payments were made as the Company prepaid principal due in 2009 during 2008.  The next required principal payment is due in December of 2011.  The Company anticipates aggressively repaying the current debt.

Deferred taxes are established to recognize future tax effects attributable to temporary differences between the financial statements and the tax return.  As these differences are realized in the financial statement or tax return, the deferred income tax established on the difference is recognized in the financial statements as an income tax expense or credit.

(c)
Net income

The Company had a net income (loss) of $7,596,575 and $(4,290,247) in 2010 and 2009, respectively.  The increase in net income in 2010 is primarily related to higher investment income and lower policyholder benefits.

Financial Condition

(a)
Assets

Investments are the largest asset group of the Company.  The Company's insurance subsidiaries are regulated by insurance statutes and regulations as to the type of investments they are permitted to make, and the amount of funds that may be used for any one type of investment.  In light of these statutes and regulations, and the Company's business and investment strategy, the Company generally seeks to invest in United States government and government agency securities and other high quality low risk investments.  Some insurance companies have suffered significant losses in their investment portfolios in the last few years; however, because of the Company’s conservative investment philosophy the Company has avoided such significant losses.

At December 31, 2010, the carrying value of fixed maturity securities in default as to principal or interest was immaterial in the context of consolidated assets, shareholders' equity or results from operations.  The Company has identified securities it may sell and classified them as "investments held for sale".  Investments held for sale are carried at market, with changes in market value charged directly to shareholders' equity. To provide additional flexibility and liquidity, the Company has categorized all fixed maturity investments as “investments held for sale”.

At December 31, 2010, the Company held a fixed maturity security with a carrying value of $10,000 that was guaranteed by a third party.  The security did not have a credit rating.  The Company had no significant concentration in a guarantor either directly or indirectly as of December 31, 2010.




The following table summarizes the Company's fixed maturities distribution at December 31, 2010 and 2009 by ratings category as issued by Standard and Poor's, a leading ratings analyst.


Fixed Maturities
   
 
% of Portfolio
Rating
       
   
2010
 
2009
Investment Grade
       
AAA
 
74%
 
76%
AA
 
4%
 
4%
A
 
9%
 
13%
BBB
 
13%
 
6%
Below Investment Grade
 
0%
 
1%
   
100%
 
100%


Mortgage loan investments represent 14% of total assets of the Company at year-end 2010 and 2009.  A significant portion of the Company’s mortgage loan investments result from opportunities available through FSNB, an affiliate of Mr. Jesse T. Correll.  Mr. Correll is the CEO and Chairman of the Board of Directors of UTG, and directly and indirectly through affiliates, its largest shareholder.  FSNB has been able to provide the Company with additional expertise and experience in underwriting commercial and residential mortgage loans, which provide more attractive yields than the traditional bond market.  FSNB services all the mortgage loans of the Company.  The majority of this amount was in the form of loans purchased at a discount from failed banks.  The Company pays FSNB a .25% servicing fee on these loans and a one-time fee at loan origination of .50% of the original loan amount to cover costs incurred by FSNB relating to the processing and establishment of the loan.  The Company paid $190,297 and $74,153 in servicing fees and $508,283 and $558,843 in origination fees to FSNB during 2010 and 2009, respectively.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company began purchasing discounted commercial mortgage loans.  Management has extensive background and experience in the analysis and valuation of commercial real estate and believes there are significant opportunities currently available in the discounted mortgage loan arena.  Experienced personnel of FSNB have also been utilized in the analysis phase.  This experience dates back to discounted loans during the Resolution Trust days where such loans were being sold from defunct savings and loans in the early 1990’s.  The discounted loans are available through the FDIC sale of assets of closed banks and from banks wanting to reduce their loan portfolios.  The loans are available on a loan by loan bid process.  Prior to placing a bid, each loan is reviewed to determine interest level utilizing such information as type of collateral, location of collateral, interest rate, current loan status and available cashflows or other sources of repayment.  Once it is determined interest in the loan remains, the collateral is physically inspected.  Following physical inspection, if interest still remains, a bid price is determined and a bid is submitted.  Once a loan has been acquired, contact is made with the appropriate individuals to begin a dialog with a goal of determining the borrower’s willingness to work together.  There are generally three paths a discounted loan will take:  the borrowers pay as required; a settlement is reached with the loan being paid off at a discounted value; or the loan is foreclosed.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, the Company had acquired $118,368,661 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $35,224,022, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 29.8%. During 2009, the Company recorded approximately $1,000,000 in income from this loan activity. During 2010, the Company acquired an additional $111,258,867 of discounted mortgage loans at a total cost of $36,283,278, representing an average purchase price to outstanding loan of 32.6%.  Additionally, during 2010, the Company settled, sold or had paid off discounted mortgage loans totaling $23,607,100.  During 2010, the Company recorded approximately $12,898,000 in income from the discounted mortgage loan activity, including $7,645,258 in discount accruals.  The Company is currently projecting a very positive return from on-going mortgage loan payments from the discounted commercial mortgage loan portfolio.

Sub-prime mortgage lending has received significant attention.  Default rates have risen sharply on these loans causing a negative impact in the economy in general.  While the Company does not have a material direct exposure to sub-prime mortgage loans, the Company could still be negatively impacted indirectly primarily through fixed maturity holdings in financial institutions that do have sub-prime loan exposures.  Declines in values relating to such entities will negatively impact the Company through unrealized investment losses.  Should any of these entities declare bankruptcy, the Company would then report a realized loss on its investment.  Management monitors events relating to this topic.

Total investment real estate holdings represent approximately 12% and 10.5% of the total assets of the Company, net of accumulated depreciation, at year-end 2010 and 2009 respectively. The Company has made several investments in real estate in recent years.  Expected returns on these investments exceed those available in fixed income securities.  However, these returns may not always be as steady or predictable.

Cash and cash equivalents decreased by approximately $19,000,000 comparing 2010 to 2009.  This cash was redeployed into additional investments.

During 2009, the Company also contributed approximately $20,000,000 to a professionally managed trading account as another way to combat the current low rate environment.  The account was established to generate a fair return while reducing risk.  Securities designated as trading are reported at fair value with gains or losses resulting from changes in fair value recognized in net investment income.  During 2010, approximately 21%, or $5,143,000, of investment income was due to this trading portfolio.  This type of return should not be expected going forward.  Volatility should be expected, as well as possible losses.

Policy loans remained consistent for the periods presented.  Industry experience for policy loans indicates that few policy loans are ever repaid by the policyholder other than through termination of the policy.  Policy loans are systematically reviewed to ensure that no individual policy loan exceeds the underlying cash value of the policy.

Deferred policy acquisition costs decreased 14% in 2010 compared to 2009.  Deferred policy acquisition costs, which vary with, and are primarily related to producing new business, are referred to as DAC.  DAC consists primarily of commissions and certain costs of policy issuance and underwriting, net of fees charged to the policy in excess of ultimate fees charged.  To the extent these costs are recoverable from future profits, the Company defers these costs and amortizes them with interest in relation to the present value of expected gross profits from the contracts, discounted using the interest rate credited by the policy.  The Company had $0 in policy acquisition costs deferred, $6,000 in interest accretion and $97,029 in amortization in 2010, and had $0 in policy acquisition costs deferred, $8,000 in interest accretion and $173,944 in amortization in 2009.

Cost of insurance acquired decreased approximately $1,324,000 in 2010 compared to $8,900,000 in 2009.  When an insurance company is acquired, the Company assigns a portion of its cost to the right to receive future cash flows from insurance contracts existing at the date of the acquisition.  The cost of policies purchased represents the actuarially determined present value of the projected future cash flows from the acquired policies.  Cost of insurance acquired is amortized with interest in relation to expected future profits, including direct charge-offs for any excess of the unamortized asset over the projected future profits.  In 2010 and 2009, amortization decreased the asset by $1,324,731 and $4,176,539 respectively.  An additional decrease of approximately $4,700,000 in 2009 was due to the sale of a subsidiary, Texas Imperial Life Insurance Company.  No impairments of this asset were recorded for the periods presented.

On December 30, 2009, the Company sold a 73% owned subsidiary, Texas Imperial Life Insurance Company.  The transaction was entered into to further streamline operations of the affiliated group.  Texas Imperial was a stipulated premium company, a unique status under Texas rules.  Consolidation of this entity was not practical due to this status.  The sale resulted in a decrease of approximately 4% in total assets in 2009.

(b)
Liabilities

The largest liability, by far, is future policy benefits.  The decrease from 2009 to 2010 in this line item was approximately 2%.  This decrease is attributable primarily to a decrease in the total future policy benefits held.  As policies in force terminate, the corresponding reserve liability held for those policies is released.

At December 31, 2010, the Company has outstanding notes payable of $10,372,239 as compared to $14,402,889 a year ago.  Approximately $6,890,000 of this debt is related to the acquisition of ACAP Corporation.  The Company has two lines of credit available for operating liquidity or acquisitions of additional lines of business.  The outstanding balances on these lines of credit were $2,290,000 and $0 as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.  The Company's debt is discussed in more detail in Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements.

As part of the investment portfolio restructuring, a portion of the Company’s funds has been dedicated to an experienced team of market professionals with the goal of grinding out a reasonable return, primarily through cash flows, with lower overall volatility and reduced risk.  The portfolio contains exchange traded equities and options which have been classified as trading securities on the balance sheet.

(c)
Shareholders' Equity

Total shareholders' equity increased approximately 20% in 2010 compared to 2009.  This increase is primarily due to the net income of $7,596,575 for the year as well as unrealized gains included in other comprehensive income.

