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EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex321c3b887.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex3122da5b5.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex311458a5c.htm
EX-23.1 - EX-23.1 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex231203577.htm
EX-21.1 - EX-21.1 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex2113bdc21.htm
EX-10.12 - EX-10.12 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex1012db329.htm
EX-10.11 - EX-10.11 - RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.rmax-20161231ex101188177.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 


FORM 10-K


ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2016

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from              to             

Commission File Number 001-36101

 

RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delaware

 

 

80-0937145

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

5075 South Syracuse Street

Denver, Colorado

 

 

80237

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

(Zip code)

 

(303) 770-5531

(Registrants’ telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

 

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is well-known seasoned issuers, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    Yes      No   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, accelerated filer, non-accelerated filer, or smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Large Accelerated Filer   

 

Accelerated Filer   

 

Non-Accelerated Filer   

 

Smaller Reporting Company 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes        No    

As of June 30, 2016, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter, the aggregate value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was approximately $708.6 million, based on the number of shares held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2016 and the closing price of the registrant’s common stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2016.  Shares of common stock held by each executive officer and director have been excluded since those persons may under certain circumstances be deemed to be affiliates.  This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes. 

The number of outstanding shares of the registrant’s Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and Class B common stock, par value $0.0001, as of January 31, 2017 was 17,652,548 and 1, respectively.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s Proxy Statement for the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. Such proxy statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.

 

 

 


 

RE/MAX HOLDINGS, INC.

2016 ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I 

    

5

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS 

 

5

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 

 

23

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 

 

45

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 

 

45

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 

 

45

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 

 

45

 

PART II 

 

46

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 

 

46

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 

 

48

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 

 

51

 

ITEM 7A. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 

 

73

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA 

 

74

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 

 

116

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 

 

116

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 

 

116

 

PART III 

 

117

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 

 

117

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 

 

117

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 

 

117

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 

 

117

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES 

 

117

 

PART IV 

 

118

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 

 

118

 

ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY 

 

118

 

 

 

2


 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations and projections relating to our financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business. You can identify forward-looking statements by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. These statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “plan,” “intend,” “believe,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “likely” and other words and terms of similar meaning in connection with any discussion of the timing or nature of future operating or financial performance or other events. For example, forward-looking statements include statements we make relating to:

·

our expectations regarding consumer trends in residential real estate transactions;

·

our expectations regarding overall economic and demographic trends, including the continued growth of the United States (“U.S.”) residential real estate market;

·

our expectations regarding our performance during future downturns in the housing sector;

·

our growth strategy of increasing our agent count;

·

our ability to expand our network of franchises in both new and existing but underpenetrated markets;

·

our expectations regarding the growth of Motto Mortgage, our new mortgage brokerage franchise;

·

our growth strategy of increasing our number of closed transaction sides and transaction sides per agent;

·

the continued strength of our brand both in the U.S. and Canada and in the rest of the world;

·

the pursuit of future reacquisitions of Independent Regions;

·

our intention to pay dividends;

·

our future financial performance;

·

our ability to forecast selling, operating and administrative expenses;

·

the effects of laws applying to our business;

·

our ability to retain our senior management and other key employees;

·

our intention to pursue additional intellectual property protections;

·

our future compliance with U.S. or state franchise regulations;

·

other plans and objectives for future operations, growth, initiatives, acquisitions or strategies, including investments in our information technology infrastructure;

·

the anticipated benefits of our advertising strategy; and

·

our intention to repatriate cash generated by our Canadian operations to the U.S. on a regular basis in order to minimize the impact of mark-to-market gains and losses.

3


 

These and other forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those that we expected. We derive many of our forward-looking statements from our operating budgets and forecasts, which are based upon many detailed assumptions. While we believe that our assumptions are reasonable, we caution that it is very difficult to predict the impact of known factors and it is impossible for us to anticipate all factors that could affect our actual results. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations, or cautionary statements, are disclosed in “Item 1A.Risk Factors” and in “Item 7.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

We caution you that the important factors referenced above may not contain all of the factors that are important to you. In addition, we cannot assure you that we will realize the results or developments we expect or anticipate or, even if substantially realized, that they will result in the consequences or affect us or our operations in the way we expect. The forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are made only as of the date of this report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

4


 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Overview

We are one of the world’s leading franchisors in the real estate industry, franchising real estate brokerages globally under the RE/MAX brand, and mortgage brokerages within the U.S. under the Motto Mortgage brand.  Our business is 100% franchised—we do not own any of the brokerages that operate under our brands. We focus on our franchisees’ success through providing education and training, valuable tools and support, and marketing to build the strength of the RE/MAX and Motto brands. Because our franchisees fund the cost of developing their brokerages, we maintain a low fixed-cost structure which, combined with our stable, recurring fee-based models, enables us to capitalize on the economic benefits of the franchising model, yielding high margins and significant cash flow.

