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EX-14 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex14.htm
EX-23 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex23.htm
EX-21 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex21.htm
EX-3.I.1 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex3i1.htm
EX-31.1 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex31-1.htm
EX-31.2 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex31-2.htm
EX-10.5 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex10-5.htm
EX-32.1 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex32-1.htm
EX-32.2 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex32-2.htm
EX-10.4 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex10-4.htm
EX-10.12 - CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPv213072_ex10-12.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



 

FORM 10-K



 

 
x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2010

 
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File No. 0-28190



 

CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPORATION

(Exact Name of Registrant As Specified in Its Charter)

 
Maine   01-0413282
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 
2 Elm Street, Camden, ME   04843
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code: (207) 236-8821



 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 
Title of Each Class   Name of Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, without par value   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None



 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter periods that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).Yes o No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 
Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer x
Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).Yes o No x

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter: $191,773,454. Shares of the Registrant’s common stock held by each executive officer, director and person who beneficially owns 5% or more of the Registrant’s outstanding common stock have been excluded, in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of March 1, 2011 is: Common Stock: 7,659,403.

Listed hereunder are documents incorporated by reference and the relevant Part of the Form 10-K into which the document is incorporated by reference:

(1) Certain information required in response to Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Part III of this Form 10-K are incorporated by reference from Camden National Corporation’s Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders pursuant to Regulation 14A of the General Rules and Regulations of the Commission.
 

 


 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CAMDEN NATIONAL CORPORATION
2010 FORM 10-K ANNUAL REPORT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
  Page
PART I
        

Item 1.

Business

    1  

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

    12  

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

    19  

Item 2.

Properties

    19  

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

    19  

Item 4.

Removed and Reserved

    19  
PART II
        

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

    20  

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

    22  

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    23  

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

    45  

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    46  

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

    90  

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

    90  

Item 9B.

Other Information

    90  
PART III
        

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

    91  

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

    91  

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    91  

Item 13.

Certain Relationships, Related Transactions and Director Independence

    91  

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

    91  
PART IV
        

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

    92  
Signatures     94  

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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The discussions set forth below and in the documents we incorporate by reference herein contain certain statements that may be considered forward-looking statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. We may make written or oral forward-looking statements in other documents we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, in our annual reports to shareholders, in press releases and other written materials and in oral statements made by our officers, directors or employees. You can identify forward-looking statements by the use of the words “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “estimate,” “assume,” “will,” “should” and other expressions which predict or indicate future events or trends and which do not relate to historical matters. You should not rely on forward-looking statements, because they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, some of which are beyond our control. These risks, uncertainties and other factors may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Camden National Corporation to be materially different from the anticipated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements.

Some of the factors that might cause these differences include, but are not limited to, the following:

general, national, regional or local economic conditions which are less favorable than anticipated, including continued global recession, impacting the performance of our investment portfolio, quality of credits or the overall demand for services;
changes in loan default and charge-off rates could affect the allowance for credit losses;
declines in the equity and financial markets which could result in impairment of goodwill;
reductions in deposit levels could necessitate increased and/or higher cost borrowing to fund loans and investments;
declines in mortgage loan refinancing, equity loan and line of credit activity which could reduce net interest and non-interest income;
changes in the domestic interest rate environment and inflation, as substantially all of our assets and virtually all of our liabilities are monetary in nature;
changes in carrying value of investment securities and other assets;
further actions by the U.S. government and Treasury Department, similar to the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation conservatorship, which could have a negative impact on our investment portfolio and earnings;
misalignment of our interest-bearing assets and liabilities;
increases in loan repayment rates affecting interest income and the value of mortgage servicing rights;
changing business, banking, or regulatory conditions or policies, or new legislation affecting the financial services industry, such as the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, that could lead to changes in the competitive balance among financial institutions, restrictions on bank activities, changes in costs (including deposit insurance premiums), increased regulatory scrutiny, declines in consumer confidence in depository institutions, or changes in the secondary market for bank loan and other products; and
changes in accounting rules, Federal and State laws, IRS regulations, and other regulations and policies governing financial holding companies and their subsidiaries which may impact our ability to take appropriate action to protect our financial interests in certain loan situations.

You should carefully review all of these factors, and be aware that there may be other factors that could cause differences, including the risk factors listed in Item 1A. Risk Factors, beginning on page 12. Readers should carefully review the risk factors described therein and should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements.

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These forward-looking statements were based on information, plans and estimates at the date of this report, and we do not promise to update any forward-looking statements to reflect changes in underlying assumptions or factors, new information, future events or other changes.

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PART I

Item 1. Business

Overview.  Camden National Corporation (hereafter referred to as “we,” “our,” “us,” or the “Company”) is a publicly-held bank holding company, with $2.3 billion in assets at December 31, 2010, incorporated under the laws of the State of Maine and headquartered in Camden, Maine. The Company, as a diversified financial services provider, pursues the objective of achieving long-term sustainable growth by balancing growth opportunities against profit, while mitigating risks inherent in the financial services industry. The primary business of the Company and its subsidiaries is to attract deposits from, and to extend loans to, consumer, institutional, municipal, non-profit and commercial customers. The Company makes its commercial and consumer banking products and services available directly and indirectly through its subsidiary, Camden National Bank (the “Bank”), and the Bank’s division, Union Trust, and its brokerage and insurance services through Acadia Financial Consultants (“Acadia Financial”). The Company also provides wealth management, trust and employee benefit products and services through its subsidiary, Acadia Trust, N.A. (“Acadia Trust”), a federally regulated, non-depository trust company headquartered in Portland, Maine. In addition to serving as a holding company, the Company provides managerial, operational, human resource, marketing, financial management, risk management and technology services to its subsidiaries. The Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company accompanying this Form 10-K include the accounts of the Company, the Bank and its divisions, and Acadia Trust. All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Descriptions of the Company and the Company’s Subsidiaries

The Company.  Following is a timeline of major recent events of the Company:

In January 1985, the Company was founded following a corporate reorganization in which the shareholders of the Bank exchanged shares of the Bank’s stock for shares in the Company, at which time it became the Bank’s parent.
In December 1995, the Company merged with UnitedCorp, a bank holding company, and acquired 100% of United Bank and 51% of Trust Company of Maine, Inc.
On December 20, 1999, the Company acquired KSB Bancorp, Inc., a publicly-held, bank holding company with one principal subsidiary, Kingfield Savings Bank.
On February 4, 2000, United Bank and Kingfield Savings Bank were merged to form UnitedKingfield Bank.
On July 19, 2001, the Company acquired Acadia Trust and Gouws Capital Management, Inc., which was merged into Acadia Trust on December 31, 2001.
On October 24, 2001, the Company acquired the remaining minority interest in Trust Company of Maine, Inc.
On January 1, 2003, Trust Company of Maine, Inc. merged with Acadia Trust, with Acadia Trust remaining as the surviving entity.
On September 30, 2006, UnitedKingfield Bank was merged into the Bank.
On January 3, 2008, the Company acquired Union Bankshares Company, Maine, including its principal wholly-owned subsidiary, Union Trust Company.

As of December 31, 2010, the Company’s securities consisted of one class of common stock, no par value, of which there were 7,658,496 shares outstanding held of record by approximately 1,400 shareholders. Such number of record holders does not reflect the number of persons or entities holding stock in nominee name through banks, brokerage firms and other nominees, which is estimated to be 3,500 shareholders.

The Company is a bank holding company (“BHC”) registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHCA”), and is subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “FRB”).

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Camden National Bank.  The Bank, a direct, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, is a national banking association chartered under the laws of the United States and having its principal office in Camden, Maine. Originally founded in 1875, the Bank became a direct, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company as a result of the January 1985 corporate reorganization. The Bank offers its products and services in the Maine counties of Androscoggin, Cumberland, Franklin, Knox, Lincoln, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Somerset, Waldo and York, and focuses primarily on attracting deposits from the general public through its branches, and then using such deposits to originate residential mortgage loans, commercial business loans, commercial real estate loans and a variety of consumer loans. Customers may also access the Bank’s products and services using other channels, including the Bank’s website located at www.camdennational.com. The Bank is a member bank of the Federal Reserve System and is subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”). The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”) insures the deposits of the Bank up to the maximum amount permitted by law.

Union Trust, a Division of Camden National Bank.  As a result of the acquisition of Union Trust, the Bank operates nine Union Trust branches located throughout Hancock and Washington counties, Maine, and a website located at www.uniontrust.com, with the same business purposes as the Bank branches. Effective February 22, 2011, the Union Trust division was combined with Camden National Bank and no longer operates as a separate division.

Acadia Financial Consultants, located at Camden National Bank.  Acadia Financial is a full-service brokerage and insurance division of the Bank, which is in the business of helping clients meet all of their financial needs by using a total wealth management approach. Its financial offerings include college, retirement, and estate planning, mutual funds, Strategic Asset Management accounts, and variable and fixed annuities. Effective February 22, 2011, Acadia Financial was renamed Camden Financial Consultants.

Acadia Trust, N.A.  Acadia Trust, a direct, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, is a national banking association chartered under the laws of the United States with a limited purpose trust charter, and has its principal office in Portland, Maine, and a website located at www.acadiatrust.com. Acadia Trust provides a broad range of trust, trust-related, investment and wealth management services, in addition to retirement and pension plan management services, to both individual and institutional clients. The financial services provided by Acadia Trust complement the services provided by the Bank by offering customers investment management services. Acadia Trust is a member bank of the Federal Reserve System and is subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the OCC as well as to supervision, examination and reporting requirements under the BHCA and the regulations of the FRB.

Competition.  Through the Bank and its divisions, Union Trust and Acadia Financial, the Company competes throughout the State of Maine, and considers its primary market areas to be in Hancock, Knox, Waldo, Penobscot, Washington and Androscoggin counties, with a growing presence in Cumberland, Lincoln and York counties. The combined population of the two primary counties of Knox and Waldo is approximately 80,000 people and their economies are based primarily on tourism and fishing and supported by a substantial population of retirees. The Bank’s downeast, central and western Maine markets are characterized as rural areas, with the exception of Bangor and Lewiston, which have populations of approximately 32,000 and 36,000, respectively. Major competitors in the Company’s market areas include local branches of large regional bank affiliates and brokerage houses, as well as local independent banks, financial advisors, thrift institutions and credit unions. Other competitors for deposits and loans within the Bank’s primary market areas include insurance companies, money market funds, consumer finance companies and financing affiliates of consumer durable goods manufacturers.

The Company and its banking subsidiary generally have effectively competed with other financial institutions by emphasizing customer service, which it has branded the Camden National Experience, including local decision-making, establishing long-term customer relationships, building customer loyalty and providing products and services designed to meet the needs of customers. No assurance can be given, however, that in the future, the Company and its banking subsidiary will continue to be able to effectively compete with other financial institutions. The Company, through its non-bank subsidiary, Acadia Trust, competes for trust, trust-related, investment management, retirement and pension plan management services with local banks and non-banks, which may now, or in the future, offer a similar range of services, as well as

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with a number of brokerage firms and investment advisors with offices in the Company’s market area. In addition, most of these services are widely available to the Company’s customers by telephone and over the internet through firms located outside the Company’s market area.

The Company’s Philosophy.  The Company is committed to the philosophy of serving the financial needs of customers in local communities, as described in its core purpose: Through each interaction, we will enrich the lives of people, help businesses succeed and vitalize communities. The Company, through the Bank, has branches that are located in communities within the Company’s geographic market areas. The Company believes that its comprehensive retail, small business and commercial loan products enable the Bank to effectively compete. No single person or group of persons provides a material portion of the Company’s deposits, the loss of any one or more of which would have a material adverse effect on the business of the Company and no material portion of the Company’s loans are concentrated within a single industry or group of related industries.

The Company’s Growth.  The Company has achieved a five-year compounded annual asset growth rate of 6.9%, resulting in $2.3 billion in total assets as of the end of 2010. The primary factors contributing to the growth were the acquisition of Union Trust, increases in security investments and retail lending activities at the Bank. The financial services industry continues to experience consolidations through mergers that could create opportunities for the Company to promote its value proposition to customers. The Company evaluates the possibility of expansion into new markets through both de novo expansion and acquisitions. In addition, the Company is focused on maximizing the potential for growth in existing markets, especially in markets where the Company has less of a presence.

The Company’s Employees.  The Company employs approximately 421 people on a full- or part-time basis, which calculates into 414 people on a full-time equivalent basis. The Company’s management measures the corporate culture every 12 months and is pleased with the most recent rating, which came in as a “positive” culture, signifying that employees understand and support the overall Company objectives and strategies. In 2009, the Company was named one of the top two “Best Places to Work in Maine” in the large-size category (200 or more employees) by ModernThink, a workplace excellence firm. There are no known disputes between management and employees.

The Company’s Employee Incentives.  All Company employees are eligible for participation in the Company’s performance-based incentive compensation program and Retirement Savings 401(k) Plan, while certain officers of the Company may also participate in various components of the Company’s 2003 Stock Option Plan, Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan, Postretirement Medical Plan, Defined Contribution Retirement Plan, Executive Incentive Compensation Program, Deferred Compensation Plan and Long-term Incentive Plan.

Supervision and Regulation

The business in which the Company and its subsidiaries are engaged is subject to extensive supervision, regulation and examination by various federal regulatory agencies (the “Agencies”), including the FRB and the OCC. The Bank is also subject to regulation under the laws of the State of Maine and the jurisdiction of the Maine Bureau of Financial Institutions. State and federal banking laws generally have as their principal objective either the maintenance of the safety and soundness of financial institutions and the federal deposit insurance system or the protection of consumers or classes of consumers, and depositors in particular, rather than the specific protection of shareholders. Set forth below is a brief description of certain laws and regulations that relate to the regulation of the Company and its banking subsidiaries.

Regulatory Reform.  On July 21, 2010, the President signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”), which comprehensively reforms the regulation of financial institutions, products and services. Many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act noted in this section are also discussed in other sections below. Furthermore, many of the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act require study or rulemaking by the Agencies, a process which will take months and years to fully implement.

