Attached files

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EX-32.2 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex32-2.htm
EX-32.1 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex31-1.htm
EX-23.2 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex23-2.htm
EX-23.1 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex23-1.htm
EX-21.1 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex21-1.htm
EX-10.18 - ProPhase Labs, Inc.ex10-18.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

OR

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______ to ______

 

Commission file number 000-21617

 

ProPhase Labs, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   23-2577138
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

711 Stewart Avenue, Suite 200 Garden City, New York   11530
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (215) 345-0919

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.0005 par value per share   “PRPH”   Nasdaq Capital Market

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes [  ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§229.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ]   Accelerated filer [   ]
Non-accelerated filer [X]   Smaller reporting company [X]
  Emerging growth company [   ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates was $12,644,080 as of June 30, 2020, based on the closing price of the common stock on The Nasdaq Capital Market.

 

As of March 31, 2021, there were 15,154,253 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.0005 per share.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement relating to its 2021 annual meeting of stockholders (the “2021 Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. The 2021 Proxy Statement will be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I    
Item 1. Business 4
Item 1A. Risk Factors 13
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 24
Item 2. Properties 24
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 24
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 24
PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 24
Item 6.

Reserved

25
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 25
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 30
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 31
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 59
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 59
Item 9B. Other Information 60
PART III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 61
Item 11. Executive Compensation 61
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 61
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 61
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 61
PART IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 62
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary 64
Signatures 65

 

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Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”) contains “forward looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements, other than statements of historical facts, included in this Annual Report, including statements related to future events and our future financial performance are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements typically are identified by use of terms such as “anticipate”, “believe”, “plan”, “expect”, “intend”, “may”, “will”, “should”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “continue” and similar words although some forward-looking statements are expressed differently. You are cautioned that such forward looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause our actual results, performance, achievements and prospects, as well as those of the markets we serve, to differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Many of these risks are beyond our ability to predict. Given the risks and uncertainties surrounding forward-looking statements, you should not place undue reliance on these statements.

 

Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to:

 

  Our dependence on our largest manufacturing customers;
     
  Our ability to successfully offer, perform and generate revenues from our new diagnostic services;
     
  Our ability to generate sufficient profits from RPP Molecular tests if and when demand for COVID-19 testing decreases or becomes no longer necessary;
     
  Our ability to secure additional capital, when needed to support our diagnostic services business and product development and commercialization programs;
     
  Potential disruptions to our supply chain or increases to the price of or adulteration of key raw materials or supplies;
     
  Potential disruptions in our ability to manufacture our products and those of others;
     
  Seasonal fluctuations in demand for the products we manufacture at our manufacturing facility;
     
  Our ability to successfully develop and commercialize our existing products and any new products;
     
  Our ability to compete effectively, including our ability to maintain and increase our markets and/or market share in the markets in which we do business;
     
  Our ability to attract, retain and motivate our key employees;
     
  Our ability to protect our proprietary rights;
     
  Our ability to comply with regulatory requirements applicable to our businesses; and
     
  Our dependence on third parties to provide services critical to our lab diagnostic services business;

 

You should also consider carefully the statements under other sections of this Annual Report, including the Risk Factors included in Item 1A, which address additional risks that could cause our actual results to differ from those set forth in any forward-looking statements. Our forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this Annual Report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise except as otherwise required by law.

 

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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

General

 

ProPhase Labs, Inc. (“ProPhase” “we,” “us,” “our” or the “Company”) is a diversified medical science and technology company with deep experience with over-the-counter (“OTC”) consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements. We conduct our operations through two operating segments: consumer products and diagnostic services. Until late 2020, we were engaged in the research, development, manufacture, distribution, marketing and sale of OTC consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements in the United States. However commencing in December 2020, we also began to offer COVID-19 and other respiratory pathogen panel (RPP) molecular tests through our new diagnostic service business.

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Pharmaloz Manufacturing, Inc. (“PMI”), is a full-service contract manufacturer and private label developer of a broad range of non-GMO, organic and natural-based cough drops and lozenges and OTC drug and dietary supplement products. The dietary supplements are developed and marketed under the TK Supplements® brand name.

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, ProPhase Diagnostics, Inc., (“ProPhase Diagnostics”), which was formed on October 9, 2020, offers a variety of important medical tests, including COVID-19 and (RPP) molecular tests. On October 23, 2020, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Confucius Plaza Medical Laboratory Corp. (“CPM”) for approximately $2.5 million in cash, subject to certain adjustments, pursuant to the terms of a Stock Purchase Agreement, by and among the Company, CPM, Pride Diagnostics LLC (“Pride Diagnostics”) and other parties named therein. CPM (which is now known as ProPhase Diagnostics NJ, Inc.) is the owner of a 4,000 square foot Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (“CLIA”) accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey, which ProPhase Diagnostics acquired as part of the transaction. As a result of the acquisition of CPM in October 2020, we entered into a new business line, diagnostic services.

 

We continue to actively pursue acquisition opportunities for other companies, technologies and products within and outside the consumer healthcare products and diagnostics services industries.

 

We use a December 31 year-end for financial reporting purposes. References in this Annual Report to “Fiscal 2020” mean the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and references to other “Fiscal” years mean the year that ended on December 31 of the year indicated. The term “we”, “us” or the “Company” as used herein also refer, where appropriate, to the Company, together with its subsidiaries unless the context otherwise requires.

 

Revenues from continuing operations for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $14.5 million and $9.9 million, respectively. We incurred a net loss for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 of $2.1 million and $3.1 million, respectively.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had working capital of approximately $9.6 million, including $1.6 million of marketable securities available for sale.

 

Contract Manufacturing Services

 

PMI provides consumer product development, pre-commercialization services, production, warehousing and distribution services for its customers. Our manufacturing facility, which is located in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, is registered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) and is a certified organic and kosher.

 

As part of the sale of our former Cold-EEZE® business in March 2017 (see “Discontinued Operations” below), PMI entered into a manufacturing agreement with Mylan Consumer Healthcare Inc. (formerly known as Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc.) (“MCH”) and Mylan Inc. (together with MCH, “Mylan”) to supply various Cold-EEZE® lozenge products to Mylan following the sale for a period of five years with annual renewal options.

 

For each of Fiscal 2020 and 2019, our revenues from continuing operations have come principally from our contract manufacturing services. Two third-party contract manufacturing customers accounted for 47.1% and 17.2%, respectively, of our Fiscal 2020 revenues from continuing operations. The loss of sales to any one or more of these large third-party contract manufacturing customers could have a material adverse effect on our business operations and financial condition, unless we are able to increase revenue from other sources.

 

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TK Supplements® Product Line

 

Our TK Supplements® product line is dedicated to promoting better health, energy and sexual vitality. Each of our herbal supplements is researched to determine the optimum blend of ingredients to ensure our customers receive premium quality products. To achieve this, we formulate with the highest quality ingredients derived from nature and ingredients enhanced by science. Our TK Supplements® product line includes Legendz XL®, a male sexual enhancement and Triple Edge XL®, an energy and stamina booster.

 

In Fiscal 2020, we extended our distribution of Legendz XL® to include more customer accounts including national chain drug retailers, internet-based retailers and several regional retailers and leveraged our existing infrastructure and retail distribution platform. We have produced and refined a television commercial and initiated television and digital media testing for Legendz XL® for marketing to consumers. We have also completed a broad series of clinical studies that support important product claims that we have incorporated into our product packaging and marketing communications for Legendz XL®.

 

We also introduced Triple Edge XL® to a limited number of retail customers in Fiscal 2020 and have gained distribution with one large national chain drug retailer.

 

We anticipate growth from our TK Supplements® product line as we optimize our market strategy and expand our channels of distribution. There can be no assurance that our strategic focus will result in any revenue growth.

 

Diagnostic Services Segment

 

ProPhase Diagnostics offers a variety of important medical diagnostic testing services, including, among other, COVID-19 testing and (RPP) molecular tests. We offer both nasal swab testing and saliva testing, and are a preferred lab for Spectrum Solutions, the manufacturer and supplier of the first FDA EUA (Emergency Use Authorization) authorized saliva collection kit used for COVID-19 testing. We currently operate two lab facilities including, (i) our facility located in Old Bridge, New Jersey, acquired in October 2020, with a capacity to process up to 10,000 COVID-19 tests per day, and (ii) our facility located in Garden City, New York, which opened in January 2021, and commenced operations in January 2021, with a capacity to process up to 50,000 COVID-19 tests per day.

 

Discontinued Operations

 

Effective March 29, 2017, we sold our intellectual property rights and other assets related to the Cold-EEZE® brand and product line, including all then current and pipeline over-the-counter allergy, cold, flu, multi-symptom relief and immune support treatments for adults and children to the extent each was, or was intended to be, branded “Cold-EEZE®”, including all formulations and derivatives thereof (collectively referred to as the “Cold-EEZE® business”) to Mylan. As a consequence of the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business, for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, we have classified all residual income and expenses attributable to the Cold-EEZE® business.

 

For Fiscal 2020, we recognized income of $201,000 as a gain from discontinued operations. For Fiscal 2019, we incurred a loss of $40,000 from discontinued operations.

 

Seasonality of the Business

 

Our contract manufacturing revenues are subject to seasonal fluctuations. As the majority of products that we manufacture for our customers are OTC healthcare and cold remedy products, our revenues tend to be higher in the first, third and fourth quarters during the cold season. Generally, a cold season is defined as the period from September to March when the incidence of the common cold rises as a consequence of the change in weather and other factors. Revenues are generally at their lowest levels during the second quarter when contract manufacturing demand generally declines.

 

Patents, Trademarks and Royalty Agreements

 

We do not currently own any patents. We maintain various trademarks for our TK Supplements® products including Legendz XL® and Triple Edge XL®.

 

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Government Regulation

 

Our business is subject to extensive governmental regulation by various federal, state, and local agencies.

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

 

Pharmaceutical Regulation

 

The manufacturing and distribution of pharmaceutical products are subject to extensive regulation by the federal government, primarily through the FDA and the Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”), and to a lesser extent by state and local government agencies. The Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FFDCA”) and other federal statutes and regulations govern or influence the manufacture, labeling, testing, storage, record keeping, approval, advertising and promotion of OTC pharmaceutical products.

 

Facilities used in the manufacture, packaging, labeling and repackaging of drug products, including OTC drug products, must be registered with the FDA and are subject to FDA inspection to ensure that drug products are manufactured in accordance with current Good Manufacturing Practice (“cGMPs”).

 

FDA approval is required before any “new drug” may be marketed, including new formulations, strengths, dosage forms and generic versions of previously approved drugs. Generally, to obtain FDA approval of a “new drug” a company must file a New Drug Application (“NDA”) or Abbreviated New Drug Application (“ANDA”).

 

Under the OTC monograph system, selected OTC drugs are generally recognized as safe and effective and do not require the submission and approval of a NDA or ANDA prior to marketing.

 

The FDA OTC monographs include well-known ingredients and specify requirements for permitted indications, required warnings and precautions, allowable combinations of ingredients and dosage levels. Drug products marketed under the OTC monograph system must conform to specific quality, formula and labeling requirements; however, these products can be developed and marketed without prior FDA approval unlike products requiring a submission and approval of an ANDA or NDA. In general, it is less costly to develop and bring to market a product regulated under the OTC monograph system. From time to time, adequate information may become available to the FDA regarding certain prescription drug products that will allow the reclassification of those products as no longer requiring the approval of an ANDA or NDA prior to marketing. For this reason, there may be increased competition and lower profitability related to a particular OTC-switch product should it be reclassified to the OTC monograph system.

 

The FDA and the United States Pharmacopeia Convention (the “USP”) have embarked on an initiative to modernize the monograph requirements of OTC drugs. We are monitoring the situation and will make appropriate adjustments to remain in compliance. In addition, regulations may change from time to time, requiring formulation, packaging or labeling changes for certain products. We cannot predict whether new legislation regulating our activities will be enacted or what effect any legislation would have on our business.

 

Noncompliance with applicable requirements can result in product recalls, seizure of products, injunctions, suspension of production and/or distribution, refusal of the government or third parties to enter into contracts with us, withdrawal or suspension of the applicable regulator’s review of our drug applications, civil penalties and criminal fines, and disgorgement of profits.

 

Dietary Supplement Regulation

 

The FDA regulates dietary supplements under a different set of regulations than those covering “conventional” foods and drug products (prescription and OTC). Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (the “DSHEA”), which was passed in 1994, dietary supplements that were in commerce prior to 1994 are broadly presumed safe. For these supplements, manufacturers do not need to register their products with the FDA nor get FDA approval before producing or selling them. Manufacturers must make sure that product label information is truthful and not misleading. For these products, the FDA is responsible for taking action against any unsafe or misbranded dietary supplement product after it reaches the market. All new ingredients marketed within dietary supplements after 1994 that are not found in food must meet a stricter set of regulations and notification prior to release in the marketplace.

 

In June 2007, pursuant to the authority granted by the FFDCA as amended by DSHEA, the FDA published detailed cGMP regulations that govern the manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and holding operations of dietary supplement manufacturers. The cGMP regulations, among other things, impose significant recordkeeping requirements on manufacturers. The cGMP requirements are in effect for all manufacturers, and the FDA is conducting inspections of dietary supplement manufacturers pursuant to these requirements. The failure of a manufacturing facility to comply with the cGMP regulations renders products manufactured in such facility “adulterated” and subjects such products and the manufacturer to a variety of potential FDA enforcement actions.

 

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In addition, under the Food Safety Modernization Act, (the “FSMA”), which was enacted on January 2, 2011, the manufacturing of dietary ingredients contained in dietary supplements are subject to similar or even more burdensome manufacturing requirements, which has the potential to increase the costs of dietary ingredients and subject suppliers of such ingredients to more rigorous inspections and enforcement. The FSMA requires importers of food, including dietary supplements and dietary ingredients, to conduct verification activities to ensure that the food they might import meets applicable domestic requirements. The FSMA also expands the reach and regulatory powers of the FDA with respect to the production and importation of food, including dietary supplements. The expanded reach and regulatory powers include the FDA’s ability to order mandatory recalls, administratively detain domestic products, require certification of compliance with domestic requirements for imported foods associated with safety issues and administratively revoke manufacturing facility registrations, effectively enjoining manufacturing of dietary ingredients and dietary supplements without judicial process. The regulation of dietary supplements may increase or become more restrictive in the future.

 

Under FFDCA, dietary supplements are subject to both adulteration and misbranding provisions. Adulterated products are those that contain unlisted ingredients or are not prepared or packaged under the FDA cGMPs for dietary supplements and misbranded products are those with false or misleading labels. Adulterated or misbranded products are subject to the full range of civil and criminal enforcement measures under the FFDCA and all violations of FFDCA are subject to criminal enforcement at the FDA’s discretion.

 

We are also subject to the Dietary Supplement and Nonprescription Drug Consumer Protection Act, which was passed in 2006 to amend the FFDCA with respect to serious adverse event reporting for dietary supplements and nonprescription drugs, among other things. The law requires that the manufacturer, packer or distributor of a dietary supplement or OTC drug notify the FDA of all serious adverse events it receives associated with their dietary supplement or OTC product within 15 business days. Serious adverse events are defined as those that result in death, a life-threatening experience, in-patient hospitalization, a persistent or significant disability or incapacity, congenital anomaly or birth defect, as well as situations where medical/surgical intervention is required to prevent the previously listed events.

 

Diagnostic Testing Services

 

The FDA has regulatory responsibility for diagnostic testing instruments, test kits, reagents and other devices used by clinical laboratories. The FDA enforces laws and regulations that govern the development, testing, manufacturing, performance, labeling, advertising, marketing, distribution and surveillance of diagnostic products, including COVID-19 diagnostics authorized by FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization, and it regularly inspects and reviews the manufacturing processes and product performance of diagnostic products.

 

Since 2014, there have been ongoing discussions and advocacy between stakeholders, including the clinical laboratory industry, the FDA, and Congress, about potential FDA regulation of laboratory-developed tests (LDTs), which are assays developed and performed in-house by clinical laboratories and can be made available to the public without pre-market review by the FDA (although COVID-19 diagnostic PCR LDTs have been subject to FDA pre-market requirements as modified by guidance issued by FDA on February 29, 2020, as a consequence of the national health emergency). Various regulatory and legislative proposals are under consideration, including some that could increase general FDA oversight of clinical laboratories and LDTs. The outcome and ultimate impact of such proposals on our business is difficult to predict at this time.

 

Consumer Product Safety Commission

 

Under the Poison Prevention Packaging Act (“PPPA”), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”) has authority to require that certain dietary supplements and certain pharmaceuticals have child-resistant packaging to help reduce the incidence of accidental poisonings. The CPSC has published regulations requiring iron-containing dietary supplements and various pharmaceuticals to have child resistant packaging, and has established rules for testing the effectiveness of child-resistant packaging and for ensuring senior adult effectiveness.

 

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (“CPSIA”) amended the Consumer Product Safety Act (“CPSA”) to require that the manufacturer of any product that is subject to any CPSC rule, ban, standard or regulation certify that based on a reasonable testing program the product complies with CPSC requirements. This certification applies to pharmaceuticals and dietary supplements that require child-resistant packaging under the PPPA. The CPSC lifted the stay of enforcement of the certification requirement and the regulation has been in effect since February 9, 2010.

 

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Federal Trade Commission

 

Advertising of our products in the United States is subject to regulation by the Federal Trade Commission (the “FTC”) under the Federal Trade Commission Act (the “FTC Act”). Under the FTC’s Substantiation Doctrine, an advertiser is required to have a “reasonable basis” for all objective product claims before the claims are made. Failure to adequately substantiate claims may be considered either deceptive or unfair practices. Pursuant to this FTC requirement, we are required to have adequate substantiation for all material advertising claims that we make for any products sold in the United States.

 

In recent years, the FTC has initiated numerous investigations of and actions against companies that sell dietary supplements. The FTC has issued guidance to assist companies in understanding and complying with its substantiation requirement. We believe that we have adequate substantiation for all material advertising claims that we make for our products in the United States, and we believe that we have organized the documentation to support our advertising and promotional practices in compliance with these guidelines. However, no assurance can be given that the FTC would reach the same conclusion if it were to review or question our substantiation for our advertising claims in the United States.

 

The FTC may enforce compliance with the law in a variety of ways, both administratively and judicially, using compulsory process, cease and desist orders, and injunctions. FTC enforcement can result in orders requiring, among other things, limits on advertising, corrective advertising, consumer redress, divestiture of assets, rescission of contracts, and such other relief as the agency deems necessary to protect the public. Violation of these orders could result in substantial financial or other penalties. Although we have not been the subject of any action by the FTC, no assurance can be given that the FTC will not question our advertising or other operations in the United States in the future. Any action in the future by the FTC could materially and adversely affect our ability to successfully market our products in the United States.

 

Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1967, and the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA)

 

The performance of laboratory diagnostic testing is subject to extensive U.S. regulation, and many of these statutes and regulations have not been interpreted by the courts. CLIA extends federal oversight to virtually all physician practices performing clinical laboratory testing and to clinical laboratories operating in the United States by requiring that they be certified by the federal government or, in the case of clinical laboratories, by a federally approved accreditation agency. Standards for testing under CLIA are based on the complexity of the tests performed by the laboratory, with tests classified as “high complexity,” “moderate complexity,” or “waived.” Laboratories performing high-complexity testing are required to meet more stringent requirements than moderate-complexity laboratories. The sanction for failure to comply with CLIA requirements may be suspension, revocation or limitation of a laboratory’s CLIA certificate, which is necessary to conduct business, as well as significant fines and/or criminal penalties. In addition, we are subject to regulation under state law. State laws may require that laboratories and/or laboratory personnel meet certain qualifications, specify certain quality controls or require maintenance of certain records. Applicable statutes and regulations could be interpreted or applied by a prosecutorial, regulatory or judicial authority in a manner that would adversely affect our business. Potential sanctions for violation of these statutes and regulations include significant fines and the suspension or loss of various licenses, certificates and authorizations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, compliance with future legislation could impose additional requirements on us, which may be costly.

 

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was designed to address issues related to the security and confidentiality of health information and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system by facilitating the electronic exchange of information in certain financial and administrative transactions. These regulations apply to health plans and healthcare providers that conduct standard transactions electronically and healthcare clearinghouses (covered entities). Six such regulations include: (i) the Transactions and Code Sets Rule; (ii) the Privacy Rule; (iii) the Security Rule; (iv) the Standard Unique Employer Identifier Rule, which requires the use of a unique employer identifier in connection with certain electronic transactions; (v) the National Provider Identifier Rule, which requires the use of a unique healthcare provider identifier in connection with certain electronic transactions; and (vi) the Health Plan Identifier Rule, which required the use of a unique health plan identifier in connection with certain electronic transactions. We believes that we are in compliance in all material respects with each of the HIPAA Rules identified above.