Our History.    RE/MAX was founded in 1973 with an innovative, entrepreneurial culture premised on combining our high commission concept—in which agents could, and still do, keep a very high percentage of their earned commissions in return for paying fixed fees—with high-quality training and education, and affording our agents and franchisees the flexibility to operate their businesses with great independence. In the early years of our expansion in the U.S. and Canada, we accelerated the brand’s growth by selling regional franchise rights to independent owners for certain geographic regions, a practice we still employ in countries outside of the U.S. and Canada. Since 1999, we have held the number one market share in the U.S. and Canada as measured by total residential transactions sides completed by our agents. Shares of our Class A common stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “RMAX” on October 2, 2013. In October 2016, we launched Motto Mortgage (“Motto”), the first national mortgage brokerage franchise offering in the United States.

Our Brands.    RE/MAX.  The RE/MAX strategy is to sell franchises to highly qualified real estate brokers and help those franchisees recruit and retain the best agents. The RE/MAX brand is built on the strength of our global franchise network, which is designed to attract and retain the best-performing and most experienced agents by maximizing their opportunity to retain a larger portion of their commissions. As a result of this agent-centric approach, we believe that our agents are substantially more productive than the industry average. The RE/MAX brand has the highest level of unaided brand awareness in real estate in the U.S. and Canada according to a 2016 consumer survey by the MMR Strategy Group, and our iconic red, white and blue RE/MAX hot air balloon is one of the most recognized real estate logos in the world. 

The majority of our revenue—65% in 2016—is derived from fixed, contractual fees and dues paid to us based on the number of agents in our franchise network, so agent count is a key measure of our business performance. Today, the RE/MAX brand has over 110,000 agents operating in over 7,000 offices, and a presence in more than 100 countries and territories—a global footprint bigger than any other real estate brokerage brand in the world.

 

 

 

 

111,915 Agents

7,343 Offices

112 Countries and Territories

Picture 3

Picture 2

Picture 1

As of December 31, 2016.

5


 

Motto Mortgage.  The Motto concept offers real estate brokers access to the mortgage brokerage business, which is highly complementary, and a model designed to help Motto franchise owners comply with all relevant mortgage regulations. Motto offers potential homebuyers an opportunity to find both real estate agents and independent Motto loan originators at offices in one location.  Further, Motto loan originators provide home-buyers with financing choices by providing access to a variety of loan options from multiple leading wholesale lenders.  Motto franchisees are mortgage brokers and not mortgage bankers; as a result, Motto franchisees do not fund any loans. Likewise, we franchise the Motto system and are not lenders or brokers. 

Motto’s fee model consists primarily of fixed contractual fees paid monthly on a per-office basis by the broker for being a part of the Motto network and for use of the Motto brand and from sales of individual franchises. Due to the fourth quarter 2016 launch of Motto, we recognized minimal revenue for this new business in 2016. As of February 2017, four months after launch, we offer Motto franchises throughout the United States. Motto franchisees should profit by attracting and retaining professional, highly productive loan originators who provide superior client service and value.  We will not be compensated based on the volume of loans completed by a franchise; the franchisee retains all upside in the quantity of loans completed by a given Motto loan originator or franchise.

The Real Estate Industry

We are a franchisor of businesses in two facets of the real estate industry—real estate brokerages and mortgage brokerages. With nearly three-quarters of our agent count and approximately 95% of our revenue coming from our franchising operations in the U.S. and Canada, we are significantly affected by the real estate market in the U.S. and Canada.

Residential real estate brokerages typically realize revenue by charging a commission based on a percentage of the price of the home sold. The real estate brokerage industry generally benefits in periods of rising home prices and transaction activity (with the number of licensed real estate agents generally increasing during such periods), and is adversely impacted in periods of falling prices and home sale transactions (with the number of licensed real estate agents generally decreasing during such periods).

U.S. and Canadian Real Estate Industry Overview.  The U.S. residential real estate industry is an approximately $1.71 trillion market based on 2016 sales volume, according to U.S. Census Bureau data and existing home sales information from the National Association of Realtors (“NAR”). Residential real estate represents the largest single asset class in the U.S. with a value of approximately $22.7 trillion, according to the Federal Reserve. Canadian home sales totaled approximately CA$263 billion in 2016, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association (“CREA”).