Among other things, the Dodd-Frank Act provides for new capital standards that eliminate the treatment of trust preferred securities as Tier 1 capital. Existing trust preferred securities are grandfathered for banking entities with less than $15 billion of assets, such as the Company. The Dodd-Frank Act permanently raises

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deposit insurance levels to $250,000, retroactive to January 1, 2008, and provides unlimited deposit insurance coverage for transaction accounts through December 31, 2012, which is mandatory for all insured depository institutions. Pursuant to modifications under the Dodd-Frank Act, deposit insurance assessments will be calculated as of April 1, 2011, based on an insured depository institution’s assets rather than its insured deposits and the minimum reserve ratio of the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund will be raised to 1.35%. The payment of interest on business demand deposit accounts is permitted by the Dodd-Frank Act. The Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the FRB to regulate interchange fees for debit card transactions and establishes new minimum mortgage underwriting standards for residential mortgages. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act bars banking organizations, such as the Company, from engaging in proprietary trading and from sponsoring and investing in hedge funds and private equity funds, except as permitted under certain limited circumstances. The Dodd-Frank Act empowers the newly established Financial Stability Oversight Council to designate certain activities as posing a risk to the U.S. financial system and to recommend new or heightened standards and safeguards for financial institutions engaging in such activities.

Under the Dodd Frank Act, the FRB may directly examine the subsidiaries of the Company, including the Bank. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act establishes the Office of Financial Research which has the power to require reports from financial services companies such as the Company. The Dodd-Frank Act also establishes the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (“CFPB”) as an independent bureau of the FRB. The CFPB has the exclusive authority to prescribe rules governing the provision of consumer financial products and services, which in the case of the Bank will be enforced by the OCC. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act establishes a new standard for preemption of state consumer financial laws, which will affect national banking associations such as the Bank. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the Agencies have proposed new regulations which prohibit incentive-based compensation arrangements that encourage executives and certain other employees to take inappropriate risks.

Bank Holding Company — Activities and Other Limitations.  As a BHC, the Company is subject to regulation under the BHCA. In addition, the Company is subject to examination and supervision by the FRB, and is required to file reports with, and provide additional information requested by, the FRB. The enforcement powers available to federal banking regulators include, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease and desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions against banking organizations and institution-affiliated parties. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of law and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with regulatory authorities. Under certain circumstances, federal and state law requires public disclosure and reports of certain criminal offenses and also enforcement actions by the Agencies.

Under the BHCA, the Company may not generally engage in activities or acquire more than 5% of any class of voting securities of any company which is not a bank or BHC, and may not engage directly or indirectly in activities other than those of banking, managing or controlling banks or furnishing services to its subsidiary banks, except that it may engage in and may own shares of companies engaged in certain activities the FRB determined to be so closely related to banking or managing and controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. However, a BHC that has elected to be treated as a “financial holding company” may engage in activities that are financial in nature or incidental or complementary to such financial activities, as determined by the FRB alone, or together with the Secretary of the Department of the Treasury. The Company has not elected “financial holding company” status. Under certain circumstances, the Company may be required to give notice to or seek approval of the FRB before engaging in activities other than banking.

The Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 (“Riegle-Neal”) and the Dodd-Frank Act permit well capitalized and well managed BHCs, as determined by the FRB, to acquire banks in any state subject to certain concentration limits and other conditions. Riegle-Neal also generally authorizes the interstate merger of banks. In addition, among other things, Riegle-Neal and the Dodd-Frank Act permit banks to establish new branches on an interstate basis to the same extent a bank chartered by the host state may establish branches. However, as a BHC, we are required to obtain prior FRB approval before acquiring more than 5% of a class of voting securities, or substantially all of the assets, of a BHC, bank or savings association.

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The Change in Bank Control Act prohibits a person or group of persons from acquiring “control” of a BHC, such as the Company, unless the FRB has been notified and has not objected to the transaction. Under a rebuttable presumption established by the FRB, the acquisition of 10% or more of a class of voting securities of a BHC with a class of securities registered under Section 12 of the Exchange Act would, under the circumstances set forth in the presumption, constitute acquisition of control of the BHC. In addition, a company is required to obtain the approval of the FRB under the BHCA before acquiring 25% (5% in the case of an acquirer that is a BHC) or more of any class of outstanding voting securities of a BHC, or otherwise obtaining control or a “controlling influence” over that BHC. In September 2008, the FRB released guidance on minority investment in banks which relaxed the presumption of control for investments of greater than 10% of a class of outstanding voting securities of a BHC in certain instances discussed in the guidance.

Activities and Investments of National Banking Associations.  National banking associations must comply with the National Bank Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder by the OCC, which limit the activities of national banking associations to those that are deemed to be part of, or incidental to, the “business of banking.” Activities that are part of, or incidental to, the business of banking include taking deposits, borrowing and lending money and discounting or negotiating paper. Subsidiaries of national banking associations generally may only engage in activities permissible for the parent national bank.

Bank Holding Company Support of Subsidiary Banks.  Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the Company is required to serve as a source of financial strength for the Bank in the event of the financial distress of the Bank. This provision codifies the longstanding policy of the FRB. This support may be required at times when the BHC may not have the resources to provide it. The Agencies must still issue regulations to implement the source of strength provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. Similarly, under the cross-guarantee provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, as amended (the “FDIA”), the FDIC can hold any FDIC-insured depository institution liable for any loss suffered or anticipated by the FDIC in connection with (1) the “default” of a commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institution; or (2) any assistance provided by the FDIC to a commonly controlled FDIC-insured depository institution “in danger of default.”

Transactions with Affiliates.  Under Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation W promulgated thereunder, there are various legal restrictions on the extent to which a BHC and its nonbank subsidiaries may borrow, obtain credit from or otherwise engage in “covered transactions” with its FDIC-insured depository institution subsidiaries. Such borrowings and other covered transactions by an insured depository institution subsidiary (and its subsidiaries) with its nondepository institution affiliates are limited to the following amounts: in the case of one such affiliate, the aggregate amount of covered transactions of the insured depository institution and its subsidiaries cannot exceed 10% of the capital stock and surplus of the insured depository institution; and in the case of all affiliates, the aggregate amount of covered transactions of the insured depository institution and its subsidiaries cannot exceed 20% of the capital stock and surplus of the insured depository institution. The Dodd-Frank Act amended the definition of affiliate to include an investment fund for which the depository institution or one of its affiliates is an investment adviser. “Covered transactions” are defined by statute for these purposes to include a loan or extension of credit to an affiliate, a purchase of or investment in securities issued by an affiliate, a purchase of assets from an affiliate unless exempted by the FRB, the acceptance of securities issued by an affiliate as collateral for a loan or extension of credit to any person or company, the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance, or letter of credit on behalf of an affiliate, securities borrowing or lending transactions with an affiliate that creates a credit exposure to such affiliate, or a derivatives transaction with an affiliate that creates a credit exposure to such affiliate. Covered transactions are also subject to certain collateral security requirements. Further, a BHC and its subsidiaries are prohibited from engaging in certain tying arrangements in connection with any extension of credit, lease or sale of property of any kind, or furnishing of any service.

Declaration of Dividends.  According to its Policy Statement on Cash Dividends Not Fully Covered by Earnings (the “FRB Dividend Policy”), the FRB considers adequate capital to be critical to the health of individual banking organizations and to the safety and stability of the banking system. Of course, one of the major components of the capital adequacy of a bank or a BHC is the strength of its earnings, and the extent to which its earnings are retained and added to capital or paid to shareholders in the form of cash dividends. Accordingly, the FRB Dividend Policy suggests that banks and BHCs generally should not maintain their existing rate of cash dividends on common stock unless the organization’s net income available to common

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shareholders over the past year has been sufficient to fully fund the dividends, and the prospective rate of earnings retention appears consistent with the organization’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. The FRB Dividend Policy reiterates the FRB’s belief that a BHC should not maintain a level of cash dividends to its shareholders that places undue pressure on the capital of bank subsidiaries, or that can be funded only through additional borrowings or other arrangements that may undermine the BHC’s ability to serve as a source of strength.

Under Maine law, a corporation’s board of directors may declare, and the corporation may pay, dividends on its outstanding shares, in cash or other property, generally only out of the corporation’s unreserved and unrestricted earned surplus, or out of the unreserved and unrestricted net earnings of the current fiscal year and the next preceding fiscal year taken as a single period, except under certain circumstances, including when the corporation is insolvent, or when the payment of the dividend would render the corporation insolvent or when the declaration would be contrary to the corporation’s charter.

Dividend payments by national banks, such as the Bank, also are subject to certain restrictions. For instance, national banks generally may not declare a dividend in excess of the bank’s undivided profits and, absent OCC approval, if the total amount of dividends declared by the national bank in any calendar year exceeds the total of the national bank’s retained net income of that year to date combined with its retained net income for the preceding two years. National banks also are prohibited from declaring or paying any dividend if, after making the dividend, the national bank would be considered “undercapitalized” (as defined by reference to other OCC regulations). Federal bank regulatory agencies have authority to prohibit banking institutions from paying dividends if those agencies determine that, based on the financial condition of the bank, such payment would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice. The OCC has the authority to use its enforcement powers to prohibit a national bank from paying dividends if, in its opinion, the payment of dividends would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice. Federal law also prohibits the payment of dividends by a bank that will result in the bank failing to meet its applicable capital requirements on a pro forma basis.

Capital Requirements.  The FRB and the OCC have issued substantially similar risk-based and leverage capital guidelines applicable to United States banking organizations. In addition, the Agencies may from time to time require that a banking organization maintain capital above the minimum levels, whether because of its financial condition or actual or anticipated growth.

The FRB’s risk-based guidelines define a three-tier capital framework. Tier 1 capital for bank holding companies generally consists of the sum of common stockholders’ equity, perpetual preferred stock and trust preferred securities (both subject to certain limitations and, in the case of the latter, to specific limitations on the kind and amount of such securities which may be included as Tier 1 capital and certain additional restrictions described below), and minority interests in the equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries, less goodwill and other non-qualifying intangible assets. Tier 2 capital generally consists of hybrid capital instruments, perpetual debt and mandatory convertible debt securities; perpetual preferred stock and trust preferred securities, to the extent it is not eligible to be included as Tier 1 capital; term subordinated debt and intermediate-term preferred stock; and, subject to limitations, general allowances for loan losses. The sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital less certain required deductions, such as investments in unconsolidated banking or finance subsidiaries, represents qualifying total capital. Risk-based capital ratios are calculated by dividing Tier 1 and total capital, respectively, by risk-weighted assets. Assets and off-balance sheet credit equivalents are assigned to one of four categories of risk-weights, based primarily on relative credit risk. The minimum Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio is 4% and the minimum total risk-based capital ratio is 8%. As of December 31, 2010, the Company’s Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio was 13.80% and its total risk-based capital ratio was 15.05%.

Pursuant to Section 171 of the Dodd-Frank Act (more commonly known as the “Collins Amendment”), the capital requirements generally applicable to insured depository institutions will serve as a floor for any capital requirements the FRB may establish for the Company as a BHC. As a result, hybrid securities, including trust preferred securities, issued on or after May 19, 2010 are not eligible to be included in Tier 1 capital and instead may be included only in Tier 2 capital. The Company has not issued any trust preferred securities since May 19, 2010. However, as the Company had total consolidated assets of less than $15 billion as of December 31, 2009, its hybrid securities, including its trust preferred securities, issued before May 19,

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2010 will remain eligible to be included in Tier 1 capital to the same extent as before the enactment of the Collins Amendment. The Collins Amendment also specifies that the Federal Reserve may not establish risk-based capital requirements for bank holding companies that are quantitatively lower than the risk-based capital requirements in effect for insured depository institutions as of July 21, 2010.

In addition to the risk-based capital requirements, the FRB requires top rated bank holding companies to maintain a minimum leverage capital ratio of Tier 1 capital (defined by reference to the risk-based capital guidelines) to its average total consolidated assets of at least 3.0%. For most other bank holding companies (including the Company), the minimum Leverage Ratio is 4.0%. Bank holding companies with supervisory, financial, operational or managerial weaknesses, as well as bank holding companies that are anticipating or experiencing significant growth, are expected to maintain capital ratios well above the minimum levels. The Company’s leverage ratio was 8.77% as of December 31, 2010.

Pursuant to the Collins Amendment, as with the risk-based capital requirements discussed above, the leverage capital requirements generally applicable to insured depository institutions will serve as a floor for any leverage capital requirements the FRB may establish for bank holding companies, such as the Company. The Collins Amendment also specifies that the FRB may not establish leverage capital requirements for bank holding companies that are quantitatively lower than the leverage capital requirements in effect for insured depository institutions as of July 21, 2010.

The OCC has promulgated regulations and adopted a statement of policy regarding the capital adequacy of national banks. These requirements are substantially similar to those adopted by the FRB regarding bank holding companies, as described above. Moreover, the OCC has promulgated corresponding regulations to implement the system of prompt corrective action established by Section 38 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (“FDIA”). Under the regulations, a bank is “well capitalized” if it has: (1) a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or greater; (2) a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0% or greater; (3) a leverage ratio of 5.0% or greater; and (4) is not subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive or prompt corrective action directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. A bank is “adequately capitalized” if it has: (1) a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater; (2) a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 4.0% or greater; and (3) a leverage ratio of 4.0% or greater (3.0% under certain circumstances) and does not meet the definition of a “well capitalized bank.”

Regulators also must take into consideration: (1) concentrations of credit risk; (2) interest rate risk; and (3) risks from non-traditional activities, as well as an institution’s ability to manage those risks, when determining the adequacy of an institution’s capital. This evaluation will be made as a part of the institution’s regular safety and soundness examination. At December 31, 2010, the Bank was deemed to be a “well capitalized” institution for the above purposes. Information concerning the Company and its subsidiaries with respect to capital requirements is incorporated by reference from Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, in the section entitled “Capital Resources,” and Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, in the section entitled “Note 18, Regulatory Capital Requirements.”

Generally, a bank, upon receiving notice that it is not adequately capitalized (i.e., that it is “undercapitalized”), becomes subject to the prompt corrective action provisions of Section 38 of FDIA that, for example, (i) restrict payment of capital distributions and management fees, (ii) require that the OCC monitor the condition of the institution and its efforts to restore its capital, (iii) require submission of a capital restoration plan, (iv) restrict the growth of the institution’s assets and (v) require prior regulatory approval of certain expansion proposals. A bank that is required to submit a capital restoration plan must concurrently submit a performance guarantee by each company that controls the bank. A bank that is “critically undercapitalized” (i.e., has a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%) will be subject to further restrictions, and generally will be placed in conservatorship or receivership within 90 days.