 

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The Privacy Rule regulates the use and disclosure of protected health information (PHI) by covered entities. It also sets forth certain rights that an individual has with respect to his or her PHI maintained by a covered entity, such as the right to access or amend certain records containing PHI or to request restrictions on the use or disclosure of PHI. The Privacy Rule requires covered entities to contractually bind third parties, known as business associates, in the event that they perform an activity or service for or on behalf of the covered entity that involves the creation, receipt, maintenance, or transmission of PHI. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with the requirements of the HIPAA Privacy Rule.

 

On February 6, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) and the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published final regulations that amended the HIPAA Privacy Rule to provide individuals (or their personal representatives) with the right to receive copies of their test reports from laboratories subject to HIPAA, or to request that copies of their test reports be transmitted to designated third parties. We believe our policies and procedures and privacy notice comply with the Privacy Rule access requirements.

 

On December 12, 2018, HHS issued a request for information (RFI) seeking input from the public on how the HIPAA regulations and the Privacy Rule, in particular, could be modified to amend existing, or impose additional, obligations relating to the processing of PHI. Subsequent to the RFI, on January 21, 2021, HHS published a notice of proposed rulemaking (“NPRM”) containing potential modifications to the Privacy Rule addressing standards that may impede the transition to value-based health care. We are monitoring the NPRM process. If modifications to the Privacy Rule are adopted, they may impact our compliance obligations under HIPAA.

 

The U.S. Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH), which was enacted in February 2009, with regulations effective on September 23, 2013, strengthened and expanded the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules and their restrictions on use and disclosure of PHI. HITECH includes, but is not limited to, prohibitions on exchanging PHI for remuneration and additional restrictions on the use of PHI for marketing. HITECH also fundamentally changes a business associate’s obligations by imposing a number of Privacy Rule requirements and a majority of Security Rule provisions directly on business associates that were previously only directly applicable to covered entities. Moreover, HITECH requires covered entities to provide notice to individuals, HHS, and, as applicable, the media when unsecured PHI is breached, as that term is defined by HITECH. Business associates are similarly required to notify covered entities of a breach. We believe our policies and procedures are fully compliant with HIPAA as modified by the HITECH requirements.

 

The administrative simplification provisions of HIPAA mandate the adoption of standard unique identifiers for healthcare providers. The intent of these provisions is to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the electronic transmission of health information. The National Provider Identifier Rule requires that all HIPAA-covered healthcare providers, whether they are individuals or organizations, must obtain an NPI to identify themselves in standard HIPAA transactions. NPI replaces the unique provider identification number and other provider numbers previously assigned by payers and other entities for the purpose of identifying healthcare providers in standard electronic transactions. The Company believes that it is in compliance with the HIPAA National Provider Identifier Rule in all material respects.

 

The Health Plan Identifier (HPID) was a unique identifier designed to furnish a standard way to identify health plans in electronic transactions. CMS published the final rule adopting the HPID for health plans required by HIPAA on September 12, 2012. Effective October 31, 2014, CMS announced a delay, until further notice, in enforcement of regulations pertaining to health plan enumeration and use of the HPID in HIPAA transactions adopted in the HPID final rule. On October 28, 2019, CMS published a final rule rescinding the adopted standard unique HPID and implementation specifications and requirements for its use and other entity identifier and implementation specifications for its use, effective December 27, 2019. This delay remains in effect. We will continue to monitor future developments related to the HPID and respond accordingly.

 

Violations of the HIPAA provisions could result in civil and/or criminal penalties, including significant fines and up to 10 years in prison. HITECH also significantly strengthened HIPAA enforcement by increasing the civil penalty amounts that may be imposed, requiring HHS to conduct periodic audits to confirm compliance and authorizing state attorneys general to bring civil actions seeking either injunctions or damages in response to violations of the HIPAA privacy and security regulations that affect the privacy of state residents.

 

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The total cost associated with meeting the ongoing requirements of HIPAA and HITECH is not expected to be material to the Company’s operations or cash flows. However, future regulations and interpretations of HIPAA and HITECH could impose significant costs on the Company.

 

In addition to the HIPAA regulations described above, numerous other data protection, privacy and similar laws govern the confidentiality, security, use, and disclosure of personal information. These laws vary by jurisdiction, but they most commonly regulate or restrict the collection, use, and disclosure of medical and financial information and other personal information. In the U.S., some state laws are more restrictive and, therefore, are not preempted by HIPAA. Penalties for violation of these laws may include sanctions against a laboratory’s licensure, as well as civil and/or criminal penalties.

 

Congress and state legislatures also have been considering new legislation relating to privacy and data protection. For example, on June 28, 2018, the California legislature passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which became effective January 1, 2020. The CCPA created new transparency requirements and granted California residents several new rights with regard to their personal information. In addition, in November 2020, California voters approved the California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) ballot initiative, which introduced significant amendments to the CCPA and established and funded a dedicated California privacy regulator, the California Privacy Protection Agency (CPPA). The amendments introduced by the CPRA go into effect on January 1, 2023, and new implementing regulations are expected to be introduced by the CPPA. Failure to comply with the CCPA may result in, among other things, significant civil penalties and injunctive relief, or potential statutory or actual damages. In addition, California residents have the right to bring a private right of action in connection with certain types of incidents. These claims may result in significant liability and potential damages. The Company implemented processes to manage compliance with the CCPA and continues to assess the impact of the CPRA on the Company’s business as additional information and guidance becomes available.

 

Effective August 14, 2020, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of HHS (SAMHSA) announced the finalization of proposed changes to the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records regulation, 42 Code of Federal Regulations Part 2. This regulation protects the confidentiality of patient records relating to the identity, diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment that are maintained in connection with the performance of any federally assisted program or activity relating to substance use disorder education, prevention, training, treatment, rehabilitation, or research. Under the regulation, patient identifying information may only be released with the individual’s written consent, subject to certain limited exceptions. The latest changes to this regulation seek to better facilitate care coordination, while maintaining more stringent confidentiality of substance use disorder information. The Company adopted changes to its policies and procedures necessary for compliance.

 

Other Regulatory Oversight

 

We are also subject to regulation under various state, local, and international laws that include provisions governing, among other things, the formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, and distribution of dietary supplements and OTC drugs. For example, Proposition 65 in the State of California is a list of substances deemed to pose a risk of carcinogenicity or birth defects at or above certain levels. If any such ingredient exceeds the permissible levels in a dietary supplement, cosmetic, or drug, the product may be lawfully sold in California only if accompanied by a prominent warning label alerting consumers that the product contains an ingredient linked to cancer or birth defect risk. Private attorney general actions as well as California attorney general actions may be brought against non-compliant parties and can result in substantial costs and fines.

 

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Reimbursement

 

Billing for diagnostic testing services is complex and subject to extensive and non-uniform rules and administrative requirements. Depending on the billing arrangement and applicable law, we bill various payers, such as patients, insurance companies, Medicare, Medicaid, clinicians, hospitals and employer groups. Failure to accurately bill for our services could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We bill third-party payors, both commercial and government, using Current Procedural Terminology, or CPT, codes, which are published by the American Medical Association, or AMA. In April 2014, Congress passed the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, or PAMA, which included substantial changes to the way in which clinical laboratory services are priced and paid under Medicare. On June 23, 2016, CMS published the final rule implementing the reporting and rate-setting requirements. Under PAMA, laboratories that receive the majority of their Medicare revenue from payments made under the CLFS or the Physician Fee Schedule are required to report to CMS, beginning in 2017 and every three years thereafter (or annually for an advanced diagnostic laboratory test, or ADLT ), private payor payment rates and volumes for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests, or CDLTs . Laboratories that fail to report the required payment information may be subject to substantial civil monetary penalties. We do not believe that any of our tests meet the current definition of ADLTs. We therefore report private payor rates for our tests every three years.

 

As required under PAMA, CMS uses the data reported by laboratories to develop Medicare payment rates for laboratory tests equal to the volume-weighted median of the private payor payment rates. For tests furnished on or after January 1, 2019, Medicare payments for CDLTs are based upon reported private payor rates. For a CDLT that is assigned a new or substantially revised CPT code, the initial payment rate is assigned using the gap-fill methodology, as under prior law.

 

On December 20, 2019, President Trump signed the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, which included the Laboratory Access for Beneficiaries Act, or LAB Act. The LAB Act delayed by one year the reporting of payment data under PAMA f or CDLTs that are not ADLTs until the first quarter of 2021. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or the CARES Act, which was signed into law on March 27, 2020, delayed the reporting period by an additional year, until the first quarter of 2022. As a result, Medicare payment rates determined by data reported in 2017 will continue through December 31, 2022.

 

In addition, under PAMA, as amended by the LAB Act, any reduction to a particular payment rate resulting from the new methodology is limited to 10% per test per year in 2020 and to 15% per test per year in each of the years 2021 through 2023. The CARES Act delayed the 15% cut scheduled to take effect on January 1, 2021, for one year.

 

Fraud and Abuse Laws and Regulations

 

Existing U.S. laws governing federal healthcare programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, as well as similar state laws, impose a variety of broadly described fraud and abuse prohibitions on healthcare providers, including clinical laboratories. These laws are interpreted liberally and enforced aggressively by multiple government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Justice, OIG and various state agencies. Historically, the clinical laboratory industry has been the focus of major governmental enforcement initiatives. The U.S. government’s enforcement efforts have been conducted under regulations such as HIPAA, which includes several provisions related to fraud and abuse enforcement, including the establishment of a program to coordinate and fund U.S., state and local law enforcement efforts, and the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which includes requirements directed at Medicaid fraud, including increased spending on enforcement and financial incentives for states to adopt false claims act provisions similar to the U.S. False Claims Act. Amendments to the False Claims Act, and other enhancements to the U.S. fraud and abuse laws enacted as part of the ACA, have further increased fraud and abuse enforcement efforts and compliance risks. For example, the ACA established an obligation to report and refund overpayments from Medicare or Medicaid within 60 days of identification (whether or not paid through any fault of the recipient); failure to comply with this requirement can give rise to additional liability under the False Claims Act and Civil Monetary Penalties statute.

 

The U.S. Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits knowingly providing anything of value in return for, or to induce the referral of, Medicare, Medicaid or other U.S. healthcare program business. Violations can result in imprisonment, fines, penalties, and/or exclusion from participation in U.S. healthcare programs. The OIG has published “safe harbor” regulations that specify certain arrangements that are protected from prosecution under the Anti-Kickback Statute if all conditions of the relevant safe harbor are met. Failure to fit within a safe harbor does not necessarily constitute a violation of the Anti-Kickback Statute; rather, the arrangement would be subject to scrutiny by regulators and prosecutors and would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Many states have their own Medicaid anti-kickback laws, and several states also have anti-kickback laws that apply to all payers (i.e., not just government healthcare programs).

 

From time to time, the OIG issues alerts and other guidance on certain practices in the healthcare industry that implicate the Anti-Kickback Statute or other fraud and abuse laws. OIG Special Fraud Alerts and Advisory Opinions relevant to the Company set forth a number of practices allegedly engaged in by some clinical laboratories and healthcare providers that raise issues under the U.S. fraud and abuse laws, including the Anti-Kickback Statute. These practices include: (i) providing employees to furnish valuable services for physicians (other than collecting patient specimens for testing) that are typically the responsibility of the physicians’ staff; (ii) offering certain laboratory services at prices below fair market value in return for referrals of other tests that are billed to Medicare at higher rates; (iii) providing free testing to physicians’ managed care patients in situations where the referring physicians benefit from such reduced laboratory utilization; (iv) providing free pickup and disposal of biohazardous waste for physicians for items unrelated to a laboratory’s testing services; (v) providing general-use facsimile machines or computers to physicians that are not exclusively used in connection with the laboratory services; (vi) providing free testing for healthcare providers, their families and their employees (i.e., so-called “professional courtesy” testing); (vii) compensation paid by laboratories to physicians for blood specimen processing and for submitting patient data to registries; and (viii) the provision of discounts on laboratory services billed to customers in return for the referral of U.S. healthcare program business.

 

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In addition to the Anti-Kickback Statute, in October 2018, the U.S. enacted the Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act of 2018 (EKRA), as part of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (SUPPORT Act). EKRA is an all-payer anti-kickback law that makes it a criminal offense to pay any remuneration to induce referrals to, or in exchange for, patients using the services of a recovery home, a substance use clinical treatment facility, or laboratory. Although it appears that EKRA was intended to reach patient brokering and similar arrangements to induce patronage of substance use recovery and treatment, the language in EKRA is broadly written. As drafted, an EKRA prohibition on incentive compensation to sales employees is inconsistent with the federal anti-kickback statute and regulations, which permit payment of employee incentive compensation, a practice that is common in the industry. Significantly, EKRA permits the U.S. Department of Justice to issue regulations clarifying EKRA’s exceptions or adding additional exceptions, but such regulations have not yet been issued. The Company is working through its trade association to address the scope of EKRA and is seeking clarification or correction.

 

Enrollment and re-enrollment in U.S. healthcare programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, are subject to certain program integrity requirements intended to protect the programs from fraud, waste, and abuse. In September 2019, CMS published a final rule implementing program integrity enhancements to provider enrollment requiring Medicare, Medicaid, and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) providers and suppliers to disclose on an enrollment application or a revalidation application any current or previous direct or indirect affiliation with a provider or supplier that (1) has uncollected debt; (2) has been or is subject to a payment suspension under a federal health care program; (3) has been or is excluded by the OIG from Medicare, Medicaid, or CHIP; or (4) has had its Medicare, Medicaid, or CHIP billing privileges denied or revoked. This rule permits CMS to deny enrollment based on such an affiliation when CMS determines that the affiliation poses an undue risk of fraud, waste, or abuse. CMS is phasing in this new affiliation disclosure requirement.

 

Under another U.S. statute, known as the Stark Law or “physician self-referral” prohibition, physicians who have a financial or a compensation relationship with a commercial laboratory may not, unless an exception applies, refer Medicare or Medicaid patients for testing to the laboratory, regardless of the intent of the parties. Similarly, laboratories may not bill Medicare or Medicaid for services furnished pursuant to a prohibited self-referral. There are several Stark Law exceptions that are relevant to arrangements involving clinical laboratories, including: i) fair market value compensation for the provision of items or services; ii) payments by physicians to a laboratory for commercial laboratory services; iii) ancillary services (including laboratory services) provided within the referring physician’s own office, if certain criteria are satisfied; iv) physician investment in a company whose stock is traded on a public exchange and has stockholder equity exceeding $75.0 million; and v) certain space and equipment rental arrangements that are set at a fair market value rate and satisfy other requirements. Many states have their own self-referral laws as well, which in some cases apply to all patient referrals, not just government reimbursement programs.

 

In December 2020, the OIG and CMS published final rules to amend the regulations implementing the Anti-Kickback Statute and the Stark Law, respectively. The amendments are primarily intended to alleviate perceived impediments to coordinated care and value-based compensation arrangements through new safe harbors to the Anti-Kickback Statute and new exceptions to the Stark Law, and have varying degrees of applicability to laboratories. The CMS final rule incorporates laboratories and permits support for value-based arrangements, under certain conditions for purposes of the Stark Law. However, the OIG final rule excludes laboratories from protection under the Anti-Kickback Statute safe harbors for value-based arrangements.

 

There are a variety of other types of U.S. and state fraud and abuse laws, including laws prohibiting submission of false or fraudulent claims. The Company seeks to conduct its business in compliance with all U.S. and state fraud and abuse laws. The Company is unable to predict how these laws will be applied in the future, and no assurances can be given that its arrangements will not be subject to scrutiny under such laws. Sanctions for violations of these laws may include exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid, and other U.S. or state healthcare programs, significant criminal and civil fines and penalties, and loss of licensure. Any exclusion from participation in a U.S. healthcare program, or material loss of licensure, arising from any action by any federal or state regulatory or enforcement authority, would likely have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business. In addition, any significant criminal or civil penalty resulting from such proceedings could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.

 

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Competition

 

We compete with other contract manufacturers of OTC healthcare products. These suppliers range widely in size. Management believes that our manufacturing capacity and abilities offer a significant advantage over many of our competitors in the full service contract development and manufacturing industry. We have over 20 years of manufacturing experience and industry know how in large scale batch production of OTC lozenge products. The markets for OTC healthcare products and dietary supplements are highly competitive. Many of the participants in these industries have substantially greater capital resources, technical staffs, facilities, marketing resources, product development, and distribution experience than we do. We believe that our ability to compete in these industries will continue to depend on a number of factors, including product quality and price, availability, speed to market, consumer marketing, reliability, credit terms, brand name recognition, delivery time and post-sale service and support.

 

Our principal competition for our lab diagnostic services are commercial laboratories, such as Quest Diagnostics Incorporated and Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, both all of which have significant infrastructures and resources to support their diagnostic processing services. In addition, we compete with large, multispecialty group medical clinics, health systems and academic medical university-based clinics may provide in-house clinical laboratories offering COVID-19 and other RPP Molecular tests. Additionally, we compete against regional clinical laboratories providing diagnostic testing, including Interpace Biosciences, Inc.

 

Human Capital Management

 

We consider talent attraction, development, engagement and retention a key driver to our business success.  We are committed to developing a comprehensive, cohesive and positive company culture and employee experience.  At December 31, 2020, we employed 95 full-time employees, of which 47 were engaged in our contract manufacturing operations and 37 employees were providing diagnostic services. The remaining employees were involved in an executive, sales, marketing or administrative capacity.

 

We emphasize a number of measures and objectives in managing our human capital assets, including, among others, employee safety and wellness; talent acquisition and retention, employee engagement, development and training, diversity and inclusion, and compensation. None of our employees are represented by a labor organization or under any collective-bargaining arrangements. We consider our employee relations to be good.

 

We are committed to fostering an environment where all employees can grow and thrive. A diverse workforce results in a broader range of perspectives, helping drive our commitment to innovation. Our human capital resources objectives include, as applicable, identifying, recruiting, retaining, incentivizing and integrating our existing and new employees, advisors and consultants. The principal purposes of our cash and equity incentive plans are to attract, retain and reward personnel through the granting of cash-based and stock-based compensation awards, in order to increase stockholder value and the success of our Company by motivating such individuals to perform to the best of their abilities and achieve our objectives.

 

The success of our business is fundamentally connected to the well-being of our employees. We understand that good health leads to better performance. We provide our employees and their families with access to a variety of flexible and convenient health and wellness programs, health reimbursement accounts and retirement savings plan  Our health and wellness programs include benefits that provide support to manage events that may require time away from work or that impact their financial well-being and that support their physical and mental health by providing tools and resources to help them improve or maintain their health status and encourage engagement in healthy behaviors. We regularly evaluate our benefits package to make modifications that are aligned with the competitive landscape, legislative changes, and the unique needs of our business and culture.

 

Corporate Information

 

ProPhase was initially organized in Nevada in July 1989. Effective June 18, 2015, we changed our state of incorporation from the State of Nevada to the State of Delaware. Our principal executive offices are located at 711 Stewart Avenue, Garden City, New York 11530 and our telephone number is 215-345-0919.

 

Where You Can Find Other Information

 

We file periodic and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). We make available on our website (www.ProPhaseLabs.com) free of charge our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to or exhibits included in those reports as soon as reasonably practical after we electronically file such materials with or furnish them to the SEC. Information appearing on our website is not part of this Annual Report. In addition, the SEC maintains an Internet site (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, including the Company.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

The following discussion addresses risks and uncertainties that could cause, or contribute to causing, actual results to differ from our expectations in material ways. In evaluating our business, investors should pay particular attention to the risks and uncertainties described below and in other sections of this Annual Report and in our subsequent filings with the SEC. These risks and uncertainties, or other events that we do not currently anticipate or that we currently deem immaterial also may affect our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition. The trading price of our common stock could also decline due to any of these risks. The following information should be read in conjunction with Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements and related notes included in Part II, Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Annual Report.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We have a history of losses.

 

We have experienced net losses from continuing operations before income tax for our last two fiscal years. As of December 31, 2020, we had working capital of approximately $9.6 million, which we believe is an acceptable and adequate level of working capital to support our business for at least the next twelve months ending March 2022. Following the sale of our Cold-EEZE™ business in March 2017, we have been actively exploring new product technologies, applications, product line extensions and other new product opportunities.  In October 2020, we purchased our first CLIA licensed laboratory in Old Bridge, New Jersey, where we offer a variety of important medical tests, including, among others, COVID-19 diagnostic testing and Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Molecular tests. In December 2020, we expanded our diagnostic services to a second location in Garden City, New York. We may in the future consider and pursue investments and acquisitions in other sectors and industries. There can be no assurance that our diagnostic services business will succeed or that we will be successful in initiating or acquiring any new lines of business in the future, or that any such new lines of business will achieve profitability.

 

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The loss of sales to any one or more of our large third-party contract manufacturing customers could have a material adverse effect on our business operations and financial condition.

 

For each of Fiscal 2020 and 2019, our revenues from continuing operations came principally from our contract manufacturing services. Two third-party contract manufacturing customers, accounted for 47.1% and 17.2%, respectively of Fiscal 2020 revenues. Three third-party contract manufacturing customers, accounted for 36.5%, 30.5% and 11.1%, respectively, of Fiscal 2019 revenues. The loss of sales to any one or more of these third-party contract manufacturing customers could have a material adverse effect on our business operations and financial condition, unless we are able to increase revenue from other sources.