Each year, the NAIC calculates financial ratio results (commonly referred to as IRIS ratios) for each insurance company.  These ratios compare key financial data pertaining to the statutory balance sheet and income statement.  The results are then compared to pre-established normal ranges determined by the NAIC.  Results outside the range typically require explanation to the domiciliary insurance department.  At year-end 2010, UG had three ratios while AC had one ratio outside the normal range.  All variances reported were anticipated by Management.  These ratios are discussed in more detail in the Regulatory Environment discussion included in this Item 7.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

The Company has three principal needs for cash - the insurance companies’ contractual obligations to policyholders, the payment of operating expenses and servicing its outstanding debt.  Cash and cash equivalents as a percentage of total assets were 4% and 9% as of December 31, 2010 and 2009.  Fixed maturities as a percentage of total invested assets were 45% and 47% as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

The Company's investments are predominantly in fixed maturity investments such as bonds and mortgage loans, which provide sufficient return to cover future obligations. The Company carries all of its fixed maturity holdings as held for sale which are reported in the consolidated financial statements at their market value.

Many of the Company's products contain surrender charges and other features which reward persistency and penalize the early withdrawal of funds.  With respect to such products, surrender charges are generally sufficient to cover the Company's unamortized deferred policy acquisition costs with respect to the policy being surrendered.

Cash used in operating activities was $(2,986,295) and $(4,248,484) in 2010 and 2009, respectively.  Sources of operating cash flows of the Company, as with most insurance entities, is comprised primarily of premiums received on life insurance products and income earned on investments.  Uses of operating cash flows consist primarily of payments of benefits to policyholders and beneficiaries and operating expenses.  The Company has not marketed any significant new products for several years.  As such, premium revenues continue to decline.  Management anticipates future cashflows from operations to remain similar to historic trends.

Cash provided by (used in) investing activities was $(11,480,532) and $2,904,973 for 2010 and 2009, respectively.  During 2010, more emphasis was placed on the trading securities and discounted mortgage loans.  These two investment areas accounted for 86% of investments acquired during 2010 and 79% of investments sold during 2010.  In late 2009, management determined market conditions were favorable for investing in both of these arenas.  The Company intends to continue this investment path as long as market conditions remain favorable in these areas and investment opportunities continue to present themselves.

Net cash used in financing activities was $(4,542,564) and $(1,159,521) for 2010 and 2009, respectively.  Cash used in financing activities during both years was primarily the result of debt reduction.

Net policyholder contract deposits decreased approximately $408,000 in 2010 compared to 2009.    Policyholder contract withdrawals decreased approximately $796,000 in 2010 compared to 2009.  Management anticipates continued moderate declines in contract deposits and withdrawals as this block of business continues to decline.  Contract withdrawals can vary from year to year based on outside influences such as changes in interest rates, competition and other economic factors.

On December 8, 2006, UTG borrowed funds from First Tennessee Bank National Association through execution of an $18,000,000 promissory note.  The note is secured by the pledge of 100% of the common stock of UG.  The promissory note carries a variable rate of interest based on the 3 month LIBOR rate plus 180 basis points.  Interest is payable quarterly.  Principal is payable annually beginning at the end of the second year in five installments of $3,600,000.  The loan matures on December 7, 2012.  The Company made principal payments of $3,600,351 during 2010.  During 2009, no payments were made, as the Company had prepaid the 2009 principal due during 2008.  At December 31, 2010 and 2009, the outstanding principal balance on this debt was $6,891,411 and $10,491,762, respectively.
In addition to the above promissory note, First Tennessee Bank National Association also provided UTG with a $5,000,000 revolving credit note.  During 2010, Management decided that a reduction in the limit to $2,750,000 in this line of credit was more reasonable for current operations.  This note is for a one-year term and may be renewed by consent of both parties.  The credit note is to provide operating liquidity for UTG.  The promissory note carries a variable rate of interest based on the 90-day LIBOR rate plus 2.75 percentage points, but at no time will the rate be less than 3.25%.  The collateral held on the above note also secures this credit note.  UTG had borrowings of $290,000 and $0 against this note during 2010 and 2009, respectively.  At December 31, 2010 and 2009, the outstanding principal balance on this debt was $290,000 and $0, respectively.

In November 2007, the Company became a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB).  This membership allows the Company access to additional credit up to a maximum of 50% of the total assets of UG.  To be a member of the FHLB, UG was required to purchase shares of common stock of FHLB.  Borrowing capacity is based on 50 times each dollar of stock acquired in FHLB above the "base membership" amount.  UG's current line of credit with the FHLB is $15,000,000.  During 2010, UG had borrowings of $2,000,000 against this line of credit at a rate of 0.25% at December 31, 2010.  During 2009, UG had borrowings of $2,000,000 and repayments of $2,000,000.  At December 31, 2010 and 2009, the outstanding principal balance on this debt was $2,000,000 and $0, respectively.  This outstanding principal balance was repaid in full on January 7, 2011.

In June 2002, the Company entered into a five-year contract for services related to its purchase of the “ID3” software system.  The contract was amended during 2006 for a five year period ended 2011.  Under the contract, the Company is required to pay $8,333 per month in software maintenance costs and a minimum charge of $14,000 per month in offsite data center costs, for a five-year period ending in 2011.

UTG is a holding company that has no day-to-day operations of its own.  Funds required to meet its expenses, generally costs associated with maintaining the Company in good standing with states in which it does business, and the servicing of its debt are primarily provided by its subsidiaries.  On a parent only basis, UTG's cash flow is dependent on management fees received from its insurance subsidiaries, stockholder dividends from its subsidiaries and earnings received on cash balances.  On December 31, 2010, substantially all of the consolidated shareholders equity represents net assets of its subsidiaries.  The Company's insurance subsidiaries have maintained adequate statutory capital and surplus.  The payment of cash dividends to shareholders by UTG is not legally restricted.  However, the state insurance department regulates insurance company dividend payments where the company is domiciled.

UG is an Ohio domiciled insurance company, which requires five days prior notification to the insurance commissioner for the payment of an ordinary dividend.  Ordinary dividends are defined as the greater of: a) prior year statutory net income or b) 10% of statutory capital and surplus.  For the year ended December 31, 2010, UG had statutory net income of $4,796,439.  At December 31, 2010, UG's statutory capital and surplus amounted to $30,442,880.  Extraordinary dividends (amounts in excess of ordinary dividend limitations) require prior approval of the insurance commissioner and are not restricted to a specific calculation.  UG paid dividends of $2,725,000 and $0 to UTG in 2010 and 2009, respectively. None of the dividends paid were considered to be an extraordinary dividend.

AC is a Texas domiciled insurance company, which requires eleven days prior notification to the insurance commissioner for the payment of an ordinary dividend. Ordinary dividends are defined as the greater of: a) prior year statutory earnings from operations or b) 10% of statutory surplus.  At December 31, 2010, AC statutory earnings from operations were $2,024,641.  At December 31, 2010 AC, statutory surplus was $8,434,448.  Extraordinary dividends (amounts in excess of ordinary dividend limitations) require prior approval of the insurance commissioner and are not restricted to a specific calculation.  AC paid ordinary dividends of $728,130 and $0 during 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Management believes the overall sources of liquidity available will be sufficient to satisfy its financial obligations.

Regulatory Environment

The Company's current and merged insurance subsidiaries are assessed contributions by life and health guaranty associations in almost all states to indemnify policyholders of failed companies.  In several states the company may reduce premium taxes paid to recover a portion of assessments paid to the states' guaranty fund association.  This right of "offset" may come under review by the various states, and the company cannot predict whether and to what extent legislative initiatives may affect this right to offset.  In addition, some state guaranty associations have adjusted the basis by which they assess the cost of insolvencies to individual companies.  The Company believes that its reserve for future guaranty fund assessments is sufficient to provide for assessments related to known insolvencies.  This reserve is based upon management's current expectation of the availability of this right of offset, known insolvencies and state guaranty fund assessment bases.  However, changes in the basis whereby assessments are charged to individual companies and changes in the availability of the right to offset assessments against premium tax payments could materially affect the company's results.

Currently, the insurance subsidiaries are subject to government regulation in each of the states in which they conduct business.  Such regulation is vested in state agencies having broad administrative power dealing with all aspects of the insurance business, including the power to:  (i) grant and revoke licenses to transact business;  (ii) regulate and supervise trade practices and market conduct;  (iii) establish guaranty associations;  (iv) license agents;  (v) approve policy forms;  (vi) approve premium rates for some lines of business;  (vii) establish reserve requirements;  (viii) prescribe the form and content of required financial statements and reports;  (ix) determine the reasonableness and adequacy of statutory capital and surplus; and  (x) regulate the type and amount of permitted investments.  Insurance regulation is concerned primarily with the protection of policyholders.  The Company cannot predict the impact of any future proposals, regulations or market conduct investigations.  UG is domiciled in the state of Ohio.  AC is domiciled in the state of Texas.

The insurance regulatory framework continues to be scrutinized by various states, the federal government and the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC).  The NAIC is an association whose membership consists of the insurance commissioners or their designees of the various states.  The NAIC has no direct regulatory authority over insurance companies.  However, its primary purpose is to provide a more consistent method of regulation and reporting from state to state.  This is accomplished through the issuance of model regulations, which can be adopted by individual states unmodified, modified to meet the state's own needs or requirements, or dismissed entirely.

Most states also have insurance holding company statutes, which require registration and periodic reporting by insurance companies controlled by other corporations licensed to transact business within their respective jurisdictions.  The insurance subsidiaries are subject to such legislation and registered as controlled insurers in those jurisdictions in which such registration is required.  Statutes vary from state to state but typically require periodic disclosure, concerning the corporation that controls the registered insurers and all subsidiaries of such corporation. In addition, prior notice to, or approval by, the state insurance commission of material inter-corporate transfers of assets, reinsurance agreements, management agreements (see Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements), and payment of dividends (see Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements) in excess of specified amounts by the insurance subsidiaries, within the holding company system, are required.

Each year, the NAIC calculates financial ratio results (commonly referred to as IRIS ratios) for each company.  These ratios measure various statutory balance sheet and income statement financial information.  The results are then compared to pre-established normal ranges determined by the NAIC.  Results outside the range typically require explanation to the domiciliary insurance department.