The Company has not elected, and does not expect to elect, to calculate its risk-based capital requirements under the Internal-Ratings Based and Advanced Measurement Approaches (commonly referred to as the “advanced approaches” or “Basel II”) proposed by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (the “Basel Committee”), as implemented in the U.S. by the federal banking agencies. In connection with Basel II, the federal banking agencies also issued, in 2008, a joint notice of proposed rulemaking that sought

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comment on implementation in the United States of certain aspects of the “standardized approach” of the international Basel II Accord (the “Standardized Approach Proposal”). However, the federal banking agencies have delayed finalizing the Standardized Approach Proposal until they can determine how best to eliminate its reliance on credit ratings, as required by Section 939A of the Dodd-Frank Act. Regardless, the Company and the Bank do not currently expect to calculate their capital requirements and ratios in accordance with the Standardized Approach Proposal.

In response to the recent financial crisis, the Basel Committee released additional recommended revisions to existing capital rules throughout the world. These proposed revisions are intended to protect financial stability and promote sustainable economic growth by setting out higher and better capital requirements, better risk coverage, the introduction of a global leverage ratio, measures to promote the buildup of capital that can be drawn down in periods of stress, and the introduction of two global liquidity standards (collectively, “Basel III”). The FRB has not yet adopted Basel III, and there remains considerable uncertainty regarding the timing for adoption and implementation of Basel III in the United States. If and when the FRB does implement Basel III, it may be with some modifications or adjustments. Accordingly, the Company is not yet in a position to determine the effect of Basel III on its capital requirements.

The Agencies may raise capital requirements applicable to banking organizations beyond current levels. The Company is unable to predict whether higher capital requirements will be imposed and, if so, at what levels and on what schedules. Therefore, the Company cannot predict what effect such higher requirements may have on it.

Deposit Insurance.  The Bank pays deposit insurance premiums to the FDIC based on an assessment rate established by the FDIC. For most banks and savings associations, including the Bank, FDIC rates depend upon a combination of CAMELS component ratings and financial ratios. CAMELS ratings reflect the applicable bank regulatory agency’s evaluation of the financial institution’s capital, asset quality, management, earnings, liquidity and sensitivity to risk. For large banks and savings associations that have long-term debt issuer ratings, assessment rates depend upon such ratings, and CAMELS component ratings. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has amended the deposit insurance assessment by changing the calculation of deposit assessments. Under the new calculation, deposit premiums will be based on assets rather than insurable deposits. To determine its actual deposit insurance premiums, the Bank will compute the base amount on its average consolidated assets less its average tangible equity (which the FDIC proposes to be defined as the amount of Tier 1 capital) and its applicable assessment rate. The new assessment formula will become effective on April 1, 2011, and will be used to calculate the June 30, 2011 assessment. Future expenses will be based on asset levels, Tier 1 capital levels, assessment rates, CAMELS ratings, and whether there are any future special assessments by the FDIC. The Bank is unable to predict the effect of the changes to the calculation of its deposit insurance assessment, but expects that its aggregate FDIC-deposit insurance premium payable June 30, 2011 will be lower than its December 31, 2010 payment.

In November 2009, the FDIC issued a final rule that mandated that insured depository institutions prepay their quarterly risk-based assessments to the FDIC for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for all of 2010, 2011, and 2012 on December 30, 2009. The amount of the Bank’s prepaid deposit premium was $6.2 million as of December 31, 2010. Each institution, including the Bank, recorded the entire amount of its prepayment as an asset (a prepaid expense). The prepaid assessments bear a 0% risk weight for risk-based capital purposes. Starting with the quarter ending December 31, 2009, and each quarter thereafter, the Bank has recorded and will record an expense for its regular quarterly assessment for the quarter and a corresponding credit to the prepaid assessment until the asset is exhausted. The FDIC will not refund or collect additional prepaid assessments because of a decrease or growth in deposits over the remaining two years. However, should the prepaid assessment not be exhausted after collection of the amount due on June 30, 2013, the remaining amount of the prepayment will be returned to the Bank. The timing of any refund of the prepaid assessment will not be affected by the change in the deposit insurance assessment calculation discussed above. In 2008, the level of FDIC deposit insurance was temporarily increased from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor and and this level of insurance was made permanent under the Dodd-Frank Act. Additionally, the Dodd-Frank Act provides temporary unlimited deposit insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transactions accounts beginning December 31, 2010, and ending December 31, 2012. This replaced the FDIC’s Transaction Account Guarantee Program, which expired on December 31, 2010.

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The FDIC has the power to adjust deposit insurance assessment rates at any time. We cannot predict whether, as a result of the adverse change in U.S. economic conditions and, in particular, declines in the value of real estate in certain markets served by the Bank, the FDIC will in the future increase deposit insurance assessment levels.

Consumer Protection Regulation

Consumer Protection Laws — General.  The Company and the Bank are subject to a number of federal and state laws designed to protect consumers and prohibit unfair or deceptive business practices. These laws include the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Fair Housing Act, Home Ownership Protection Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, as amended by the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (the “FACT Act”), the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (the “GLBA”), Truth in Lending Act, the Community Reinvestment Act (the “CRA”), the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, National Flood Insurance Act and various state law counterparts. These laws and regulations mandate certain disclosure requirements and regulate the manner in which financial institutions must interact with customers when taking deposits, making loans, collecting loans and providing other services. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act established the CFPB, which has the responsibility for making rules and regulations under the federal consumer protection laws relating to financial products and services. The CFPB also has a broad mandate to prohibit unfair or deceptive acts and practices and is specifically empowered to require certain disclosures to consumers and draft model disclosure forms. Failure to comply with consumer protection laws and regulations can subject financial institutions to enforcement actions, fines and other penalties. The OCC will examine the Bank for compliance with CFPB rules and enforce CFPB rules with respect to the Bank.

Preemption of State Consumer Protection Laws.  The Dodd-Frank Act established a new standard for preemption of state consumer financial laws, which will affect national banking associations such as the Bank. Under the new standard, a state consumer protection law may only be preempted if it has a discriminatory effect against national banks, it prevents or significantly interferes with the exercise of a national bank’s powers as determined by court order or by the OCC on a case-by-case basis or such law is preempted by a provision of federal law. This standard is expected to result in the preemption of fewer state consumer laws, thus, the Bank may have to comply with certain state laws that were considered preempted before the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act.

Interchange Fees.  Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the FRB has issued a proposed rule governing the interchange fees charged on debit cards. The proposed rule would cap the fee a bank could charge on a debit card transaction and shifts such interchange fees from a percentage of the transaction amount to a per transaction fee. Although the proposed rule does not directly apply to institutions with less than $10 billion in assets, market forces may result in debit card issuers of all sizes adopting fees that comply with this rule. If adopted by the Bank, the proposed rule would result in a significant decrease in the fee income the Bank earns from debit cards.

Mortgage Reform.  The Dodd-Frank Act prescribes certain standards that mortgage lenders must consider before making a residential mortgage loan, including verifying a borrower’s ability to repay such mortgage loan. The Dodd-Frank Act also allows borrowers to assert violations of certain provisions of the Truth-in-Lending Act as a defense to foreclosure proceedings. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, prepayment penalties are prohibited for certain mortgage transactions and creditors are prohibited from financing insurance policies in connection with a residential mortgage loan or home equity line of credit. The Dodd-Frank Act requires mortgage lenders to make additional disclosures prior to the extension of credit, in each billing statement and for negative amortization loans and hybrid adjustable rate mortgages.

Customer Information Security.  The Agencies have adopted guidelines that establish standards for safeguarding nonpublic personal information about customers. These guidelines implement provisions of the GLBA, which establishes a comprehensive framework to permit affiliations among commercial banks, insurance companies, securities firms, and other financial service providers by revising and expanding the BHCA framework. Specifically, the Information Security Guidelines established by the GLBA require each financial institution, under the supervision and ongoing oversight of its Board of Directors or an appropriate committee thereof, to develop, implement and maintain a comprehensive written information security program designed to ensure the security and confidentiality of customer information, to protect against anticipated

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threats or hazards to the security or integrity of such information and to protect against unauthorized access to or use of such information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer. The federal banking regulators have issued guidance for banks on response programs for unauthorized access to customer information. This guidance, among other things, requires notice to be sent to customers whose “sensitive information” has been compromised if unauthorized use of this information is “reasonably possible.” A majority of states have enacted legislation concerning breaches of data security and Congress is considering federal legislation that would require consumer notice of data security breaches.

Privacy.  The GLBA requires financial institutions to implement policies and procedures regarding the disclosure of nonpublic personal information about consumers to nonaffiliated third parties. In general, the statute requires financial institutions to explain to consumers their policies and procedures regarding the disclosure of such nonpublic personal information, and, unless otherwise required or permitted by law, financial institutions are prohibited from disclosing such information except as provided in their policies and procedures.

Identity Theft Red Flags.  The Agencies jointly issued rules and guidelines effective January 1, 2008 implementing Section 114 (“Section 114”) of the FACT Act and rules implementing section 315 of the FACT Act (“Section 315”). Section 114 requires the Bank to develop and implement a written Identity Theft Prevention Program to detect, prevent and mitigate identity theft in connection with the opening of certain accounts or certain existing accounts. Section 114 also requires credit and debit card issuers to assess the validity of notifications of changes of address under certain circumstances. The Agencies issued joint rules under Section 315 that provide guidance regarding reasonable policies and procedures that a user of consumer reports must employ when a consumer reporting agency sends the user a notice of address discrepancy.

Fair Credit Reporting Affiliate Marketing Regulations.  The Agencies jointly issued rules effective on January 1, 2008, to implement the affiliate marketing provisions in Section 214 of the FACT Act, which amends the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The final rules generally prohibit a person from using information received from an affiliate to make a solicitation for marketing purposes to a consumer, unless the consumer is given notice and a reasonable opportunity and a reasonable and simple method to opt out of the making of such solicitations.

Other Regulatory Requirements

The Community Reinvestment Act.  The CRA requires lenders to identify the communities served by the institution’s offices and other deposit taking facilities and to make loans and investments and provide services that meet the credit needs of these communities. Regulatory agencies examine banks and rate such institutions’ compliance with the CRA as “Outstanding,” “Satisfactory,” “Needs to Improve” or “Substantial Noncompliance.” Failure of an institution to receive at least a “Satisfactory” rating could inhibit such institution or its holding company from undertaking certain activities, including engaging in activities newly permitted as a financial holding company under the GLBA and acquisitions of other financial institutions. The FRB must take into account the record of performance of banks in meeting the credit needs of the entire community served, including low-and moderate-income neighborhoods. The Bank has achieved a rating of “Outstanding” on its most recent examination.

Anti-Money Laundering and the Bank Secrecy Act.  Under the Bank Secrecy Act (“BSA”), a financial institution, is required to have systems in place to detect certain transactions, based on the size and nature of the transaction. Financial institutions are generally required to report to the United States Treasury any cash transactions involving more than $10,000. In addition, financial institutions are required to file suspicious activity reports for transactions that involve more than $5,000 and which the financial institution knows, suspects or has reason to suspect involves illegal funds, is designed to evade the requirements of the BSA or has no lawful purpose. The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the “USA PATRIOT Act”), which amended the BSA, is designed to deny terrorists and others the ability to obtain anonymous access to the U.S. financial system. The USA PATRIOT Act has significant implications for financial institutions and businesses of other types involved in the transfer of money. The USA PATRIOT Act, together with the implementing regulations of various federal regulatory agencies, has caused financial institutions, such as the Bank, to adopt and implement additional policies or amend existing policies and procedures with respect to, among other things,

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anti-money laundering compliance, suspicious activity, currency transaction reporting, customer identity verification and customer risk analysis. In evaluating an application under Section 3 of the BHCA to acquire a bank or an application under the Bank Merger Act to merge banks or effect a purchase of assets and assumption of deposits and other liabilities, the applicable federal banking regulator must consider the anti-money laundering compliance record of both the applicant and the target. In addition, under the USA PATRIOT Act financial institutions are required to take steps to monitor their correspondent banking and private banking relationships as well as, if applicable, their relationships with “shell banks.”

Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”).  The United States has imposed economic sanctions that affect transactions with designated foreign countries, nationals and others. These sanctions, which are administered by OFAC, take many different forms. Generally, however, they contain one or more of the following elements: (i) restrictions on trade with or investment in a sanctioned country, including prohibitions against direct or indirect imports from and exports to a sanctioned country and prohibitions on “U.S. persons” engaging in financial transactions relating to making investments in, or providing investment-related advice or assistance to, a sanctioned country; and (ii) a blocking of assets in which the government or specially designated nationals of the sanctioned country have an interest, by prohibiting transfers of property subject to U.S. jurisdiction (including property in the possession or control of U.S. persons). Blocked assets (for example, property and bank deposits) cannot be paid out, withdrawn, set off or transferred in any manner without a license from OFAC. Failure to comply with these sanctions could have serious legal and reputational consequences for the Company.

Regulation R.  The GLBA also amended the federal securities laws to eliminate the blanket exceptions that banks traditionally have had from the definition of “broker,” “dealer” and “investment adviser” under the Exchange Act. The GLBA provided 11 exceptions from the definition of “broker” in Section 3(a)(4) of the Exchange Act that permit banks to effect securities transactions under certain conditions without registering as broker-dealers with the SEC. Regulation R, which was issued jointly by the SEC and the FRB, implements certain of these exceptions. The FRB and SEC have stated that they will jointly issue any interpretations or no action letters/guidance regarding Regulation R and consult with each other and the appropriate federal banking agency with respect to formal enforcement actions pursuant to Regulation R.

Regulatory Enforcement Authority.  The enforcement powers available to the Agencies include, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease and desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions against banking organizations and institution-affiliated parties. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of law and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with regulatory authorities. Under certain circumstances, federal and state law requires public disclosure and reports of certain criminal offenses and also final enforcement actions by the Agencies.

Available Information

The Company’s Investor Relations information can be obtained through its subsidiary banks’ internet address, www.camdennational.com. The Company makes available on or through its Investor Relations page without charge, its annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, and current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. The Company’s reports filed with, or furnished to, the SEC are also available at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. In addition, the Company makes available, free of charge, its press releases and Code of Ethics through the Company’s Investor Relations page. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this document and should not be considered part of this Report.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Our financial condition and results of operations have been adversely affected, and may continue to be adversely affected, by the U.S. and international financial market and economic conditions.

We have been and continue to be impacted by general business and economic conditions in the United States and, to a lesser extent, abroad. These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, money supply, political issues, legislative and regulatory changes, fluctuations in both debt and equity capital markets, broad trends in industry and finance, unemployment and the strength of the U.S. economy and the local economies in which the Company operates, all of which are beyond the Company’s control. Continued deterioration in any of these conditions could result in an increase in loan delinquencies, and non-performing assets, decreases in loan collateral values and a decrease in demand for the Company’s products and services. While there are indications that the U.S. economy is stabilizing, there remains significant uncertainty regarding the sustainability of the economic recovery, unemployment levels and the impact of the U.S. government’s unwinding of its extensive economic and market support.