 

We have a limited operating history in the diagnostic testing services business. There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully offer, perform or generate revenues from our lab diagnostic services.

 

Despite our management’s extensive experience in the healthcare industry, we had no specific experience operating a diagnostic services business prior to entering this field in November 2020. We face substantial risks and uncertainties to which our diagnostic services business is subject. To address these risks and uncertainties, we must, among other things, successfully execute our business strategy, respond to competitive developments, and attract and retain qualified personnel. We cannot assure you that we will operate profitably or that our business strategy will be successful. As a result, our diagnostic services business may not succeed.

 

Our ability to generate revenues from COVID-19 and other RPP molecular testing, and our ability to generate profits from our diagnostic services business, will depend on a variety of factors, including:

 

  the level of demand for COVID-19 and other diagnostic testing, the price we are able to receive for performing our testing services, and the length of time for which that demand persists;
     
  the availability of COVID-19 testing from other laboratories;
     
  the period of time for which we are able to serve as an authorized laboratory offering COVID-19 testing under various Emergency Use Authorizations;
     
  our ability to maintain our status as an authorized laboratory to perform COVID-19 and other diagnostic testing and related services and to respond to any changes in regulatory requirements;
     
  the potential for supply disruptions and our reliance on certain single-source suppliers;
     
  the potential for disruption in the delivery of patient samples to our laboratory;
     
  the capacity of our laboratory to satisfy both COVID-19 testing and other testing demands;
     
  the extent to which we choose to allocate limited laboratory capacity, supplies and other resources to areas of our business other than COVID-19 testing;
     
  the complexity of billing for, and collecting revenue for, our testing services;
     
  our ability to maintain laboratory operations during the COVID-19 pandemic and to perform the test accurately and punctually;
     
  our ability to expand and or diversity our diagnostic services and
     
  the ease of use of our ordering and reporting process.

 

In addition, the process of building and expanding our lab diagnostic service business may divert resources and distract management’s attention from other areas of our business that may be more profitable or strategic. If we are unable to successfully provide diagnostic services while continuing to operate our existing manufacturing and dietary supplements business, our results of operations, financial position and reputation may suffer.

 

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If demand for COVID-19 testing decreases or becomes no longer necessary and we are unable to generate sufficient profits from other RPP Molecular tests, our business could be materially harmed and our $3.0 million Secured Promissory Note receivable could become uncollectable.

 

There can be no assurance that demand for our COVID-19 testing services will continue to exist in the future due to successful containment efforts, the successful vaccination of a majority of Americans, or due to other events. If there is no demand for our COVID-19 testing services, and we are unable to generate sufficient profits from other RPP Molecular tests, our business could be materially harmed. Similarly, the business of the issuer of our $3.0 million secured note (“Secured Note”), who is also in the diagnostic test processing business, could also be harmed, leading to their inability to repay amounts due and owed to us under the Secured Note. If the issuer is unable to pay amounts owed to us under the Secured Note receivable, we may be required to pursue legal remedies in order to recoup amounts owed to us.

 

We may require additional capital to support our growing diagnostic services business and product development and commercialization programs and additional funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

We may require additional capital to support our growing diagnostic services business and consumer product development and commercialization programs. The amount of capital that may be needed to support our business will depend on many factors which may include, but are not limited to (i) the revenue we generate from our lab diagnostic services, contract manufacturing services and dietary supplement sales, (ii) the expenses we incur in growing our lab diagnostic business and marketing our manufacturing capabilities and dietary supplement line; (iii) the cost involved in applying for and obtaining FDA, international regulatory or other technical approvals, if required, and (iv) whether we elect to establish partnering or other strategic arrangements for the development, sales, manufacturing and marketing of our products.

 

Income from our diagnostic services business, contract manufacturing business and TK Supplements® products line may not generate all the funds we need to support the growth of our diagnostic services business and future product development and commercialization. To the extent that we do not generate sufficient cash from operations, we may, in the short and long-term, seek to raise capital through the issuance of equity securities or through other financing sources. To the extent that we seek to raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may experience significant dilution. Any debt financing, if available, may include financial and other covenants that could restrict our use of the proceeds from such financing or impose other business and financial restrictions on us. In addition, we may consider alternative approaches such as licensing, joint venture, or partnership arrangements to provide long term capital. Additional funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

The customers for whom we contract manufacture may significantly influence our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our contract manufacturing business is dependent on demand for the products we manufacture for our customers and we have no control or influence over the market demand for those products. Demand for our customers’ products may be adversely affected by, among other things, regulatory issues, the loss of patent or other intellectual property rights protection, the emergence of competing products, competition from other contract manufacturers, negative public or consumer perception of those products or our industry and changes in the marketing strategies for such products. If production volumes of products that we manufacture for third-parties and related revenues are not maintained or if there is any change in the terms or termination of our manufacturing agreement with Mylan or any of our other significant customers, it may have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Disruptions to our supply chain or increases in the price or adulteration of key raw materials needed for our businesses could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Disruptions to our supply chain, including our access to raw materials necessary for our contract manufacturing business and TK Supplements® product line as well as access to COVID-19 testing supplies and personal protective equipment for our diagnostic services business, could have a material impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted, and may continue to adversely impact, third parties that are critical to our businesses, including vendors, suppliers, and business partners. While our businesses have not been impacted up to this point by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is difficult if not impossible to predict, whether that may change in the future.

 

Our TK Supplements® products and the products we manufacture for third parties are composed of certain key raw materials. If the prices of these raw materials were to increase significantly, it could result in a significant increase to us in the prices charged to us for our own branded products and third-party products. Raw material prices may increase in the future and we may not be able to pass on those increases to customers who purchase our products or to the customers whose products we manufacture. A significant increase in the price of raw materials that cannot be passed on to customers could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are reliant upon the supply of raw materials that meet our specifications and the specifications of third parties for whom we manufacture. If any raw material is adulterated and does not meet our specifications or third parties’ specifications, it could significantly impact our ability to manufacture products and could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, if we are no longer able to obtain the resources, raw materials or components we need from one or more of our suppliers on terms reasonable to us or at all, including as a result of the increased demand that may be placed on our suppliers as a result of public health epidemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic, our customer relationships could be materially and adversely affected, which could have a material impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Disruptions at our PMI manufacturing facilities or any loss of manufacturing certifications could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and customer relationships.

 

Any significant disruption at our manufacturing facility for any reason, including regulatory requirements, an FDA determination that the facility is not in compliance with the applicable cGMP regulations, the loss of certifications, power interruptions, destruction or damage to the facility or disruptions related to the COVID-19 pandemic, could disrupt our ability to manufacture products for our contract manufacturing customers and any of our own branded products. Any such disruption could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our PMI manufacturing business is subject to seasonal fluctuations and may fluctuate from cold season to cold season.

 

Because the majority of sales from our PMI manufacturing facility are from cold remedy products, our sales are subject to seasonal fluctuations and influenced by the timing, length and severity of each cold season. Our revenues tend to be higher in the first, third and fourth quarters during the cold season. Generally, a cold season is defined as the period of September to March, when the incidence of the common cold rises as a consequence of the change in weather and other factors.

 

Our product development and commercialization efforts may be unsuccessful.

 

There are numerous risks associated with OTC product development and commercialization. We may be subject to delays and/or be unable to successfully implement our business plan and strategy to develop and commercialize one or more OTC products and/or dietary supplements. The successful commercialization and market acceptance of any products we develop will be subject to, among other things, consumer purchasing trends, health and wellness trends, regulatory factors, retail acceptance and overall economic and market conditions. As a consequence, we may suspend or abandon some or all of our proposed new products before they ever become commercially viable. Even if we successfully develop and obtain approval of a new product, if we cannot successfully commercialize it in a timely manner, our business and financial condition may be materially adversely affected.

 

Our business is subject to significant competitive pressures.

 

We compete with other contract manufacturers of OTC drug and dietary supplement products. These suppliers range widely in size. We compete primarily on the basis of price, quality and service. Management believes that our manufacturing capacity and abilities offer a significant advantage over many of our competitors in the full service contract development and manufacturing industry. We have over 20 years of manufacturing experience and industry know how in large scale batch production of OTC lozenge products. To the extent that any of our competitors are able to offer better prices, quality and/or services, however, we could lose customers and our sales and margins may decline.

 

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The OTC healthcare products and dietary supplements industries are highly competitive. Many of the participants in these industries have substantially greater capital resources, technical staffs, facilities, marketing resources, product development, and distribution experience than we do. We believe that our ability to continue to compete in these industries will depend on a number of factors, including product quality and price, availability, speed to market, consumer marketing, reliability, credit terms, brand name recognition, delivery time and post-sale service and support. However, our failure to appropriately and timely respond to consumer preferences and demand for new products could significantly harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, unfavorable publicity or consumer perception of products we develop and commercialize could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

Our principal competition for our lab diagnostic services are commercial laboratories, such as Quest Diagnostics Incorporated and Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, both all of which have significant infrastructures and resources to support their diagnostic processing services. In addition, we compete with large, multispecialty group medical clinics, health systems and academic medical university-based clinics may provide in-house clinical laboratories offering COVID-19 and other RPP Molecular tests. Additionally, we compete against regional clinical laboratories providing diagnostic testing, including Interpace Biosciences, Inc. If we are unable to compete effectively, our earnings may be significantly negatively impacted.

 

Our success is dependent on key personnel.

 

Our success depends, in part, upon the continued service of key personnel, such as Mr. Ted Karkus, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and certain managers and strategists within the Company. The loss of the services of any one of them could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

In order to be successful, we must retain and motivate executives and other key employees, including those in managerial, technical, marketing and health product positions. In particular, our product generation efforts depend on hiring and retaining qualified health and science professionals. Competition for skilled employees who can perform the services that we require is intense and hiring, training, motivating, retaining and managing employees with the skills required is time-consuming and expensive. If we are not able to hire sufficient professional staff to support our operations, or to train, motivate, retain and manage the employees we do hire, it could have a material adverse effect on our business operations or financial results.

 

Failure to protect our trademarks and other intellectual property could impact our business.

 

We will rely on trademark laws to protect our proprietary rights in any products we develop and commercialize. Monitoring the unauthorized use of our intellectual property will be difficult. Litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Litigation of this type could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources, may result in counterclaims or other claims against us and could significantly harm our results of operations. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries do not protect our proprietary rights to the same extent as do the laws of the United States. From time to time, we may apply to have certain trademarks registered. There is no guarantee that such trademark registrations will be granted. The unauthorized reproduction of our trademarks could diminish the value of our brand and its market acceptance, competitive advantages or goodwill, which could adversely affect our business.

 

Our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income may be subject to certain limitations.

 

In general, under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Section 382”), a corporation that undergoes an “ownership change” is subject to limitations on its ability to use its pre-change net operating loss carryforwards (the “NOLs”), to offset future taxable income. Future changes in our stock ownership, some of which are outside of our control, could result in an ownership change under Section 382. Furthermore, our ability to use NOLs of companies that we may acquire in the future may be subject to limitations.

 

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Based on our Section 382 analysis, we do not believe our current net operating loss carryforwards are subject to these limitations as of December 31, 2020.

 

Adverse credit market conditions may significantly affect our access to capital, cost of capital and ability to meet liquidity needs.

 

Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the credit markets could adversely impact the availability and cost of credit to us in the future. Accordingly, we may be forced to delay raising capital or pay unattractive interest rates, which could increase our interest expense, decrease our profitability and significantly reduce our financial flexibility. Longer-term disruptions in the capital and credit markets as a result of uncertainty, changing or increased regulation, reduced alternatives or failures of significant financial institutions could adversely affect our access to liquidity needed for our business. Any disruption could require us to take measures to conserve cash until the markets stabilize or until alternative credit arrangements or other funding for our business needs can be arranged. Such measures could include deferring capital expenditures or other discretionary uses of cash. Overall, our results of operations, financial condition and cash flows could be materially adversely affected by disruptions in the credit markets.

 

System failures could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Like many companies, our business is highly dependent upon our information technology infrastructure (websites, accounting and manufacturing applications, and product and customer information databases) to manage effectively and efficiently our operations, including order entry, customer billing, accurate tracking of purchases and volume incentives and managing accounting, finance and manufacturing operations. The occurrence of a natural disaster, security breach or other unanticipated problem could result in interruptions in our day-to-day operations that could adversely affect our business. A long-term failure or impairment of any of our information systems could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Risks Related to Governmental Regulation and Litigation

 

Our contract manufacturing and dietary supplement businesses are subject to extensive governmental regulation.

 

We are subject to laws and regulations that cover:

 

  the formulation, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, distribution, importation, sale and storage of our products;
     
  the health and safety of our products;
     
  trade practice and direct selling laws; and
     
  product claims and advertising.

 

Compliance with these laws and regulations is time consuming and expensive. Moreover, new regulations could be adopted that would severely restrict the products we sell or manufacture or our ability to continue our business. We are unable to predict the nature of any future laws, regulations, interpretations or applications, nor can we predict what effect additional governmental regulations or administrative orders, when and if promulgated, would have on our business in the future. These future changes could, however, require the reformulation or elimination of certain products; imposition of additional record keeping and documentation requirements; imposition of new federal reporting and application requirements; modified methods of importing, manufacturing, storing or distributing certain products; and expanded or different labeling and substantiation requirements for certain products and ingredients. Any or all of these requirements could harm our business.

 

In July 2011, the FDA issued draft guidance governing the notification of new dietary ingredients (“NDIs”) and in August 2016, the FDA issued revised draft guidance. Although FDA guidance is not mandatory, it is a strong indication of the FDA’s current views, including its position on enforcement. We believe that the draft guidance, if implemented as proposed, could have a material impact on our operations. FDA enforcement of the NDI guidance as written could require us to incur additional expenses, which could be significant, and negatively affect our business in several ways, including, but not limited to, the detention and refusal of admission of imported products, the injunction of manufacturing of any dietary ingredients or dietary supplements until the FDA determines that those ingredients or products are in compliance, and the potential imposition of penalties for non-compliance.

 

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Our diagnostic business could be harmed by the loss or suspension of a license or imposition of a fine or penalties under, or future changes in, or interpretations of, the law or regulations of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1967, and the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA), or those of Medicare, Medicaid or other national, state or local agencies in the United States.

 

The performance of laboratory testing is subject to extensive U.S. regulation, and many of these statutes and regulations have not been interpreted by the courts. CLIA extends federal oversight to virtually all physician practices performing clinical laboratory testing and to clinical laboratories operating in the United States by requiring that they be certified by the federal government or, in the case of clinical laboratories, by a federally approved accreditation agency. The sanction for failure to comply with CLIA requirements may be suspension, revocation or limitation of a laboratory’s CLIA certificate, which is necessary to conduct business, as well as significant fines and/or criminal penalties. In addition, we expect to be subject to regulation under state law. State laws may require that laboratories and/or laboratory personnel meet certain qualifications, specify certain quality controls or require maintenance of certain records. Applicable statutes and regulations could be interpreted or applied by a prosecutorial, regulatory or judicial authority in a manner that would adversely affect our business. Potential sanctions for violation of these statutes and regulations include significant fines and the suspension or loss of various licenses, certificates and authorizations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, compliance with future legislation could impose additional requirements on us, which may be costly.

 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation of diagnostic products could result in increased costs and the imposition of fines or penalties, and could have a material adverse effect upon our business.

 

The FDA has regulatory responsibility for instruments, test kits, reagents and other devices used by clinical laboratories. The FDA enforces laws and regulations that govern the development, testing, manufacturing, performance, labeling, advertising, marketing, distribution and surveillance of diagnostic products, including COVID-19 diagnostics authorized by FDA under an Emergency Use Authorization, and it regularly inspects and reviews the manufacturing processes and product performance of diagnostic products.

 

FDA regulation of the diagnostic products we use could result in increased costs and administrative and legal actions for noncompliance, including warning letters, fines, penalties, product suspensions, product recalls, injunctions and other civil and criminal sanctions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and cash flows.

 

If we fail to comply with the complex federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations that apply to our business, we could suffer severe consequences that could materially and adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

 

We expect our diagnostic testing operations to be subject to extensive federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations, all of which are subject to change. These laws and regulations currently include, among other things:

 

  CLIA, which requires that laboratories obtain certification from the federal government, and state licensure laws;
     
  CMS and FDA laws and regulations;
     
  HIPAA, which imposes comprehensive federal standards with respect to the privacy and security of protected health information and requirements for the use of certain standardized electronic transactions, and amendments to HIPAA under HITECH, which strengthen and expand HIPAA privacy and security compliance requirements, increase penalties for violators, extend enforcement authority to state attorneys general and impose requirements for breach notification;
     
  state laws regulating genetic testing and protecting the privacy of genetic test results, as well as state laws protecting the privacy and security of health information and personal data and mandating reporting of breaches to affected individuals and state regulators;
     
  the federal anti-kickback law, or the Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits knowingly and willfully offering, paying, soliciting, receiving, or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, in exchange for or to induce either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing, arranging for, or recommending of an item or service that is reimbursable, in whole or in part, by a federal health care program;
     
  other federal and state fraud and abuse laws, such as anti-kickback laws, prohibitions on self-referral, and false claims acts, which may extend to services reimbursable by any third-party payor, including private insurers;

 

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  the federal Physician Payments Sunshine Act, which requires medical device manufactures to track and report to the federal government certain payments and other transfers of value made to physicians and teaching hospitals and ownership or investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members;
     
  Section 216 of the federal Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, which requires applicable laboratories to report private payor data in a timely and accurate manner beginning in 2017 and every three years thereafter (and in some cases annually);
     
  state laws that impose reporting and other compliance-related requirements;
     
  state billing laws, including regulations on “pass through billing” which may limit our ability to submit claims for payment and/or mark up the cost of services in excess of the price paid for such services, and “direct-bill” laws which may limit our ability to purchase services from a laboratory and bill for the services ordered;
     
  similar foreign laws and regulations that apply to us in the countries in which we operate.

 

These laws and regulations are complex and are subject to interpretation by the courts and by government agencies. Our failure to comply could lead to civil or criminal penalties, exclusion from participation in state and federal health care programs, or prohibitions or restrictions on our laboratory’s ability to provide or receive payment for our services. Any action taken against us by a governmental entity or private party could, regardless of their outcome, damage our reputation and adversely affect important business relationships with third parties, including managed care organizations, and other private third-party payors.

 

We use potentially hazardous materials, chemicals and patient samples in our business and any disputes relating to improper handling, storage or disposal of these materials could be time consuming and costly.

 

Our lab diagnostic services involves the controlled use of hazardous laboratory materials and chemicals, including small quantities of acid and alcohol, and patient samples. We are subject to U.S. laws and regulations related to the protection of the environment, the health and safety of employees and the handling, transportation and disposal of medical specimens, infectious and hazardous waste. We could be liable for accidental contamination or discharge or any resultant injury from hazardous materials, and conveyance, processing, and storage of and data on patient samples. If we fail to comply with applicable laws or regulations, we could be required to pay penalties or be held liable for any damages that result and this liability could exceed our financial resources. Further, future changes to environmental health and safety laws could cause us to incur additional expense or restrict operations.

 

In the event of a lawsuit or investigation concerning such hazardous materials, we could be held responsible for any injury caused to persons or property by exposure to, or release of, these hazardous materials or patient samples that may contain infectious materials. The cost of this liability could exceed our resources. While we expect to maintain broad form liability insurance coverage for these risks, the level or breadth of our coverage may not be adequate to fully cover potential liability claims.

 

Failure to accurately bill for testing services, or to comply with applicable laws relating to government health care programs, could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Billing for diagnostic testing services is complex and subject to extensive and non-uniform rules and administrative requirements. Depending on the billing arrangement and applicable law, we bill various payers, such as patients, insurance companies, government groups, Medicare and Medicaid. We expect that the majority of our billing and related operations will be provided by a third party. Failure to accurately bill for our services could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, failure to comply with applicable laws relating to billing government health care programs may result in various consequences, including the return of overpayments, civil and criminal fines and penalties, exclusion from participation in government health care programs and the loss of various licenses, certificates and authorizations necessary to operate our business, as well as incur additional liabilities from third-party claims, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Certain violations of these laws may also provide the basis for a civil remedy under the federal False Claims Act, including fines and damages of up to three times the amount claimed. The qui tam provisions of the federal False Claims Act and similar provisions in certain state false claims acts allow private individuals to bring lawsuits against health care companies on behalf of the government.

 

Although we expect to be in compliance, in all material respects, with applicable laws and regulations, there can be no assurance that a regulatory agency or tribunal would not reach a different conclusion. The federal and state governments have substantial leverage in negotiating settlements since the amount of potential damages and fines far exceeds the rates at which services will be reimbursed, and the government has the remedy of excluding a non-compliant provider from participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. We expect that federal and state governments continue aggressive enforcement efforts against perceived health care fraud. Legislative provisions relating to health care fraud and abuse provide government enforcement personnel with substantial funding, powers, penalties and remedies to pursue suspected cases of fraud and abuse.