6


 

Cyclical Nature. The U.S. real estate industry has seen steady, multi-year improvement since 2012, but is fundamentally cyclical in nature and has seen downturns before, such as from the second half of 2005 through 2011, when existing home sale transactions declined by 40%, and the median price declined 24%, according to NAR. 2016 saw increased transactions and a fifth year of price increases over 5%, but NAR forecasts a relatively moderate 1.7% increase in transactions and 3.9% increase in median price in 2017.  Therefore, we believe that moderate, sustainable growth will continue for at least the next few years.

 

 

Picture 46

 

Picture 45

Picture 44

Picture 43

While this price recovery has meant that home affordability, as indicated by NAR’s Home Affordability Index, has weakened somewhat from record favorable conditions in 2012, home affordability has remained substantially better than its twenty-year average. This means homes continue to be affordable for the median consumer. However, in comparison to what is traditionally considered a ‘balanced’ market, with enough inventory on the market to satisfy six months of home sales demand, inventory has remained tight for nearly four and a half years.

 

 

Months Supply of Inventory

NAR Home Affordability Index

Picture 41

Source: NAR (based on seasonally adjusted home sales)

Picture 42

Source: NAR 

The extent to which home affordability remains high will depend on the magnitude of widely anticipated interest rate changes, changes in home prices (which may be influenced by the amount of inventory on the market), and changes in the job market and/or wage growth.

In Canada, the downturn from 2005 through 2011 was mild by comparison to that of the U.S. for the same period. Canadian home sales were up 5.5% in 2015 and 6.3% in 2016, but are forecast to decline 3.3% in 2017, according to CREA.

Favorable Long-term Demand. We believe long-term demand for housing in the U.S. is primarily driven by the economic health of the domestic economy, and local factors such as demand relative to supply. We also believe the residential real estate market in the U.S. will benefit from fundamental demographic shifts over the long term. These include an increase in household formations, including as a result of immigration and population growth. We believe there is also pent-up selling demand from generational shifts, such as many retirement age homeowners who are likely to

7


 

take advantage of improving housing market conditions in order to sell their existing residences and retire in new areas of the country or purchase smaller homes. Similarly, we believe there is also pent-up buying demand among adults in the large millennial generation, driving household formation back to historical levels. In 2016, we began to see evidence of this demand in the market. The number of adults reaching age 65 each year continues to increase as the “baby boom” generation enters retirement age, and their ability to sell their homes has been and will be aided by the fact that, according to CoreLogic, the percentage of homes with a loan-to-value ratio less than 80% increased from 55% in October 2012, to 79% as of October 2016. Likewise, first-time homebuyers showed signs of a rebound in 2016, according to NAR. Having historically averaged around 40% of the market, in 2014 and 2015, first-time homebuyers comprised 32% to 33%, respectively, of all homebuyers, which was near a 30-year low.  In 2016, however, first-time homebuyers improved to 35% of homebuyers.

The Long-Term Value Proposition for Real Estate Brokerage Services.  We believe the traditional agent-assisted business model compares favorably to alternative channels of the residential brokerage industry, such as discount brokers, “for sale by owner” listings, and lower-fee brokerages catering to consumers who use technology for some of the services traditionally provided by brokers, because full-service brokerages are best suited to address many of the key characteristics of real estate transactions, including:

(i)

the complexity and large monetary value involved in home sale transactions,

(ii)

the infrequency of home sale transactions,

(iii)

the high price variability in the home market,

(iv)

the intimate local knowledge necessary to advise clients on neighborhood characteristics,

(v)

the unique nature of each particular home, and

(vi)

the consumer’s need for a high degree of personalized advice and support in light of these factors.

For these reasons, we believe that consumers will continue to use the agent-assisted model for residential real estate transactions. In addition, although listings are available for viewing on a wide variety of real estate websites, we believe an agent’s local market expertise provides the ability to better understand the inventory of for-sale homes and the interests of potential buyers. This knowledge allows the agent to customize the pool of potential homes they show to a buyer, as well as help sellers to present their home professionally to best attract potential buyers. We believe this demand to have an advocate and a guide through the home-buying or -selling process is borne out by NAR data showing that the percentage of home buyers and sellers using an agent or broker has climbed over the last decade and a half, to 89% of sellers and 88% of purchasers being represented by a real estate agent.

Percentage of Home Buyers and Sellers Using An Agent

Picture 40

Source: NAR Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers                                                                                         

8


 

The Long-term Value Proposition for Mortgage Brokerage Services.    Likewise, we believe mortgage brokers provide a valuable “concierge” service for consumers.  Mortgage brokers are familiar with the latest loan programs and choices available through various wholesale lenders. A professional mortgage broker can introduce consumers to loan programs from several lenders, providing choice and information consumers may be unlikely to locate on their own. The percentage of mortgage originations handled by mortgage brokerages was, in 2016, substantially below historical levels, which we believe indicates the potential for growth in the mortgage brokerage production channel.