Recent market volatility may impact our business and the value of our common stock.

Our business performance and the trading price of shares of our common stock may be affected by many factors affecting financial institutions, including the recent volatility in the credit, mortgage and housing markets, the markets for securities relating to mortgages or housing, and the value of debt and mortgage-backed and other securities that we hold in our investment portfolio. Government action and legislation may also impact us and the value of our common stock. Given the unprecedented nature of this volatility, we cannot predict what impact, if any, it will have on our business or share price and for these and other reasons our shares of common stock may trade at a price lower than that at which they were purchased.

If we do not maintain net income growth, the market price of our common stock could be adversely affected.

Our return on shareholders’ equity and other measures of profitability, which affect the market price of our common stock, depend in part on our continued growth and expansion. Our growth strategy has two principal components — internal growth and external growth. Our ability to generate internal growth is affected by the competitive factors described below as well as by the primarily rural characteristics and related demographic features of the markets we serve. Our ability to continue to identify and invest in suitable acquisition candidates on acceptable terms is an important component of our external growth strategy. In pursuing acquisition opportunities, we may be in competition with other companies having similar growth strategies. As a result, we may not be able to identify or acquire promising acquisition candidates on acceptable terms. Competition for these acquisitions could result in increased acquisition prices and a diminished pool of acquisition opportunities. An inability to find suitable acquisition candidates at reasonable prices could slow our growth rate and have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock.

Interest rate volatility may reduce our profitability.

Our profitability depends to a large extent upon our net interest income, which is the difference between interest income on interest-earning assets, such as loans and investments, and interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowed funds. Net interest income can be affected significantly by changes in market interest rates. In particular, changes in relative interest rates may reduce our net interest income as the difference between interest income and interest expense decreases. As a result, we have adopted asset and liability management policies to minimize the potential adverse effects of changes in interest rates on net interest income, primarily by altering the mix and maturity of loans, investments and funding sources. However, there can be no assurance that a change in interest rates will not negatively impact our results from operations or financial position. Since market interest rates may change by differing magnitudes and at different times, significant changes in interest rates over an extended period of time could reduce overall net interest income. An increase in interest rates could also have a negative impact on our results of operations by reducing the ability of borrowers to repay their current loan obligations, which could not only result in increased loan defaults, foreclosures and write-offs, but also necessitate further increases to our allowance for loan losses.

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If our allowance for loan losses is not adequate to cover actual loan losses, our earnings could decrease.

We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio and provide an allowance for probable loan losses based on a number of factors. Monthly, the Corporate Risk Management group reviews the assumptions, calculation methodology and balance of the allowance for loan losses with the board of directors for the bank subsidiary. On a quarterly basis, the Company’s Board of Directors, as well as the board of directors for the subsidiary bank, completes a similar review of the allowance for loan losses. If the assumptions are incorrect, the allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover the losses we could experience, which would have an adverse effect on operating results, and may also cause us to increase the allowance for loan losses in the future. In addition, bank regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provisions for credit losses or recognize further loan charge-offs. Any increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs as required by regulatory authorities could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition. If additional amounts are provided to the allowance for loan losses, our earnings could decrease.

Our loans are concentrated in certain areas of Maine and adverse conditions in those markets could adversely affect our operations.

We are exposed to real estate and economic factors throughout Maine, as virtually the entire loan portfolio is concentrated among borrowers in Maine, with higher concentrations of exposure in Cumberland, Hancock, Knox and Waldo counties. Further, because a substantial portion of the loan portfolio is secured by real estate in this area, the value of the associated collateral is also subject to regional real estate market conditions. Adverse economic, political or business developments or natural hazards may affect these areas and the ability of property owners in these areas to make payments of principal and interest on the underlying mortgages. If these regions experience adverse economic, political or business conditions, we would likely experience higher rates of loss and delinquency on these loans than if the loans were more geographically diverse.

We experience strong competition within our markets, which may impact our profitability.

Competition in the banking and financial services industry is strong. In our market areas, we compete for loans, deposits and other financial products and services with local independent banks, thrift institutions, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies and brokerage and investment banking firms operating locally as well as nationally. Many of these competitors have substantially greater resources and lending limits than those of our subsidiaries and may offer services that our subsidiaries do not or cannot provide. Our long-term success depends on the ability of our subsidiaries to compete successfully with other financial institutions in their service areas. Because we maintain a smaller staff and have fewer financial and other resources than larger institutions with which we compete, we may be limited in our ability to attract customers. If we are unable to attract and retain customers, we may be unable to achieve growth in the loan and core deposit portfolios, and our results of operations and financial condition may be negatively impacted.

Our banking business is highly regulated, and we may be adversely affected by changes in law and regulation.

Bank holding companies and national banking associations operate in a highly regulated environment and are subject to supervision, regulation and examination by various federal regulatory agencies, as well as other governmental agencies in the states in which they operate. Federal and state laws and regulations govern numerous matters including changes in the ownership or control of banks and BHCs, maintenance of adequate capital and the financial condition of a financial institution, permissible types, amounts and terms of extensions of credit and investments, permissible non-banking activities, the level of reserves against deposits and restrictions on dividend payments. The OCC possesses cease and desist powers to prevent or remedy unsafe or unsound practices or violations of law by banks subject to their regulation, and the FRB possesses similar powers with respect to BHCs. These and other restrictions limit the manner in which we may conduct business and obtain financing.

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Our business is affected not only by general economic conditions, but also by the economic, fiscal and monetary policies of the United States and its agencies and regulatory authorities, particularly the FRB. The economic and fiscal policies of various governmental entities and the monetary policies of the FRB may affect the interest rates our bank subsidiary must offer to attract deposits and the interest rates they must charge on loans, as well as the manner in which they offer deposits and make loans. These economic, fiscal and monetary policies have had, and are expected to continue to have, significant effects on the operating results of depository institutions generally, including our bank subsidiary.

On July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act, which comprehensively reforms the regulation of financial institutions, products and services, was signed into law. Among other things, the Dodd-Frank Act grants the FRB increased supervisory authority and codifies the source of strength doctrine. The Dodd-Frank Act also provides for new capital standards that eliminate the treatment of trust preferred securities as Tier 1 capital, however existing trust preferred securities are grandfathered for banking entities with less than $15 billion of assets, such as the Company. The Dodd-Frank Act establishes the CFPB, as an independent bureau of the FRB. The CFPB has the authority to prescribe rules for all depository institutions governing the provision of consumer financial products and services, which may result in rules and regulations that reduce the profitability of such products and services or impose greater costs on us and our subsidiaries. The Bank will continue to be examined by the OCC for compliance with such rules. Further, the Dodd-Frank Act establishes a new standard for preemption of state consumer financial laws, which will may result the Bank having to comply with certain state laws that were considered preempted before the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act.

The Dodd-Frank Act also permanently raises deposit insurance levels to $250,000, retroactive to January 1, 2008. Pursuant to modifications under the Dodd-Frank Act, deposit insurance assessments will be calculated based on an insured depository institution’s assets rather than its insured deposits and the minimum reserve ratio of the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund will be raised to 1.35%. The payment of interest on business demand deposit accounts is permitted by the Dodd-Frank Act. The Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the FRB to regulate interchange fees for debit card transactions and establishes new minimum mortgage underwriting standards for residential mortgages.

Because many aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act are subject to rulemaking and will take effect over several years, it is difficult to forecast the impact that such rulemaking will have on us, our customers or the financial industry. Certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act that affect deposit insurance assessments, the payment of interest on demand deposits and interchange fees could increase the costs associated with the Bank’s deposit-generating activities, as well as place limitations on the revenues that those deposits may generate. For example, the FRB has proposed rules governing debit card interchange fees that apply to institutions with greater than $10 billion in assets. Market forces may effectively require all banks to adopt debit card interchange fee structures which comply with these rules, which will significantly reduce the fee income earned from debit card transactions.

Regulators may raise capital requirements above current levels in connection with the implementation of Basel III, the Dodd-Frank Act or otherwise, which may require us and our banking subsidiaries to hold additional capital which could limit the manner in which we and our banking subsidiaries conduct their business and obtain financing. Furthermore, the imposition of liquidity requirements in connection with the implementation of Basel III in the United States, or otherwise, could result in us and our banking subsidiaries having to lengthen the term of their funding, restructure their business models, and/or increase their holdings of liquid assets. If the federal banking agencies implement a capital conservation buffer and/or a countercyclical capital buffer, as proposed in Basel III, a failure by us or any of our banking subsidiaries to satisfy the applicable buffer’s requirements would limit such institution’s ability to make distributions, including paying out dividends or buying back shares.

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Our cost of funds may increase as a result of general economic conditions, interest rates and competitive pressures.

Our banking subsidiary has traditionally obtained funds principally through deposits and borrowings. As a general matter, deposits are a less costly source of funds than borrowings because interest rates paid for deposits are typically less than interest rates charged for borrowings. If, as a result of general economic conditions, market interest rates, competitive pressures or otherwise, the value of deposits at our banking subsidiary decreases relative to our overall banking operations, we may have to rely more heavily on borrowings as a source of funds in the future.

We are subject to liquidity risk.

Liquidity risk is the risk of potential loss if we are unable to meet our funding requirements at a reasonable cost. Our liquidity could be impaired by an inability to access the capital markets or by unforeseen outflows of cash. This situation may arise due to circumstances that we may be unable to control, such as a general market disruption or an operational problem that affects third parties or us. Our credit ratings are important to our liquidity. A reduction in our credit ratings could adversely affect our liquidity and competitive position, increase our borrowing costs, limit our access to the capital markets or trigger unfavorable contractual obligations.

Our access to funds from subsidiaries may be restricted.

The Company is a separate and distinct legal entity from our banking and nonbanking subsidiaries. We therefore depend on dividends, distributions and other payments from our banking and nonbanking subsidiaries to fund dividend payments on our common stock and to fund all payments on our other obligations. Our subsidiaries are subject to laws that authorize regulatory bodies to block or reduce the flow of funds from those subsidiaries to the Company, which could impede access to funds we need to make payments on our obligations or dividend payments.

Prepayments of loans may negatively impact our business.

Generally, our customers may prepay the principal amount of their outstanding loans at any time. The speed at which such prepayments occur, as well as the size of such prepayments, are within our customers’ discretion. If customers prepay the principal amount of their loans, and we are unable to lend those funds to other borrowers or invest the funds at the same or higher interest rates, our interest income will be reduced. A significant reduction in interest income could have a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

We may incur significant losses as a result of ineffective risk management processes and strategies.

We seek to monitor and control our risk exposure through a risk and control framework encompassing a variety of separate but complementary financial, credit, operational, compliance and legal reporting systems, internal controls, management review processes and other mechanisms. While we employ a broad and diversified set of risk monitoring and risk mitigation techniques, those techniques and the judgments that accompany their application may not be effective and may not anticipate every economic and financial outcome in all market environments or the specifics and timing of such outcomes. Market conditions over the last several years have involved unprecedented dislocations and highlight the limitations inherent in using historical data to manage risk.

We may be unable to attract and retain key personnel.

The Company’s success depends, in large part, on its ability to attract and retain key personnel. Competition for qualified personnel in the financial services industry can be intense and the Company may not be able to hire or retain the key personnel that it depends upon for success. The unexpected loss of services of one or more of the Company’s key personnel could have a material adverse impact on its business because of their skills, knowledge of the markets in which the Company operates, years of industry experience and the difficulty of promptly finding qualified replacement personnel.

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We have credit and counter-party risk inherent in our securities portfolio and bank-owned life insurance policies.

We maintain a diversified securities portfolio, which includes mortgage-backed securities issued by U.S. government and government sponsored agencies, obligations of the U.S. Treasury and government-sponsored agencies, securities issued by state and political subdivisions, private issue collateralized mortgage obligations and auction preferred securities. We also carry investments in bank-owned life insurance and Federal Home Loan Bank stock. We seek to limit credit losses in our securities portfolios by generally purchasing only highly-rated securities.

The current economic environment and recent volatility of financial markets increase the difficulty of assessing investment securities impairment and the same influences tend to increase the risk of potential impairment of these assets. During the year ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, we recorded charges for other-than-temporary impairment of securities of $221,000, $11,000 and $15.0 million, respectively. We believe that we have adequately reviewed our investment securities for impairment and that our investment securities are carried at fair value. However, over time, the economic and market environment may provide additional insight regarding the fair value of certain securities, which could change our judgment regarding impairment. In addition, if the counter-party should default, become insolvent, declare bankruptcy, or otherwise cease to exist, the value of our investment may be impaired. This could result in realized losses relating to other-than-temporary declines being charged against future income. Given the current market conditions and the significant judgments involved, there is continuing risk that further declines in fair value may occur and additional material other-than-temporary impairments may be charged to income in future periods, resulting in realized losses.

Increases in FDIC deposit insurance premiums will increase our non-interest expense.

Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has amended the deposit insurance assessment by changing the calculation of deposit assessments. Under the new calculation, deposit premiums will be based on assets rather than insurable deposits. To determine its actual deposit insurance premiums, the Bank will compute the base amount on its average consolidated assets less its average tangible equity (which the FDIC proposes to be defined as the amount of Tier 1 capital) and its applicable assessment rate. The new assessment formula will become effective on April 1, 2011, and will be used to calculate the June 30, 2011 assessment. Future expenses will be based on asset levels, Tier 1 capital levels, assessment rates, CAMELS ratings, and whether there are any future special assessments by the FDIC. The Bank is unable to predict the effect of the changes to the calculation of its deposit insurance assessment, but expects that its aggregate FDIC-deposit insurance premium payable June 30, 2011 will be lower than its December 31, 2010 payment. Any increase in our deposit insurance premiums will result in an increase in our non-interest expense.

We could be held responsible for environmental liabilities of properties we acquire through foreclosure.

If we are forced to foreclose on a defaulted mortgage loan to recover our investment, we may be subject to environmental liabilities related to the underlying real property. Hazardous substances or wastes, contaminants, pollutants or sources thereof may be discovered on properties during our ownership or after a sale to a third party. The amount of environmental liability could exceed the value of the real property. There can be no assurance that we would not be fully liable for the entire cost of any removal and clean-up on an acquired property, that the cost of removal and clean-up would not exceed the value of the property, or that we could recoup any of the costs from any third party.

Due to the nature of our business, we may be subject to litigation from time to time, some of which may not be covered by insurance.