 

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Our failure to comply with FTC regulations could result in substantial monetary penalties and could adversely affect our operating results.

 

The FTC exercises jurisdiction over the advertising of dietary supplements and has instituted numerous enforcement actions against OTC drug companies for failure to have adequate substantiation for claims made in advertising or for the use of false or misleading advertising claims. Failure by us to comply with applicable regulations could result in substantial monetary penalties, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

Laws and regulations regarding direct selling may prohibit or restrict our ability to sell our products in some markets or require us to make changes to our business model in some markets.

 

Direct selling companies are subject to laws and regulations by various government agencies. These laws and regulations are generally intended to prevent fraudulent or deceptive practices and to protect consumers. The FTC periodically investigates and brings enforcement actions against direct selling companies based on alleged pyramid selling activity and/or false and misleading claims made by the direct selling company or its independent distributors. Direct selling companies that have been the subject of an FTC enforcement action have generally been required to make significant changes to their business model and pay significant monetary fines. Being the target of an investigation or enforcement action by the FTC could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

We depend on third parties to provide services critical to our diagnostic testing business, and we depend on them to comply with applicable laws and regulations. Additionally, any breaches of the information technology systems of third parties could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

 

We depend on third parties to provide services critical to our diagnostic testing business, including diagnostic lab equipment, supplies, ground and air transport of clinical and diagnostic testing supplies and specimens, research products, and people, among other services. Third parties that provide services to us are subject to similar risks related to security of customer-related information and compliance with U.S., state, local, or international environmental, health and safety, and privacy and security laws and regulations as we are. Any failure by third parties to comply with applicable laws, or any failure of third parties to provide services more generally, could have a material impact on us, whether because of the loss of the ability to receive services from the third parties, our legal liability for the actions or inactions of third parties, or otherwise. In addition, third parties to whom we outsource certain services or functions may process personal data, or other confidential information belonging to us. A breach or attack affecting these third parties could also harm our business, results of operations and reputation.

 

If our products do not have the effects intended or cause undesirable side effects, our business may suffer.

 

Although many of the ingredients in our current dietary supplement products are vitamins, minerals, and other substances for which there is a long history of human consumption, they also contain innovative ingredients or combinations of ingredients. While we believe that all of these products and the combinations of ingredients in them are safe when taken as directed, the products could have certain undesirable side effects if not taken as directed or if taken by a consumer who has certain medical conditions. In addition, these products may not have the effect intended if they are not taken in accordance with certain instructions, which include certain dietary restrictions. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that any of the products, even when used as directed, will have the effects intended or will not have harmful side effects in an unforeseen way or on an unforeseen cohort. If any of our products or products we develop or commercialize in the future are shown to be harmful or generate negative publicity from perceived harmful effects, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects could be harmed significantly.

 

We must comply with complex and overlapping laws protecting the privacy and security of health information and personal data.

 

There are a number of state, federal and international laws protecting the privacy and security of health information and personal data. Under the administrative simplification provisions of HIPAA, HHS has issued regulations which establish uniform standards governing the conduct of certain electronic health care transactions and protecting the privacy and security of PHI used or disclosed by health care providers and other covered entities.

 

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The privacy regulations regulate the use and disclosure of PHI by health care providers engaging in certain electronic transactions or “standard transactions.” They also set forth certain rights that an individual has with respect to his or her PHI maintained by a covered health care provider, including the right to access or amend certain records containing PHI or to request restrictions on the use or disclosure of PHI. The HIPAA security regulations establish administrative, physical, and technical standards for maintaining the integrity and availability of PHI in electronic form. These standards apply to covered health care providers and also to “business associates” or third parties providing services involving the use or disclosure of PHI. The HIPAA privacy and security regulations establish a uniform federal “floor” and do not supersede state laws that are more stringent or provide individuals with greater rights with respect to the privacy or security of, and access to, their records containing PHI. As a result, we may be required to comply with both HIPAA privacy regulations and varying state privacy and security laws.

 

Moreover, HITECH, among other things, established certain health information security breach notification requirements. In the event of a breach of unsecured PHI, a covered entity must notify each individual whose PHI is breached, federal regulators and in some cases, must publicize the breach in local or national media. Breaches affecting 500 individuals or more are publicized by federal regulators who publicly identify the breaching entity, the circumstances of the breach and the number of individuals affected.

 

These laws contain significant fines and other penalties for wrongful use or disclosure of PHI. Given the complexity of HIPAA and HITECH and their overlap with state privacy and security laws, and the fact that these laws are rapidly evolving and are subject to changing and potentially conflicting interpretation, our ability to comply with the HIPAA, HITECH and state privacy requirements is uncertain and the costs of compliance are significant. Adding to the complexity is that our planned operations are currently evolving and the requirements of these laws will apply differently depending on such things as whether or not we bill electronically for our services, or provide services involving the use or disclosure of PHI and incur compliance obligations as a business associate. The costs of complying with any changes to the HIPAA, HITECH and state privacy restrictions may have a negative impact on our operations. Noncompliance could subject us to criminal penalties, civil sanctions and significant monetary penalties as well as reputational damage.

 

We are also required to collect and maintain personal information about our employees as well as receive and transfer certain payment information, to accept payments from our customers, including credit card information. Most states have adopted laws requiring notification of affected individuals and state regulators in the event of a breach of personal information, which is a broader class of information than the health information protected by HIPAA. Many state laws impose significant data security requirements, such as encryption or mandatory contractual terms to ensure ongoing protection of personal information. Activities outside of the United States implicate local and national data protection standards, impose additional compliance requirements, and generate additional risks of enforcement for non-compliance. The collection and use of such information may be subject to contractual obligations as well. If the security and information systems that we or our outsourced third-party providers use to store or process such information are compromised or if we, or such third parties, otherwise fail to comply with these laws, regulations, and contractual obligations, we could face litigation and the imposition of penalties that could adversely affect our financial performance.

 

We must comply with all applicable privacy and data security laws in order to operate our business and may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to ensure ongoing compliance, to protect against security breaches and hackers or to alleviate problems caused by such breaches. Breaches of health information and/or personal data may be extremely expensive to remediate, may prompt federal or state investigation, fines, civil and/or criminal sanctions and significant reputational damage.

 

We may be subject to product liability claims.

 

As a direct marketer and manufacturer of products designed for human consumption, we are subject to product liability claims if the use of our products or the products that we manufacture for third parties are alleged to have resulted in injury or to include inadequate instructions for use or inadequate warnings concerning possible side effects and interactions with other substances. Our current products and the products that we currently manufacture for third parties are not subject to pre-market regulatory approval in the United States and could contain contaminated substances.

 

While we currently maintain product liability insurance, a successful claim brought against us related to our branded products or products that we manufacture for third parties in excess of, or outside of, our existing insurance coverage, could result in increased costs and could adversely affect our reputation with customers, which could in turn materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Risks Related to Our Common Stock and Governance Matters

 

Future sales of shares of our common stock in the public market could adversely affect the trading price of shares of our common stock and our ability to raise funds in new stock offerings.

 

Future sales of substantial amounts of shares of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that such sales are likely to occur, could affect prevailing trading prices of our common stock. Moreover, the perceived risk of this potential dilution could cause stockholders to attempt to sell their shares and investors to “short” our stock, a practice in which an investor sells shares that he or she does not own at prevailing market prices, hoping to purchase shares later at a lower price to cover the sale. As each of these events would cause the number of shares of common stock being offered for sale to increase, our common stock’s market price would likely further decline. All of these events could combine to make it very difficult for us to sell equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem appropriate.

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business or if they issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding our stock, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. If any of the analysts who cover us issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding us, our business model, products or stock performance, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline. Moreover, the unpredictability of our financial results likely reduces the certainty, and therefore reliability, of the forecasts by securities or industry analysts of our future financial results, adding to the potential volatility of our stock price.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors owns a substantial amount of our common stock.

 

As of March 31, 2021, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors beneficially owned approximately 29.3% of our common stock. As such, our Chief Executive Officer may exert significant influence over the outcome of all matters submitted to stockholders for approval, including the election of directors. Consequently, he exercises substantial influence over major decisions including major corporate actions such as mergers and other business combinations transactions which could result in or prevent a change of control of the Company. Circumstances may occur in which the interests of our Chief Executive Officer could be in conflict with the interests of other stockholders. Accordingly, a stockholder’s ability to influence us through voting their shares may be limited.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation and By-laws contain certain provisions that may be barriers to a takeover.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation and By-laws contain certain provisions which may deter, discourage, or make it difficult for another person or entity to gain control of the Company through a tender offer, merger, proxy contest or similar transaction or series of transactions. These provisions may deter a future tender offer or other takeover attempt which could include a premium over the market price of our common stock at the time. Such provisions could depress the trading price of our common stock.

 

We have agreed to indemnify our officers and directors from liability.

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation and our By-laws provide that we will indemnify, to the fullest extent permitted by the Delaware General Corporation Law, any person who is or was made a party to, or is or was threatened to be made a party to, any pending, completed, or threatened action, suit or proceeding because he or she is or was a director, officer, employee or agent of the Company or is or was serving at the Company’s request as a director, officer, employee or agent of any corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise. These provisions permit us to advance expenses to an indemnified party in connection with defending any such proceeding, upon receipt of an undertaking by the indemnified party to repay those amounts if it is later determined that the party is not entitled to indemnification. We entered into indemnity agreements with each member of our board of directors. These agreements provide, among other things, that we will indemnify each officer and director in the event they become a party or otherwise a participant in any action or proceeding on account of their service as a director or officer of the Company (or service for another corporation or entity in any capacity at the request of the Company) to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law. The indemnification provisions may reduce the likelihood of derivative litigation against directors and officers and discourage or deter stockholders from suing directors or officers for breaches of their duties to the Company, even though such an action, if successful, might otherwise benefit the Company or its stockholders. In addition, to the extent that we expend funds to indemnify directors and officers, funds will be unavailable for operational purposes.

 

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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 2. Properties

 

Our corporate headquarters are located in Garden City, New York. We leased this property commencing in December 2020. Our headquarters are approximately 25,000 square feet and are comprised of lab diagnostic area with storage area and office space. Our second location is approximately 4,000 square feet and is comprised of lab diagnostic area with storage area and office space in Old Bridge, NJ. We leased additional administrative office space of approximately 2,000 square feet in Fort Washington, PA. Our principal manufacturing facility is located in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The facility was purchased in October 2004. The facility has a total area of approximately 57,500 square feet and is comprised of manufacturing, warehousing and office space. We believe that our existing facilities are adequate at this time and do not anticipate the need for additional facilities in the foreseeable future.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we have been and may again become involved in legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, including the lawsuit discussed below. We are not presently a party to any material litigation.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is currently traded on The Nasdaq Capital Market under the trading symbol “PRPH.”

 

As of March 24, 2021, there were approximately 200 holders of record.

 

Securities Authorized Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

See Part III, Item 12. “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters” for information relating to our equity compensation plans.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

None.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

 

None.

 

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Item 6. Reserved

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read together with our financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report. This discussion contains forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. See “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks and assumptions associated with these statements. Actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

General

 

We are a diversified medical science and technology company with deep experience with OTC consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements. We conduct our operations through two operating segments: consumer products and diagnostic services. Until late 2020 we were engaged in the research, development, manufacture, distribution, marketing and sale of OTC consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements in the United States. However, in December 2020, we also began to offer COVID-19 and other respiratory pathogen panel (RPP) molecular tests through our new diagnostic services business.  

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, PMI, is a full-service contract manufacturer and private label developer of a broad range of non-GMO, organic and natural-based cough drops and lozenges and OTC drug and dietary supplement products. The dietary supplements are developed and marketed under the TK Supplements® brand name.

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, ProPhase Diagnostics, formed on October 9, 2020, offers a variety of important medical tests, including COVID-19 and (RPP) molecular tests. On October 23, 2020, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Confucius Plaza Medical Laboratory Corp. (“CPM”) for approximately $2.5 million in cash, subject to certain adjustments, pursuant to the terms of a Stock Purchase Agreement, by and among the Company, CPM, Pride Diagnostics and other parties named therein CPM (which is now known as ProPhase Diagnostics NJ, Inc.) is the owner of a 4,000 square foot CLIA accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey, which ProPhase Diagnostics acquired as part of the transaction. As a result of the acquisition of CPM in October 2020, we entered into a new business line, diagnostic services. In December 2020, we expanded our diagnostic services business with the signing of a lease and the recent build out of a second, larger CLIA accredited laboratory in Garden City, New York. Operations at this second facility commenced in January 2021.

 

We continue to actively pursue acquisition opportunities for other companies, technologies and products within and outside the consumer healthcare products and diagnostics services industries.

 

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Results of Operations from Continuing Operations

 

Fiscal 2020 compared with Fiscal 2019

 

Net sales for Fiscal 2020 increased $4.6 million to $14.5 million as compared to $9.9 million for Fiscal 2019. The increase in net sales for Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 is principally due to increased third party customer orders in contract manufacturing and revenue of $1.3 million related to our new diagnostic services business.

 

Cost of sales for Fiscal 2020 were $9.9 million as compared to $7.3 million for Fiscal 2019. We realized a gross profit $4.6 million for Fiscal 2020 as compared to $2.6 million for Fiscal 2019. For Fiscal 2020, our gross margin was 31.8% as compared to 26.5% for Fiscal 2019. Such increase in gross margin for Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 is principally due to (i) an increase in the absorption of fixed production costs and (ii) fluctuations in our product mix and pricing fluctuations from period to period and increased margins generally associated with the new diagnostic services business. Gross margins have historically been influenced by fluctuations in quarter-to-quarter production volume, fixed production costs and related overhead absorption, raw ingredient costs, inventory mark to market write-downs and timing of shipments to customers.

 

Sales and marketing expense for Fiscal 2020 was $1.3 million as compared to $1.0 million for Fiscal 2019. The increase in sales and marketing expenses of $245,000 was related to an increase in advertising expenses for our retail consumer products and the new diagnostic services business.

 

Administrative expense increased $2.2 million for Fiscal 2020 to $6.7 million as compared to $4.5 million in Fiscal 2019. The increase in administrative expense for Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 was principally due to greater professional and legal fees resulting from, in part, our entry into the diagnostic services business. In addition, share-based compensation expense increased by $715,000.

 

Research and development costs for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $663,000 and $332,000, respectively. The increase of $301,000 in research and development costs for Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 was principally due to validation costs associated with diagnostic services in the current period.

 

Net interest income for Fiscal 2020 was $62,000 as compared to $133,000 for Fiscal 2019. The decrease in interest income in Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 is principally due to a lower average account balance in our investment account. Interest expense for Fiscal 2020 was $295,000 as compared to $0 for Fiscal 2019. The increase in interest expenses in Fiscal 2020 as compared to Fiscal 2019 is principally due to the interest on the unsecured promissory notes issued in September 2020.

 

As a result of the effects of the above, the loss from continuing operations for Fiscal 2020 was $2.33 million, or ($0.18) per share, as compared to a loss from continuing operations of $3.1 million, or ($0.27) per share, for Fiscal 2019. In Fiscal 2020, we recognized a $1.9 million gain on the sales of real estate that contributed to a lower loss from operation. The gain from discontinued operations for Fiscal 2020 was $201,000, or $0.02 per share, as compared to a loss of $40,000, or ($0.00) per share, for Fiscal 2019. Net loss for Fiscal 2020 was $2.1 million, or ($0.18) per share, as compared to $3.1 million, or ($0.27) per share for Fiscal 2019.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our aggregate cash and cash equivalents and marketable securities as of December 31, 2020 were $8.5 million as compared to $1.4 million at December 31, 2019. Our working capital was $9.6 million and $9.0 million as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The increase of $7.1 million in our cash and cash equivalents and marketable securities balance for the 12 months ended December 31, 2020 was principally due the following (i) the release of the escrow funds of $4.8 million by Mylan, (ii) our receipt of two loans for total proceeds of $10 million,and (ii) the sale of our corporate headquarters for $2.2 million offset by (i) the issuance of a net $3.00 million promissory note receivable, (ii) acquisition of a new CLIA accredited laboratory for $2.5 million, and (iii) our investment in capital expenditures, prepaid supplies and inventory for our the diagnostic services business of $5.1 million.

 

As a consequence of the seasonality of our business, we realize variations in operating results and demand for working capital from quarter to quarter.

 

COVID-19

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has not had a material impact on our business to date, although we did experience higher than normal net sales for Fiscal 2020, primarily as a result of increased customer demand for our OTC healthcare and cold remedy products as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

In October 2020, we acquired our first CLIA accredited laboratory that offers a variety of important medical tests, including, among others, COVID-19 diagnostic testing services. In December 2020, we acquired our second diagnostic testing facility. While we expect revenues to continue to increase as result of our new business line, we will need to continue to make substantial investments to secure the necessary equipment, supplies and personnel to provide these services. There can be no assurance that our efforts to offer and perform COVID-19 testing will be successful and that we will be able to generate a profit.

 

The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on our business will depend on many factors beyond our knowledge or control, including the duration and severity of the outbreak, the timing, scope and effectiveness of federal, state and local governmental responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the extent of business disruptions caused by the pandemic, including as a result of travel restrictions, quarantines, social distancing requirements and business closures in the United States and other countries in order to contain and treat the virus. We may also be impacted by changes in the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic at different times in the various cities and regions where we operate and offer diagnostic testing services. Also, there can be no assurance that demand for our COVID-19 testing services will continue to exist in the future due to successful containment efforts, the successful vaccination of a majority of Americans, or due to other events. If there is no demand for our COVID-19 testing services, and we are unable to generate sufficient profits from other RPP Molecular tests, our business could be materially harmed. For these reasons, we are unable to estimate the extent to which COVID-19 will negatively impact our financial results or liquidity.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on the global capital markets and economies worldwide and could ultimately have a material adverse impact on our ability to raise capital needed to develop and commercialize products.

 

September 2020 Notes

 

On September 15, 2020, we issued two unsecured, partially convertible promissory notes (the “September 2020 Notes”) for an aggregate principal amount of $10 million to two investors. We intend to use the proceeds from the September 2020 Notes for working capital and general corporate purposes, which may include capital expenditures, product development and commercialization expenditures, and acquisitions of companies, businesses, technologies and products.

 

September 2020 Notes

 

On September 15, 2020, we issued two unsecured, partially convertible, promissory notes (the “September 2020 Notes”) for an aggregate principal amount of $10 million to two investors. We used the proceeds from the September 2020 Notes for working capital and general corporate purposes, which included capital expenditures and acquisitions of companies, businesses.

 

January 2021 Offerings

 

In January 2021, we completed two separate equity offerings whereby we issued a total of 3,550,000 shares of our common stock for net proceeds of $40.6 million. The net proceeds derived from these equity offerings will be used principally for the expansion of our diagnostics services business.

 

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General

 

Management is not aware of any other trends, events or uncertainties that have or are reasonably likely to have a material negative impact upon our (i) short-term or long-term liquidity, or (ii) revenue or income from continuing operations. Any challenge to our trademark rights could have a material adverse effect on our future; however, we are not aware of any condition that would make such an event probable. Our business is subject to seasonal variations that impact our liquidity and working capital during the course of our fiscal year and is now subject to the demand for COVID testing in our diagnostic services business.

 

To the extent that we do not generate sufficient cash from operations, our cash balances will decline. We may also use our cash to explore and/or acquire new product technologies, applications, product line extensions, new contract manufacturing applications and other new business opportunities. In the event that our available cash is insufficient to support such initiatives and the development of our new diagnostic service business, we may need to incur indebtedness or issue common stock to finance plans for growth. Volatility in the credit markets and the liquidity of major financial institutions may have an adverse effect on our ability to fund our business strategy through borrowings, under either existing or newly created loan instruments, or the sale of securities in the public or private markets on terms that we believe to be reasonable, if at all.

 

 27 
   

 

Impact of Inflation

 

We are subject to normal inflationary trends and anticipate that any increased costs would be passed on to our customers. Inflation has not had a material effect on our business.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included under Item 8 of this Part II. However, certain accounting policies are deemed “critical”, as they require management’s highest degree of judgment, estimates and assumptions. These accounting policies, estimates and disclosures have been discussed with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors. A discussion of our critical accounting policies and estimates, the judgments and uncertainties affecting their application and the likelihood that materially different amounts would be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions are as follows:

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements and the accompanying notes thereto, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”), requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the respective reporting periods. Examples include the provision for bad debt, sales returns and allowances, inventory obsolescence, useful lives of property and equipment, impairment of goodwill, intangibles and property and equipment, income tax valuations and assumptions related to accrued advertising. The estimates and assumptions are based on historical experience, current trends and other factors that management believes to be relevant at the time the financial statements are prepared. Management reviews the accounting policies, assumptions, estimates and judgments on a quarterly basis. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition and Accounts Receivables

 

We generate revenue principally through two types of revenue streams, diagnostic services and consumer products with two types of customers, contract manufacturing customers and retail customers. The process for estimating revenues and the ultimate collection of receivables involves assumptions and judgments.