Mortgage Brokerage Share of Mortgage Originations 

 

 

Picture 39

Picture 38

Source: Inside Mortgage Finance Publications, Inc. © 2017 Used with permission.                                  

Moreover, according to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (known as “Freddie Mac”), purchase-money originations are expected to increase gradually in the next few years. Such increases in mortgage originations would provide a growth opportunity for the Motto franchise.

Picture 37

Purchase-money mortgage originations are loans that arise during the initial sale of a house, and therefore correlate to the overall number of home sales and home prices, which, as mentioned above, NAR forecasts to increase gradually. Home purchases are driven primarily by the buyer’s personal and professional circumstances, whereas refinancings depend mainly upon interest rates, because they primarily occur when homeowners see the opportunity to take advantage of improved interest rates.

Our Franchise Model and Offering

Introduction to Franchising.  Franchising is a distributed model for licensing the use of the franchisor’s system and brand. In return, the franchisee retains ownership and sole responsibility for the local business, and therefore the substantial portion of the profits it generates and its risks. The successful franchisor provides its franchisees, i) a unique product or service offering; ii) a distinctive brand name and, eventually as the system gains market share, the favorable consumer recognition that brand comes to symbolize; iii) training and productivity tools to help franchisees operate their business effectively, efficiently, and successfully; and iv) group purchasing power of the franchise system to obtain favorable prices for supplies, advertising, and other tools and services necessary in the operation of the business. Because franchising involves principally the development and licensing of intellectual property, and the costs of retail space and employees are borne by the individual unit owner, it is a low fixed-cost structure typified by high gross margins, allowing the franchisor to focus on innovation, franchisee training and support, and marketing to grow brand reputation.

9


 

The REMAX “Agent-Centric” Franchise Offering.  We believe that our “agent-centric” approach is a compelling offering in the real estate brokerage industry, and it enables us to attract and retain highly effective agents and motivated franchisees to our network and drive growth in our business and profitability. Our franchise model provides the following unique combination of benefits to our franchisees and agents:

·

High Agent Commission Fee Split and Low Franchise Fees.  The RE/MAX high commission split concept is a cornerstone of our model and, although not unique, differentiates us in the industry. We recommend to our franchisees an agent-favorable commission split of 95%/5%, in exchange for the agent paying fixed fees to share the overhead and other costs of the brokerage. This model allows high-producing agents to earn a higher commission compared to traditional brokerages where the broker typically takes 30% to 40% of the agent’s commission.

·

Affiliation with the Best Brand in Residential Real Estate. With number one market share as measured by total residential transaction sides completed by our agents, and leading unaided brand awareness in the U.S. and Canada, according to a consumer survey by MMR Strategy Group, we reinforce brand awareness through marketing and advertising campaigns that are supported by our franchisees’ and agents’ local marketing.

·

Entrepreneurial, High Performance Culture. Our brand and the economics of our model attract highly driven, professional, productive agents, and we allow them autonomy to run their businesses independently, including, generally, the freedom to set commission rates and oversee local advertising.

·

High Traffic Websites Supporting Lead Referral Systems. Remax.com was the most visited real estate franchisor website during 2016, according to Hitwise data. When a prospective buyer inquires about a property displayed on our websites, a RE/MAX agent receives this lead through our lead referral system, LeadStreet®, without a referral fee. LeadStreet® has sent over 17 million free leads to our agents since 2006. We believe that no other national real estate brand provides their agents comparable access to free leads.

·

RE/MAX University® Training Programs. RE/MAX University® offers on-demand access to industry information and advanced training in areas such as distressed properties, luxury properties, senior clients, buyer agency and many other specialty areas of real estate. Our proprietary Momentum® training, development and recruiting program educates our broker owners on how to manage their business more effectively and profitably, and plan for future success by recruiting and training more agents.

·

RE/MAX Approved Supplier Program. Using the collective buying power of our franchise network, a network of preferred suppliers provide group discount prices, marketing materials that have been pre-vetted to comply with RE/MAX brand standards and higher quality materials that may not be cost-effective to procure on an individual office basis. These vendors provide us additional revenue in return for marketing access to our network of franchisees and agents.