As a holding company and through our bank subsidiary, we operate in a highly regulated industry, and as a result, are subject to various regulations related to disclosures to our customers, our lending practices, and other fiduciary responsibilities, including those to our shareholders. From time to time, we have been, and may become, subject to legal actions relating to our operations that have involved, or could involve, claims for substantial monetary damages. Although we maintain insurance, the scope of this coverage may not provide us with full, or even partial, coverage in any particular case. As a result, a judgment against us in any such litigation could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation.

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We are subject to reputational risk.

Our actual or perceived failure to (a) identify and address potential conflicts of interest, ethical issues, money-laundering, or privacy issues; (b) meet legal and regulatory requirements applicable to the Bank and to the Company; (c) maintain the privacy of customer and accompanying personal information; (d) maintain adequate record keeping; (e) engage in proper sales and trading practices; and (f) identify the legal, reputational, credit, liquidity and market risks inherent in our products could give rise to reputational risk that could cause harm to the Bank and our business prospects. If we fail to address any of these issues in an appropriate manner, we could be subject to additional legal risks, which, in turn, could increase the size and number of litigation claims and damages asserted or subject us to enforcement actions, fines and penalties and cause us to incur related costs and expenses. Our ability to attract and retain customers and employees could be adversely affected to the extent our reputation is damaged.

To the extent that we acquire other companies, our business may be negatively impacted by certain risks inherent with such acquisitions.

We have acquired and will continue to consider the acquisition of other financial services companies. To the extent that we acquire other companies in the future, our business may be negatively impacted by certain risks inherent with such acquisitions. These risks include the following:

the risk that the acquired business will not perform in accordance with management’s expectations;
the risk that difficulties will arise in connection with the integration of the operations of the acquired business with the operations of our businesses;
the risk that management will divert its attention from other aspects of our business;
the risk that we may lose key employees of the combined business; and
the risks associated with entering into geographic and product markets in which we have limited or no direct prior experience.

We may be required to write down goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets.

When the Company acquires a business, a portion of the purchase price of the acquisition is allocated to goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets. The excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired determines the amount of the purchase price that is allocated to goodwill acquired. At December 31, 2010, the Company’s goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets were approximately $45.8 million. Under current accounting standards, if the Company determines goodwill or intangible assets are impaired, it would be required to write down the value of these assets. The Company conducts an annual review to determine whether goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets are impaired. The Company recently completed such an impairment analysis and concluded that no impairment charge was necessary for the year ended December 31, 2010. The Company cannot provide assurance whether it will be required to take an impairment charge in the future. Any impairment charge would have a negative effect on its shareholders’ equity and financial results and may cause a decline in our stock price.

We are subject to operational risk.

We are subject to certain operational risks, including, but not limited to, information technology system failures and errors, customer or employee fraud and catastrophic failures resulting from terrorist acts or natural disasters. We depend upon information technology, software, communication, and information exchange on a variety of computing platforms and networks and over the Internet. Despite instituted safeguards, we cannot be certain that all of our systems are entirely free from vulnerability to attack or other technological difficulties or failures. If our information security is breached or other technology difficulties or failures occur, information may be lost or misappropriated, services and operations may be interrupted and we could be exposed to claims from customers. While we maintain a system of internal controls and procedures, any of these results could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.

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We must adapt to information technology changes in the financial services industry, which could present operational issues, require significant capital spending, or impact our reputation.

The financial services industry is constantly undergoing technological changes, with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. The effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to better serve customers and reduce costs. The Company’s future success will depend, in part, upon the Company’s ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience, as well as to create additional efficiencies in the Company’s operations. The Company may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services or be successful in marketing these products and services to the Company’s customers.

The market value of wealth management assets under administration may be negatively affected by changes in economic and market conditions.

A substantial portion of income from fiduciary services is dependent on the market value of wealth management assets under administration, which are primarily marketable securities. Changes in domestic and foreign economic conditions, volatility in financial markets, and general trends in business and finance, all of which are beyond our control, could adversely impact the market value of these assets and the fee revenues derived from the management of these assets.

We may not be able to attract and retain wealth management clients at current levels.

Due to strong competition, our wealth management division may not be able to attract and retain clients at current levels. Competition is strong as there are numerous well-established and successful investment management and wealth advisory firms including commercial banks and trust companies, investment advisory firms, mutual fund companies, stock brokerage firms, and other financial companies. Our ability to attract and retain wealth management clients is dependent upon our ability to compete with competitors’ investment products, level of investment performance, client services, marketing and distribution capabilities. If we are not successful, our results of operations and financial condition may be negatively impacted.

Our shareholders may not receive dividends on the common stock.

Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends only when, and if declared by our board of directors. Although we have historically declared cash dividends on our common stock, we are not required to do so and our board of directors may reduce or eliminate our common stock dividend in the future. Further, the FRB has issued guidelines for evaluating proposals by large bank holding companies to increase dividends or repurchase or redeem shares, which includes a requirement for such firms to develop a capital distribution plan. The FRB has indicated that it is considering expanding these requirements to cover all bank holding companies, which may in the future restrict our ability to pay dividends. A reduction or elimination of dividends could adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Changes in accounting standards can be difficult to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations.

Our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) changes the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be hard to anticipate and implement and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. For example, the FASB’s current financial instruments project could, among other things, significantly change the way loan loss provisions are determined from an incurred loss model to an expected loss model, and may also result in most financial instruments being required to be reported at fair value.

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Our financial statements are based in part on assumptions and estimates, which, if wrong, could cause unexpected losses in the future.

Pursuant to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, we are required to use certain assumptions and estimates in preparing our financial statements, including in determining credit loss reserves, reserves related to litigation and the fair value of certain assets and liabilities, among other items. If assumptions or estimates underlying our financial statements are incorrect, we may experience material losses. For additional information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Critical Accounting Policies.”

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

There are no unresolved written comments relating to our periodic or current reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 that were received from the SEC staff 180 days or more before the end of our fiscal year.

Item 2. Properties

The Company operates in 40 facilities, all of which are fully utilized and considered suitable and adequate for the purposes intended. The Company’s service center is located at 245 Commercial Street, Rockport, Maine, and is owned by the Company. The building has 32,360 square feet of space on two levels. The headquarters of the Company and the headquarters and main office of the Bank are located at 2 Elm Street, Camden, Maine. The building, which the Bank owns, has 15,500 square feet of space on three levels. The Bank also owns twenty-five of its branch facilities, none of which are subject to a mortgage. The Bank’s Rockland branch in the renovated “Spear Block” building is owned by the Bank and has the Bank branch facility on the first floor and suites for rent or sale on the upper floors. The Bangor, Maine building has 25,600 square feet of space on two levels. The Bank occupies 16,975 square feet of space on both floors, the Company utilizes 2,042 square feet for computer processing, and Acadia Trust leases 1,110 square feet on the first floor. The remainder of the Bangor, Maine building and the former Rockland branch are leased to third-party tenants. The Ellsworth Main Street location, the main office for the former Union Bankshares Company, is owned by the Bank and has the Union Trust branch on the first floor, along with 2,365 square feet of space leased to Acadia Trust, while the third floor is leased to third-party tenants. The Bank also leases fifteen branches, a parcel of land, two parking lots and parking spaces associated with those branches under long-term leases, which expire in years ranging from 2011 through 2077. In 2007, Acadia Trust renewed its facility lease at 511 Congress Street, Portland, Maine, under a long-term lease, which expires in May 2012. Acadia Trust leases and occupies 11,715 square feet on the 9th floor of this facility.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

Various legal claims arise from time to time in the normal course of the Company’s business, which in our opinion, are not expected to have a material effect on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

Item 4. Removed and Reserved

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The Company’s common stock is currently traded on the NASDAQ Global Market (“NASDAQ”) under the ticker symbol “CAC.” The Company has paid quarterly dividends since its inception in 1984 following a corporate reorganization in which the shareholders of the Bank exchanged shares of Bank stock for shares in the Company. The high and low sales prices (as quoted by NASDAQ for 2010 and 2009) and cash dividends paid per share of the Company’s common stock, by calendar quarter for the past two years were as follows:

           
  2010   2009
     Market Price   Dividends
Paid per
Share
  Market Price   Dividends
Paid per
Share
     High   Low   High   Low
First Quarter   $ 34.53     $ 28.75     $ 0.25     $ 31.52     $ 14.34     $ 0.25  
Second Quarter   $ 36.94     $ 27.42     $ 0.25     $ 35.93     $ 21.63     $ 0.25  
Third Quarter   $ 35.00     $ 26.58     $ 0.25     $ 35.40     $ 31.10     $ 0.25  
Fourth Quarter   $ 39.63     $ 32.63     $ 0.25     $ 35.91     $ 27.80     $ 0.25  

As of December 31, 2010, there were 7,658,496 shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding held of record by approximately 1,400 shareholders, as obtained through our transfer agent. Such number of record holders does not reflect the number of persons or entities holding stock in nominee name through banks, brokerage firms and other nominees, which is estimated to be 3,500 shareholders based on the number of requested copies from such institutions.

Although the Company has historically paid quarterly dividends on its common stock, the Company’s ability to pay such dividends depends on a number of factors, including restrictions under federal laws and regulations on the Company’s ability to pay dividends, and as a result, there can be no assurance that dividends will be paid in the future. For further information on dividend restrictions, refer to the “Capital Resources” section in Item 7.

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The following graph illustrates the annual percentage change in the cumulative total shareholder return of the Company’s common stock for the period December 31, 2005 through December 31, 2010. For purposes of comparison, the graph illustrates comparable shareholder returns of the ABA NASDAQ Community Bank Index, the SNL $1B – $5B Bank Index, and the Russell 2000 Stock Index. The graph assumes a $100 investment on December 31, 2005 in each case and measures the amount by which the market value, assuming reinvestment of dividends, has changed as of December 31, 2010.

Stock Performance Graph

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

In June 2008, the Company’s Board of Directors approved the 2008 Common Stock Repurchase Program (the “2008 Plan”). Under the program, the Company was authorized to repurchase up to 750,000 shares of its outstanding common stock for a one-year period. Under the 2008 Plan, the Company repurchased 50,000 shares of common stock at an average price of $32.00 during the second half of 2008 and made no repurchases in the first half of 2009. The authority, which expired on July 1, 2009, was not renewed.

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

         
  At or for the Year Ended December 31,
(In Thousands, Except per Share Data)   2010   2009   2008(1)   2007   2006
Financial Condition Data
                                            
Investments   $ 611,643     $ 539,587     $ 670,040     $ 483,648     $ 461,708  
Loans and loans held for sale     1,530,280       1,526,758       1,500,908       1,145,639       1,218,129  
Allowance for loan losses     22,293       20,246       17,691       13,653       14,933  
Total assets     2,306,007       2,235,383       2,341,496       1,716,788       1,769,886  
Deposits     1,515,811       1,495,807       1,489,517       1,118,051       1,185,801  
Borrowings     559,919       527,347       661,805       460,133       437,364  
Shareholders’ equity     205,995       190,561       166,400       120,203       107,052  
Operating Data
                                            
Interest income   $ 104,507     $ 113,331     $ 127,120     $ 107,736     $ 107,238  
Interest expense     30,217       40,320       56,899       57,866       53,048  
Net interest income     74,290       73,011       70,221       49,870       54,190  
Provision for credit losses     6,299       8,213       4,397       100       2,208  
Net interest income after provision for credit losses     67,991       64,798       65,824       49,770       51,982  
Non-interest income before other-than-temporary impairment of securities     21,076       19,453       16,660       12,652       11,629  
Other-than-temporary impairment of securities     (221 )      (11 )      (14,950 )             
Non-interest expense     52,967       51,024       46,816       33,686       34,224  
Income before income taxes     35,879       33,216       20,718       28,736       29,387  
Income taxes     11,113       10,443       5,383       8,453       9,111  
Net income   $ 24,766     $ 22,773     $ 15,335     $ 20,283     $ 20,276  
Ratios
                                            
Return on average assets     1.09 %      1.00 %      0.67 %      1.16 %      1.17 % 
Return on average equity     12.42 %      12.81 %      9.15 %      18.34 %      18.40 % 
Allowance for credit losses to total loans     1.46 %      1.33 %      1.18 %      1.19 %      1.23 % 
Non-performing loans to total loans     1.47 %      1.29 %      0.85 %      0.93 %      1.12 % 
Non-performing assets to total assets     1.08 %      1.13 %      0.71 %      0.64 %      0.78 % 
Average equity to average assets     8.77 %      7.80 %      7.28 %      6.33 %      6.36 % 
Efficiency ratio(2)     55.75 %      54.27 %      52.43 %      52.70 %      51.08 % 
Tier 1 leverage capital ratio     8.77 %      8.17 %      7.19 %      8.55 %      7.63 % 
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio     13.80 %      12.24 %      11.11 %      13.41 %      11.29 % 
Total risk-based capital ratio     15.05 %      13.49 %      12.32 %      14.64 %      12.73 % 
Per common share data
                                            
Basic earnings per share   $ 3.23     $ 2.98     $ 2.00     $ 3.09     $ 2.93  
Diluted earnings per share     3.23       2.97       2.00       3.09       2.93  
Dividends declared per share     1.00       1.00       1.00       1.20       0.66  
Dividends paid per share     1.00       1.00       0.99       0.96       0.88  
Book value per share     26.90       24.93       21.78       18.45       16.18  
Tangible book value per share(3)     20.91       18.86       15.62       17.79       15.40  
Dividend payout ratio     30.95 %      33.56 %      50.00 %      38.83 %      30.03 % 

(1) The 2008 data includes the merger of Union Bankshares Company with and into the Company as of January 3, 2008.
(2) Computed by dividing non-interest expense by the sum of net interest income (tax equivalent) and non-interest income (excluding security gains/losses, OTTI and proceeds from legal settlement of $2.0 million in 2010).
(3) Computed by dividing shareholders’ equity less goodwill and other intangibles by the number of common shares outstanding.

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Management’s discussion and analysis, which follows, focuses on the factors affecting our consolidated results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 and financial condition at December 31, 2010 and 2009 and, where appropriate, factors that may affect our future financial performance. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements, Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements and Selected Consolidated Financial Data.