 

Revenue from our diagnostic services are recognized when the lab test is complete and the diagnostic test result is provided to the customer. Revenue from our consumer products is recognized when the shipments to contract manufacturing and retailer customers are recognized at the time ownership is transferred to the customer. In 2020, we had $14.5 million of net sales of which approximately $12.3 million were from contract manufacturing customers, $1.0 million of our sales were from retailer sales and $1.2 million were from diagnostic services. We bill the providers at standard price and take into consideration for negotiated discounts and an anticipated reimbursement remittance adjustments based on, the payer portfolio, when revenue is recorded. We use the most expected value method to estimate the transaction price for reimbursements that may vary from the listed contract price.

 

Revenue Recognition – Sales Allowances

 

When providing for the appropriate sales returns, allowances, cash discounts and cooperative incentive promotion costs (“sales allowances”), we apply a uniform and consistent method for making certain assumptions for estimating these provisions. These estimates and assumptions are based on historical experience, current trends and other factors that management believes to be relevant at the time the financial statements are prepared. Management reviews the accounting policies, assumptions, estimates and judgments on a quarterly basis. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Our return policy accommodates returns for (i) discontinued products, (ii) store closings and (iii) products that have reached or exceeded designated expiration date. The following is a summary of the change in the return provision for the years ended December 31, 2019 to the year ended December 31, 2020 (in thousands):

 

   Amount 
Return provision at December 31, 2019  $169 
Net change in the return provision Fiscal 2020   122 
Return provision at December 31, 2020  $291 

 

 28 
   

 

For Fiscal 2020, the return provision increased by $122,000. The increase in the return provision was principally due to net returns associated with Fiscal 2020.

 

A one percent deviation for these sales allowance provisions for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 would affect net sales by approximately $10,000 and $8,600, respectively.

 

Additionally, accrued advertising and other allowances from retail as of December 31, 2020 include $463,000 for cooperative incentive promotion costs, which is reported as accrued advertising and other allowances under current liabilities. As of December 31, 2019, accrued advertising and other allowances from retail revenue include $92,000 for cooperative incentive promotion costs, which is reported as accrued advertising and other allowances under current liabilities.

 

Goodwill and Long lived Assets

 

We review our goodwill at least annually for impairment as well as the carrying value of goodwill and our long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of these assets may not be fully recoverable. When it is determined that the carrying amount of long-lived assets or goodwill is impaired, impairment is measured by comparing an asset’s estimated fair value to its carrying value. The determination of fair value is based on quoted market prices in active markets, if available, or independent appraisals; sales price negotiations; or projected future cash flows discounted at a rate determined by management to be commensurate with our business risk. The estimation of fair value utilizing discounted forecasted cash flows includes significant judgments regarding assumptions of revenue, operating and marketing costs; selling and administrative expenses; interest rates; property and equipment additions and retirements; and industry competition, general economic and business conditions, among other factors.

 

Management has determined that there was no impairment to our long-lived assets and goodwill on the basis of a review of a discounted cash flow analysis, which for goodwill is performed at the level of the subsidiaries to which the goodwill relates. If there is a material change in the assumptions used in the determination of fair value or a material change in the conditions or circumstances influencing fair value, we could be required to recognize a material impairment charge.

 

Income Taxes

 

Accounting for income taxes requires recognition of deferred tax liabilities and assets for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities. These deferred taxes are measured by applying the provisions of tax laws in effect at the balance sheet date, including the impact of the TCJA enacted on December 22, 2017. The TCJA made broad and significant changes to the U.S. tax code that affects the year ended December 31, 2017, including, but not limited to, a change in the federal rate from 35% to 21% effective January 1, 2018.

 

We recognizes in income the effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities in the period that includes the TCJA enactment date. We utilize the asset and liability approach which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. In estimating future tax consequences, we generally consider all expected future events other than enactments of changes in the tax law or rates. Until sufficient taxable income to offset the temporary timing differences attributable to operations and the tax deductions attributable to option, warrant and stock activities are assured, a valuation allowance equaling the total net current and non-current deferred tax asset is being provided.

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

 

In February 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) in order to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by, among other provisions, recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet for those leases classified as operating leases under previous GAAP. For public companies, ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 (including interim periods within those periods) using a modified retrospective approach and early adoption is permitted. In transition, entities may also elect a package of practical expedients that must be applied in its entirety to all leases commencing before the adoption date, unless the lease is modified, and permits entities to not reassess (a) the existence of a lease, (b) lease classification or (c) determination of initial direct costs, as of the adoption date, which effectively allows entities to carryforward accounting conclusions under previous GAAP. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842): Targeted Improvements, which provides entities an optional transition method to apply the guidance under Topic 842 as of the adoption date, rather than as of the earliest period presented. We adopted Topic 842 on January 1, 2019, using the optional transition method to apply the new guidance as of January 1, 2019, rather than as of the earliest period presented, and elected the package of practical expedients described above. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07 “Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting”, which simplifies the accounting for share-based payments granted to nonemployees for goods and services. Under the ASU, most of the guidance on such payments to nonemployees would be aligned with the requirements for share-based payments granted to employees. The amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted, but not earlier than an entity’s adoption date of Topic 606. We adopted this standard on January 1, 2019. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards, Not Yet Adopted

 

In September 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326). The ASU sets forth a “current expected credit loss” (CECL) model which requires the Company to measure all expected credit losses for financial instruments held at the reporting date based on historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable supportable forecasts. This replaces the existing incurred loss model and is applicable to the measurement of credit losses on financial assets measured at amortized cost and applies to some off-balance sheet credit exposures. In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-02, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), which amends the effective date of the original pronouncement for smaller reporting companies. ASU 2016-13 and its amendments will be effective for the Company for interim and annual periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this ASU on its financial statements.

 

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In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes (“ASU 2019-12”), which is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and also clarifies and amends existing guidance to improve consistent application. This guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

Like virtually all commercial enterprises, we may be exposed to the risk (“market risk”) that the cash flows to be received or paid relating to certain financial instruments could change as a result of changes in interest rate, exchange rates, commodity prices, equity prices and other market changes.

 

Our operations are not subject to risks of material foreign currency fluctuations, nor do we use derivative financial instruments in our investment practices. We place our marketable investments in instruments that meet high credit quality standards. We do not expect material losses with respect to our investment portfolio or excessive exposure to market risks associated with interest rates. The impact on our results of one percentage point change in short-term interest rates would not have a material impact on our future earnings, fair value, or cash flows related to investments in cash equivalents or interest-earning marketable securities.

 

Current economic conditions may cause a decline in business and consumer spending which could adversely affect our business and financial performance including the collection of accounts receivables, realization of inventory and recoverability of assets. In addition, our business and financial performance may be adversely affected by current and future economic conditions, including a reduction in the availability of credit, financial market volatility and recession.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

  Page
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms 32
Financial Statements:  
Consolidated Balance Sheets 34
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) 35
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity 36
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows 37
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 38

 

 31 
   

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and
Stockholders of ProPhase Labs, Inc., Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of ProPhase Labs, Inc., Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company” or “ProPhase”) as of December 31, 2020 and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss), statements of changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2020, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2020, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.

 

Critical Audit Matter Description

 

Secured Promissory Note Receivable (“the Note”) Realization

 

The Note, as amended and restated, was entered into with a company (the borrower) pursuant to which ProPhase loaned $3.0 million while also entering into a consulting agreement with the borrower, as disclosed in Notes 12 and 16. In January 2021, the consulting agreement was terminated and the Note was amended. The January 2021 amendment required repayments to be based, in part, on a percentage of certain diagnostic test revenue, as defined, performed by the borrower. The ultimate realization of the Note requires management to make significant assumptions and subjective judgments about the ability to receive repayment from a percentage of the borrower’s diagnostic test revenue, as well as from the borrower’s creditworthiness and viability. Given the subjectivity of these estimates, performing audit procedures to evaluate whether the note receivable was appropriately recorded at December 31, 2020 required a high degree of auditor judgment and an increased extent of effort.

 

How We Addressed the Matter in Our Audit

 

Addressing this matter involved procedures to test whether the underlying data used in management’s projections, including diagnostic test volume and revenue the borrower achieved prior to this amendment, as well as the payments remitted to date. Our procedures also included reviewing the borrowers diagnostic test volume reported through the financial statement issuance date but not yet been remitted to the Company. We further evaluated how this information and other assumptions were used to forecast the future repayment stream based on the borrower’s expected diagnostic testing. Further, we made direct inquires and reviewed management’s assessment of the borrowers current financial condition regarding their creditworthiness and viability.

 

Critical Audit Matter Description

 

Diagnostic Service Variable Consideration and Receivable Allowances

 

As described in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company’s diagnostic revenue is derived from third party insurers and government agencies. Management estimates the amount of consideration it expects to receive for providing the diagnostic services based on reimbursement allowances from insurance providers (including payer denials) and uninsured patient reimbursement allowances from government agency programs. Net revenues and accounts receivable recognized are billed based on standard test rates, net of allowances for expected reimbursements. Given the nature of these estimates and the variables, performing audit procedures to evaluate appropriate revenue recognition required a high degree of auditor judgment and an increased extent of effort.

 

How We Addressed the Matter in Our Audit

 

Addressing the matter involved performing procedures which included gaining an understanding of the internal controls relating to the diagnostic services’ billing and collection process and testing the completeness and accuracy of the Company’s billing system. These procedures also included, among other things, performing transaction testing on a sample of diagnostic tests performed which included assessing payer mix and reimbursements to date for each respective payer. We also compared management’s estimated allowances at year-end to actual reimbursements received through the financial statement issuance date, weighted by payer mix.

 

/s/ Friedman LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2020.

 

East Hanover, New Jersey

March 31, 2021

 

 32 
   

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

  

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

ProPhase Labs, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of ProPhase Labs, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019, and the related consolidated statements of operations and other comprehensive income (loss), stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for the year then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audit we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ EisnerAmper LLP

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor from 2010 through 2020.

 

EISNERAMPER LLP

Iselin, New Jersey

March 26, 2020

 

 33 
   

 

PROPHASE LABS, INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2020   2019 
ASSETS          
Current assets          
Cash and cash equivalents  $6,816   $434 
Marketable debt securities, available for sale   1,639    926 
Escrow receivable   -    4,812 
Accounts receivable, net   3,155    2,010 
Inventory, net   3,039    1,459 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   1,238    304 
Total current assets   15,887    9,945 
           
Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $5,021 and $6,252, respectively   3,578    2,329 
Secured promissory note receivable, net   2,750    - 
Prepaid expenses, net of current portion   2,084    - 
Right-of-use asset, net   4,731    - 
Intangible asset, net of accumulated amortization of $73   1,234    - 
Goodwill   901    - 
Other assets   240    - 
TOTAL ASSETS  $31,405   $12,274 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Current liabilities          
Accounts payable  $3,771   $432 
Accrued advertising and other allowances   463    92 
Lease liabilities   329    - 
Other current liabilities   1,731    409 
Total current liabilities   6,294    933 
           
Non-current liabilities:          
Deferred revenue, net of current portion   162    110 
Unsecured convertible promissory notes, net   9,991    - 
Lease liabilities, net of current portion   4,402    - 
Total non-current liabilities   14,555    110 
Total liabilities   20,849    1,043 
           
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES          
           
Stockholders’ equity          
Preferred stock authorized 1,000,000, $.0005 par value, no shares issued   -    - 
Common stock authorized 50,000,000, $.0005 par value, issued 28,256,275 and 28,225,615 shares, respectively   14    14 
Additional paid-in capital   61,674    60,215 
Accumulated deficit   (3,631)   (1,506)
Treasury stock, at cost, 16,652,022 and 16,652,022 shares, respectively   (47,490)   (47,490)
Accumulated comprehensive loss   (11)   (2)
Total stockholders’ equity   10,556    11,231 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY  $31,405   $12,274 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 34 
   

 

PROPHASE LABS, INC & SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Net sales  $14,514   $9,876 
Cost of sales   9,908    7,261 
Gross profit   4,606    2,615 
           
Operating expenses:          
Sales and marketing   1,287    1,042 
General and administration   6,671    4,480 
Research and development   633    332 
Total operating expenses   8,591    5,854 
Gain on sale of real estate   1,892    - 
Loss from operations   (2,093)   (3,239)
           
Interest income, net   62    133 
Interest expense   (295)   - 
Loss from continuing operations   (2,326)   (3,106)
           
Discontinued Operations:          
Income (loss) from discontinued operations   201    (40)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations   201    (40)
Net loss  $(2,125)  $(3,146)
           
Other comprehensive loss:          
Unrealized gain (loss) on marketable debt securities   (9)   22 
Total comprehensive loss  $(2,134)  $(3,124)
           
Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share:          
Loss from continuing operations  $(0.20)  $(0.27)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations   0.02    (0.00)
Net loss per share  $(0.18)  $(0.27)
           
Weighted average common shares outstanding:          
Basic and diluted   11,595    11,564 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 35 
   

 

PROPHASE LABS, INC & SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in thousands, except share data)

 

    Common Stock                                      
    Shares Outstanding,            Additional           Accumulated              
    Net of Shares of     Par     Paid in     Accumulated     Comprehensive     Treasury        
    Treasury Stock     Value     Capital     Deficit     Income (loss)     Stock     Total  
Balance as of January 1, 2019     11,549,519     $ 14     $ 59,471     $ 4,533     $ (24 )   $ (47,490 )   $ 16,504  
                                                         
Cash dividends     -       -       -       (2,893 )     -       -       (2,893 )
                                                         
Unrealized gain on marketable debt securities, net of realized losses of $12, net of taxes     -       -       -       -       22       -       22  
                                                         
Stock-based compensation     24,074       -       744       -       -       -       744  
                                                         
Net loss     -       -       -       (3,146 )     -       -       (3,146 )
                                                         
Balance as of December 31, 2019     11,573,593       14       60,215       (1,506 )     (2 )     (47,490 )     11,231  
                                                         
Unrealized loss on marketable debt securities, net of realized losses of $4, net of taxes     -       -       -       -       (9 )     -       (9 )
                                                         
Stock-based compensation     30,660       -       1,459       -       -       -       1,459  
                                                         
Net loss     -       -       -       (2,125 )     -       -       (2,125 )
                                                         
Balance as of December 31, 2020     11,604,253     $ 14     $ 61,674     $ (3,631 )   $ (11 )   $ (47,490 )   $ 10,556  

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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PROPHASE LABS, INC & SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Cash flows from operating activities          
Net loss  $(2,125)  $(3,146)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:          
Realized (gain) loss on marketable debt securities   (2)   12 
(Gain) loss on discontinued operations, net of taxes   (201)   40 
Depreciation and amortization   449    398 
Amortization of debt discount   1    - 
Amortization on right-of-use assets   9    - 
Lower of cost or net realizable value inventory adjustment   68    - 
Consulting expense paid through reduction of secured promissory note receivable   250      
Stock-based compensation expense   1,459    744 
Gain on sale of real estate   (1,892)   - 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (1,039)   936 
Inventory   (1,468)   444 
Prepaid and other assets   (3,005)   (8)
Other assets   (240)   - 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   3,339    (14)
Lease liabilities   (9)   - 
Other liabilities   1,814    (247)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities   (2,592)   (841)
           
Cash flows from investing activities          
Issuance of secured promissory note receivable   (3,000)   - 
Purchase of marketable securities   (4,560)   (3,137)
Proceeds from sale of marketable debt securities   3,840    8,908 
Escrow receivable   4,812    - 
Capital expenditures   (1,689)   (228)
Acquisition of Confucius Labs   (2,500)   - 
Proceeds from sale of building, net   2,081    - 
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities   (1,016)   5,543 
           
Cash flows from financing activities          
Payment of dividends   -    (5,822)
Issuance costs on unsecured convertible promissory notes   (10)   - 
Proceeds from unsecured convertible promissory notes   10,000    - 
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities   9,990    (5,822)
           
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents   6,382    (1,120)
Cash and cash equivalents, at the beginning of the year   434    1,554 
Cash and cash equivalents, at the end of the year  $6,816   $434 
           
Supplemental disclosures:          
Cash paid for income taxes  $-   $103 
Interest payment on the promissory ntoes  $250   $- 
           
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:          
Right-of-use assets and lease liability recorded upon adoption of ASC 842  $4,740    - 
Net unrealized (loss) gain, investments in marketable debt securities  $(9)  $22 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

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Note 1 – Organization and Business

 

ProPhase Labs, Inc. (“ProPhase or the “Company”) is a diversified medical science and technology company with deep experience with over-the-counter (“OTC”) consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements. We conduct our operations through two operating segments: consumer products and diagnostic services. Until late 2020, we were engaged in the research, development, manufacture, distribution, marketing and sale of OTC consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements in the United States. However, commencing in December 2020, we also began offering COVID-19 and other respiratory pathogen panel (RPP) molecular tests through our new diagnostic service business. 

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Pharmaloz Manufacturing, Inc. (“PMI”), is a full-service contract manufacturer and private label developer of a broad range of non-GMO, organic and natural-based cough drops and lozenges and OTC drug and dietary supplement products.

 

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, ProPhase Diagnostics, Inc., (“ProPhase Diagnostics”), which was formed on October 9, 2020, offers a variety of medical tests, including COVID-19 and Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Molecular tests. On October 23, 2020, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Confucius Plaza Medical Laboratory Corp. (“CPM”) for approximately $2.5 million in cash (see Note 3) which a 4,000 square foot Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (“CLIA”) accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey. As a result of the acquisition of CPM in October 2020, we entered into a new business line, diagnostic services. In December 2020, we expanded our diagnostic service business with the signing of a lease and the recent build out of a second, larger CLIA accredited laboratory in Garden City, New York. Operations at this second facility commenced in January 2021.

 

In addition, we continue to actively pursue acquisition opportunities for other companies, technologies and products within and outside the consumer products industry.

 

We use a December 31 year-end for financial reporting purposes. References in this Annual Report to “Fiscal 2020” mean the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and references to other “Fiscal” years mean the year that ended on December 31 of the year indicated. The term “we”, “us” or the “Company” as used herein also refer, where appropriate, to the Company, together with its subsidiaries unless the context otherwise requires.

 

We own and operate a manufacturing facility and manufacturing business in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and relocated our headquarters in Garden City, New York as of January 2021. As part of the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business, we entered into a manufacturing agreement with Mylan Consumer Healthcare Inc. (formerly known as Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc.) (“MCH”) and Mylan Inc. (together with MCH, “Mylan”) and our wholly-owned subsidiary, Pharmaloz Manufacturing, Inc. (“PMI”), to supply various Cold-EEZE® lozenge products to Mylan. In addition to the production services we provide to Mylan under the manufacturing agreement, we also produce OTC healthcare and dietary supplement products for other third-party customers in addition to performing operational tasks such as warehousing and shipping.

 

We are also engaged in development and distribution of a product line of OTC dietary supplements under the brand name of TK Supplements®. The TK Supplements® product line comprises two men’s health products: (i) Legendz XL® for sexual health, and (ii) Triple Edge XL®, an energy booster plus testosterone support. In addition to developing direct-to-consumer marketing strategies for Legendz XL®, we are currently in distribution in a national chain drug retailers and several regional retailers.

 

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Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

 

Segments

 

Operating segments are defined as components of an enterprise that engage in business activities for which separate financial information is available and is evaluated by the Chief Operating Decision Maker (“CODM”), which for the Company is its Chief Executive Officer, in deciding how to allocate resources and assess performance. The Company has two operating segments: diagnostic services and consumer products.

 

Seasonality of the Business and Liquidity

 

A significant portion of our net sales are derived from our contract manufacturing of OTC healthcare and dietary supplement products sold in the United States. In addition, we are engaged in market activities for the TK Supplements® product line of dietary supplements and diagnostic services.

 

Our consumer sales are influenced by and subject to (i) the timing of acceptance of our TK Supplements® products in the marketplace, and (ii) fluctuations in the timing of purchase and the ultimate level of demand for the OTC healthcare and cold remedy products that we manufacture for others, which are a function of the timing, length and severity of each cold season. Generally, a cold season is defined as the period from September to March when the incidence of the common cold rises as a consequence of the change in weather and other factors. We generally experience in the first, third and fourth quarter higher levels of net sales from our contract manufacturing of OTC healthcare and cold remedy products. Revenues are generally at their lowest levels in the second quarter when customer demand generally declines.