10


 

We attribute our success to our ability, by providing this unique, agent-centric suite of benefits, to recruit and retain highly-productive agents and motivated franchisees. Our goal is to continue a self-reinforcing cycle that we call “Premier Market Presence,” whereby recruiting agents and franchisees helps achieve a network effect to further enhance our brand and market share, expand our franchise network and support offerings, and ultimately grow our revenue, as illustrated below:

Picture 36

RE/MAX Four-Tier Franchise Structure. We are a 100% franchised business, with all of the RE/MAX branded brokerage office locations being operated by franchisees. In the early years of our expansion in the U.S. and Canada, we sold regional franchise rights to independent owners for certain geographic regions (“Independent Regions”). In recent years, we have pursued a strategy to reacquire regional franchise rights from Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada, as discussed below. We franchise directly in the rest of the U.S. and Canada, in what we call “Company-owned Regions.” Brokerage offices, in turn, enter into independent contractor relationships with real estate sales associates who represent real estate buyers and sellers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·

 

·

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tier

 

Description

 

Services

 

 

 

 

 

Franchisor

RE/MAX, LLC

 

Owns the right to the RE/MAX brand and sells franchises and franchising rights.

 

Brand Equity

Market Share

Advertising

Marketing Strategies

Corporate Communications

 

 

 

 

 

Picture 6

Independent Regional Franchise Owner

 

Picture 7

 

Owns rights to sell brokerage franchises in a specified region.

14 regional franchises, with 36% of our U.S. and Canada agent count as of the end of 2016, are Independent Regions. Typically, 20-year agreement with renewal options.

RE/MAX, LLC franchises directly in Company-owned Regions, in the rest of the U.S. and Canada.

 

Local Services

Regional Advertising

Franchise Sales

In Company-owned Regions, RE/MAX, LLC performs these services.

 

 

 

 

 

Franchisee

(Broker-Owner)

 

Operates a RE/MAX-branded brokerage office, lists properties and recruits agents.

Typically, 5-year agreement.

 

Office Infrastructure

Sales Tools / Management

Broker of Record

 

 

 

 

 

Agent

(Sales Associate)

 

Branded independent contractors who operate out of local franchise brokerage offices.

 

Represents real estate buyer or seller

Typically sets own commission rate

11


 

In Company-owned Regions in the U.S. and Canada, we typically enter into five-year renewable franchise agreements with franchisees covering a standard set of terms and conditions. For those regions that are independently owned, we have a long-term agreement (typically 20 years, with up to three renewal periods of equal length) with the Independent Region owner, pursuant to which it is authorized to enter into franchise agreements with individual franchisees in that region.

In general, the franchisees (or broker-owners) do not receive an exclusive territory except under certain limited circumstances. Prior to opening an office, a franchisee or principal owner is required to attend a four- to five-day training program at our global headquarters. Prospective franchisees, renewing franchisees, and transferees of a franchise are subject to a criminal background check and must meet certain subjective and objective standards, including those related to relevant experience, education, licensing, background, financial capacity, skills, integrity and other qualities of character.

RE/MAX Marketing and Promotion. We believe the widespread recognition of the RE/MAX brand and our iconic red, white and blue RE/MAX hot air balloon logo and property signs is a key aspect of our value proposition to agents and franchisees. A variety of advertising, marketing and promotion programs build our brand and generate leads for our agents, including leading websites such as remax.com, advertising campaigns using television, digital marketing, social media, print, billboards and signs, and appearances of the iconic RE/MAX hot-air balloon. Event-based marketing programs, sponsorships, sporting activities and other similar functions also promote our brand. These include our support, since 1992 for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals in the U.S. and Children's Miracle Network in Canada, to help sick and injured children. Through the Miracle Home program, participating RE/MAX agents donate to Children's Miracle Network Hospitals once a home sale transaction is complete.

Our agents and franchisees fund nearly all of the advertising, marketing and promotion supporting the RE/MAX brand, which, in the U.S. and Canada, occurs primarily on three levels:

·

Local Campaigns. Our franchisees and agents engage in extensive promotional efforts within their local markets to attract customers and drive agent and brand awareness locally. These programs are subject to our brand guidelines and quality standards for use of the RE/MAX brand, but we allow our franchisees and agents substantial flexibility to create advertising, marketing and promotion programs that are tailored to local market conditions. We believe the marketing, advertising and promotion expenditures by our agents and franchisees substantially exceed the amounts spent by our advertising funds each year.

·

Regional Advertising Funds. Regional advertising funds primarily support advertising campaigns to build and maintain brand awareness at the regional level. The regional advertising funds in Company-owned Regions are funded by our agents through fees that our brokers collect and pay to the regional advertising funds. These regional advertising funds in Company-owned Regions are corporations owned by our controlling stockholder, and the use of the fund balances is restricted by the terms of our franchise agreements. Therefore, the regional advertising fund entities are excluded from our consolidated financial statements. Franchisee contributions to the regional advertising funds that promote the RE/MAX brand in Company-owned Regions were $50.6 million for their fiscal year ended January 31, 2017. The RE/MAX brand is promoted in Independent Regions by other regional advertising funds.