At year-end 2010, UG had three ratios outside the normal range.  AC had one ratio outside the normal range.  Each of the ratios outside the normal range was anticipated by Management.  UG’s ratios relate to the Company’s affiliated investments, percentage of real estate and mortgage loans to cash and invested assets and change in premium.  The Company has made investments in real estate projects, which have been consolidated into these financial statements through limited liability companies.  The limited liability companies were created to provide additional risk protection to the Company.  Additionally, ACAP Corporation is a subsidiary of UG. During 2009, the Company re-evaluated its investment portfolio and began eliminating unwanted bonds.  At the same time, the Company began purchasing mortgage loans at deep discounts.  The Company continued to purchase discounted mortgage loans in 2010.  While these investments negatively impact these ratios, the Company believes that this structure is in the best interest of the Company and these investments will have a positive long-term impact on the Company.  The Company has not actively marketed life products in the past several years.  Management currently placed little emphasis on new business production, believing resources could be better utilized in other ways.  Current sales primarily represent sales to existing customers through additional insurance needs or conservation efforts.  AC’s ratio outside the normal range relates to change in premium.  AC, like UG, has not actively marketed life products in the past several years.  Management currently places little emphasis on new business production, believing resources could be better utilized in other ways.

The NAIC's risk-based capital requirements require insurance companies to calculate and report information under a risk-based capital formula.  The risk-based capital (RBC) formula measures the adequacy of statutory capital and surplus in relation to investment and insurance risks such as asset quality, mortality and morbidity, asset and liability matching and other business factors.  The RBC formula is used by state insurance regulators as an early warning tool to identify, for the purpose of initiating regulatory action, insurance companies that potentially are inadequately capitalized.  In addition, the formula defines new minimum capital standards that supplement the current system of low fixed minimum capital and surplus requirements on a state-by-state basis.  Regulatory compliance is determined by a ratio of the insurance company's regulatory total adjusted capital, as defined by the NAIC, to its authorized control level RBC, as defined by the NAIC.  Insurance companies below specific trigger points or ratios are classified within certain levels, each of which requires specific corrective action.  The levels and ratios are as follows:


   
Ratio of Total Adjusted Capital to
   
Authorized Control Level RBC
Regulatory Event
 
(Less Than or Equal to)
     
Company action level
 
2.0*
Regulatory action level
 
1.5
Authorized control level
 
1.0
Mandatory control level
 
0.7
     
   
*Or, 2.5 with negative trend


At December 31, 2010, UG has a ratio of approximately 3.6, which is 360% of the authorized control level.  AC’s ratio is approximately 7.5, which is 750% of the authorized control level.  Accordingly, both companies meet the RBC requirements.

On July 30, 2002, President Bush signed into law the “SARBANES-OXLEY” Act of 2002 (“the Act”).  This Law, enacted in response to several high-profile business failures, was developed to provide meaningful reforms that protect the public interest and restore confidence in the reporting practices of publicly traded companies.  The implications of the Act to public companies, (which includes UTG) are vast, widespread, and evolving.  The Company has implemented requirements affecting the current reporting period, and is continually monitoring, evaluating, and planning implementation of requirements that will need to be taken into account in future reporting periods.  As part of the implementing these requirements, the Company has developed a compliance plan, which includes documentation, evaluation and testing of key financial reporting controls.

The “USA PATRIOT” Act of 2001 (“the Patriot Act”), enacted in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, strengthens our Nation’s ability to combat terrorism and prevent and detect money-laundering activities.  Under Section 352 of the Patriot Act, financial institutions (definition includes insurance companies) are required to develop an anti-money laundering program.  The practices and procedures implemented under the program should reflect the risks of money laundering given the entity’s products, methods of distribution, contact with customers and forms of customer payment and deposits.  In addition, Section 326 of the Patriot Act creates minimum standards for financial institutions regarding the identity of their customers in connection with the purchase of a policy or contract of insurance.  The Company has instituted an anti-money laundering program to comply with Section 352, and has communicated this program throughout the organization.  In addition, all new business applications are regularly screened through the Medical Information Bureau.  The Company regularly updates the information provided by the Office of Foreign Asset Control, U.S. Treasury Department in order to remain in compliance with the Patriot Act and will continue to monitor this issue as changes and new proposals are made.

Accounting Developments

In January 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued the Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2011-01 Receivables (Topic 310) Deferral of the Effective Date of Disclosures about Troubled Debt Restructurings in Update No 2010-10. The amendments in this Update temporarily delay the effective date of the disclosures about troubled debt restructurings in Update 2010-20 for public entities. The delay is intended to allow the Board time to complete its deliberations on what constitutes a troubled debt restructuring. The effective date of the new disclosures about troubled debt restructurings for public entities and the guidance for determining what constitutes a troubled debt restructuring will then be coordinated. Currently, that guidance is anticipated to be effective for interim and annual periods ending after June 15, 2011. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2011-01 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-29 Business Combinations (Topic 805) Disclosure of Supplementary Pro Forma Information for Business Combinations. The amendments in this Update specify that if a public entity presents comparative financial statements, the entity should disclose revenue and earnings of the combined entity as though the business combination(s) that occurred during the current year had occurred as of the beginning of the comparable prior annual reporting period only. The amendments in this Update also expand the supplemental pro forma disclosures under Topic 805 to include a description of the nature and amount of material, nonrecurring pro forma adjustments directly attributable to the business combination included in the reported pro forma revenue and earnings. The amendments in this Update are effective prospectively for business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2010. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-29 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-28 Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) When to Perform Step 2 of the Goodwill Impairment Test for Reporting Units with Zero or Negative Carrying Amounts. The amendments in this Update modify Step 1 of the goodwill impairment test for reporting units with zero or negative carrying amounts. For those reporting units, an entity is required to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test if it is more likely than not that a goodwill impairment exists. In determining whether it is more likely than not that a goodwill impairment exists, an entity should consider whether there are any adverse qualitative factors indicating that an impairment may exist. The qualitative factors are consistent with the existing guidance and examples in paragraph 350-20-35-30, which requires that goodwill of a reporting unit be tested for impairment between annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. For public entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2010. Early adoption is not permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-28 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In October 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-26 Consolidations (Topic 944) Financial Services-Insurance. The amendments in this Update specify that the following costs incurred in the acquisition of new and renewal contracts should be capitalized in accordance with the amendments in this Update: 1. Incremental direct costs of contract acquisition. Incremental direct costs are those costs that result directly from and are essential to the contract transaction(s) and would not have been incurred by the insurance entity had the contract transaction(s) not occurred. 2. Certain costs related directly to Underwriting, policy issuance and processing, medical and inspection, and sales force contract selling performed by the insurer for the contract. The costs related directly to those activities include only the portion of an employee’s total compensation (excluding any compensation that is capitalized as incremental direct costs of contract acquisition) and payroll-related fringe benefits related directly to time spent performing those activities for actual acquired contracts and other costs related directly to those activities that would not have been incurred if the contract had not been acquired. All other acquisition-related costs—including costs incurred by the insurer for soliciting potential customers, market research, training, administration, unsuccessful acquisition or renewal efforts, and product development—should be charged to expense as incurred. Administrative costs, rent, depreciation, occupancy, equipment, and all other general overhead costs are considered indirect costs and should be charged to expense as incurred. If the initial application of the amendments in this Update results in the capitalization of acquisition costs that had not been capitalized previously by an entity, the entity may elect not to capitalize those types of costs. The amendments in this Update do not affect the guidance in paragraphs 944-30-25-4 through 25-5, which prohibits the capitalization of certain costs incurred in obtaining universal life-type contracts. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2011. The amendments in this update should be applied prospectively upon adoption. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-26 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In July 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-20 Consolidations (Topic 310) Receivables. The main objective in developing this Update is to provide financial statement users with greater transparency about an entity’s allowance for credit losses and the credit quality of its financing receivables. This Update is intended to provide additional information to assist financial statement users in assessing an entity’s credit risk exposures and evaluating the adequacy of its allowance for credit losses. Currently, a high threshold for recognition of credit impairments impedes timely recognition of losses. ASU 2010-20 is effective for annual reporting periods ending on or after December 15, 2011. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU No 2010-20 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In February 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-09, Subsequent Events (Topic 855) Amendments to Certain Recognition and Disclosure Requirements, which amends disclosure requirements within Subtopic 855-10. An entity that is an SEC filer is not required to disclose the date through which subsequent events have been evaluated. This change alleviates potential conflicts between Subtopic 855-10 and the SEC's requirements. ASU 2010-09 is effective upon issuance. The adoption of ASU 2010-09 did not have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In January 2010, FASB issued ASU 2010-06, Improving Disclosures about Fair Measurements, which provides amendments to subtopic 820-10 that require separate disclosure of significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and the presentation of separate information regarding purchases, sales, issuances and settlements for Level 3 fair value measurements. Additionally, ASU 2010-06 provides amendments to subtopic 820-10 that clarify existing disclosures about the level of disaggregation and inputs and valuation techniques. ASU 2010-06 is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements in the rollforward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements, which are effective for interim and annual periods ending after December 15, 2010. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-06 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In January 2010, FASB issued ASU 2010-02, Accounting and Reporting for Decreases in Ownership of a Subsidiary- a Scope Clarification, which addresses the accounting for non-controlling interests and changes in ownership interests of a subsidiary. ASU 2010-02 is effective for the interim or annual reporting periods ending on or after December 15, 2009, and must be applied retrospectively to interim or annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The adoption of ASU 2010-02 did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In April 2009, the FASB replaced the guidance in the Investments – Debt and Equity Securities Topic of the FASB ASC related to OTTI.  Under this new accounting guidance, an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) loss must be separated into the amount representing the decrease in cash flows expected to be collected, or “credit loss”, which is recognized in earnings, and the amount related to all other factors, or “noncredit loss”, which is recognized in other comprehensive income.  In addition, the requirement for management to assert that it has the intent and ability to hold an impaired security until recovery was replaced by the requirement for management to assert if it either has the intent to sell the debt security or if it is more likely than not the entity will be required to sell the debt security before recovery of its amortized cost basis.


ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Market risk relates, broadly, to changes in the value of financial instruments that arise from adverse movements in interest rates, equity prices and foreign exchange rates.  The Company is exposed principally to changes in interest rates which affect the market prices of its fixed maturities available for sale.  The Company’s exposure to equity prices and foreign currency exchange rates is immaterial.  The information is presented in U.S. Dollars, the   Company’s reporting currency.

Interest rate risk

The Company’s exposure to interest rate changes results from a significant holding of fixed maturity investments and mortgage loans on real estate, all of which comprised approximately 64% of the investment portfolio as of December 31, 2010.  These investments are mainly exposed to changes in treasury rates.  The fixed maturities investments include U.S. government bonds, securities issued by government agencies, mortgage-backed bonds and corporate bonds.  Approximately 53% of the fixed maturities owned at December 31, 2010 are instruments of the United States government or are backed by U.S. government agencies or private corporations carrying the implied full faith and credit backing of the U.S. government.

To manage interest rate risk, the Company performs periodic projections of asset and liability cash flows to evaluate the potential sensitivity of the investments and liabilities.  Management assesses interest rate sensitivity with respect to the available-for-sale fixed maturities investments using hypothetical test scenarios that assume either upward or downward 100-basis point shifts in the prevailing interest rates.  The following tables set forth the potential amount of unrealized gains (losses) that could be caused by 100-basis point upward and downward shifts on the available-for-sale fixed maturities investments as of December 31, 2010:


Decrease in Interest Rates
 
Increase in Interest Rates
           
200
Basis Points
100
Basis Points
 
100
Basis Points
200
Basis Points
300
Basis Points
           
$32,835,000
$15,086,000
 
$(12,720,000)
$(23,369,000)
$(32,687,000)

While the test scenario is for illustrative purposes only and does not reflect our expectations regarding future interest rates or the performance of fixed-income markets, it is a near-term change that illustrates the potential impact of such events.  The Company attempts to mitigate its exposure to adverse interest rate movements through staggering the maturities of its fixed maturity investments and through maintaining cash and other short term investments to assure sufficient liquidity to meet its obligations and to address reinvestment risk considerations.  Due to the composition of the Company’s book of insurance business, Management believes it is unlikely that the Company would encounter large surrender activity due to an interest rate increase that would force the disposal of fixed maturities at a loss.

At December 31, 2010, $37,029,550 of assets and $(18,429,677) of liabilities were classified as trading securities carried at fair value.  Included in these amounts are derivative investments with a fair value of $2,244,478 and $(17,246,957) in trading securities assets and trading securities liabilities, respectively.

At December 31, 2009, $19,613,472 of assets and $(11,671,911) of liabilities were classified as trading securities carried at fair value.  Included in these amounts are derivative investments with a fair value of $1,054,965 and $(4,753,525) in trading securities assets and trading securities liabilities, respectively.

The Company had no capital lease obligations, material operating lease obligations or purchase obligations outstanding as of December 31, 2010.

The Company has $10,372,239 in debt outstanding at December 31, 2010.

Future policy benefits reflected as liabilities of the Company on its balance sheet as of December 31, 2010, represent actuarial estimates of liabilities of future policy obligations such as expected death claims on the insurance policies in force as of the financial reporting date.  Due to the nature of these liabilities, maturity is event dependent, and therefore, these liabilities have been classified as having an indeterminate maturity.

Tabular presentation

The following table provides information about the Company’s long term debt that is sensitive to changes in interest rates.  The table presents principal cash flows and related weighted average interest rates by expected maturity dates.  The Company has no interest rate derivative financial instruments or interest rate swap contracts.

December 31, 2010
Expected maturity date
               
Long term debt
2011
2012
2013
2014
Thereafter
Total
Fair value
               
Fixed rate
27,008
943,712
31,586
34,154
154,368
1,190,828
1,110,156
Average interest rate
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
 
               
Variable rate
3,600,000
3,291,411
0
0
0
6,891,411
6,891,411
Average interest rate
2.0%
2.0%
N/A
N/A
N/A
2.0%
 
               
               
Short term debt
             
               
Fixed rate
2,000,000
0
0
0
0
2,000,000
2,000,000
Average interest rate
0.25%
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
0.25%
 
               
Variable rate
290,000
0
0
0
0
290,000
290,000
Average interest rate
3.25%
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
3.25%
 


Equity risk

Equity risk is the risk that the Company will incur economic losses due to adverse fluctuations in a particular stock.  As of December 31, 2010 and 2009, the fair value of our equity securities was $13,884,257 and $13,323,322, respectively.  As of December 31, 2010 a 10% decline in the value of the equity securities would result in an unrealized loss of $1,388,426 as compared to an estimated unrealized loss of $1,332,332 as of December 31, 2009.  The selection of a 10% unfavorable change in the equity markets should not be construed as a prediction by the Company of future market events, but rather as an illustration of the potential impact of such an event.
ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Listed below are the financial statements included in this Part of the Annual Report on SEC Form 10-K:

 
Page No.
UTG, INC. AND CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES
 
 
Report of Management on Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting……..….......................................................................................................................................
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
  for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009…………………………………………..…..….............................................................................................................
 
36
 
 
37
 
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets………………………………………………………………………............................................................................................................….
 
 
38
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations…………………………………………………..………........................................................................................................……
 
 
39
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity………………………………………..……….............................................................................................................…..
 
 
40
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows……………………………………………………......…..........................................................................................................….
 
 
41
 
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements……………………………………………………............................................................................................................…..
 
 
42-67





Report of Management on Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f). The Company’s internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance to the Company’s management and its Board of Directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of published financial statements. However, internal control systems, no matter how well designed, cannot provide absolute assurance. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.
 
 
The Company’s management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework contained in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the “COSO Report”).
 
 
Based on our evaluation under the framework in the COSO Report our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2010.
 
 
This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this annual report.
 
 
During the Company’s fourth fiscal quarter, there has been no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 
 

 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


 


To the Board of Directors and
Shareholders of UTG, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Springfield, Illinois


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of UTG, Inc. (a Delaware corporation) and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement.  The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting.  Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.  Accordingly, we express no such opinion.  An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of UTG, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the consolidated results of their operations and their consolidated cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We have also audited Schedule I, II, IV and V as of December 31, 2010, and 2009 and for the years then ended, of UTG, Inc. and subsidiaries..  In our opinion, these schedules present fairly, in all material respects, the information required to be set forth therein.


/s/ Brown Smith Wallace, L.L.C.

St. Louis, Missouri
March 28, 2011



 
UTG, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
As of December 31, 2010 and 2009
             
             
             
             
ASSETS
             
       
2010
 
2009
Investments:
       
 
Investments available for sale:
       
 
  Fixed maturities, at market (amortized cost $142,948,693 and $138,680,398)
$
147,905,948
$
139,704,693
 
  Equity securities, at market (cost $13,940,811 and $14,316,463)
13,884,257
 
13,323,322
 
Trading securities, at market (cost $34,183,252 and $19,043,448)
37,029,550
 
19,613,472
 
Mortgage loans on real estate at amortized cost
 
12,411,587
 
27,041,447
 
Discounted mortgage loans on real estate at amortized cost
47,523,860
 
34,229,937
 
Investment real estate, at cost, net of accumulated depreciation
53,148,755
 
45,556,811
 
Policy loans
 
13,976,019
 
14,343,606
 
Short-term investments
 
0
 
700,000
   
 
 
325,879,976
 
294,513,288
             
Cash and cash equivalents
 
18,483,452
 
37,492,843
Investment in unconsolidated affiliate, at fair value (cost $5,000,000 and $5,000,000)
5,137,700
 
5,057,762
Accrued investment income
 
1,609,425
 
1,577,199
Reinsurance receivables:
       
 
Future policy benefits
 
67,033,539
 
68,615,385
 
Policy claims and other benefits
 
4,446,940
 
5,131,031
Cost of insurance acquired
 
14,077,281
 
15,402,012
Deferred policy acquisition costs
 
556,958
 
647,526
Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation
 
1,478,935
 
1,485,253
Income taxes receivable
 
0
 
500,305
Other assets
 
2,883,893
 
1,096,368
   
Total assets
$
441,588,099
$
431,518,972
             
             
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Policy liabilities and accruals:
       
 
Future policy benefits
$
307,509,531
$
313,798,199
 
Policy claims and benefits payable
 
3,588,914
 
3,248,521
 
Other policyholder funds
 
810,062
 
940,357
 
Dividend and endowment accumulations
 
14,190,946
 
14,182,516
Income taxes payable
 
209,888
 
0
Deferred income taxes
 
13,381,278
 
11,950,254
Notes payable
 
10,372,239
 
14,402,889
Trading securities, at market (proceeds $17,387,108 and $10,590,552)
18,429,677
 
11,671,911
Other liabilities
 
7,967,807
 
7,265,586
   
Total liabilities
 
376,460,342
 
377,460,233
             
             
Shareholders' equity:
       
Common stock - no par value, stated value $.001 per share.
 
     
 
Authorized 7,000,000 shares - 3,848,079 and 3,884,445 shares issued
   
 
and outstanding after deducting treasury shares of 446,929 and 410,838
3,848
 
3,885
Additional paid-in capital
 
41,432,636
 
41,782,274
Retained earnings (accumulated deficit)
 
6,335,072
 
(1,261,503)
Accumulated other comprehensive income
 
3,679,684
 
322,156
Total UTG shareholders' equity
 
51,451,240
 
40,846,812
Noncontrolling interest
 
13,676,517
 
13,211,927
   
Total shareholders' equity
 
65,127,757
 
54,058,739
   
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
$
441,588,099
$
431,518,972

See accompanying notes.