 

The diagnostic service business is influenced by the level of demand for COVID-19 and other diagnostic testing, the price we are able to receive for performing our testing services, and the length of time for which that demand persists, as well as the availability of COVID-19 testing from other laboratories and the period of time for which we are able to serve as an authorized laboratory offering COVID-19 testing under various Emergency Use Authorizations.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had working capital of approximately $9.6 million, including $1.6 million marketable securities available for sale.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements and the accompanying notes thereto, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (“GAAP”), requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the respective reporting periods. Examples include the provision for bad debt, sales returns and allowances, diagnostic services reimbursements, inventory obsolescence, useful lives of property and equipment, impairment of property and equipment, income tax valuations and assumptions related to accrued advertising. When providing for the appropriate sales returns, allowances, cash discounts and cooperative incentive promotion costs (“sales allowances”), we apply a uniform and consistent method for making certain assumptions for estimating these provisions. These estimates and assumptions are based on historical experience, current trends and other factors that management believes to be relevant at the time the financial statements are prepared. Management reviews the accounting policies, assumptions, estimates and judgments on a quarterly basis. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

We consider all highly liquid investments with an initial maturity of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents include cash on hand and monies invested in money market funds. The carrying amount approximates the fair market value due to the short-term maturity of these investments.

 

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Marketable Debt Securities

 

We have classified our investments in marketable debt securities as available-for-sale and as a current asset. Our investments in marketable securities are carried at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses included as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Realized gains and losses from our marketable securities are recorded as other interest income (expense). The investments carry maturity dates between one and three years from date of purchase with interest rates of 0.85% - 3.35% during Fiscal 2020. The following is a summary of the components of our marketable securities and the underlying fair value input level tier hierarchy (see long-lived assets below) (in thousands):

 

   As of December 31, 2020 
   Amortized   Unrealized   Fair 
   Cost   Losses   Value 
U.S. government obligations  $1,021   $(7)  $1,014 
Corporate obligations   629    (4)   625 
   $1,650   $(11)  $1,639 

 

   As of December 31, 2019 
   Amortized   Unrealized   Fair 
   Cost   Losses   Value 
U.S. government obligations  $125   $-   $125 
Corporate obligations   803    (2)   801 
   $928   $(2)  $926 

 

Inventory, net

 

Inventory is valued at the lower of cost, determined on a first-in, first-out basis (“FIFO”), or net realizable value. Inventory items are analyzed to determine cost and the net realizable value and appropriate valuation adjustments are established. At December 31, 2020 and 2019, the financial statements include adjustments to reduce inventory for excess, obsolete or short-dated shelf-life inventory of $167,000 and $360,824, respectively, The components of inventory are as follows (in thousands): 

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2020   2019 
Raw materials  $3,460   $1,024 
Work in process   437    299 
Finished goods   170    136 
   $4,067   $1,459 

 

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Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost. We use the straight-line method in computing depreciation for financial reporting purposes. Depreciation expense is computed in accordance with the following ranges of estimated asset lives: building and improvements – ten to thirty-nine years; machinery and equipment – three to seven years; computer equipment and software – three to five years; and furniture and fixtures – five years.

 

Concentration of Risks

 

Future revenues, costs, margins and profits will continue to be influenced by our ability to maintain our manufacturing availability and capacity together with our marketing and distribution capabilities and the regulatory requirements associated with the development of OTC consumer healthcare products, dietary supplements and other remedies in order to compete on a national level and/or international level. In addition, with the October 2020 acquisition of CPM and the commencement of operations in February 2021 at our new Garden City, New York CLIA accredited laboratory, our diagnostic service business has significant availability and capacity which will be influence by the demand of diagnostic testing services, particularly COVID-19 as well as our marketing and service capabilities and regulatory requirements associated with operating under and maintaining our CLIA license.

 

Our business is subject to federal and state laws and regulations adopted for the health and safety of users of our products. The manufacturing and distribution of OTC healthcare and dietary supplement products are subject to regulations by various federal, state and local agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and, as applicable, the Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States.

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject us to significant concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash investments, marketable debt securities, and trade accounts receivable. Our marketable securities are fixed income investments, which are highly liquid and can be readily purchased or sold through established markets.

 

We maintain cash and cash equivalents with certain major financial institutions. As of December 31, 2020, our cash and cash equivalents balance was $6.8 million and our bank balance was $7.4 million. Of the total bank balance, $0.5 million was covered by federal depository insurance and $6.9 million was uninsured at December 31, 2020.

 

Trade accounts receivable potentially subject us to credit concentrations from time-to-time as a consequence of the timing, payment pattern and ultimate purchase volumes or shipping schedules with our consumer products customer of the demand for our diagnostic services. We extend credit to our customers based upon an evaluation of the customer’s financial condition and credit history and generally we do not require collateral. Our customers include two customer classifications (i) consumer products companies and large national chain, regional, specialty and local retail stores associated with our consumer products business and (ii) healthcare institutions, insurance companies, corporation and individuals associated with our diagnostic services business. These credit concentrations may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that our customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic, regulatory or other conditions that may impact the timing and collectability of amounts, reimbursement rates of amounts due to us. Based on our evaluation of our customer’s financial condition, payment patterns, balances due to us and other factors, we did not offset our account receivable with an allowance for bad debt at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

We also assess our note holder’s (see Note 12 & 16) financial condition, balances due to us and other factors, and based on this assessment. Based on this assessment, such notes are expected to be fully realizable and no reserve was deemed necessary at December 31, 2020.

 

In addition, see Note 13 - Customer Concentration Risk.

 

Leases

 

Effective January 1, 2019, we adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 842, Leases (“ASC 842”), using the required modified retrospective approach and utilizing the effective date as its date of initial application, for which prior periods are presented in accordance with the previous guidance in ASC 840, Leases (“ASC 840”).

 

At the inception of an arrangement, we determine whether the arrangement is or contains a lease based on the unique facts and circumstances present in the arrangement. Most leases with a term greater than one year are recognized on the balance sheet as right-of-use assets and short-term and long-term lease liabilities, as applicable. We have elected not to recognize on the balance sheet leases with terms of 12 months or less. We typically only include an initial lease term in its assessment of a lease arrangement. Options to renew a lease are not included in the Company’s assessment unless there is reasonable certainty that we will renew.

 

Operating lease liabilities and their corresponding right-of-use assets are recorded based on the present value of lease payments over the expected remaining lease term. Certain adjustments to the right-of-use asset may be required for items such as incentives received. The interest rate implicit in our leases is typically not readily determinable. As a result, we utilize our incremental borrowing rate, which reflects the fixed rate at which the Company could borrow on a collateralized basis the amount of the lease payments in the same currency, for a similar term and in a similar economic environment. (See Note 10)

 

In accordance with ASC 842, components of a lease should be allocated between lease components (e.g., land, building, etc.) and non-lease components (e.g., common area maintenance, consumables, etc.). The fixed and in-substance fixed contract consideration (including any consideration related to non-components) must be allocated based on the respective relative fair values to the lease components and non-lease components.

 

 41 
   

 

Long-lived Assets

 

We review the carrying value of our long-lived assets with definite lives whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable. When indicators of impairment exist, we determine whether the estimated undiscounted sum of the future cash flows of such assets is less than their carrying amounts. If less, an impairment loss is recognized in the amount, if any, by which the carrying amount of such assets exceeds their respective fair values. The determination of fair value is based on quoted market prices in active markets, if available, or independent appraisals; sales price negotiations; or projected future cash flows discounted at a rate determined by management to be commensurate with our business risk. The estimation of fair value utilizing discounted forecasted cash flows includes significant judgments regarding assumptions of revenue, operating and marketing costs; selling and administrative expenses; interest rates; property and equipment additions and retirements; industry competition; and general economic and business conditions, among other factors.

 

Goodwill and Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets

 

Goodwill is the excess of purchase price over the fair value of identified net assets of businesses acquired. Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives are measured at their respective fair values as of the acquisition date. We do not amortize goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives. Intangible assets related to IPR&D projects, if any, are considered to be indefinite lived until the completion or abandonment of the associated R&D efforts. If and when development is complete, which generally occurs if and when regulatory approval to market a product is obtained, the associated assets would be deemed finite lived and would then be amortized based on their respective estimated useful lives at that point in time.

 

We review goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets at least annually for possible impairment. Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are reviewed for possible impairment between annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of the reporting unit or the indefinite-lived intangible assets below their carrying values.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value is based on the prices that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. In order to increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements, a three-tier fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. These tiers include: Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs for which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions.

 

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Marketable securities and assets held for sale are reflected in the consolidated financial statements at carrying value which approximates fair value. We account for our marketable securities at fair value, with the net unrealized gains or losses reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income or loss. The components of marketable debt securities are as follows (in thousands):

 

   As of December 31, 2020 
   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
Marketable debt securities                    
U.S. government obligations  $-   $1,014   $-   $1,014 
Corporate obligations   -    625    -    625 
   $-   $1,639   $-   $1,639 

 

   As of December 31, 2019 
   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
Marketable debt securities                    
U.S. government obligations  $-   $125   $-   $125 
Corporate obligations   -    801    -    801 
   $-   $926   $-   $926 

 

There were no transfers of marketable debt securities between Levels 1, 2 or 3 for the Fiscal 2020 and 2019.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

We recognize revenue that represents the transfer of promised goods or services to customers at an amount that reflects the consideration that is expected to be received in exchange for those goods or services. We recognize revenue when performance obligations with our customers have been satisfied. At contract inception, we evaluate the contract to determine if revenue should be recognized using the following five steps: (1) identify the contract with the customer; (2) identify the performance obligations; (3) determine the transaction price; (4) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations; and (5) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

 

Performance Obligations

 

We have historically generated sales principally through two types of customers, contract manufacturing and retail customers. Sales from product shipments to contract manufacturing and retailer customers are recognized at the time ownership is transferred to the customer. Revenue from diagnostic services are recognized when the results are made available to the customer. Net sales from consumer products were $13.2 million and $1.3 million for diagnostic services, for Fiscal 2020 and $9.9 million for consumer products and no sales for diagnostic service in Fiscal 2019.

 

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer and is the unit of account. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. The Company’s performance obligation for contract manufacturing and retail customers is to provide the goods ordered by the customer. For diagnostic services, the Company has one performance obligation, which is to provide the results of the laboratory test to the customer.

 

Transaction Price

 

For contract manufactures and retail revenue, the transaction price is fixed based upon either (i) the terms of a combined Master Agreement and each related purchase order, or (ii) if there is no Master Agreement, the price per the individual purchase order received from each customer. The customers are invoiced at an agreed upon contractual price for each unit ordered and delivered by the Company.

 

Revenue from retail customers is reduced for trade promotions, estimated sales returns and other allowances in the same period as the related sales are recorded. No such allowance is applicable to our contract manufacturing customers. We estimate potential future product returns and other allowances related to current period revenue. We analyze historical returns, current trends, and changes in customer and consumer demand when evaluating the adequacy of the sales returns and other allowances.

 

We do not accept returns in the contract manufacturing revenue stream. Our return policy for retailer customers accommodates returns for (i) discontinued products, (ii) store closings and (iii) products that have reached or exceeded their designated expiration date. We do not impose a period of time within which product may be returned. All requests for product returns must be submitted to us for pre-approval. We will not accept return requests pertaining to customer inventory “Overstocking” or “Resets”. We will accept return requests for only products in its intended package configuration. We reserve the right to terminate shipment of product to customers who have made unauthorized deductions contrary to our return policy or pursue other methods of reimbursement. We compensate the customer for authorized returns by means of a credit applied to amounts.

 

Accrued advertising and other allowances from continuing operations as of December 31, 2020 included (i) $291,000 for estimated returns and allowances which is reported as a liability and (ii) $463,000 for cooperative and incentive promotion costs which is also reported as a liability. There were no accrued advertising and other allowances from discontinued operations as of December 31, 2020 As of December 31, 2019, accrued advertising and other allowances from continuing operations included (i) $37,000 for estimated returns which is reported as a liability and (ii) $92,000 for cooperative and incentive promotion costs which is also reported as a liability. Accrued advertising and other allowances from discontinued operations as of December 31, 2019 included (i) $132,000 for estimated returns, which is reported as a reduction to account receivables, and (ii) $76,000 for cooperative incentive promotion costs, which is reported as accrued advertising and other allowances under current liabilities.

 

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We experienced a reduction in the estimate for returns and cooperative and incentive allowance costs in the amount of $201,000 which was recognized as income from discontinued operations associated with the sale of the Cold-EEZE® Business in Fiscal 2020. See Note 9.

 

For the diagnostic services business, a revenue transaction is initiated when we receive a requisition order to perform a diagnostic test. The information provided on the requisition form is used to determine the party that will be billed for the testing performed and the expected reimbursement. We provide diagnostic services to a range of customers, including health plans, government agencies and consumers. In many cases, the customer that orders our services is not responsible for paying for these services. Depending on the billing arrangement and applicable law, the payer may be the patient or a third party, such as a health plan, Medicare or Medicaid program and other government reimbursement programs. We bill the providers at standard price and take into consideration negotiated discounts and anticipated reimbursement remittance adjustments based on the payer portfolio, when revenue is recorded. We use the most expected value method to estimate the transaction price for reimbursements that vary from the listed contract price.

 

Recognize Revenue When the Company Satisfies a Performance Obligation

 

Performance obligations related to contract manufacturing and retail customers are satisfied at a point in time when the goods are shipped to the customer as (i) we have transferred control of the assets to the customers upon shipping, and (ii) the customer obtains title and assumes the risks and rewards of ownership after the goods are shipped. For diagnostic services, the Company satisfies its performance obligation at the point in time that the results are made available to the customer, which is when the customer benefits from the information contained in the results and obtains control.

 

Contract Balances

 

As of December 31, 2020, we have deferred revenue of $331,000 in relation to R&D stability and release testing programs recognized as contract manufacturing revenue. As of December 31, 2019, deferred revenue was $214,000. Deferred revenues primarily consist of amounts that have been billed to or received from customers in advance of revenue recognition and prepayments received from customers in advance of services performed for the R&D work. We recognize deferred revenues as revenues when the services are performed and the corresponding revenue recognition criteria are met. Customer prepayments are generally applied against invoices issued to customers when services are performed and billed.

 

The following table disaggregates the Company’s deferred revenue by recognition period (in thousands):

 

   Deferred Revenue 
Recognition Period     
0-12 Months  $169 
13-24 Months   84 
Over 24 Months   78 
Total  $331 

 

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Disaggregation of Revenue

 

We disaggregate revenue from contracts with customers into three categories: contract manufacturing and retail customers and lab processing services. We determined that disaggregating revenue into these categories achieves the disclosure objective to depict how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors.

 

The following table disaggregates the Company’s revenue by revenue source for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 (in thousands):

 

   For the Years Ended 
Revenue by Customer Type  December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Contract manufacturing  $12,252   $8,974 
Retail and others   985    902 
Diagnostic services   1,277    - 
Total revenue  $14,514   $9,876 

  

Sales Tax Exclusion from the Transaction Price

 

We exclude from the measurement of the transaction price all taxes assessed by a governmental authority that are both imposed on and concurrent with a specific revenue-producing transaction and collected by the Company from the customer.

 

Shipping and Handling Activities

 

We account for shipping and handling activities that we perform as activities to fulfill the promise to transfer the good.

 

Advertising and Incentive Promotions

 

Advertising and incentive promotion costs are expensed within the period in which they are utilized. Advertising and incentive promotion expense is comprised of (i) media advertising, presented as part of sales and marketing expense, (ii) cooperative incentive promotions and coupon program expenses, which are accounted for as part of net sales, and (iii) free product, which is accounted for as part of cost of sales. Advertising and incentive promotion expenses incurred from continuing operations for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $766,000 and $443,000, respectively.

 

Share-Based Compensation

 

We recognize all share-based payments to employees and directors, including grants of stock options, as compensation expense in the financial statements based on their grant date fair values. The grant date fair values of stock options are determined through the use of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The compensation cost is recognized as an expense over the requisite service period of the award, which usually coincides with the vesting period. We account for forfeitures as they occur.

 

Stock and stock options to purchase our common stock have been granted to employees pursuant to the terms of certain agreements and stock option plans (see Note 5). Stock options are exercisable during a period determined by us, but in no event later than seven years from the date granted. For Fiscal 2020 and 2019, we charged to operations $1,178,000 and $744,000, respectively, for share-based compensation expense for the aggregate fair value of stock grants issued and vested stock options earned.

 

Research and Development

 

R&D costs are charged to operations in the period incurred, R&D costs incurred for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $633,000 and $332,000, respectively. R&D costs are principally related to personnel expenses and new product development initiatives and costs associated with the OTC health care products, dietary supplements and validation fees in association with the diagnostic services business including the validation work of the diagnostic services business.

 

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Income Taxes

 

We utilize the asset and liability approach, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. In estimating future tax consequences, we generally consider all expected future events other than enactments of changes in the tax law or rates. Until sufficient taxable income to offset the temporary timing differences attributable to operations and the tax deductions attributable to option, warrant and stock activities are assured, a valuation allowance equaling the total deferred tax asset is being provided.

 

We utilize a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount, which is more than fifty percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Any interest or penalties related to income taxes will be recorded as interest or administrative expense, respectively.

 

As a result of our losses from continuing operations, we have recorded a full valuation allowance against a net deferred tax asset. Additionally, we have not recorded a liability for unrecognized tax benefit.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards, Not Yet Adopted

 

In September 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326). The ASU sets forth a “current expected credit loss” (CECL) model which requires the Company to measure all expected credit losses for financial instruments held at the reporting date based on historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable supportable forecasts. This replaces the existing incurred loss model and is applicable to the measurement of credit losses on financial assets measured at amortized cost and applies to some off-balance sheet credit exposures. In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-02, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), which amends the effective date of the original pronouncement for smaller reporting companies. ASU 2016-13 and its amendments will be effective for the Company for interim and annual periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this ASU on its financial statements.

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes (“ASU 2019-12”), which is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and also clarifies and amends existing guidance to improve consistent application. This guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Note 3 – Business Acquisition

 

On October 23, 2020, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of “CPM” for approximately $2.5 million in cash, subject to certain adjustments, pursuant to the terms of a Stock Purchase Agreement, by and among the Company, “CPM”, Pride Diagnostics LLC (“Pride Diagnostics”) and the members of Pride Diagnostics (together with Pride Diagnostics, the “Seller Parties”), and Arvind Gurnani, as representative of the Seller Parties. “CMP” Labs (now known as ProPhase Diagnostics NJ, Inc.) includes a 4,000 square foot (CLIA) accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey. On October 23, 2020 (the “Effective Date”), we entered into a Consulting Agreement with Mr. Gurnani for a six-month period from the Effective Date for an aggregate total of $300,000, which was subsequently terminated after two months of service.

 

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Based on the preliminary valuation, the total consideration of $2.5 million has been allocated to assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their respective fair values as follows (amount in thousands):

 

Clinical lab material  $180 
Lab equipment   112 
Definite-lived intangible asset   1,307 
Total assets acquired   1,599 
Liabilities assumed   - 
Net identifiable assets acquired   1,599 
Goodwill   901 
Total consideration  $2,500 

 

Goodwill has been measured as the excess of the total consideration over the amounts assigned to the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed in the amount of $901,000, which was primarily related to the acquisition of the assembled workforce. Other definite-lived intangible asset of approximate $1.3 million were related to the CLIA license which was determined to have an estimated useful life of three years.

 

We have not presented unaudited pro forma combined results of operations as if CPM was acquired as of the beginning of fiscal year 2019 because CPM had no revenue and minimal expenses and, as such, would have been immaterial to our reported losses.

 

The preliminary purchase price allocation is adjusted, as necessary, up to one year after the acquisition closing date if management obtains more information regarding asset valuations and liabilities assumed.

 

Note 4 – Property, Plant and Equipment

 

The components of property and equipment are as follows (in thousands):

 

   December 31,   December 31,    
   2020   2019   Estimated Useful Life
Land  $352   $504    
Building improvements   1,729    3,113   10-39 years
Machinery and laboratory equipment   5,443    4,285   3-7 years
Computer equipment   881    472   3-5 years
Furniture and fixtures   194    207   5 years
    8,599    8,581    
Less: accumulated depreciation   (5,021)   (6,251)   
Total property, plant and equipment, net  $3,578   $2,329    

 

Depreciation expense incurred for Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $375,000 and $398,000, respectively.

 

On July 10, 2020, we entered into an Agreement of Sale and Purchase (the “Sale Agreement”) with Lenape Valley Foundation (the “Purchaser”), pursuant to which we agreed to sell our then corporate headquarters land and building located in Doylestown, Pennsylvania to the Purchaser for $2.2 million.

 

On November 13, 2020, we closed on the sale of our former corporate headquarters and relocated our headquarters to Garden City, New York in January 2021. The total sales price of the property, which was paid in cash, was $2.2 million, less closing costs and related expenses of approximately $134,000. As a consequence of the sale, we recorded $1.9 million gain from the sale of the real estate for Fiscal 2020.

 

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Note 5 – Stockholders’ Equity

 

Our authorized capital stock consists of 50 million shares of common stock and one million shares of preferred stock, $0.0005 par value (“Preferred Stock”) per share.