·

Pan-Regional Campaigns. The regional advertising funds in Company-owned Regions, together with some or all of the advertising funds in Independent Regions, may contribute to national or pan-regional creative development and media purchases, to promote a consistent brand message and achieve economies of scale in the purchase of advertising.  

The Motto Mortgage Brokerage Model.  In late 2016, we launched Motto. In connection with our Motto business, we are a mortgage brokerage franchisor, not a lender or mortgage broker. Our franchisees will be brokers, not lenders, and so neither we nor our franchisees fund any loans. As a franchisor, we help our Motto franchisees establish independent mortgage brokerage companies, with a model designed to comply with all relevant regulations. The technology, training, marketing, tools and other services that we provide to Motto franchisees have been designed to enable real estate brokers—both RE/MAX franchisees and other real estate brokers—to overcome the barriers to enter into the mortgage business. Pairing a Motto franchise with a real estate brokerage lets homebuyers enjoy an enhanced, coordinated,

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convenient and simplified experience with a professional real estate agent to find a home and with a Motto loan originator to secure financing from among several financing options. Because Motto’s emphasis is on proximity to real estate brokerages and marketing to home buying customers, we believe our franchisees are well-positioned to benefit from gradually increasing home sales and by extension, a gradually increasing purchase-money mortgage origination market. This convenience will be a differentiator for real estate agents, which we believe will result in enhanced customer satisfaction and customer loyalty, which is essential for a successful, professional, real estate agent. There are not presently any other mortgage brokerage franchisors in the United States.

Our Motto mortgage brokerage franchise business, Motto Franchising, LLC, offers seven-year agreements with franchisees. Motto Franchising sells franchises directly throughout the U.S.; there are no regional franchise rights in the Motto system. Loan Originators at Motto franchises are typically employees of the franchisee and not independent contractors.

Motto, similar to RE/MAX, has an advertising fund that is owned by our controlling stockholder that will be funded by fees paid by each Motto franchisee. The Motto advertising fund currently primarily engages in efforts to help build awareness of the Motto brand and help Motto franchisees recruit experienced loan originators.

Financial Model

As a franchisor, we maintain a low fixed-cost structure. In addition, our stable, fee-based model derives a majority of our revenue from recurring fees paid by our agents, franchisees and regional franchise owners. This combination helps us drive significant operating leverage through incremental revenue growth, yielding significant cash flow.

Picture 35 

(1)

Adjusted EBITDA is a non-GAAP measure of financial performance that differs from U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. See “Item 7.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for further discussion of Adjusted EBITDA and a reconciliation of the differences between Adjusted EBITDA and net income.

(2)

Excludes adjustments attributable to the non-controlling interest. See "Corporate Structure and Ownership” below.

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Revenue Streams. The chart below illustrates our revenue streams:

Revenue Streams as Percentage of 2016 Total Revenue

 

 

 

Picture 34

Continuing Franchise Fees. In the U.S. and Canada, RE/MAX continuing franchise fees are fixed contractual fees paid monthly by regional franchise owners in Independent Regions or franchisees in Company-owned Regions to RE/MAX based on the number of agents in the franchise region or in the franchisee’s office. Likewise, Motto continuing franchise fees are fixed contractual fees paid monthly by Motto franchisees.

Annual Dues. Annual dues are the membership fees that agents pay directly to us to be a part of the RE/MAX network and use the RE/MAX brand. Annual dues are currently a flat fee of US$400/CA$400 per agent annually for our U.S. and Canadian agents. Motto franchisees and their loan originators do not pay annual dues.

Broker Fees. Broker fees are assessed to the RE/MAX broker against real estate commissions paid by customers when an agent sells a home. Generally, the amount paid by broker-owners to the master or regional franchisor, which we refer to as the “broker fee,” is 1% of the total commission on the transaction. The amount of commission collected by brokers is based primarily on the sales volume of RE/MAX agents, home sale prices in such sales and real estate commissions earned by agents on these transactions. Broker fees therefore vary based upon the overall health of the real estate industry and the volume of existing home sales in particular. Motto franchisees do not pay any fees based on the number or dollar value of loans brokered.

Franchise Sales and Other Franchise Revenue. Franchise sales and other franchise revenue primarily comprises:

·

Franchise Sales:  Revenue from sales and renewals of individual franchises in RE/MAX Company-owned Regions, Independent Regions, and Motto, as well as RE/MAX regional and country master franchises for Independent Regions in global markets outside of North America (“Global Regions”). We receive only a portion of the revenue from the sales and renewals of individual franchises from Independent and Global Regions.