Executive Overview

Net income for 2010 of $24.8 million, or $3.23 per diluted share, was 9% higher than the net income of $22.8 million, or $2.97 per diluted share, reported for 2009. The following were significant factors influencing the results of fiscal year 2010 compared to fiscal year 2009:

Growth in our loan portfolio (including loans held for sale) of $3.5 million was driven primarily by commercial activity with business loans increasing $18.6 million, or 3%, offset by declines in retail lending of $15.1 million, or 2%, associated with our sale of long-term fixed rate residential mortgages.
Investments at December 31, 2010 were $611.6 million, an increase of $72.1 million compared to December 31, 2009.
Deposits increased $20.0 million with strong growth in our core deposits (checking, savings and money market accounts) of $82.2 million, or 9%, offset by declines in certificates of deposit of $62.2 million.
Improved asset quality ratios and a reduction in net loan charge-offs for the year resulted in a decline in the loan loss provision to $6.3 million for 2010 compared to $8.2 million in 2009. The allowance for credit losses compared to total loans was 1.46% and 1.33% at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
Non-performing assets as a percentage of total assets amounted to 1.08% and 1.13% at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
Our primary revenue source, net interest income, increased $1.3 million, or 2%, due to a seven basis point increase in our net interest margin to 3.60% during 2010.
Non-interest income grew $1.4 million, or 7%, primarily due to proceeds from a legal settlement of $2.0 million related to investment security write-downs in 2008.
Non-interest expenses increased $1.9 million, or 4%, primarily as a result of increases in compensation and benefit costs, and increased costs associated with loan collection and foreclosed assets, offset by a decline in FDIC assessment costs.

Critical Accounting Policies

In preparing the Consolidated Financial Statements, management is required to make significant estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. Actual results could differ from our current estimates, as a result of changing conditions and future events. Several estimates are particularly critical and are susceptible to significant near-term change, including the allowance for credit losses, accounting for acquisitions and our review of goodwill and other identifiable intangible assets for impairment, valuation of other real estate owned, other-than-temporary impairment of investments, accounting for postretirement plans and income taxes. Our significant accounting policies and critical estimates are summarized in Note 1 of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Allowance for Credit Losses.  The allowance for credit losses consists of two components: (1) the allowance for loan losses (“ALL”) which is presented as a contra to total gross loans in the asset section of the balance sheet, and (2) the reserve for unfunded commitments included in other liabilities on the balance sheet. In preparing the Consolidated Financial Statements, the ALL requires the most significant amount of management estimates and assumptions. The ALL, which is established through a charge to the provision for credit losses, is based on our evaluation of the level of the allowance required in relation to the estimated loss

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exposure in the loan portfolio. We regularly evaluate the ALL for adequacy by taking into consideration, among other factors, local industry trends, management’s ongoing review of individual loans, trends in levels of watched or criticized assets, an evaluation of results of examinations by regulatory authorities and other third parties, analyses of historical trends in charge-offs and delinquencies, the character and size of the loan portfolio, business and economic conditions and our estimation of probable losses.

In determining the appropriate level of ALL, we use a methodology to systematically measure the amount of estimated loan loss exposure inherent in the loan portfolio. The methodology includes four elements: (1) identification of loss allocations for specific loans, (2) loss allocation factors for certain loan types based on credit grade and loss experience, (3) general loss allocations for other environmental factors, and (4) the unallocated portion of the allowance. The specific loan component relates to loans that are classified as doubtful, substandard or special mention. For such loans that are also classified as impaired, an allowance is established when the discounted cash flows (or collateral value or observable market price) of the impaired loan is lower than the carrying value of that loan. The methodology is in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We use a risk rating system to determine the credit quality of our loans and apply the related loss allocation factors. In assessing the risk rating of a particular loan, we consider, among other factors, the obligor’s debt capacity, financial condition and flexibility, the level of the obligor’s earnings, the amount and sources of repayment, the performance with respect to loan terms, the adequacy of collateral, the level and nature of contingencies, management strength, and the industry in which the obligor operates. These factors are based on an evaluation of historical information, as well as a subjective assessment and interpretation of current conditions. Emphasizing one factor over another, or considering additional factors that may be relevant in determining the risk rating of a particular loan but which are not currently an explicit part of our methodology, could impact the risk rating assigned to that loan. We periodically reassess and revise the loss allocation factors used in the assignment of loss exposure to appropriately reflect our analysis of loss experience. Portfolios of more homogenous populations of loans including home equity and consumer loans are analyzed as groups taking into account delinquency rates and other economic conditions which may affect the ability of borrowers to meet debt service requirements, including interest rates and energy costs. We also consider the results of regulatory examinations, historical loss ranges, portfolio composition, and other changes in the portfolio. An additional allocation is determined based on a judgmental process whereby management considers qualitative and quantitative assessments of other environmental factors. For example, a significant portion of our loan portfolio is concentrated among borrowers in southern Maine and a substantial portion of the portfolio is collateralized by real estate in this area. Another portion of the commercial and commercial real estate loans are to borrowers in the hospitality, tourism and recreation industries. Finally, an unallocated portion of the total allowance is maintained to allow for measurement imprecision attributable to uncertainty in the economic environment.

Since the methodology is based upon historical experience and trends as well as management’s judgment, factors may arise that result in different estimations. Significant factors that could give rise to changes in these estimates may include, but are not limited to, changes in economic conditions in our market area, concentration of risk, declines in local property values, and results of regulatory examinations. While management’s evaluation of the ALL as of December 31, 2010 determined the allowance to be appropriate, under adversely different conditions or assumptions, we may need to increase the allowance. The Corporate Risk Management group reviews the ALL with the Camden National Bank’s Board of Directors on a monthly basis. A more comprehensive review of the ALL is reviewed with the Company’s Board of Directors, as well as the Camden National Bank’s Board of Directors, on a quarterly basis.

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The adequacy of the reserve for unfunded commitments is determined similarly to the allowance for loan losses, with the exception that management must also estimate the likelihood of these commitments being funded and becoming loans. This is done by evaluating the historical utilization of each type of unfunded commitment and estimating the likelihood that the historical utilization rates could change in the future.

Goodwill and Identifiable Intangible Assets for Impairment.  We record all assets and liabilities acquired in purchase acquisitions at fair value, which is an estimate determined by the use of internal or other valuation techniques. These valuation estimates result in goodwill and other intangible assets and are subject to ongoing periodic impairment tests and are evaluated using various fair value techniques. Goodwill impairment evaluations are required to be performed annually and may be required more frequently if certain conditions indicating potential impairment exist. Identifiable intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are subject to impairment tests if events or circumstances indicate a possible inability to realize the carrying amount. If we were to determine that our goodwill was impaired, the recognition of an impairment charge could have an adverse impact on our results of operations in the period that the impairment occurred or on our financial position. Goodwill is evaluated for impairment using several standard valuation techniques including discounted cash flow analyses, as well as an estimation of the impact of business conditions. The use of different estimates or assumptions could produce different estimates of carrying value.

Valuation of Other Real Estate Owned (“OREO”).  Periodically, we acquire property in connection with foreclosures or in satisfaction of debt previously contracted. The valuation of this property is accounted for individually based on its fair value on the date of acquisition. At the acquisition date, if the fair value of the property less the costs to sell is less than the book value of the loan, a charge or reduction in the ALL is recorded. If the value of the property becomes permanently impaired, as determined by an appraisal or an evaluation in accordance with our appraisal policy, we will record the decline by charging against current earnings. Upon acquisition of a property, we use a current appraisal or broker’s opinion to substantiate fair value for the property.

Other-Than-Temporary Impairment (“OTTI”) of Investments.  We record an investment impairment charge at the point we believe an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other than temporary. In determining whether an OTTI has occurred, we review information about the underlying investment that is publicly available, analysts’ reports, applicable industry data and other pertinent information, and assess our ability to hold the securities for the foreseeable future. The investment is written down to its current market value at the time the impairment is deemed to have occurred. Future adverse changes in market conditions, continued poor operating results of underlying investments or other factors could result in further losses that may not be reflected in an investment’s current carrying value, possibly requiring an additional impairment charge in the future.

Effectiveness of Hedging Derivatives.  The Company maintains an overall interest rate risk management strategy that incorporates the use of interest rate contracts, which are generally non-leveraged generic interest rate and basis swaps, to minimize significant fluctuations in earnings that are caused by interest rate volatility. Interest rate contracts are used by the Company in the management of its interest rate risk position. The Company’s goal is to manage interest rate sensitivity so that movements in interest rates do not significantly adversely affect earnings. As a result of interest rate fluctuations, hedged assets and liabilities appreciate or depreciate in fair value. Gains or losses on the derivative instruments that are linked to the hedged assets and liabilities are expected to substantially offset this unrealized appreciation or depreciation. The Company utilizes a third party service to evaluate the effectiveness of its cash flow hedges on a quarterly basis. The effective portion of a gain or loss on a cash flow hedge is recorded in other comprehensive income, net of tax, and other assets or other liabilities on the balance sheet. The ineffective portions of cash flow hedging transactions are included in “other income” in the income statement if material.

Accounting for Postretirement Plans.  We use a December 31 measurement date to determine the expenses for our postretirement plans and related financial disclosure information. Postretirement plan expense is sensitive to changes in eligible employees (and their related demographics) and to changes in the discount rate and other expected rates, such as medical cost trends rates. As with the computations on plan expense, cash contribution requirements are also sensitive to such changes.

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Stock-Based Compensation.  The fair value of restricted stock and stock options is determined on the date of grant and amortized to compensation expense, with a corresponding increase in common stock, over the longer of the service period or performance period, but in no event beyond an employee’s retirement date. For performance-based restricted stock, we estimate the degree to which performance conditions will be met to determine the number of shares that will vest and the related compensation expense. Compensation expense is adjusted in the period such estimates change. Non-forfeitable dividends, if any, paid on shares of restricted stock are recorded to retained earnings for shares that are expected to vest and to compensation expense for shares that are not expected to vest.

Income Taxes.  We account for income taxes by deferring income taxes based on the estimated future tax effects of differences between the tax and book basis of assets and liabilities considering the provisions of enacted tax laws. These differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included in the Consolidated Statement of Condition. We must also assess the likelihood that any deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income and establish a valuation allowance for those assets determined not likely to be recoverable. Judgment is required in determining the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting deferred tax assets and liabilities, including projections of future taxable income. Although we have determined a valuation allowance is not required for all deferred tax assets, there is no guarantee that these assets will be realized. Although not currently under review, income tax returns for the years ended December 31, 2007 through 2009 are open to audit by federal and Maine authorities. If we, as a result of an audit, were assessed interest and penalties, the amounts would be recorded through other non-interest expense.

Results of Operations

For the year ended December 31, 2010, we reported record net income of $24.8 million compared to $22.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, and $15.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2008. Diluted earnings per share for each of these years were $3.23, $2.97, and $2.00, respectively. The major components of these results, which include net interest income, provision for credit losses, non-interest income, non-interest expense, and income taxes, are discussed below.

Net Interest Income

Net interest income is our largest source of revenue and accounts for approximately 78% of total revenues. Net interest income reflects revenues generated through income from earning assets plus loan fees, less interest paid on interest-bearing deposits and borrowings. Net interest income is affected by changes in interest rates, by loan and deposit pricing strategies and competitive conditions, the volume and mix of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, and the level of non-performing assets.

Net interest income was $75.7 million on a fully-taxable equivalent basis for 2010, compared to $74.6 million for 2009, an increase of $1.1 million, or 2%. The increase in net interest income is primarily due to an improvement of seven basis points in the net interest margin, to 3.60%, for 2010. Total average interest-earning assets decreased $10.9 million for 2010 compared to 2009, primarily due to decreases in investments, partially offset by increases in average loans of $25.9 million. The yield on earning assets averaged 5.04% in 2010 compared to 5.44% in 2009, a decrease of 40 basis points. The earning asset yield has gradually declined over the past year primarily as the result of reinvestment of cash flows at lower rates, particularly in the investment portfolio. Average interest-bearing liabilities decreased $48.6 million for 2010 compared to 2009, primarily due to declines in Federal Home Loan Bank (“FHLB”) advances, in part offset by an increase in brokered deposits. The cost of funds averaged 1.64% in 2010 compared to 2.13% in 2009, a decrease of 49 basis points. The cost of funds declined over the past year due to lower interest rates on deposit accounts, maturing retail certificates of deposit and wholesale funding combined with a favorable change in our deposit mix as a result of growth in lower cost deposit accounts. The average balance for demand deposit, interest checking, savings and money market accounts increased $64.8 million, or 8%, to $909.2 million for 2010.

Net interest income was $74.6 million on a fully-taxable equivalent basis for 2009, compared to $72.0 million for 2008, an increase of $2.7 million, or 4%. The increase in net interest income is largely due to an improvement of 16 basis points in the net interest margin, to 3.53%, for 2009. The increase in the net interest margin resulted from a decrease in the cost of funds, offset in part by a decrease in income on earning assets, both of which were caused by the decline in interest rates. Average interest-earning assets decreased by

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$24.1 million for 2009 compared to 2008, primarily due to decreases in investments and commercial loans. The yield on earning assets for 2009 decreased 59 basis points, reflecting a decline in the interest rate environment impacting both the investment and loan yields. Average interest-bearing liabilities decreased $31.3 million for 2009 compared to 2008, primarily due to declines in wholesale funding, in part offset by an increase in retail deposits driven by increases in certificates of deposit accounts. Total cost of funds decreased 83 basis points due to the decline in short-term interest rates. Future growth in net interest income will depend upon consumer and commercial loan demand, growth in deposits and the general level of interest rates.

The following table presents, for the periods indicated, average balance sheets, interest income, interest expense, and the corresponding average yields earned and rates paid, as well as net interest income, net interest rate spread and net interest margin.