 

Preferred Stock

 

The preferred stock authorized under our certificate of incorporation may be issued from time to time in one or more series. As of December 31, 2020, no shares of preferred stock have been issued. Our board of directors have the full authority permitted by law to establish, without further stockholder approval, one or more series of preferred stock and the number of shares constituting each such series and to fix by resolution voting powers, preferences and relative, participating, optional and other special rights of each series of preferred stock, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions thereof, if any. Subject to the limitation on the total number of shares of preferred stock that we have authority to issue under our certificate of incorporation, the board of directors is also authorized to increase or decrease the number of shares of any series, subsequent to the issue of that series, but not below the number of shares of such series then-outstanding. In case the number of shares of any series is so decreased, the shares constituting such decrease will resume the status that they had prior to the adoption of the resolution originally fixing the number of shares of such series. We may, subject to any required stockholder approval amend from time to time our certificate of incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares of preferred stock or common stock or to make other changes or additions to our capital structure or the terms of our capital stock.

 

Common Stock Dividends

 

On December 24, 2018, the Board declared a special cash dividend of $0.25 per share on the Company’s common stock to holders of record on January 10, 2019, resulting in the payment of $2.9 million to stockholders on January 24, 2019.

 

On November 20, 2019, the Board declared a special cash dividend of $0.25 per share on the Company’s common stock to holders of record on December 3, 2019, resulting in the payment of $2.9 million to stockholders on December 12, 2019.

 

In Fiscal 2020, no cash dividends were declared.

 

The 2010 Directors’ Equity Compensation Plan

 

On May 5, 2010, our stockholders approved the 2010 Directors’ Equity Compensation Plan which, was has been subsequently amended and restated by our stockholders (the “2010 Directors’ Plan”). A primary purpose of the 2010 Directors’ Plan is to provide us with the ability to pay all or a portion of the fees of directors in stock instead of cash. The 2010 Directors’ Plan provides that the total number of shares of common stock that may be issued is equal to 675,000 shares.

 

During Fiscal 2020 and 2019, 30,660 and 24,074 shares, respectively, were granted to our directors under the 2010 Directors’ Plan. We recorded $53,000 and $62,000 of director fees during Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019, respectively, in connection with these grants.

 

During Fiscal 2020, 200,000 options were granted to our directors under the 2010 Directors’ Plan at an exercise price of $2.83, the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant. The stock options will vest in four quarterly installments. We recorded $165,000 of compensation expenses for directors during Fiscal 2020, in connection with these grants. No options were granted in Fiscal 2019.

 

At December 31, 2020, there were 200,000 options outstanding and there were 128,126 shares of common stock available to be issued pursuant to the terms of the 2010 Directors’ Plan. No stock options were exercised during the Fiscal 2020.

 

The 2010 Equity Compensation Plan

 

On May 5, 2010, our stockholders approved the 2010 Equity Compensation Plan, which has been subsequently amended and restated by our stockholders (the “2010 Plan”). The 2010 Plan provides that the total number of shares of common stock that may be issued under the 2010 Plan is 3.9 million shares.

 

During Fiscal 2020,513,000 stock options were granted to our employees and non-employees under the 2010 Plan at an exercise price between $2.64 - $8.82 the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant with 25% of the stock options vested on the grant date, and 75% vesting over a 3-year period in equal annually installments. In addition, 510,000 options were granted during Fiscal 2020 in excess of the total amount allocated in the 2010 Plan. These options were excluded from the stock compensation expense calculation as the options require stockholder approval before we recognize the compensation expense.

 

During Fiscal 2019, the Company granted 200,000 stock options at an exercise price of $2.01, the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant, to certain employees. The stock options will vest in four equal annual installments beginning on the date of grant.

 

As of December 31, 2020, there were 1,295,000 stock options outstanding and 15,659 stock options available to be issued pursuant to the terms of the 2010 Plan.

 

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The 2018 Stock Incentive Plan

 

On April 12, 2018, our stockholders approved the 2018 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2018 Stock Plan”). The 2018 Stock Plan provides for the grant of incentive stock options to eligible employees of the Company, and for the grant of nonstatutory stock options to eligible employees, directors and consultants. The purpose of the 2018 Stock Plan is to advance the interests of the Company and its stockholders by providing an incentive to attract, retain, and reward persons performing services for the Company and by motivating such persons to contribute to the growth and profitability of the Company. The 2018 Stock Plan provides that the total number of shares that may be issued pursuant to the 2018 Stock Plan is 2.3 million shares. At April 12, 2018, all 2.3 million shares have been granted in the form of stock options to Ted Karkus (the “CEO Option”), our Chief Executive Officer and, to date, no stock options have been exercised under the 2018 Stock Plan. We will recognize approximately $59,000 of share-based compensation expense over a weighted average period of 0.2 years.

 

The 2018 Plan requires certain proportionate adjustments to be made to the stock options granted under the 2018 Plan upon the occurrence of certain events, including a special distribution (whether in the form of cash, shares, other securities, or other property) in order to maintain parity. Accordingly, the Compensation Committee of the board of directors, as required by the terms of the 2018 Stock Plan, adjusted the terms of the CEO Option, such that the exercise price of the CEO Option was reduced from $3.00 per share to $2.00 per share, effective as of September 5, 2018, the date the special $1.00 special cash dividend was paid to stockholders. The exercise price of the CEO Option was further reduced from $2.00 to $1.75 per share, effective as of January 24, 2019, the date the $0.25 special cash dividend was paid to stockholders. The exercise price of the CEO Option was further reduced from $1.75 to $1.50 per share, effective as of December 12, 2019, the date another $0.25 special cash dividend was paid to stockholders.

 

The following table summarizes stock options activities during Fiscal 2020 and 2019 for both 2010 Plan and 2018 Stock Plan (in thousands, except per share data). All outstanding options are expected to vest.

 

   Number of Shares   Weighted Average Exercise Price   Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life
(in years)
   Total Intrinsic Value 
Outstanding as of January 1, 2019   2,980   $1.82    4.8   $3,235 
Granted   200    2.01    6.9    - 
Forfeited/expired   (98)   2.81    -    - 
Outstanding as of December 31, 2019   3,082    1.67    3.7    1,085 
Granted   713    4.58    7.0    - 
Outstanding as of December 31, 2020   3,795   $2.21    3.4   $26,441 
Options vested and exercisable   3,007   $1.83    2.9   $22,101 

 

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The following table summarizes weighted average assumptions used in determining the fair value of the stock options at the date of grant during Fiscal 2020 and 2019:

 

   For the years ended 
   December 31, 
   2020   2019 
Exercise price  $4.58   $2.01 
Expected term (years)   4.2    4.5 
Expected stock price volatility   52%   42%
Risk-free rate of interest   0%   2%
Expected dividend yield (per share)   0%   0%

 

The expected stock price volatility is based on the Company’s historical common stock trading prices and the expected term is based on the period that the Company’s stock-based awards are expected to be outstanding based on the simplified method. The fair value of the stock options at the time of the grant in Fiscal 2020 and 2019 was $1.4 million and $148,000, respectively. For Fiscal 2020 and 2019, we charged to operations approximately $1.2 million and $0.7 million, respectively, for share-based compensation expense for the aggregate fair value of the vested stock options earned.

 

Warrants

 

During the second and third quarter of Fiscal 2020, 450,000 three year warrants were issued to various consultants with vesting terms of one year or less and exercise prices of $3.00 to $5.00 per share. The following table summarizes warrants activities during Fiscal 2020 (in thousands, except per share data).

 

   Number of Shares   Weighted Average Exercise Price   Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life
(in years)
 
Outstanding as of January 1, 2020   -   $-    - 
Warrants granted   450    3.22    3.0 
Outstanding as of December 31, 2020   450   $3.22    2.7 
Warrants vested and exercisable   115   $3.43    2.7 

 

The following table summarizes weighted average assumptions used in determining the fair value of the warrants at the date of grant during Fiscal 2020:

 

   For the year ended 
   December 31, 2020 
Exercise price  $3.22 
Expected term (years)   2.0 
Expected stock price volatility   58%
Risk-free rate of interest   0%
Expected dividend yield (per share)   0%

 

As of December 31, 2020, there were 450,000 warrants outstanding and we recognized $178,000 of share-based compensation expense during Fiscal 2020.

 

Note 6 – Defined Contribution Plans

 

We maintain the ProPhase Labs, Inc. 401(k) Savings and Retirement Plan, a defined contribution plan for our employees. Our contributions to the plan are based on the amount of the employee plan contributions and compensation. Our contributions to the plan in Fiscal 2020 and 2019 were $71,000 and $84,000, respectively.

 

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Note 7 – Income Taxes

 

The components of the provision (benefit) for income taxes, in the consolidated statements of operations are as follows (in thousands):

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Continuing Operations          
Current          
Federal  $-   $- 
State   12    - 
    12    - 
Deferred          
Federal   -    - 
State   -    - 
Income taxes from Continuing Operations   12    - 
           
Discontinued Operations          
Current          
Federal   -    - 
State   -    - 
    -    - 
Deferred          
Federal   -    - 
State   -    - 
Income taxes from Discontinued Operations   -    - 
           
Total  $12   $- 

 

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A reconciliation of the statutory federal income tax expense (benefit) to the effective tax is as follows (in thousands):

 

   2020   2019 
Statutory rate - federal  $(377)  $(660)
State taxes, net of federal benefit   (31)   (7)
Permanent differences and other   159    145 
Income tax from continuing operation before valuation allowance   (249)   (522)
           
Change in valuation allowance   261    (522)
           
Income tax expense   12    - 
Total  $12   $- 

 

The tax effects of the primary “temporary differences” between values recorded for assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and values utilized for measurement in accordance with tax laws giving rise to our deferred tax assets are as follows (in thousands):

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Net operating loss and capital loss carryforward  $5,020   $4,605 
Right of use asset   1,086    - 
Other   370    198 
Capital lease obligations   (1,086)   - 
Depreciation   (419)   (93)
Valuation allowance   (4,971)   (4,710)
Total  $-   $- 

 

We recognize tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences related to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, and for net operating loss carryforwards. Management evaluated the deferred tax assets for recoverability using a consistent approach that considers the relative impact of negative and positive evidence, including historical profitability and projections of future reversals of temporary differences and future taxable income. We are required to establish a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets if management determines, based on available evidence at the time the determination is made, that it is not more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will be realized.

 

A valuation allowance for all of our net deferred tax assets has been provided as we are unable to determine, at this time, that the generation of future taxable income against which the net operating losses (“NOL”) carryforwards could be used is more likely than not. As a result of ongoing losses from continuing operations the Company has concluded that it is more likely than not that it will not realize all of its deferred tax assets relating to federal and state filing jurisdictions. As of December 31, 2020, there is a valuation allowance of approximately $5.0 million. As of December 31, 2020, the Company has state NOL carryforwards of $1.1 million, which begin to expire in 2024 and federal NOL carryforwards of $3.9 million. The amount of the federal NOL generated prior to the 2017 legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“TCJA”) of $2.6 million may be carried forward for 20 years and begins to expire in 2032. The remaining amount of $1.3 million federal NOL generated in years 2018 and after may be carried forward indefinitely and its utilization is limited to 80% of taxable income for tax year’s post 2020.

 

We file a consolidated federal income tax return and separate company state returns as well as combined state returns where applicable.

 

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Note 8 – Other Current Liabilities

 

The following table sets forth the components of other current liabilities at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively (in thousands):

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2020   2019 
Accrued payroll  $464   $57 
Accrued commissions   461    - 
Accrued expenses   304    218 
Accrued returns   291    - 
Accrued income tax payable   8    - 
Accrued benefits   30    25 
Accrued vacation   4    5 
Deferred revenue   169    104 
Total other current liabilities  $1,731   $409 

 

Note 9 – Commitments and Contingencies

 

Escrow Receivable

 

Effective March 29, 2017, we sold our intellectual property rights and other assets related to our Cold-EEZE® brand and product line, including all then current and pipeline over-the-counter allergy, cold, flu, multi-symptom relief and immune support treatments for adults and children to the extent each was, or was intended to be, branded “Cold-EEZE®”, including all formulations and derivatives thereof (collectively referred to as the “Cold-EEZE® Business”) to Mylan Consumer Healthcare Inc. (formerly known as Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc.) (“MCH”) and Mylan Inc. (together with MCH, “Mylan”). As a result of the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business, for Fiscal 2017, we have classified as discontinued operations (i) all income and expenses attributable to the Cold-EEZE® business, (ii) the gain from the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business, and (iii) the income tax expense attributed to the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business. Excluded from the sale of the Cold-EEZE® business were our accounts receivable and inventory. We have also retained all liabilities associated with our Cold-EEZE® business operations arising prior to March 29, 2017.

 

For Fiscal 2020 and 2019, we incurred income of $201,000 and costs of $40,000, respectively, which was recorded as income (loss) on sale of discontinued operations.

 

We have indemnification obligations to Mylan under the asset purchase agreement pursuant to which we sold the Cold-EEZE®  business to Mylan, that may require us to make future payments to Mylan and other related persons for any damages incurred by Mylan or such related persons as a result of any breaches of our representations, warranties, covenants or agreements contained in the asset purchase agreement, or arising from the Retained Liabilities (as such term is defined in the asset purchase agreement) or certain third party claims specified in the asset purchase agreement. Generally, our representations and warranties survive for a period of 24 months from the closing date, which was March 29, 2017, other than certain fundamental representations which survive until the expiration of the applicable statute of limitations. There is a limited indemnification cap with respect to a majority of the Company’s indemnification obligations under the asset purchase agreement with the exception of claims for actual fraud, the breach of any fundamental representations and certain other items, which have a larger indemnification cap (i.e., the purchase price).

 

Pursuant to the terms of the asset purchase agreement, we, Mylan, and an escrow agent entered into an Escrow Agreement at closing, pursuant to which Mylan deposited $5.0 million of the aggregate purchase price for the Cold-EEZE® business into an escrow account established with the escrow agent in order to satisfy, in whole or in part, certain of our indemnity obligations under the asset purchase agreement. Other than certain fundamental representations which survive until the expiration of the applicable statute of limitations, our representations and warranties under the agreement expired 24 months after the closing date, which was March 29, 2017.

 

On May 4, 2020, the final pending claim against our escrow account with Mylan was resolved and, as a result, the escrow agent released all funds from the escrow account to us on May 7, 2020, in the amount of $4.8 million.

 

Manufacturing Agreement

 

In connection with the asset purchase agreement with Mylan, the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, PMI, entered into a manufacturing agreement (the “Manufacturing Agreement”) with Mylan. Pursuant to the terms of the Manufacturing Agreement, Mylan (or an affiliate or designee) purchased the inventory of the Company’s Cold-EEZE® brand and product line, and PMI will manufacture certain products for Mylan, as described in the Manufacturing Agreement, at prices that reflect current market conditions for such products and include an agreed upon mark-up on our costs. Unless terminated sooner by the parties, the Manufacturing Agreement will remain in effect until March 29, 2022. Thereafter, the Manufacturing Agreement may be renewed by Mylan for up to five successive one-year periods by providing notice of its intent to renew not less than 90 days prior to the expiration of the then-current term.

 

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Future Obligations

 

We have estimated future minimum obligations for an executive’s employment agreement over the next five years as of December 31, 2020, as follows (in thousands):

 

   Employment 
   Contracts 
2021  $595 
2022   675 
2023   675 
2024   675 
2025   675 
Total  $3,295 

 

Litigation

 

In the normal course of our business, we may be named as a defendant in legal proceedings. It is our policy to vigorously defend litigation or to enter into a reasonable settlement where management deems it appropriate.

 

Note 10 – Leases

 

On October 23, 2020, we completed the acquisition of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of Confucius Plaza Medical Laboratory Corp. (“CPM”) for approximately $2.5 million in cash, subject to certain adjustments, pursuant to the terms of a Stock Purchase Agreement, by and among the Company, CPM, Pride Diagnostics and other parties named therein CPM (which is now known as ProPhase Diagnostics NJ, Inc.) is the owner of a 4,000 square foot CLIA accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey, which ProPhase Diagnostics acquired as part of the transaction. As a result of this acquisition. ProPhase Diagnostics NJ, Inc. (f/k/a Confucius Labs) is the owner of a 4,000 square foot Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) accredited laboratory located in Old Bridge, New Jersey.

 

On December 8, 2020, the Company entered into a Lease Agreement (the “NY Lease”) with BRG Office L.L.C. and Unit 2 Associates L.L.C. (the “Landlord”), pursuant to which the Company has agreed to lease certain premises located on the second floor (the “Leased Premises”) of 711 Stewart Avenue, Garden City, New York (the “Building”). The Leased Premises serve as the Company’s second location, offering a wide range of laboratory testing services for diagnosis, screening and evaluation of diseases, including COVID-19 and Respiratory Pathogen Panel Molecular tests.

 

The New York Lease is effective as of December 8, 2020 and commenced in December 2020 when the facility was made available to us by the Landlord. Payments on the lease will begin upon the date of the Landlord’s substantial completion of certain improvements to the Leased Premises (the “Commencement Date”), as set forth in the NY Lease, targeted to be 35 days from the execution of the NY Lease. The initial term of the NY Lease is 10 years and seven months (the “Initial Term”), unless sooner terminated as provided in the NY Lease. We may extend the term of the NY Lease for one additional option period of five years. We have the option to terminate the NY Lease on the sixth anniversary of the Commencement Date, provided that we give the Landlord written notice not less than nine months and not more than 12 months in advance and that we pay the Landlord a termination fee as more particularly described in the NY Lease. The Landlord will provided a construction allowance to the Company in an aggregate amount not to exceed $250,795, to reimburse the Company for the cost of certain improvements to be made by the Company to the Leased Premises.

 

For the first year of the NY Lease, we will pay a base rent of $56,963 per month (subject to a seven month abatement period), with a gradual rental rate increase of 2.75% for each 12 month period thereafter in lieu of paying its proportionate share of common area operating expenses, culminating in a monthly base rent of $74,716 during the final months of the Initial Term. In addition to the monthly base rent, we are responsible for its proportionate share of real estate tax escalations in accordance with the terms of the NY Lease.

 

We also have a right of first refusal to lease certain additional space located on the ground floor of the Building containing 4,500 square feet and 4,600 square feet, as more particularly described in the NY Lease. We also has a right of first offer to purchase the Building during the term of the NY Lease.

 

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At December 31, 2020, we had operating lease liabilities of approximately $4.7 million and right of use assets of approximately $4.7 million, which were included in the consolidated balance sheet.

 

The following summarizes quantitative information about our operating leases (amounts in thousands):

 

   For the Year Ended December 31, 2020 
Operating leases     
Operating lease cost  $11 
Variable lease cost   1 
Operating lease expense   12 
Short-term lease rent expense   - 
Total rent expense  $12 

 

   For the Year Ended December 31, 2020 
Operating cash flows used in operating leases  $(11)
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for operating lease liabilities  $4,740 
Weighted-average remaining lease term – operating leases (in years)   10.3 
Weighted-average discount rate – operating leases   10.00%

 

Maturities of the Company’s operating leases, excluding short-term leases, are as follows (amounts in thousands):

 

Year Ended December 31, 2021  $357 
Year Ended December 31, 2022   774 
Year Ended December 31, 2023   738 
Year Ended December 31, 2024   747 
Year Ended December 31, 2025   768 
Thereafter   4,659 
Total   8,043 
Less present value discount   (3,312)
Operating lease liabilities  $4,731 

 

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Note 11 –Unsecured Convertible Promissory Notes Payable

 

On September 15, 2020, we issued two unsecured, partially convertible, promissory notes (the “September 2020 Notes”) for an aggregate principal amount of $10 million to two investors (collectively, the “Lenders”).

 

The September 2020 Notes are due and payable on September 15, 2023, and accrue interest at a rate of 10% per year from the closing date, payable on a quarterly basis, until the September 2020 Notes are repaid in full. We have the right to prepay the September 2020 Notes at any time after the 13 month anniversary of the closing date after providing written notice to the Lenders, and may prepay the September 2020 Notes prior to such time with the consent of the Lenders. The Lenders have the right, at any time, and from time to time, on and after the 13-month anniversary of the closing date to convert up to an aggregate of $3.0 million of the September 2020 Notes into common stock of the Company at a conversion price of $3.00 per share. Repayment of the Notes has been guaranteed by our wholly-owned subsidiary, PMI.

 

The September 2020 Notes contain customary events of default. If a default occurs and is not cured within the applicable cure period or is not waived, any outstanding obligations under the Notes may be accelerated. The September 2020 Notes also contain certain restrictive covenants which, among other things, restrict our ability to create, incur, assume or permit to exist, directly or indirectly, any lien (other than certain permitted liens described in the Notes) securing any indebtedness of the Company, and prohibits us from distributing or reinvesting the proceeds from any divestment of assets (other than in the ordinary course) without the prior approval of the Lenders.

 

Note 12 – Consulting Agreement and Secured Promissory Note Receivable

 

Consulting Agreement

 

On September 25, 2020 (the “Effective Date”), we entered into a Consulting Agreement with a consultant (the “Consulting Agreement”). The Consulting Agreement will be effective for a period commencing on the Effective Date and expiring on September 1, 2022; provided, however, that we may terminate this agreement at any time on five days’ prior written notice.