·

Other Franchise Revenue: Revenue from preferred marketing arrangements and approved supplier programs with third parties, as well as event-based revenue from training and other programs, including our annual convention in the U.S.

Revenue per Agent in Owned versus Independent RE/MAX Regions. We receive a higher amount of revenue per agent in our Company-owned Regions than in our Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada, and more in Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada than in Global Regions. While both Company-owned Regions and Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada charge relatively similar fees to RE/MAX brokerages and agents, we receive the entire amount of the continuing franchise fee, broker fee and initial franchise and renewal fee in Company-owned Regions, whereas we receive only a portion of these fees in Independent Regions. We generally receive 15%, 20% or 30% of the amount of

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such fees in Independent Regions, which is a fixed rate in each particular Independent Region established by the terms of the applicable regional franchise agreement. We base our continuing franchise fees, agent dues and broker fees outside the U.S. and Canada on the same structure as our Independent Regions, except that the aggregate level of such fees is substantially lower in these markets. In 2016, the average annual revenue per agent in our Company-owned Regions in the U.S. and Canada was approximately $2,500, whereas the average annual revenue per agent in Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada was approximately $800, and in Global Regions was approximately $200.

Picture 31 

Value Creation and Growth Strategy

Our favorable margins generate healthy cash flow, which facilitates our value creation and growth strategy. We intend to leverage our market leadership as a leading franchisor in the residential real estate industry in the U.S. and Canada to drive shareholder value by:

a)

achieving organic growth, building on our network of over 7,000 RE/MAX franchisees and 110,000 agents and building our network of Motto mortgage brokerage franchises;

b)

catalyzing growth by reacquiring regional RE/MAX franchise rights and acquiring other complementary businesses; and

c)

returning capital to shareholders.

Organic Growth. Our organic growth generally comes from: a) RE/MAX agent count growth; b) RE/MAX and Motto franchise sales, c) increases in our ability to monetize the value of our RE/MAX and Motto networks; d) the extent to which we increase the fees paid by RE/MAX or Motto franchisees or RE/MAX agents; and e) continued improvement in the housing market, resulting in more home sale transactions or higher home prices.

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Organic Growth from Agent Count and Franchise Sales.  With respect to RE/MAX agent count growth, we experienced agent losses during the downturn, but we returned to a period of net agent growth in 2012 and our year-over-year growth in agent count continued in 2013 through 2016. 

RE/MAX Agent Count

Picture 24

Number of Agents at Quarter-End

RE/MAX sold 903 office franchises in 2016 and intends to continue adding franchises in new and existing markets, and as a result, increase our global market share and brand awareness. Each incremental agent leverages our existing infrastructure, allowing us to drive additional revenue at little incremental cost. We are committed to reinvesting in the business to enhance our value proposition and through a range of new and existing programs and tools.

RE/MAX Office Franchise Sales

Picture 23

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Organic Growth from Global Regions. Over the last two decades, the size of the RE/MAX network outside of the U.S. and Canada has grown to nearly a quarter of RE/MAX agent count. However, we earn substantially more of our revenue in the U.S. than in other countries as a result of the higher average revenue per agent earned in Company-owned Regions than in Independent Regions, and in the U.S. and Canada as compared to the rest of the world:  

 

 

 

 

 

RE/MAX Agents by Geography

As of Year-end 2016

  

Revenue by Geography

Percent of 2016 Revenue 

Picture 28

  

Picture 29

While the portion of our revenue from Global Regions has historically been small, a notable portion of it has come from sales of master franchises—the right to franchise the RE/MAX brand across an entire country or multi-country region—in Global Regions. Having a presence in over 100 countries and territories at present, we have sold the rights to most major territories, and our revenue from Global Regions in 2016 did not contain revenue from any major master franchise sales. Revenue from Global Regions has remained a relatively consistent percentage of our revenue because, as our agent count in these regions has increased, recurring revenue from fees and dues has taken the place of less predictable revenue from master franchise sales, and we view this as a positive sign of Global Regions’ ability to contribute to our revenue in future years.

Our revenue from countries outside of the U.S. is also affected by the strength of the U.S. dollar against other currencies, primarily the Canadian dollar and to a lesser degree, the Euro.

Pricing.  Given the low fixed infrastructure cost of our franchise model, modest increases in aggregate fees per agent positively affect our profitability. We may increase our aggregate fees per agent over time as we enhance the value we offer to our network. In July 2016, we increased continuing franchise fees in the Company-owned regions in the U.S. by five dollars per agent per month and in Canada by $2.50 per agent per month.  We are judicious with respect to the timing and amount of increases in aggregate fees per agent and our strategic focus remains on growing agent count through franchise sales, recruiting programs and retention initiatives.

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Growth Catalysts through Acquisitions. 