 



 


UTG, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
For the Years Ended December 31, 2010 and 2009
             
             
       
2010
 
2009
             
Revenues:
       
             
 
Premiums and policy fees
$
16,498,551
$
17,434,156
 
Reinsurance premiums and policy fees
 
(4,107,958)
 
(3,931,963)
 
Net investment income
 
24,858,837
 
14,240,793
 
Other income
 
1,834,465
 
1,645,322
   
    Revenues before realized gains (losses)
 
39,083,895
 
29,388,308
 
Realized investment gains (losses), net:
       
   
Other-than-temporary impairments
 
(1,478,970)
 
(2,007,174)
   
Other realized investment gains, net
 
838,432
 
1,377,646
   
    Total realized investment losses, net
 
(640,538)
 
(629,528)
       
38,443,357
 
28,758,780
             
             
Benefits and other expenses:
       
             
 
Benefits, claims and settlement expenses:
       
   
Life
 
23,833,379
 
25,633,506
   
Reinsurance benefits and claims
 
(6,424,865)
 
(4,645,387)
   
Annuity
 
976,755
 
810,509
   
Dividends to policyholders
 
561,713
 
695,349
 
Commissions and amortization of deferred
       
   
policy acquisition costs
 
(824,850)
 
57,313
 
Amortization of cost of insurance acquired
 
1,324,731
 
4,176,539
 
Operating expenses
 
8,030,984
 
7,042,585
 
Interest expense
 
304,353
 
484,449
       
27,782,200
 
34,254,863
             
Income (loss) before income taxes
 
10,661,157
 
(5,496,083)
Income tax (expense) benefit
 
(2,278,245)
 
300,745
             
Net income (loss)
 
8,382,912
 
(5,195,338)
             
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
(786,337)
 
905,091
             
Net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders'
$
7,596,575
$
(4,290,247)
             
Amounts attributable to common shareholders':
       
             
 
Basic income (loss) per share
$
1.97
$
(1.12)
             
 
Diluted income (loss) per share
$
1.97
$
(1.12)
             
 
Basic weighted average shares outstanding
 
3,848,079
 
3,843,113
             
 
Diluted weighted average shares outstanding
 
     3,848,079
 
     3,843,113
             

See accompanying notes.
 

 
 


UTG, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
For The Years Ended December 31, 2010 and 2009
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
       
2010
   
2009
       
             Shareholders'
           Comprehensive
 
              Shareholders'
Comprehensive
       
Equity
 
Income
   
Equity
 
Income
Common stock
                 
 
Balance, beginning of year
$
3,885
     
$
3,834
   
 
Issued during year
 
0
       
61
   
 
Treasury shares acquired and retired
 
(37)
       
(10)
   
 
Balance, end of year
$
3,848
     
$
3,885
   
                       
                       
Additional paid-in capital
                 
 
Balance, beginning of year
$
41,782,274
     
$
41,943,229
   
 
Issued during year
 
0
       
(61)
   
 
Treasury shares acquired and retired
 
(349,638)
       
(160,894)
   
 
Balance, end of year
$
41,432,636
     
$
41,782,274
   
                       
                       
Retained earnings (accumulated deficit)
                 
 
Balance, beginning of year
$
(1,261,503)
     
$
3,028,744
   
 
Net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders
7,596,575
$
7,596,575
   
(4,290,247)
$
(4,290,247)
 
Balance, end of year
$
6,335,072
     
$
(1,261,503)
   
                       
                       
Accumulated other comprehensive income
                 
 
Balance, beginning of year
$
322,156
     
$
1,269,404
   
 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
                 
 
  Unrealized holding income (loss) on securities
                 
 
     net of non controlling and
                 
 
     reclassification adjustment and taxes
 
3,357,528
 
3,357,528
   
(947,248)
 
(947,248)
 
Comprehensive income (loss)
   
$
10,954,103
     
$
(5,237,495)
 
Balance, end of year
$
3,679,684
     
$
322,156
   
                       
Noncontrolling Interest
                 
 
Balance, beginning of year
$
13,211,927
     
$
13,050,030
   
 
Distributions
 
(561,493)
       
0
   
 
Gain attributable to noncontrolling interest
 
1,026,083
       
161,897
   
 
Balance, end of year
$
13,676,517
     
$
13,211,927
   
                       
Total shareholders' equity, end of year
$
65,127,757
     
$
54,058,739
   

See accompanying notes.



 
 

UTG, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
For the Years Ended December 31, 2010 and 2009
             
             
       
2010
 
2009
             
Cash flows from operating activities:
       
   Net income (loss) attributable to common shares
$
7,596,575
$
(4,290,247)
   Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
       
     provided by (used in) operating activities net of changes in assets and liabilities
   
     resulting from the sales and purchases of subsidiaries:
       
 
Amortization (accretion) of investments
 
(7,530,201)
 
136,366
 
Realized investment (gains) losses, net
 
640,538
 
629,528
 
Unrealized trading (gains) losses included in income
 
(1,803,729)
 
511,339
 
Amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs
 
90,568
 
165,944
 
Amortization of cost of insurance acquired
 
1,324,731
 
4,176,539
 
Depreciation
 
1,311,029
 
1,430,501
 
Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interest
 
786,337
 
(905,091)
 
Charges for mortality and administration
       
 
  of universal life and annuity products
 
(7,709,727)
 
(8,042,562)
 
Interest credited to account balances
 
5,247,365
 
5,360,221
 
Change in accrued investment income
 
(32,226)
 
268,477
 
Change in reinsurance receivables
 
2,265,937
 
2,126,492
 
Change in policy liabilities and accruals
 
(4,007,032)
 
(3,454,113)
 
Change in income taxes payable
 
277,669
 
(1,694,210)
 
Change in other assets and liabilities, net
 
(1,444,129)
 
(667,668)
Net cash used in operating activities
 
(2,986,295)
 
(4,248,484)
             
Cash flows from investing activities:
       
   Proceeds from investments sold and matured:
       
 
Fixed maturities available for sale
 
24,718,790
 
105,310,516
 
Equity securities available for sale
 
948,385
 
46,098,801
 
Trading securities
 
163,891,508
 
10,590,552
 
Mortgage loans
 
16,431,689
 
16,426,727
 
Discounted mortgage loans
 
23,607,100
 
999,044
 
Real estate
 
2,709,233
 
1,394,222
 
Policy loans
 
3,468,202
 
3,902,483
 
Short-term investments
 
700,000
 
0
   Total proceeds from investments sold and matured
 
236,474,907
 
184,722,345
   Cost of investments acquired:
       
 
Fixed maturities available for sale
 
(28,947,923)
 
(89,132,935)
 
Equity securities available for sale
 
(1,333,942)
 
(27,157,177)
 
Trading securities
 
(171,842,107)
 
(18,829,024)
 
Mortgage loans
 
(2,489,523)
 
(424,858)
 
Discounted mortgage loans
 
(38,323,757)
 
(35,799,381)
 
Real estate
 
(1,778,281)
 
(6,307,090)
 
Policy loans
 
(3,100,615)
 
(3,616,417)
 
Short-term investments
 
0
 
(700,000)
   Total cost of investments acquired
 
(247,816,148)
 
(181,966,882)
   Purchase of property and equipment
 
(139,291)
 
(17,403)
   Sale of property and equipment
 
0
 
166,913
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
 
(11,480,532)
 
2,904,973
             
Cash flows from financing activities:
       
 
Policyholder contract deposits
 
6,632,125
 
7,039,947
 
Policyholder contract withdrawals
 
(6,232,871)
 
(7,028,841)
 
Proceeds from notes payable/line of credit
 
7,290,000
 
2,000,000
 
Payments of principal on notes payable/line of credit
 
(11,320,650)
 
(3,213,877)
 
Purchase of treasury stock
 
(349,675)
 
(160,904)
 
Purchase of stock of affiliate
 
0
 
(1,000,000)
 
Non controlling contribution to consolidated subsidiary
 
0
 
1,025,000
 
Non controlling distributions of consolidated subsidiary
 
(561,493)
 
0
 
Cash received from sale of subsidiary
 
0
 
6,365,169
 
Cash of subsidiary at date of sale
 
0
 
(6,186,015)
Net cash used in financing activities
 
(4,542,564)
 
(1,159,521)
             
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents
 
(19,009,391)
 
(2,503,032)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
 
37,492,843
 
39,995,875
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
$
18,483,452
$
37,492,843

See accompanying notes.



UTG, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


1.
ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

A.
ORGANIZATION - At December 31, 2010, the significant majority-owned subsidiaries of UTG were as depicted on the following organizational chart.



 
organizational chart



UTG and its subsidiaries are collectively referred to as (“The Company”).  The Company’s significant accounting policies, consistently applied in the preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements, are summarized as follows.

B.
NATURE OF OPERATIONS - UTG is an insurance holding company.  The Company’s dominant business is individual life insurance which includes the servicing of existing insurance business in force and the acquisition of other companies in the insurance business.
 
C.
 
BUSINESS SEGMENTS - The Company has only one significant business segment – insurance.
 
D.
 
BASIS OF PRESENTATION - The financial statements of UTG and its subsidiaries have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
 
 
E.
PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION - The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Registrant and its wholly and majority-owned subsidiaries. All significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated.
 
F.
 
INVESTMENTS - Investments are shown on the following bases:
 
 
Investments available for sale - at fair value, unrealized gains and losses deemed temporary, net of deferred income taxes, are credited or charged, as appropriate, directly to accumulated other comprehensive income or loss (a component of shareholders’ equity).  Premiums and discounts on debt securities purchased at other than par value are amortized and accreted, respectively, to interest income in the Consolidated Statements of Operations, using the constant yield method over the period to maturity.  Net realized gains and losses on sales of held for sale securities, and unrealized losses considered to be other-than-temporary, are credited or charged to net realized investment gains (losses) in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
 
 
Mortgage loans on real estate - at unpaid principal balances, adjusted for amortization of premium or discount and valuation allowances.  Valuation allowances are established for impaired loans when it is probable that contractual principal and interest will not be collected.
 