                 
                 
  Average Balance, Interest and Yield/Rate Analysis
     December 31, 2010   December 31, 2009   December 31, 2008
(Dollars in Thousands)   Average
Balance
  Interest   Yield/
Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Yield/
Rate
  Average
Balance
  Interest   Yield/
Rate
ASSETS
                                                                                
Interest-earning assets:
                                                                                
Securities – taxable   $ 511,800     $ 20,425       3.99 %    $ 539,959     $ 25,979       4.81 %    $ 547,276     $ 27,671       5.06 % 
Securities – nontaxable(1)     54,392       3,247       5.97 %      63,472       3,707       5.84 %      70,177       4,138       5.90 % 
Trading account assets     1,973       36       1.82 %      1,479       24       1.62 %      1,515       35       2.31 % 
Federal funds sold                 %                  %      335       11       3.28 % 
Loans(1)(2):
                                                                                
Residential real estate     620,357       33,165       5.35 %      622,535       35,726       5.74 %      626,519       37,634       6.01 % 
Commercial real estate     444,153       25,486       5.74 %      415,369       25,168       6.06 %      413,744       28,828       6.97 % 
Commercial     173,073       9,464       5.47 %      181,981       10,170       5.59 %      206,220       14,181       6.88 % 
Municipal     16,417       901       5.49 %      21,533       1,079       5.01 %      22,752       1,131       4.97 % 
Consumer     280,069       13,235       4.73 %      266,786       13,106       4.91 %      248,628       15,256       6.14 % 
Total loans     1,534,069       82,251       5.36 %      1,508,204       85,249       5.65 %      1,517,863       97,030       6.39 % 
Total interest-earning assets     2,102,234       105,959       5.04 %      2,113,114       114,959       5.44 %      2,137,166       128,885       6.03 % 
Cash and due from banks     33,204                         28,985                         37,351                    
Other assets     161,067                         155,921                         146,108                    
Less: ALL     (22,021 )                  (18,742 )                  (17,303 )             
Total assets   $ 2,274,484                 $ 2,279,278                 $ 2,303,322              
LIABILITIES & SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                                                                                
Interest-bearing liabilities:
                                                                                
Interest checking accounts   $ 252,692       861       0.34 %    $ 218,715       1,042       0.48 %    $ 186,652       1,490       0.80 % 
Savings accounts     156,397       467       0.30 %      140,246       499       0.36 %      133,128       766       0.58 % 
Money market accounts     292,510       2,408       0.82 %      300,455       3,158       1.05 %      345,834       7,542       2.18 % 
Certificates of deposit     515,882       9,647       1.87 %      578,231       15,997       2.77 %      531,539       19,008       3.58 % 
Total retail deposits     1,217,481       13,383       1.10 %      1,237,647       20,696       1.67 %      1,197,153       28,806       2.41 % 
Brokered deposits     102,702       1,760       1.71 %      75,204       1,881       2.50 %      71,513       2,894       4.05 % 
Junior subordinated debentures     43,565       2,817       6.47 %      43,462       2,845       6.55 %      43,356       2,949       6.80 % 
Borrowings     480,897       12,257       2.55 %      537,658       14,898       2.77 %      612,532       22,250       3.63 % 
Total wholesale funding     627,164       16,834       2.68 %      656,324       19,624       2.99 %      727,401       28,093       3.86 % 
Total interest-bearing liabilities     1,844,645       30,217       1.64 %      1,893,971       40,320       2.13 %      1,924,554       56,899       2.96 % 
Demand deposits     207,579                         184,979                         186,924                    
Other liabilities     22,832                   22,598                   24,275              
Shareholders’ equity     199,428                   177,730                   167,569              
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity   $ 2,274,484                 $ 2,279,278                 $ 2,303,322              
Net interest income (fully-taxable equivalent)              75,742                         74,639                         71,986           
Less: fully-taxable equivalent adjustment           (1,452 )                  (1,628 )                  (1,765 )       
           $ 74,290                 $ 73,011                 $ 70,221        
Net interest rate spread (fully-taxable equivalent)                 3.40 %                  3.31 %                  3.07 % 
Net interest margin (fully-taxable equivalent)                 3.60 %                  3.53 %                  3.37 % 

(1) Reported on tax-equivalent basis calculated using a rate of 35%.
(2) Non-accrual loans are included in total average loans.

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The following table presents certain information on a fully-taxable equivalent basis regarding changes in interest income and interest expense for the periods indicated. For each category of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, information is provided with respect to changes attributable to rate and volume.

  

           
  December 31, 2010 vs 2009
Increase (Decrease) Due to
  December 31, 2009 vs 2008
Increase (Decrease) Due to
(Dollars in Thousands)   Volume   Rate   Total   Volume   Rate   Total
Interest-earning assets:
                                                     
Securities – taxable   $ (1,354 )    $ (4,2009 )    $ (5,554 )    $ (370 )    $ (1,322 )    $ (1,692 ) 
Securities – nontaxable     (530 )      70       (460 )      (395 )      (36 )      (431 ) 
Trading account assets     8       4       12       (1 )      (10 )      (11 ) 
Federal funds sold                       (11 )            (11 ) 
Residential real estate     (125 )      (2,436 )      (2,561 )      (239 )      (1,669 )      (1,908 ) 
Commercial real estate     1,744       (1,426 )      318       113       (3,773 )      (3,660 ) 
Commercial     (498 )      (208 )      (706 )      (1,707 )      (2,304 )      (4,011 ) 
Municipal     (256 )      78       (178 )      (61 )      9       (52 ) 
Consumer     653       (524 )      129       1,150       (3,300 )      (2,150 ) 
Total interest income     (358 )      (8,642 )      (9,000 )      (1,521 )      (12,405 )      (13,926 ) 
Interest-bearing liabilities:
                                                     
Interest checking accounts     162       (343 )      (181 )      233       (681 )      (448 ) 
Savings accounts     57       (89 )      (32 )      41       (308 )      (267 ) 
Money market accounts     (84 )      (666 )      (750 )      (691 )      (3,693 )      (4,384 ) 
Certificates of deposit     (1,725 )      (4,625 )      (6,350 )      1,670       (4,681 )      (3,011 ) 
Brokered deposits     688       (809 )      (121 )      149       (1,162 )      (1,013 ) 
Junior subordinated debentures     7       (35 )      (28 )      7       (111 )      (104 ) 
Borrowings     (1,573 )      (1,068 )      (2,641 )      (2,747 )      (4,605 )      (7,352 ) 
Total interest expense     (2,468 )      (7,635 )      (10,103 )      (1,338 )      (15,241 )      (16,579 ) 
Net interest income
(fully-taxable equivalent)
  $ 2,110     $ (1,007 )    $ 1,103     $ (183 )    $ 2,836     $ 2,653  

Provision for Loan Losses

The provision for loan losses is determined by management as the amount necessary to adjust the allowance for loan losses to a level, which, in management’s best estimate, is necessary to absorb probable losses within the existing loan portfolio. The provision for loan losses reflects loan quality trends, including, among other factors the levels of and trends related to nonaccrual loans, past due loans, potential problem loans, criticized loans, net charge-offs or recoveries and growth in the loan portfolio. Accordingly, the amount of the provision reflects both the necessary increases in the allowance for loan losses related to newly identified criticized loans, as well as the actions taken related to other loans including, among other things, any necessary increases or decreases in required allowances for specific loans or loan pools. The provision for loan losses for 2010 totaled $6.3 million, or 0.41% of average loans, compared with $8.2 million in 2009 and $4.4 million in 2008. See additional discussion below under the caption “Asset Quality.”

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Non-Interest Income

Non-interest income represents 16.9%, 14.6% and 12.0% of total revenue, before net securities gains, losses and OTTI, in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Non-interest income of $20.9 million for 2010 increased $1.4 million, or 7%, compared to 2009 non-interest income of $19.4 million.

     
  Year Ended December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008
Income from fiduciary services   $ 6,236     $ 5,902     $ 6,453  
Service charges on deposit accounts     4,911       5,261       5,375  
Other service charges and fees     3,345       2,908       2,720  
Proceeds from legal settlement     2,000              
Bank-owned life insurance     1,478       1,476       1,287  
Brokerage and insurance commissions     1,449       1,356       1,371  
Mortgage banking income (loss), net     761       1,314       (361 ) 
Net (losses) gains on sale of securities     (188 )      63       (624 ) 
Other income     1,084       1,173       439  
Non-interest income before other-than-temporary impairment of securities     21,076       19,453       16,660  
Other-than-temporary impairment of securities     (221 )      (11 )      (14,950 ) 
Total non-interest income   $ 20,855     $ 19,442     $ 1,710  

  

The significant changes in non-interest income in 2010 compared to 2009 include:

Legal settlement proceeds of $2 million related to the Company’s investment in auction pass-through certificates with Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”) for preferred stock assets which resulted in an OTTI write-down of $15.0 million in 2008;
Increase in income from fiduciary services of $334,000, or 6%, resulting from market value increases in assets under administration. At December 31, 2010, assets under management totaled $939.7 million;
Increase in other service charges and fees of $437,000, or 15%, resulting from increased debit card income associated with increased transaction volume;
Decrease in mortgage banking income of $553,000, or 42%, due to the decline in loan sales to $20.2 million in 2010 compared to $72.6 million during 2009; and
Decrease in service charges on deposit accounts of $350,000, or 7%, resulting primarily from a decrease in overdraft fee income associated with recent regulation prohibiting financial institutions from charging consumers fees for paying overdrafts on automated teller machines and debit card transactions, unless a consumer consents, or opts in, to the overdraft service for those types of transactions.

Non-interest income increased to $19.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to non-interest income of $1.7 million in 2008, an increase of $17.7 million. The increase was primarily the result of a $15.0 million write-down of other-than-temporarily-impaired securities resulting from investments in auction pass-through certificates, which consisted of Freddie Mac preferred stock and other net security losses of $624,000 in 2008. In 2009, an increase of $1.7 million was also recorded in mortgage banking income due to the sale of $72.5 million of residential mortgages in the secondary market.

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Non-Interest Expense

Total non-interest expense increased $1.9 million, or 4%, for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to the year ended December 31, 2009.

     
  Year Ended December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008
Salaries and employee benefits   $ 26,337     $ 24,588     $ 24,093  
Furniture, equipment and data processing     4,647       4,150       4,574  
Net occupancy     3,833       3,908       4,023  
OREO and collection costs     3,489       2,332       1,079  
Regulatory assessments     2,868       4,035       1,041  
Consulting and professional fees     2,596       2,455       3,166  
Amortization of identifiable intangible assets     577       578       897  
Other expenses     8,620       8,978       7,943  
Total non-interest expenses   $ 52,967     $ 51,024     $ 46,816  

The significant changes in non-interest expenses in 2010 compared to 2009 include:

Increase in salaries and employee benefits of $1.7 million, or 7%, primarily due to a $799,000 increase in benefits associated with increased health insurance costs and retirement expenses, a reduction in deferred salary costs of $522,000 related to a decline in mortgage production volume in 2010, and an increase in salary and incentives of $504,000, or 2%, due to merit increases and new positions;
Increase in furniture, equipment and data processing of $497,000, or 12%, related to depreciation associated with investments in technology, including a telephone system and document imaging technology;
Increase in foreclosure and collection costs and expenses on OREO of $1.2 million, or 50%, which includes OREO write-downs of $1.6 million due to declining real estate values;
Decrease in regulatory assessments of $1.2 million, or 29%, related to the FDIC special assessment imposed on all banks in 2009; and
The efficiency ratio (non-interest expense divided by net interest income on a tax equivalent basis plus non-interest income excluding net investment securities gains/losses, OTTI and proceeds from legal settlement) was 55.75% for the year ended December 31, 2010, compared to 54.27% for 2009.

Total non-interest expense increased $4.2 million, or 9.0%, for the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008. The increase was primarily due to the increase in regulatory assessments of $3.0 million due to a $2.9 million increase in the FDIC insurance assessment rate which included a special assessment of $1.1 million and an increase in costs associated with foreclosure and collection costs and expenses on other real estate owned of $1.3 million which included OREO write-downs of $1.0 million due to declining real estate values. There were modest or declining expenses in most other non-interest expense categories due to the Company’s cost control measures combined with a full-year benefit related to the integration of Union Trust into the Company.

Income Taxes

Income tax expense totaled $11.1 million, $10.4 million and $5.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The Company’s effective income tax rate was approximately 31.0%, 31.4%, and 26.0% in each of the past three years, respectively. These effective rates differ from our marginal rate of about 35%, primarily due to our significant non-taxable interest income from state and political subdivisions obligations. A full detail of these amounts can be found in Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

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Impact of Inflation and Changing Prices

The Consolidated Financial Statements and the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements presented in Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, which require the measurement of financial position and operating results in terms of historical dollars without considering changes in the relative purchasing power of money over time due to inflation. Unlike many industrial companies, substantially all of our assets and virtually all of our liabilities are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates have a more significant impact on our performance than the general level of inflation. Over short periods of time, interest rates and the yield curve may not necessarily move in the same direction or in the same magnitude as inflation.

Financial Condition

Overview

Total assets at December 31, 2010 were $2.3 billion, an increase of $70.6 million, or 3%, from December 31, 2009. The change in assets consisted primarily of a $72.1 million increase in investments and a $3.5 million increase in loans and loans held for sale. Total liabilities increased $55.2 million as borrowings and total deposits (including brokered deposits) increased $32.6 million and $20.0 million, respectively. Total shareholders’ equity increased $15.4 million, which was a result of earnings in 2010 of $24.8 million offset by dividends declared of $7.7 million and a decrease of $2.5 million in other comprehensive income.

Investment Securities

Investments in securities of U.S. government sponsored enterprises, states and political subdivisions, mortgage-backed securities, FHLB and FRB stock, investment grade corporate bonds and equities are used to diversify our revenues, to provide interest rate and credit risk diversification and to provide for liquidity and funding needs. Total investment securities increased $72.1 million, or 13%, to $611.6 million at December 31, 2010. We have investment securities in both the available-for-sale and held-to-maturity categories.

Unrealized gains or losses from investments categorized as “held to maturity” are only recorded when, and if, the security is sold or is considered other-than-temporarily impaired. Unrealized gains or losses on securities classified as “available for sale” are recorded as adjustments to shareholders’ equity, net of related deferred income taxes and are a component of other comprehensive income contained in the Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity and Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. At December 31, 2010, we had $6.2 million of unrealized gains on securities available for sale, net of deferred taxes, compared to $7.1 million of unrealized gains, net of deferred taxes, at December 31, 2009. The change from 2009 to 2010 is primarily attributed to a decline in market interest rates.

At December 31, 2010, $8.4 million of our private issue collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”) have been downgraded to non-investment grade. The Company’s share of these downgraded CMOs is in the senior tranches. Management believes the unrealized loss for the CMOs is the result of current market illiquidity and the underestimation of value in the market. Stress tests are performed regularly on the higher risk bonds in the portfolio using current statistical data to determine expected cash flows and forecast potential losses. The results of the stress tests at December 31, 2010 reflect potential future credit losses in the base case. Based on this analysis, the Company recorded a $221,000 OTTI write-down on four private issue CMOs during 2010 compared to a $11,000 write-down in 2009. During 2010, the Company recorded proceeds of $4.2 million on the sale of one downgraded CMO investment classified as available for sale, which resulted in a gross realized loss of $188,000.

At December 31, 2010, the Company held Duff & Phelps Select Income Fund Auction Preferred Stock with an amortized cost of $5.0 million which has failed at auction. The security is rated Triple-A by Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s. Management believes the failed auctions are a temporary liquidity event related to this asset class of securities. The Company is currently collecting all amounts due according to contractual terms and has the ability and intent to hold the securities until they clear auction, are called, or mature; therefore, the securities are not considered other than temporarily impaired.