 

During the term of the Consulting Agreement, the consultant will provide us with such regular and customary consulting advice as is reasonably requested by us. The consultant’s duties will also include, among other things, (i) identifying and introducing us to new opportunities in the medical technology and testing fields, (ii) assisting and advising us in acquiring one or more CLIA certified labs suitable for COVID-19 and other testing (“Test Labs”), (see Notes 3 and 10); (iii) assisting us in equipping and staffing any Test Labs acquired by us; (iv) advising and assisting in the operation of such Test Labs; (v) validating and obtaining certification of such Test Labs; and (vi) assisting us in obtaining a flow of business, orders and revenues from multiple sources in the industry, including but not limited to at least one significant, nation-wide manufacturer and distributor of COVID-19 saliva sample collection test kits (“COVID-19 Test Kits”).

 

The compensation to be paid to the consultant under the Consulting Agreement will be based on the following milestones:

 

  At such time as we complete the acquisition of our first Test Lab that has been validated and certified to process COVID-19 Test Kits collection test kits manufactured by a substantial, nation-wide manufacturer and distributor of COVID-19 Test Kits, the consultant will receive a consulting fee of $250,000;
  At such time as we have processed 50,000 COVID-19 Test Kits from a source introduced to us by the consultant, they will receive a consulting fee of $500,000;
  At such time as we have processed 50,000 COVID-19 Test Kits from a second source introduced by the consultant (i.e., a source other than the source contemplated by the bullet immediately above) the consultant will receive a consulting fee of $250,000; and
  The consultant will receive consulting fees equal to 5% of the net revenues that we generate from processing COVID-19 Test Kits in the Test Labs where such revenues are from sources introduced to us by the consultant (excluding the revenues from the COVID-19 Test Kits set forth in the second and third bullets above).

 

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All compensation earned by the consultant will first be applied to the acceleration and prepayment of all sums due to us, including but not limited to sums due pursuant to the Amended and Restated Secured Promissory Note (“Secured Note”) described below. Under the terms of the Consulting Agreement, the consultant will not be entitled to receive any payments pursuant to the Consulting Agreement unless and until the Secured Note has been paid in full. The total compensation that the consultant will be entitled to earn or to receive under the Consulting Agreement (inclusive of amounts credited against the Secured Note) will be capped at $4.0 million. See Note 16 for amendment subsequent to year end.

 

Promissory Note and Security Agreement

 

On September 25, 2020 (the “Restatement Effective Date”), we also entered into an Amended and Restated Promissory Note and Security Agreement with the consultant, pursuant to which we loaned $3.0 million to the consultant (inclusive of $1.0 million in the aggregate previously loaned to the consultant, as described below).

 

The Secured Note amended and restated in its entirety (i) that certain Promissory Note and Security Agreement, dated July 21, 2020 (the “Original July 21 Note”), pursuant to which we loaned $750,000 to the consultant and (ii) that certain Promissory Note and Security Agreement, dated July 29, 2020 (the “Original July 29 Note”, and, together with the Original July 21 Note, the “Original Notes”), pursuant to which we loaned $250,000 to the consultant.

 

The Secured Note bears interest at a rate of 15% per annum from and including the Restatement Effective Date until the principal amount is repaid in full plus any Principal Increases (as defined below) together with any accrued interest that has not been capitalized; provided, however, that upon the occurrence and during an Event of Default (as defined in the Secured Note), the interest rate payable under the Secured Note will automatically increase to 9% above the rate of interest then applicable to the Secured Note.

 

Interest under the Secured Note will be payable monthly in arrears on the first day of each month for the prior monthly period, as well as at maturity (whether upon demand, by acceleration or otherwise) (each such date, a “Payment Date”); provided, however, that prior to September 1, 2021, interest will be paid and capitalized in kind by increasing the principal amount of the Secured Note (any such increase, a “Principal Increase”) by an amount equal to the interest accrued on the principal amount (as increased by the Principal Increases) during the prior month. On each Payment Date commencing after September 1, 2021, in addition to payments of interest described in the preceding sentence, the consultant will also make payments on the principal amount of the loan equal to 1/36 of the then outstanding principal amount. The amount of the monthly payments will be equal to the amount required to amortize fully the outstanding principal amount of the loan, together with interest, over a period of 36 months.

 

The entire remaining unpaid principal amount of the Secured Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon and all other amounts payable under the Secured Note, will be due and payable, if not sooner paid, on September 30, 2022. The Secured Note may be prepaid in full or in part at any time without penalty or premium.

 

The Secured Note contains customary events of default. If a default occurs and is not cured within the applicable cure period or is not waived, any outstanding obligations under the Secured Note may be accelerated.

 

The Secured Note contain customary representation and warranties and certain restrictive covenants which, among other things, restrict the consultant’s ability to (i) sell, transfer, finance, lease, license, or dispose of all or substantially all of its property or assets, liquidate, windup, or dissolve, (ii) acquire all or substantially all of the property or assets of, or the equity interests in, any other person, (iii) participate in any merger, consolidation, share exchange, division, conversion, reclassification, or other absorption or reorganization, (iv) except for those existing as of the Restatement Effective Date, create, incur, assume, permit, or suffer to exist any pledges, liens, security interests, and other encumbrances of its property or assets, whether now owned or hereafter owned or acquired, and (v) create, incur or permit to exist any debt that is senior to, or pari passu with the Secured Note.

 

In order to secure the consultant’s obligations under the Secured Note, the consultant granted to the Company a continuing security interest in certain property and assets.

 

On January 14, 2021, we entered into an Amendment and Termination Agreement (the “Agreement”) with a consultant pursuant to which the parties amended that certain Amended and Restated Promissory Note and Security Agreement by and between the parties, dated September 25, 2020. Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, the Company has loaned an additional $1 million to the consultant in consideration for consultant’s agreement to cancel its existing consulting agreement with the Company, dated September 25, 2020 (the “Consulting Agreement”), and terminate the Company’s obligation to pay the consultant additional consulting fees beyond the $250,000 already earned by the consultant under the Consulting Agreement. As a result, the initial principal amount due under the Note was increased from $2.75 million to $3.75 million plus all accrued and unpaid interest arising under the Note through and including January 14, 2021.

 

The consultant will sell and process its viral test by RT-PCR (together with other viral and other types of tests). Until the Secured Note is paid in full, for each COVID-19 Test Kit sold or processed from and after January 14, 2021, and for which payment of at least the specified amount, as defined for the Test is received by the consultant, the consultant will pay the Company a specified amount, as defined (the “Test Fee”). The total payments shall not exceed the aggregate amounts due under the Note and shall be applied first to Interest and other amounts due under the Note and then to the then-current outstanding principal. Test Fees will be due and payable on the tenth (10th) business day after the end of each month commencing in February, 2021, and until the Note is paid in full. We received the first payment in the amount of $95,000 with respect to the Test Fees from January 15 through February 2021.

 

On each Payment Date commencing on or after September 1, 2021, in addition to payments of Test Fees described above, the consultant shall also make payments in an amount equal to the greater of (x) the Test Fee, or (y) 1/36th of the then outstanding Principal Amount together with interest thereon and interest accruing on the Note, in accordance with the Note. Accordingly, commencing on September 1, 2021, the minimum number of monthly payments due and payable will be equal to the amount required to amortize fully the outstanding Principal Amount of the Loan, together with interest over a period of thirty six (36) months with level monthly payments.

 

October 2020 Promissory Note

 

On October 22, 2020, we entered into a promissory note with an unrelated third party pursuant to which we loaned $300,000 to such entity. The promissory note bears interest at a rate of 10% per annum and is due December 31, 2020 and was repaid in the first quarter of Fiscal 2021.

 

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Note 13 – Significant Customers

 

Revenue from continuing operations for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019 was $14.5 million and $9.9 million, respectively. Two third-party contract manufacturing customers accounted for 47.1% and 17.2%, respectively, of our revenue from continuing operations for Fiscal 2020. Three third-party contract manufacturing customers accounted for 36.5%, 30.5% and 11.1%, respectively, of Fiscal 2019 revenues from continuing operations. The loss of sales to any of these large third-party contract manufacturing customers could have a material adverse effect on our business operations and financial condition.

 

We are subject to account receivable credit concentrations from time-to-time as a consequence of the timing, payment pattern and ultimate purchase volumes or shipping schedules with our customers. These concentrations may impact our overall exposure to credit risk, either positively or negatively, in that our customers may be similarly affected by changes in economic, regulatory or other conditions that may impact the timing and collectability of amounts due to us. Three of our customers represented 36%, 20% and 13% of our total trade receivable balances at December 31, 2020 and three of our customers represented 70%, 14% and 11% of our total trade receivable balances at December 31, 2019.

 

Note 14 – Segment Information

 

The Company has identified two operating segments, diagnostic services and consumer products, based on the manner in which the Company’s CEO as CODM assesses performance and allocates resources across the organization. The operating segments are organized in a manner that depicts the difference in revenue generating synergies that include the separate processes, profit generation and growth of each segment. The diagnostic services segment provides COVID-19 diagnostic information services to a broad range of customers in the United States, including health plans, third party payers and government organizations. The consumer products segment is engaged in the research, development, manufacture, distribution, marketing and sale of OTC consumer healthcare products and dietary supplements in the United States.

 

The following table is a summary of segment information for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019. (amounts in thousands):

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
Net sales          
Diagnostic services  $1,277   $- 
Consumer products   13,237    9,876 
Consolidated net sales   14,514    9,876 
Cost of sales   9,908    7,261 
Depreciation expense          
Diagnostic services   110    - 
Consumer products   16    82 
Total Depreciation expense   126    82 
Operating and other expenses   6,806    5,639 
Income (loss) from continuing operations, before income taxes          
Diagnostic services   (344)   - 
Consumer products   1,962    2,533 
Unallocated corporate   (3,944)   (5,639)
Total loss from continuing operations, before income taxes   (2,326)   (3,106)
Income (Loss) from discontinued operations, before income taxes   201    (40)
Net Loss  $(2,125)  $(3,146)

 

The following table is a summary of segment information for Fiscal 2020 and Fiscal 2019. (amounts in thousands):

 

   December 31,   December 31, 
   2020   2019 
         
ASSETS          
Diagnostic services  $13,410   $- 
Consumer products   6,261    5,872 
Unallocated corporate   11,734    6,402 
Total assets  $31,405   $12,274 

 

Note 15 – Loss Per Share

 

Basic loss per share for continuing and discontinued operations are computed by dividing the respective net loss attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares of our common stock outstanding for the period. Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that shared in the earnings of the entity. Diluted loss per share also utilize the treasury stock method which prescribes a theoretical buy-back of shares from the theoretical proceeds of all options and warrants outstanding during the period.

 

For Fiscal 2020 and 2019, dilutive loss per share were the same as basic earnings per share due to the inclusion of common stock in the form of stock options and warrants (“Common Stock Equivalents”), when in a net loss position would have an anti-dilutive effect on loss per share. For Fiscal 2020, there were 4,245,000 that were excluded from the loss per share computation as a consequence of their anti-dilutive effect. For Fiscal 2019, there were 3,082,000 that were excluded from the loss per share computation as a consequence of their anti-dilutive effect.

 

Note 16 – Subsequent Events

 

Registered Direct Offering

 

On January 5, 2021, we entered into a securities purchase agreement with certain accredited investors and qualified institutional buyers, pursuant to which we issued and sold to the Purchasers an aggregate of (i) 550,000 shares of our common stock, and (ii) warrants to purchase up to 275,000 shares of common stock in a registered direct offering.

 

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The Shares were sold at a purchase price of $10.00 per share and derived net proceeds of $5.5 million, Each Warrant has an exercise price equal to $11.00 per share of common stock, will be exercisable at any time and from time to time, subject to certain conditions described in the Warrant, after the date of issuance, and will expire on the date that is three years from the date of issuance. The Shares and the Warrants are immediately separable and will be issued separately.

 

Consulting Agreement and Promissory Note Amendment

 

On January 14, 2021, we entered into an Amendment and Termination Agreement (the “Agreement”) with a consultant pursuant to which the parties amended that certain Amended and Restated Promissory Note and Security Agreement by and between the parties, dated September 25, 2020. (See Note 12) Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, the Company has loaned an additional $1 million to the consultant in consideration for consultant’s agreement to cancel its existing consulting agreement with the Company, dated September 25, 2020 (the “Consulting Agreement”), and terminate the Company’s obligation to pay the consultant an additional consulting fees beyond the $250,000 already earned by the consultant under the Consulting Agreement. As a result, the initial principal amount due under the Note was increased from $2.75 million to $3.75 million plus all accrued and unpaid interest arising under the Note through and including January 14, 2021.

 

The consultant will sell and process its viral test by RT-PCR (together with other viral and other types of tests). Until the Secured Note is paid in full, for each COVID-19 Test Kit sold or processed from and after January 14, 2021, and for which payment of at least the specified amount, as defined for the Test is received by the consultant, the consultant will pay the Company a specified amount, as defined (the “Test Fee”). The total payments shall not exceed the aggregate amounts due under the Note and shall be applied first to Interest and other amounts due under the Note and then to the then-current outstanding principal. Test Fees will be due and payable on the 10th business day after the end of each month commencing in February, 2021, and until the Note is paid in full. We received the first payment in the amount of $95,000 with respect to the Test Fees from January 15 through February 2021.

 

On each Payment Date commencing on or after September 1, 2021, in addition to payments of Test Fees described above, the consultant shall also make payments in an amount equal to the greater of (x) the Test Fee, or (y) 1/36th of the then outstanding Principal Amount together with interest thereon and interest accruing on the Secured Note, in accordance with the Secured Note. Accordingly, commencing on September 1, 2021, the minimum number of monthly payments due and payable will be equal to the amount required to amortize fully the outstanding Principal Amount of the Loan, together with interest over a period of 36 months with level monthly payments. The entire remaining unpaid principal amount of the Secured Note, together with all accrued and unpaid interest thereon is due and payable on September 30, 2022 or an earlier date as a result of a maturity, whether by acceleration or otherwise. The Secured Note may be prepaid in full or in part at any time without penalty or premium.

 

Public Offering

 

On January 18, 2021, we entered into an underwriting agreement for the public offering of three million shares of common stock, at a price to the public of $12.50 per share. On January 21, 2021, we completed the offering for net proceeds of $35.1 million, after deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses.

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

On December 10, 2020 (the “Dismissal Date”), the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of ProPhase Labs, Inc. (the “Company”) dismissed EisnerAmper LLP (“EisnerAmper”) as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm. Also on December 10, 2020, the Audit Committee recommended and approved the selection of Friedman LLP (“Friedman”) as the Company’s new independent registered public accounting firm

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) as of December 31, 2020. This evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer. Based upon that evaluation, our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2020.

 

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Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed with or submitted to the SEC under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining an adequate system of internal control over financial reporting. Our system of internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

 

  pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect our transactions and dispositions of our assets;
  provide reasonable assurance that our transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of our financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and our directors; and
  provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, a system of internal control over financial reporting can provide only reasonable assurance and may not prevent or detect misstatements. Further, because of changes in conditions, effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting may vary over time. Our system contains self-monitoring mechanisms, and actions are taken to correct deficiencies as they are identified.

 

Our management conducted an evaluation of our effectiveness of the system of internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 Framework). Based upon our review, our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, concluded that the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting were effective as of December 31, 2020.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

During 2020, there was no change in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Rules 13a-15 or 15d-15 under the Exchange Act that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected or is reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Item 9B. Other Information

 

None

 

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PART III

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

The information required under this item is incorporated by reference from the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “2021 Proxy Statement”) which is to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after the close of our fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and is hereby incorporated by reference.

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

The information required under this item is incorporated by reference to the 2021 Proxy Statement.

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

The information required under this item is incorporated by reference from the 2021 Proxy Statement.

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

 

The information required under this item is incorporated by reference from the 2021 Proxy Statement.

 

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

The information required under this item is incorporated by reference from the 2021 Proxy Statement.

 

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PART IV

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

(a)(1) Financial Statements.

 

The following consolidated financial statements of ProPhase Labs, Inc., together with the report thereon of Friedman LLP and EisnerAmper LLP, independent registered public accounting firms, are included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

  Page
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firms 32
Financial Statements:  
Consolidated Balance Sheets 34
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) 35
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity 36
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows 37
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 38

 

(a)(2) Financial Statement Schedules.

 

All schedules have been omitted because they are not required or because the required information is given in the consolidated financial statements or Notes thereto set forth under Item 8 above.

 

(a)(3) Exhibits

 

Exhibit   Description
2.1†+   Asset purchase agreement, dated January 6, 2017, by and between ProPhase Labs, Inc., Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc. and Mylan Inc., as Buyer Guarantor (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on March 29, 2017).
2.2†+   Manufacturing Agreement, dated March 29, 2017, by and between Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc., Pharmaloz Manufacturing, Inc. and Prophase Labs, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on March 29, 2017).
3.1   Certificate of Incorporation of the Company, (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on June 19, 2015).
3.2   Amended and Restated Bylaws of the Company (as of February 16, 2018) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on February 21, 2018).
4.1   Specimen Common Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of Form 10-KSB/A (File No. 000-21617) filed on April 4, 1997).

 

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4.2   Form of Voting Agreement, dated January 6, 2017, by and between Meda Consumer Healthcare Inc. and the undersigned stockholders of ProPhase Labs, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on January 9, 2017).
4.3   Description of Common Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.3 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on March 26, 2020).
10.1   Form of Indemnification Agreement between the Company and each of its Officers and Directors, dated August 19, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on August 19, 2009).
10.2*   Amended and Restated 2010 Equity Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on May 24, 2018).
10.3*   Amended and Restated 2010 Directors’ Equity Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on May 24, 2018).
10.4*   Form of Option Agreement pursuant to 2010 Equity Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (File No. 000-21617) filed on May 15, 2017).
10.5*   Form of Option Agreement pursuant to 2010 Directors’ Equity Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on May 10, 2010).
10.6*   Form of Restricted Stock Award Agreement pursuant to 2010 Directors’ Equity Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on May 10, 2010).
10.7*    Amended and Restated 2015 Executive Employment Agreement with Ted Karkus, effective February 23, 2018 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on February 21, 2018).
10.8*  

2018 Stock Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on February 21, 2018). 

10.9   Agreement of Sale and Purchase, dated July 10, 2020, by and between ProPhase Labs, Inc. and Lenape Valley Foundation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on August 25, 2020).
10.10   Unsecured Convertible Promissory Note and Guaranty issued to JXVII Trust, dated September 15, 2020 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on September 18, 2020).
10.11   Unsecured Convertible Promissory Note and Guaranty issued Justin J. Leonard, dated September 15, 2020 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on September 18, 2020).
10.12   Sales Agreement dated September 23, 2020 between the Registrant and A.G.P./Alliance Global Partners (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on September 23, 2020).
10.13   Amended and Restated Promissory Note and Security Agreement, dated September 25, 2020, by and between ProPhase Labs, Inc. and Predictive Labs, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on September 30, 2020).

 

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10.14   Stock Purchase Agreement, dated October 22, 2020, by and among Confucius Plaza Medical Laboratory Corp., Pride Diagnostics LLC, the Members of Pride Diagnostics LLC and ProPhase Diagnostics, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on October 26, 2020).
10.15   Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated January 5, 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on January 7, 2021).
10.16   Form of Warrant (dated January 5, 2021) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on January 7, 2021).
10.17   Amendment and Termination Agreement, dated and effective as of January 14, 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 000-21617) filed on January 15, 2021).
10.18   Lease agreement by and among ProPhase Diagnostics, Inc., BRG Office L.L.C. and Unit 2 Associates L.L.C. for the corporate headquarters and diagnostic lab facility located at 711 Stewart Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530
21.1   Subsidiaries of ProPhase Labs, Inc.
23.1  

Consent of Friedman LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.

23.2   Consent of EisnerAmper LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2  

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

     
   

* Indicates a management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement

 † Confidential treatment granted as to portions of the exhibit. Confidential materials omitted and filed separately with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 + Certain schedules and exhibits have been omitted pursuant to Item 601(b)(2) of Regulation S-K. The Company agrees to furnish supplementally a copy of any omitted schedule or exhibit to the Securities and Exchange Commission upon request.

 

40**   101 INS — XBRL Instance Document
41**   101 SCH — XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
42**   101 CAL — XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
43**   101 DEF — XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
44**   101 LAB — XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
45**   101 PRE — XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

Item 16. Form 10-K Summary

 

None.

 

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Signatures

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  PROPHASE LABS, INC.
     
  By: /s/ Ted Karkus
   

Ted Karkus, Chairman of the Board,

Chief Executive Officer and Director

 

POWER OF ATTORNEY

 

KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints Ted Karkus and Monica Brady, jointly and severally, his or her attorneys-in-fact, each with the power of substitution, for him or her in any and all capacities, to sign any amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and to file the same, with exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, hereby ratifying and confirming all that each of said attorneys-in-fact, or his or her substitute or substitutes, may do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:

 

Signature   Title   Date