 
Discounted mortgage loans – during 2009 and 2010, the Company purchased non-performing loans at a deep discount through an auction process led by the federal government.  In general, the discounted loans are non-performing and there is a significant amount of uncertainty surrounding the timing and amount of cash flows to be received by the Company.  Accordingly, the Company records its investment in the discounted loans at its original purchase price.  Management works the loans with the borrower to reach a settlement on the loan or they foreclose on the underlying collateral which is primarily commercial real estate.  For cash payments received during the work out process, the Company records these payments to interest income on a cash basis.  For loan settlements reached, the Company records the amount in excess of the carrying amount of the loan as a discount accretion to investment income at the closing date.  Management reviews the discount loan portfolio regularly for impairment.  If an impairment is identified (after consideration of the underlying collateral), the Company records an impairment to earnings in the period the information becomes known.
 
 
Real estate - investment real estate at lower of cost net of accumulated depreciation or fair value less cost to sell.  Expenses to maintain the property are expensed as incurred.
 
 
Trading securities – at fair value, with gains or losses resulting from changes in fair value recognized in earnings.  Trading securities include exchange traded equities and exchange traded equity options.
 
 
Policy loans - at unpaid balances including accumulated interest but not in excess of the cash surrender value of the related policy.
 
 
Short-term investments - at amortized cost, which approximates current market value.
 
 
Realized gains and losses include sales of investments, periodic changes in fair value, and write downs in value. If any, other-than-temporary declines in fair value are recognized in net income on the specific identification basis.
 
 
Unrealized gains and losses on investments carried at market value are recognized in other comprehensive income on the specific identification basis.
 
With each reporting period, management reviews its investment portfolio for securities whose value has declined below amortized cost to assess whether the decline is other than temporary.  Included in the analysis are considerations of the severity and duration of the decline in fair value, the length of time expected to recover, the financial condition of the issuer, and whether the Company either plans to sell the security or it is more-likely-than-not that it will be required to sell the security before recovery of its amortized cost.  If there is deemed to be an other than temporary decline in the value of any individual equity security, the Company reclassifies the associated net unrealized loss out of accumulated other comprehensive income with a corresponding charge to equity investment income.  For debt securities available for sale that are determined to have an other than temporary impairment (“OTTI”), the credit component of the OTTI is recognized in earnings and the non-credit component is recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in situations where the Company does not intend to sell the security and it is more-likely-than-not that the Company will not be required to sell the security.  Prior to January 1, 2009, unrealized losses on available for sale debt securities that were deemed to be other-than-temporary were included in current period earnings.
 
G.
 
CASH EQUIVALENTS - The Company considers certificates of deposit and other short-term instruments with an original purchased maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.
 
H.
 
REINSURANCE - In the normal course of business, the Company seeks to limit its exposure to loss on any single insured and to recover a portion of benefits paid by ceding reinsurance to other insurance enterprises or reinsurers under excess coverage and coinsurance contracts.  The Company retains a maximum of $125,000 of coverage per individual life.
 
 
Amounts paid, or deemed to have been paid, for reinsurance contracts are recorded as reinsurance receivables.  Reinsurance receivables are recognized in a manner consistent with the liabilities relating to the underlying reinsured contracts.  The cost of reinsurance related to long-duration contracts is accounted for over the life of the underlying reinsured policies using assumptions consistent with those used to account for the underlying policies.
 
For financial reinsurance arrangements, the Company reports the initial ceding commission received as an “other liability” on its financial statements.  Financial results in subsequent periods are reported in the various line items of the income statement as with other reinsurance agreements, with the repayment amount reported in the line item “amortization of DAC”.  The net impact to the statement of operations in any subsequent period represents the fees paid to the reinsurer on the current outstanding balance of the initial ceding commission.
 
I.
 
FUTURE POLICY BENEFITS AND EXPENSES - The liabilities for traditional life insurance and accident and health insurance policy benefits are computed using a net level method. These liabilities include assumptions as to investment yields, mortality, withdrawals, and other assumptions based on the life insurance subsidiaries’ experience adjusted to reflect anticipated trends and to include provisions for possible unfavorable deviations. The Company makes these assumptions at the time the contract is issued or, in the case of contracts acquired by purchase, at the purchase date.  Future policy benefits for individual life insurance and annuity policies are computed using interest rates ranging from 2% to 6% for life insurance and 2.5% to 9.3% for annuities. Benefit reserves for traditional life insurance policies include certain deferred profits on limited-payment policies that are being recognized in income over the policy term. Policy benefit claims are charged to expense in the period that the claims are incurred. Current mortality rate assumptions are based on 1975-80 select and ultimate tables. Withdrawal rate assumptions are based upon Linton B or C, which are industry standard actuarial tables for forecasting assumed policy lapse rates.
 
 
Benefit reserves for universal life insurance and interest sensitive life insurance products are computed under a retrospective deposit method and represent policy account balances before applicable surrender charges.  Policy benefits and claims that are charged to expense include benefit claims in excess of related policy account balances.  Interest crediting rates for universal life and interest sensitive products range from 4.0% to 5.5% as of December 31, 2010 and 2009.
 
J.
 
POLICY AND CONTRACT CLAIMS - Policy and contract claims include provisions for reported claims in process of settlement, valued in accordance with the terms of the policies and contracts, as well as provisions for claims incurred and unreported based on prior experience of the Company.  Incurred but not reported claims were $1,315,533 and $1,309,068 as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 respectively.
 
K.
 
COST OF INSURANCE ACQUIRED - When an insurance company is acquired, the Company assigns a portion of its cost to the right to receive future cash flows from insurance contracts existing at the date of the acquisition.  The cost of policies purchased represents the actuarially determined present value of the projected future profits from the acquired policies.  The Company utilizes a 12% discount rate on the remaining unamortized business.  Cost of insurance acquired is amortized with interest in relation to expected future profits, including direct charge-offs for any excess of the unamortized asset over the projected future profits.  The interest rate utilized in the amortization calculation is 12%.  The interest rates vary due to differences in the blocks of business.  The amortization is adjusted retrospectively when estimates of current or future gross profits to be realized from a group of products are revised.



   
2010
 
2009
         
Cost of insurance acquired, beginning of year
$
15,402,012
$
24,293,914
         
   Interest accretion
 
1,870,852
 
4,885,293
   Amortization
 
(3,195,583)
 
(9,061,832)
   Net amortization
 
(1,324,731)
 
(4,176,539)
         
Disposed with the sale of Subsidiary
 
0
 
(4,715,363)
         
Cost of insurance acquired, end of year
$
14,077,281
$
15,402,012
 
   
 
Estimated net amortization expense of cost of insurance acquired for the next five years is as follows:
 

 

   
Interest
Accretion
 
 
Amortization
 
Net
Amortization
2011
$
1,712,000
$
2,943,000
$
1,231,000
2012
 
1,564,000
 
2,710,000
 
1,146,000
2013
 
1,427,000
 
2,491,000
 
1,064,000
2014
 
1,299,000
 
2,285,000
 
986,000
2015
 
1,181,000
 
2,088,000
 
907,000


L.
DEFERRED POLICY ACQUISITION COSTS - Commissions and other costs (salaries of certain employees involved in the underwriting and policy issue functions and medical and inspection fees) of acquiring life insurance products that vary with and are primarily related to the production of new business have been deferred.  Traditional life insurance acquisition costs are being amortized over the premium-paying period of the related policies using assumptions consistent with those used in computing policy benefit reserves.
 
 
For universal life insurance and interest sensitive life insurance products, acquisition costs are being amortized generally in proportion to the present value of expected gross profits from surrender charges and investment, mortality, and expense margins.  Pursuant to Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 944, "Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises for Certain Long-Duration Contracts and for Realized Gains and Losses from the Sale of Investments," the Company makes certain assumptions regarding the mortality, persistency, expenses, and interest rates it expects to experience in future periods.  These assumptions are to be best estimates and are to be periodically updated whenever actual experience and/or expectations for the future change from initial assumptions.  The amortization is adjusted retrospectively when estimates of current or future gross profits to be realized from a group of products are revised.
 
 
The following table summarizes deferred policy acquisition costs and related data for the years shown:


     
2010
 
2009
 
             
 
Deferred, beginning of year
$
647,526
$
813,470
 
 
 
         
 
Acquisition costs deferred:
         
 
   Commissions
 
0
 
0
 
 
   Other expenses
 
0
 
0
 
 
   Total
 
0
 
0
 
             
 
Interest accretion
 
6,461
 
8,000
 
 
Amortization charged to income
 
(97,029)
 
(173,944)
 
 
   Net amortization
 
(90,568)
 
(165,944)
 
 
   Change for the year
 
(90,568)
 
(165,944)
 
 
Deferred, end of year
$
556,958
$
647,526
 
 
 Estimated net amortization expense of deferred policy acquisition costs for the next five years is as follows:

 

 
   
Interest
     
Net
   
Accretion
 
Amortization
 
Amortization
             
2011
$
6,000
$
77,000
$
71,000
2012
 
5,000
 
62,000
 
57,000
2013
 
4,000
 
56,000
 
52,000
2014
 
3,000
 
50,000
 
47,000
2015
 
3,000
 
77,000
 
74,000
             

M.
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT - Company-occupied property, data processing equipment and furniture and office equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation of $3,079,922 and $2,934,312 at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.  Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis for financial reporting purposes using estimated useful lives of three to thirty years.  Depreciation expense was $175,809 and $168,553 for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
N.
 