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The following table sets forth the carrying amount of our investment securities as of the dates indicated:

           
  December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008
Securities available for sale:
                                                     
Obligations of U.S. government sponsored enterprises   $ 49,357       9 %    $       %    $ 4,603       1 % 
Obligations of states and political subdivisions     14,220       2 %      18,060       4 %      25,347       4 % 
Mortgage-backed securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored enterprises     464,842       84 %      428,356       89 %      525,336       87 % 
Private issue collateralized mortgage obligations     20,722       4 %      28,872       6 %      46,777       7 % 
Total debt securities     549,141       99 %      475,288       99 %      602,063       99 % 
Equity securities     4,438       1 %      4,420       1 %      3,968       1 % 
Total securities available for sale     553,579       100 %      479,708       100 %      606,031       100 % 
Securities held to maturity:
                                                     
Obligations of states and political subdivisions     36,102       100 %      37,914       100 %      42,040       100 % 
Total securities held to maturity     36,102       100 %      37,914       100 %      42,040       100 % 
     $ 589,681           $ 517,622           $ 648,071        

  

The following table sets forth the contractual maturities and fully-taxable equivalent weighted average yields of our investment securities at December 31, 2010.

       
  Available for Sale   Held to Maturity
(Dollars in Thousands)   Book
Value
  Yield to
Maturity
  Amortized
Cost
  Yield to
Maturity
U.S. government sponsored enterprises:
                                   
Due in 1 to 5 years   $ 49,357       1.73 %    $        
       49,357       1.73 %             
State and political subdivisions:
                                   
Due in 1 year or less     916       4.04 %      342       5.01 % 
Due in 1 to 5 years     3,360       3.75 %      1,893       4.07 % 
Due in 5 to 10 years     8,408       3.92 %      29,360       3.96 % 
Due after 10 years     1,536       3.93 %      4,507       4.03 % 
       14,220       3.89 %      36,102       3.98 % 
Mortgage-backed securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. government sponsored enterprises:
                                   
Due in 1 year or less     922       4.59 %             
Due in 1 to 5 years     16,388       4.80 %             
Due in 5 to 10 years     40,511       3.94 %             
Due after 10 years     407,021       3.81 %             
       464,842       3.86 %             
Private issue collateralized mortgage obligations:
                                
Due after 10 years     20,722       4.47 %             
       20,722       4.47 %             
Equity securities:
                             
No fixed maturity     4,438       0.33 %             
       4,438       0.33 %             
Total securities   $ 553,579       3.51 %    $ 36,102       3.98 % 

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Federal Home Loan Bank Stock

We are required to maintain a level of investment in FHLB Boston (“FHLBB”) stock based on the level of our FHLB advances. As of December 31, 2010 and 2009, our investment in FHLBB stock totaled $21.0 million. No market exists for shares of the FHLBB. FHLBB stock may be redeemed at par value five years following termination of FHLB membership, subject to limitations which may be imposed by the FHLB or its regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Board, to maintain capital adequacy of the FHLB. While we currently have no intention to terminate our FHLB membership, the ability to redeem our investment in FHLBB stock would be subject to the conditions imposed by the FHLB.

In early 2009, the FHLBB advised its members that it is focusing on preserving capital in response to ongoing market volatility. Accordingly, payments of quarterly dividends were suspended for 2009 and 2010 and the FHLBB placed a moratorium on excess stock repurchases from its members. The FHLBB announced a dividend payment to be paid March 2, 2011.

Loans

The Bank provides loans primarily to customers located within its geographic market area. At December 31, 2010, loans (excluding loans held for sale) of $1.5 billion decreased $2.0 million from December 31, 2009. Increases in commercial real estate and consumer loans, of $29.3 million and $10.7 million, respectively, were offset by declines in the residential real estate portfolio of $31.3 million and commercial loans of $10.6 million.

The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio at the dates indicated.

                   
  December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008   2007   2006
Residential real estate   $ 596,308       39 %    $ 627,655       41 %    $ 621,048       41 %    $ 410,687       36 %    $ 412,812       34 % 
Commercial real estate     464,037       30 %      434,783       28 %      400,312       27 %      333,506       29 %      392,381       32 % 
Commercial     180,592       12 %      191,214       13 %      213,683       14 %      197,736       17 %      213,450       18 % 
Consumer     283,815       19 %      273,106       18 %      265,865       18 %      203,710       18 %      199,486       16 % 
Total loans   $ 1,524,752       100 %    $ 1,526,758       100 %    $ 1,500,908       100 %    $ 1,145,639       100 %    $ 1,218,129       100 % 

  

Residential real estate loans consist of loans secured by one-to-four family residences. We generally retain adjustable-rate mortgages in the portfolio and, based on market risk assessments, frequently will retain fixed-rate mortgages. Residential real estate loan balances decreased $31.3 million, or 5%, at December 31, 2010 compared to a year ago. We originated and sold $20.1 million in residential fixed-rate real estate production on the secondary market to Freddie Mac, and $5.5 million of loans were held for sale at December 31, 2010. In 2009, residential real estate loan balances increased $6.6 million, or 1%, from 2008 because of increased mortgage refinancing activity compared to prior years due to low mortgage rates. We originated and sold $72.5 million in residential fixed-rate real estate production on the secondary market to Freddie Mac.

Commercial real estate loans consist of loans secured by income and non-income producing commercial real estate. We focus on lending to financially sound business customers within our geographic marketplace, as well as offering loans for the acquisition, development and construction of commercial real estate. In the past two years, we have experienced growth in our commercial real estate portfolio as a result of opportunities resulting from the pull-back of many financial institutions in this segment. In 2010, commercial real estate loans increased $29.3 million, or 7%, from 2009 and in 2009, commercial real estate loans increased $34.5 million, or 9%, from 2008.

Commercial loans consist of loans secured by various corporate assets, as well as loans to provide working capital in the form of lines of credit, which may be secured or unsecured. Municipal loans primarily consist of short-term tax anticipation notes made to municipalities for fixed asset or construction related purposes and are included in commercial loans. We focus on lending to financially sound business customers and municipalities within our geographic marketplace. In the past two years, we have experienced declines in our commercial loan portfolio as a result of pay-downs and decreased market demand. In 2010, commercial loans decreased $10.6 million, or 6%, from 2009 and in 2009, commercial loans decreased $22.5 million, or 11%, from 2008.

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Consumer loans are originated for a wide variety of purposes designed to meet the needs of our customers. Consumer loans include overdraft protection, automobile, boat, recreation vehicle, and mobile home loans, home equity loans and lines, and secured and unsecured personal loans. In 2010, consumer loans increased by $10.7 million, or 4%, from 2009 primarily as a result of utilization of low rate home equity loans and lines for home improvement, to consolidate debt and for general consumer purposes. In 2009, consumer loans increased by $7.2 million, or 3%, from 2008.

Asset Quality

The Board of Directors monitors credit risk management through the Directors’ Loan Committee and Corporate Risk Management. The Directors’ Loan Committee reviews large exposure credit requests, monitors asset quality on a regular basis and has approval authority for credit granting policies. Corporate Risk Management oversees management’s systems and procedures to monitor the credit quality of the loan portfolio, conduct a loan review program, maintain the integrity of the loan rating system and determine the adequacy of the ALL. Our practice is to identify problem credits early and take charge-offs as promptly as practicable. In addition, management continuously reassesses its underwriting standards in response to credit risk posed by changes in economic conditions.

Non-Performing Assets.  Non-performing assets include non-accrual loans, accruing loans 90 days or more past due, renegotiated loans and property acquired through foreclosure or repossession.

The following table sets forth the amount of our non-performing assets as of the dates indicated:

         
  December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008   2007   2006
Non-accrual loans
                                            
Residential real estate loans   $ 7,225     $ 6,161     $ 4,048     $ 1,800     $ 368  
Commercial real estate     6,072       6,476       4,957       6,625       7,393  
Commercial loans     4,421       4,145       2,384       2,200       5,111  
Consumer loans     1,721       1,158       1,112             252  
Non-accrual loans     19,439       17,940       12,501       10,625       13,124  
Accruing loans past due 90 days     711       1,135       206       6       555  
Renegotiated loans not included above     2,295       581                    
Total non-performing loans     22,445       19,656       12,707       10,631       13,679  
Other real estate owned     2,387       5,479       4,024       400       125  
Total non-performing assets   $ 24,832     $ 25,135     $ 16,731     $ 11,031     $ 13,804  
Non-performing loans to total loans     1.47 %      1.29 %      0.85 %      0.93 %      1.12 % 
Allowance for credit losses to non-performing loans     99.44 %      103.26 %      139.22 %      128.43 %      109.17 % 
Non-performing assets to total assets     1.08 %      1.13 %      0.71 %      0.64 %      0.78 % 
Allowance for credit losses to non-performing assets     89.88 %      80.75 %      105.73 %      123.77 %      108.18 % 

A loan is classified as non-accrual generally when it becomes 90 days past due as to interest or principal payments. All previously accrued but unpaid interest on non-accrual loans is reversed from interest income in the current period. Interest payments received on non-accrual loans (including impaired loans) are applied as a reduction of principal. A loan remains on non-accrual status until all principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonably assured.

Non-accrual loans at December 31, 2010 were $19.4 million, or 1.27% of total loans, compared to $17.9 million, or 1.18% of total loans, at December 31, 2009. Interest income that would have been recognized if loans on non-accrual status had been current in accordance with their original terms was approximately $985,000, $961,000 and $838,000 in 2010, 2009, and 2008, respectively. Interest income attributable to these loans included in the Consolidated Statements of Income amounted to approximately $36,000, $12,000 and $0 in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

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The OREO balance at December 31, 2010 consisted of ten properties, including four residential properties and six commercial/mixed use properties. During 2010, the Company recorded OREO write-downs of $1.6 million related to seven properties the majority of which were included in OREO at December 31, 2009. After foreclosure, management periodically obtains updated valuations of the OREO assets and, if additional impairments are deemed necessary, the subsequent write-downs for declines in value are recorded.

Non-performing loans increased $2.8 million since December 31, 2009 due to a weak economy, a continued decrease in retail sales in our market area, high unemployment, and an overall decline in real estate values. The portfolio of loans listed as non-performing are diversified by region, collateral, and loan size. Until the economy improves, we expect that non-performing loans will remain at elevated levels.

Potential Problem Loans.  Potential problem loans consist of classified accruing commercial and commercial real estate loans that were between 30 and 89 days past due. Such loans are characterized by weaknesses in the financial condition of borrowers or collateral deficiencies. Based on historical experience, the credit quality of some of these loans may improve due to changes in collateral values or the financial condition of the borrowers, while the credit quality of other loans may deteriorate, resulting in some amount of loss. These loans are not included in the analysis of non-accrual loans above. At December 31, 2010, potential problem loans amounted to approximately $1.8 million, or 0.12% of total loans, compared to $1.7 million, or 0.11% of total loans, at December 31, 2009.

Past Due Loans.  Past due loans consist of accruing loans that were between 30 and 89 days past due and include the potential problem loans noted above. The following table sets forth information concerning the past due loans at the date indicated.

   
(Dollars in Thousands)   December 31,
2010
  December 31,
2009
Loans 30 – 89 days past due:
                 
Residential real estate loans   $ 2,493     $ 1,847  
Commercial real estate     1,439       2,196  
Commercial loans     928       639  
Consumer loans     926       563  
Total loans 30 – 89 days past due   $ 5,786     $ 5,245  
Loans 30 – 89 days past due to total loans     0.38 %      0.34 % 

  

Allowance for Loan Losses.  We use a methodology to systematically measure the amount of estimated loan loss exposure inherent in the loan portfolio for purposes of establishing a sufficient allowance for loan losses. During 2010, there were no significant changes to the allowance assessment methodology. The allowance is management’s best estimate of the probable loan losses as of the balance sheet date. The allowance is increased by provisions charged to earnings and by recoveries of amounts previously charged off, and is reduced by charge-offs on loans.

Reserve for Unfunded Commitments.  The reserve for unfunded commitments is based on management’s estimate of the amount required to reflect the probable inherent losses on outstanding letters and unused loan credit lines. Adequacy of the reserve is determined using a consistent, systematic methodology, similar to the one which analyzes the allowance for loan losses. Additionally, management must also estimate the likelihood that these commitments would be funded and become loans. This is done by evaluating the historical utilization of each type of unfunded commitment and estimating the likelihood that the current utilization rates on lines available at the balance sheet date could increase in the future.

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The following table sets forth information concerning the activity in our allowance for credit losses during the periods indicated.

         
  Years Ended December 31,
(Dollars in Thousands)   2010   2009   2008   2007   2006
Allowance for loan losses at the beginning of period   $ 20,246     $ 17,691     $ 13,653     $ 14,933     $ 14,167  
Acquired from Union Trust                 4,369              
Provision for loan losses     6,325       8,162       4,397       100       2,208  
Charge-offs:
                                            
Residential real estate loans     1,262       792       221       50        
Commercial real estate     1,382       1,844       3,236       416       1,030  
Commercial loans     1,502       2,640       1,286       1,411       569  
Consumer loans     1,401       1,180       810       315       234  
Total loan charge-offs     5,547       6,456       5,553       2,192       1,833  
Recoveries:
                                            
Residential real estate loans     225       10       12             13  
Commercial real estate loans     232       127       78       215        
Commercial loans     553       306       422       425       202  
Consumer loans     259       406       313       172       176  
Total loan recoveries     1,269       849       825       812       391  
Net charge-offs     4,278       5,607       4,728       1,380       1,442  
Allowance for loan losses at the end of the period   $ 22,293     $ 20,246     $ 17,691     $ 13,653     $ 14,933  
Components of allowance for credit losses:
                                            
Allowance for loan losses   $ 22,293     $ 20,246     $ 17,691     $ 13,653     $ 14,933  
Liability for unfunded credit commitments     25       51                    
Balance of allowance for credit losses at end of the period   $ 22,318     $ 20,297     $ 17,691     $ 13,653     $ 14,933  
Average loans outstanding   $ 1,534,069     $ 1,508,204     $ 1,517,863     $ 1,187,627     $ 1,225,933  
Net charge-offs to average loans outstanding     0.28 %      0.37 %      0.31 %      0.12 %      0.12 % 
Provision for credit losses to average loans outstanding     0.41 %      0.54 %      0.29 %      0.01 %      0.18 % 
Allowance for loan losses to total loans     1.46 %      1.33 %      1.18 %      1.19 %      1.23 % 
Allowance for credit losses to net charge-offs     521.61 %      361.99 %      374.18 %      989.35 %      1035.58 % 
Allowance for loan losses to non-perfor