INCOME TAXES - Income taxes are reported Pursuant to FASB Codification 740-10 Section 50, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes – An Interpretation of FASB Statement number 109”.  Deferred income taxes are recorded to reflect the tax consequences on future periods of differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their financial reporting amounts at the end of each such period. The principal assets and liabilities giving rise to such differences are deferred policy acquisition costs, differences in tax basis of invested assets, cost of insurance acquired, future policy benefits, and gains on the sale of subsidiaries.
 
O.
 
EARNINGS PER SHARE - Earnings per share (EPS) are reported pursuant to FASB Codification 260-10 sections 5, 10, 15, 45, 50, 55, and 60.  The objective of both basic EPS and diluted EPS is to measure the performance of an entity over the reporting period.  Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income/(loss) attributable to common shares (the numerator) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding (the denominator) during the period.   Diluted EPS is similar to the computation of basic EPS except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the dilutive potential common shares had been issued.  In addition, the numerator also is adjusted for any changes in income or loss that would result from the assumed conversion of those potential common shares.
 
P.
 
TREASURY SHARES - The Company holds 446,929 and 410,838 shares of common stock as treasury shares with a cost basis of $3,400,844 and $3,051,170 at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
Q.
RECOGNITION OF REVENUES AND RELATED EXPENSES - Premiums for traditional life insurance products, which include those products with fixed and guaranteed premiums and benefits, consist principally of whole life insurance policies, and certain annuities with life contingencies are recognized as revenues when due. Limited payment life insurance policies defer gross premiums received in excess of net premiums, which is then recognized in income in a constant relationship with insurance in force. Accident and health insurance premiums are recognized as revenue pro rata over the terms of the policies. Benefits and related expenses associated with the premiums earned are charged to expense proportionately over the lives of the policies through a provision for future policy benefit liabilities and through deferral and amortization of deferred policy acquisition costs. For universal life and investment products, generally there is no requirement for payment of premium other than to maintain account values at a level sufficient to pay mortality and expense charges. Consequently, premiums for universal life policies and investment products are not reported as revenue, but as deposits. Policy fee revenue for universal life policies and investment products consists of charges for the cost of insurance and policy administration fees assessed during the period. Expenses include interest credited to policy account balances and benefit claims incurred in excess of policy account balances.
 
R.
 
PARTICIPATING INSURANCE - Participating business represents 10% of life insurance in force at December 31, 2010 and 2009.  Premium income from participating business represents 16% and 24% of total premiums for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.  The amount of dividends to be paid is determined annually by the insurance subsidiary's Board of Directors.  Earnings allocable to participating policyholders are based on legal requirements that vary by state.
 
S.
 
RECLASSIFICATIONS - Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the 2010 presentation. Such reclassifications had no effect on previously reported net income or shareholders' equity.
 
T.
USE OF ESTIMATES - In preparing financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.  The following estimates have been identified as critical in that they involve a high degree of judgment and are subject to a significant degree of variability: (i) deferred acquisition cost; (ii) policy liabilities and accruals; (iii) reinsurance recoverable; (iv) other-than-temporary impairment; (v) federal income taxes; (vi) cost of insurance acquired; (vii) discounted mortgage loans on real estate; (viii) foreclosed loans held for resale; and (vix) deferred tax assets and liabilities.
 
U.
 
IMPAIRMENT OF LONG LIVED ASSETS - The Company evaluates whether events and circumstances have occurred that indicate the remaining estimated useful life of long lived assets may warrant revision or that the remaining balance of an asset may not be recoverable.  The measurement of possible impairment is based on the ability to recover the balance of assets from expected future operating cash flows on an undiscounted basis.  During 2010, other-than-temporary impairments of approximately $610,000 and $215,000 were recognized on bonds backed by trust preferred securities and on common stock, respectively.  The other-than-temporary impairments were due to changes in expected future cash flows.  Additionally, an other-than-temporary impairment of approximately $129,000 was recognized on a mortgage loan as a result of its appraisal valuation.
 
 
2.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In January 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued the Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2011-01 Receivables (Topic 310) Deferral of the Effective Date of Disclosures about Troubled Debt Restructurings in Update No 2010-10. The amendments in this Update temporarily delay the effective date of the disclosures about troubled debt restructurings in Update 2010-20 for public entities. The delay is intended to allow the Board time to complete its deliberations on what constitutes a troubled debt restructuring. The effective date of the new disclosures about troubled debt restructurings for public entities and the guidance for determining what constitutes a troubled debt restructuring will then be coordinated. Currently, that guidance is anticipated to be effective for interim and annual periods ending after June 15, 2011. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2011-01 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-29 Business Combinations (Topic 805) Disclosure of Supplementary Pro Forma Information for Business Combinations. The amendments in this Update specify that if a public entity presents comparative financial statements, the entity should disclose revenue and earnings of the combined entity as though the business combination(s) that occurred during the current year had occurred as of the beginning of the comparable prior annual reporting period only. The amendments in this Update also expand the supplemental pro forma disclosures under Topic 805 to include a description of the nature and amount of material, nonrecurring pro forma adjustments directly attributable to the business combination included in the reported pro forma revenue and earnings. The amendments in this Update are effective prospectively for business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2010. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-29 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-28 Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) When to Perform Step 2 of the Goodwill Impairment Test for Reporting Units with Zero or Negative Carrying Amounts. The amendments in this Update modify Step 1 of the goodwill impairment test for reporting units with zero or negative carrying amounts. For those reporting units, an entity is required to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test if it is more likely than not that a goodwill impairment exists. In determining whether it is more likely than not that a goodwill impairment exists, an entity should consider whether there are any adverse qualitative factors indicating that an impairment may exist. The qualitative factors are consistent with the existing guidance and examples in paragraph 350-20-35-30, which requires that goodwill of a reporting unit be tested for impairment between annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. For public entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2010. Early adoption is not permitted. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-28 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In October 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-26 Consolidations (Topic 944) Financial Services-Insurance. The amendments in this Update specify that the following costs incurred in the acquisition of new and renewal contracts should be capitalized in accordance with the amendments in this Update: 1. Incremental direct costs of contract acquisition. Incremental direct costs are those costs that result directly from and are essential to the contract transaction(s) and would not have been incurred by the insurance entity had the contract transaction(s) not occurred. 2. Certain costs related directly to Underwriting, policy issuance and processing, medical and inspection, and sales force contract selling performed by the insurer for the contract. The costs related directly to those activities include only the portion of an employee’s total compensation (excluding any compensation that is capitalized as incremental direct costs of contract acquisition) and payroll-related fringe benefits related directly to time spent performing those activities for actual acquired contracts and other costs related directly to those activities that would not have been incurred if the contract had not been acquired. All other acquisition-related costs—including costs incurred by the insurer for soliciting potential customers, market research, training, administration, unsuccessful acquisition or renewal efforts, and product development—should be charged to expense as incurred. Administrative costs, rent, depreciation, occupancy, equipment, and all other general overhead costs are considered indirect costs and should be charged to expense as incurred. If the initial application of the amendments in this Update results in the capitalization of acquisition costs that had not been capitalized previously by an entity, the entity may elect not to capitalize those types of costs. The amendments in this Update do not affect the guidance in paragraphs 944-30-25-4 through 25-5, which prohibits the capitalization of certain costs incurred in obtaining universal life-type contracts. The amendments in this update are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2011. The amendments in this update should be applied prospectively upon adoption. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-26 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In July 2010, the FASB issued the ASU No. 2010-20 Consolidations (Topic 310) Receivables. The main objective in developing this Update is to provide financial statement users with greater transparency about an entity’s allowance for credit losses and the credit quality of its financing receivables. This Update is intended to provide additional information to assist financial statement users in assessing an entity’s credit risk exposures and evaluating the adequacy of its allowance for credit losses. Currently, a high threshold for recognition of credit impairments impedes timely recognition of losses. ASU 2010-20 is effective for annual reporting periods ending on or after December 15, 2011. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU No 2010-20 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In February 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-09, Subsequent Events (Topic 855) Amendments to Certain Recognition and Disclosure Requirements, which amends disclosure requirements within Subtopic 855-10. An entity that is an SEC filer is not required to disclose the date through which subsequent events have been evaluated. This change alleviates potential conflicts between Subtopic 855-10 and the SEC's requirements. ASU 2010-09 is effective upon issuance. The adoption of ASU 2010-09 did not have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In January 2010, FASB issued ASU 2010-06, Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements, which provides amendments to subtopic 820-10 that require separate disclosure of significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and the presentation of separate information regarding purchases, sales, issuances and settlements for Level 3 fair value measurements. Additionally, ASU 2010-06 provides amendments to subtopic 820-10 that clarify existing disclosures about the level of disaggregation and inputs and valuation techniques. ASU 2010-06 is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements in the rollforward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements, which are effective for interim and annual periods ending after December 15, 2010. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2010-06 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In January 2010, FASB issued ASU 2010-02, Accounting and Reporting for Decreases in Ownership of a Subsidiary- a Scope Clarification, which addresses the accounting for noncontrolling interests and changes in ownership interests of a subsidiary. ASU 2010-02 is effective for the interim or annual reporting periods ending on or after December 15, 2009, and must be applied retrospectively to interim or annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The adoption of ASU 2010-02 did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.

In April 2009, the FASB replaced the guidance in the Investments – Debt and Equity Securities Topic of the FASB ASC related to OTTI.  Under this new accounting guidance, an other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) loss must be separated into the amount representing the decrease in cash flows expected to be collected, or “credit loss”, which is recognized in earnings, and the amount related to all other factors, or “noncredit loss”, which is recognized in other comprehensive income.  In addition, the requirement for management to assert that it has the intent and ability to hold an impaired security until recovery was replaced by the requirement for management to assert if it either has the intent to sell the debt security or if it is more likely than not the entity will be required to sell the debt security before recovery of its amortized cost basis.


3.
SHAREHOLDER DIVIDEND RESTRICTION AND MINIMUM STATUTORY CAPITAL

At December 31, 2010, substantially all of consolidated shareholders' equity represents net assets of UTG’s subsidiaries.  The payment of cash dividends to shareholders by UTG is not legally restricted.  However, the state insurance department regulates insurance company dividend payments where the company is domiciled.  UG and AC’s dividend limitations are described below.

UG is an Ohio domiciled insurance company, which requires five days prior notification to the insurance commissioner for the payment of an ordinary dividend.  Ordinary dividends are defined as the greater of: a) prior year statutory net income or b) 10% of statutory capital and surplus.  For the year ended December 31, 2010, UG had statutory net income of $4,796,439.  At December 31, 2010, UG's statutory capital and surplus amounted to $30,442,880.  Extraordinary dividends (amounts in excess of ordinary dividend limitations) require prior approval of the insurance commissioner and are not restricted to a specific calculation.  UG paid dividends of $2,725,000 and $0 to UTG in 2010 and 2009, respectively. None of the dividends paid were considered to be an extraordinary dividend.

AC is a Texas domiciled insurance company, which requires eleven days prior notification to the insurance commissioner for the payment of an ordinary dividend. Ordinary dividends are defined as the greater of: a) prior year statutory earnings from operations or b) 10% of statutory surplus.  At December 31, 2010, AC statutory earnings from operations were $2,024,641.  At December 31, 2010 AC, statutory surplus was $8,434,448.  Extraordinary dividends (amounts in excess of ordinary dividend limitations) require prior approval of the insurance commissioner and are not restricted to a specific calculation.  AC paid ordinary dividends of $728,130 and $0 during 2010 and 2009, respectively.

UG is required to maintain minimum statutory surplus of $2,500,000. AC is required to maintain minimum statutory surplus of $1,400,000.


4.
INCOME TAXES

The valuation allowance against deferred taxes is a sensitive accounting estimate.  The Company follows the guidance of ASC 740, “Income Taxes,” which prescribes the liability method of accounting for deferred income taxes.  Under the liability method, companies establish a deferred tax liability or asset for the future tax effects of temporary differences between book and tax basis of assets and liabilities.

FASB ASC Topic 740-10 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The recognition threshold is based on a determination of whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination based on the technical merits of the position. Only tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold at the effective date may be recognized or continue to be recognized.  Management believes the Company has no material uncertain income tax provisions at December 31, 2010 or 2009.

The Company’s Federal income tax returns are periodically audited by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”).  In February 2011, the federal income tax return for 2009 of UTG underwent an IRS examination.  The examination was closed with no adjustments to the return.  There is no examination ongoing currently, nor is management aware of any pending examination by the IRS.  The statutes of limitation for the assessments of additional tax are closed for all tax years prior to 2007.  Management believes that adequate provision has been made in the consolidated financial statements for any potential assessments that may result from future tax examinations and other tax-related matters for all open tax years.

At December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, the Company had gross deferred tax assets of $3,243,631 and $3,971,251 net of valuation allowances of $0 and $147,521, and gross deferred tax liabilities of $16,624,909 and $15,921,505, resulting from temporary differences primarily related to the life insurance subsidiaries.  The valuation allowance in 2009 was from UG that for tax purposes generated a net operating loss of $421,488.  The Company established a deferred tax asset of $147,521 in 2009 relating to the operating loss carryforward.  Also in 2009, the Company established an offsetting allowance of $147,521 for the loss.  The allowances were established as a result of uncertainty in the Company’s ability to utilize the loss carryforwards which is dependent on generating sufficient taxable income prior to expiration of the loss carryforward.  The Company has not experienced any reductions of deferred tax assets due to the lapse of applicable statute of limitations.

The Company classifies interest and penalties on underpayment of income taxes as income tax expense.  No interest or penalties were included in the reported income taxes for the years presented.  Tax years 2007 to current remain subject to examination.  The Company has no agreements of extension of the review period currently in effect.  The Company is not aware of any potential or proposed changes to any of its tax filings.

The companies of the group file separate federal income tax returns except for ACAP, AC, and Imperial Plan, which file a consolidated life/non-life federal income tax return.

Life insurance company taxation is based primarily upon statutory results with certain special deductions and other items available only to life insurance companies.  Income tax expense (benefits) consists of the following components:

   
2010
 
2009
         
Current tax
$
2,710,769
$
201,041
Deferred tax
 
(432,524)
 
(501,786)
 
$
2,278,245
$
(300,745)


The expense for income differed from the amounts computed by applying the applicable United States statutory rate of 35% before income taxes as a result of the following differences:

   
2010
 
2009
         
Tax computed at statutory rate
$
3,731,405
$
(1,923,629)
Changes in taxes due to:
       
   Utilization of capital loss carryforward
 
0
 
(344,835)
   Valuation allowance
 
(147,521)
 
147,521
   Minority interest
 
(276,185)
 
276,806
   Utilization of net operating loss carryforward
 
0
 
(667,980)
   Small company deduction
 
(986,502)
 
(65,862)
   Sale of subsidiary
 
0
 
2,131,861
   Other
 
(42,952)
 
145,373
Income tax expense (benefit)
$
2,278,245
$
(300,745)

The following table summarizes the major components that comprise the deferred tax liability as reflected in the balance sheets:
 
 


   
2010
 
2009
         
Investments
$
4,751,156
$
3,293,449
Cost of insurance acquired
 
4,927,048
 
5,390,705
Deferred policy acquisition costs
 
194,935
 
226,634
Management/consulting fees
 
(80,381)
 
(178,153)
Future policy benefits
 
2,671,913
 
2,635,289
Deferred gain on sale of subsidiary
 
2,312,483
 
2,312,483
Other liabilities
 
(304,229)
 
(493,837)
Federal tax DAC
 
(1,091,647)
 
(1,236,316)
Deferred tax liability
$
13,381,278
$
11,950,254



 
 
5.
 
ANALYSIS OF INVESTMENTS, INVESTMENT INCOME AND INVESTMENT GAIN
 
A.
 
NET INVESTMENT INCOME - The following table reflects net investment income by type of investment:


   
2010
 
2009
         
Fixed Maturities Available for Sale
$
5,577,292
$
8,464,738
Equity Securities
 
891,777
 
970,778
Trading Securities
 
5,143,204
 
13,661
Mortgage Loans
 
1,176,747
 
2,442,908
Discounted Mortgage Loans
 
12,897,978
 
987,387
Real Estate
 
6,600,327
 
6,086,901
Policy Loans
 
864,416
 
868,114
Short-term Investments
 
57,339
 
55,375
Cash
 
10,761
 
44,368
Total Consolidated Investment Income
 
33,219,841
 
19,934,230
Investment Expenses
 
(8,361,004)
 
(5,693,437)
Consolidated Net Investment Income
$
24,858,837
$
14,240,793


The following table reflects net realized investment gains (losses) by type of investment:


 
 
2010
 
Gross
Realized
Gains
 
Gross
Realized
(Losses)
 
Net
Realized
Gains (Losses)
             
Fixed Maturities Available for Sale
$
811,175
$
(3,334)
$
807,841
Fixed Maturities Available for Sale - OTTI
 
0
 
(610,254)
 
(610,254)
Equity Securities
 
0
 
(21,360)
 
(21,360)
Equity Securities - OTTI
 
0
 
(726,828)
 
(726,828)
Real Estate
 
51,949
 
0
 
51,949
Mortgage Loans – OTTI
 
0
 
(128,867)
 
(128,867)
Other
 
0
 
(13,019)
 
(13,019)
Consolidated Net Realized Losses
$
863,124
$
(1,503,662)
$
(640,538)



 
 
2009
 
Gross
Realized
Gains
 
Gross
Realized
(Losses)
 
Net
Realized
Gains (Losses)
             
Fixed Maturities Available for Sale
$
3,996,328
$
(4,054,347)
$
(58,019)
Fixed Maturities Available for Sale - OTTI
 
0
 
(2,007,174)
 
(2,007,174)
Equity Securities
 
6,273,996
 
(5,077,207)
 
1,196,789
Real Estate
 
159,282
 
0
 
159,282
Other
 
79,594
 
0
 
79,594
Consolidated Net Realized Losses
$
10,509,200
$
(11,138,728)
$
(629,528)



 


B.
INVESTMENT SECURITIES

The amortized cost and estimated market values of investments in securities including investments available for sale are as follows:

2010
 
Original or Amortized
Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Estimated Market
Value
Investments available for sale:
               
Fixed maturities
               
U.S. Government and govt. agencies and authorities
$
74,596,648
$
4,427,285
$
0
$
79,023,933
States, municipalities and political subdivisions
 
330,000
 
5,198
 
0
 
335,198
Collateralized mortgage obligations
 
16,170,099
 
510,840
 
(6,677)
 
16,674,262
Public utilities
 
904,139
 
82,886
 
0
 
987,025
All other corporate bonds
 
50,947,807
 
2,320,965
 
(2,383,242)
 
50,885,530
   
142,948,693
 
7,347,174
 
(2,389,919)
 
147,905,948
Equity securities
 
13,940,811
 
39,700
 
(96,254)
 
13,884,257
Total
$
156,889,504
$
7,386,874
$
(2,486,173)
$
161,790,205
                 
Investment in unconsolidated affiliate
$
5,000,000
$
137,700
$
0
$
5,137,700


2009
 
Original or Amortized
Cost
 
Gross Unrealized Gains
 
Gross Unrealized Losses
 
Estimated Market
Value
Investments available for sale:
               
Fixed maturities
               
U.S. Government and govt. agencies and authorities
 
$
 
73,298,975
 
$
 
1,773,136
 
$
 
(1,375,073)
 
$
 
73,697,038
States, municipalities and political subdivisions
 
 
2,567,650
 
 
44,274
 
 
(192,776)
 
 
2,419,148
Collateralized mortgage obligations
 
17,992,385