We intend to continue to pursue reacquisitions of the regional RE/MAX franchise rights in a number of Independent Regions in the U.S. and Canada, as well as other acquisitions in related areas that build on our core competencies in franchising and real estate brokerage support.

6

 

 

Independent Region Acquisitions.  The reacquisition of a regional franchise substantially increases our revenue per agent and provides an opportunity for us to drive enhanced profitability, as we receive a higher amount of revenue per agent in our Company-owned Regions than in our Independent Regions. While both Company-owned Regions and Independent Regions charge relatively similar fees to their brokerages and agents, we only receive a percentage of the continuing franchise fee, broker fee and initial franchise and renewal fee in Independent Regions. By reacquiring regional franchise rights, we can capture 100% of these fees and substantially increase the average revenue per agent for agents in the reacquired region, which, as a result of our low fixed-cost structure, further increases our overall margins. In addition, we can establish operational efficiencies and improvements in financial performance of a reacquired region by leveraging our existing infrastructure and experience.

Revenue Flow through Independent Regions

Picture 12

 

Picture 11

 

Recent History of Re-Acquiring

Independent Regional Rights

 

  

 

2007

  

California & Hawaii

2007

  

Florida

2007

  

Carolinas

2011

  

Mountain States

2012

  

Texas

2013

  

Central Atlantic

2013

  

Southwest

2016

 

New York

2016

 

Alaska

2016

 

New Jersey

2016

 

Georgia

2016

 

Kentucky/Tennessee

2016

 

Southern Ohio

 

 

 

 

Company-owned Regions

 

64%

of US/CA agents, as of year-end 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Independent Regions

 

36%

 

 

 

The regions in which we have re-acquired franchise rights since 2007 represented 45% of our agents in the U.S. and Canada as of December 31, 2016, with the result that the Company-owned Regions in which we franchise directly represented 64% of our agents in the U.S. and Canada. The remaining 36% of our U.S. and Canada combined agent count operate in Independent Regions.

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Other Acquisitions.  In September 2016, we acquired certain assets of Full House Mortgage Connection, Inc. (“Full House”), which had created a concept for franchising mortgage brokerages. We used the assets acquired from Full House in the launch of our Motto mortgage franchising business in October 2016, which we believe extends our core competencies of franchising and real estate industry knowledge to the mortgage brokerage business. We believe that the new Motto business, with its recurring fee model, complements RE/MAX’s franchise model and adds a new channel for long-term growth. We may pursue other acquisitions, either of other brands, or of other businesses that we believe can help enhance the value proposition that we provide to the franchisees in our existing businesses.

Return of Capital to Shareholders. We are committed to returning capital to shareholders as part of our value creation strategy. We have paid quarterly dividends since April of 2014, the first quarter after our October 7, 2013 initial public offering, when we began paying quarterly dividends of $0.0625 per share, and we have periodically increased our quarterly dividends since then, as we have deemed appropriate. On February 22, 2017, our Board of Directors announced a quarterly dividend of $0.18 per share.

Quarterly Dividends

Picture 10

We distributed approximately $18.1 million to our shareholders and unitholders in the form of dividends in 2016. Our disciplined approach to allocating capital allows us to return capital to shareholders while driving organic growth and catalyzing growth through acquisitions and, as a result, generate shareholder value.

Competition

The real estate brokerage franchise business is highly competitive. We primarily compete against other real estate franchisors seeking to grow their franchise system. Our largest national competitors in the U.S. and Canada include the brands operated by Realogy Holdings Corp. (including Century 21, Coldwell Banker, ERA, Sothebys and Better Homes and Gardens), Berkshire Hathaway Home Services, Keller Williams Realty, Inc. and Royal LePage. In most markets, we also compete against regional chains, independent, non-franchise brokerages and Internet-based and other brokers offering deeply discounted commissions. Our efforts to target consumers and connect them with a RE/MAX agent via our websites also face competition from major real estate portals. Likewise, the support services we provide to RE/MAX franchisees and agents also face competition from various providers of training, back office management, and lead generation services. We believe that competition in the real estate brokerage franchise business is based principally upon the reputational strength of the brand, the quality of the services offered to franchisees, and the amount of franchise-related fees to be paid by franchisees.

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The ability of our franchisees to compete with other real estate brokerages, both franchised and unaffiliated, is an important aspect of our growth strategy. A franchisee’s ability to compete may be affected by a variety of factors, including the quality of the franchisee’s independent agents, the location of the franchisee’s offices and the number of competing offices in the area. A franchisee’s success may also be affected by general, regional and local housing conditions, as well as overall economic conditions.

While there are no national mortgage brokerage franchisors in the United States at the present time, other than Motto Franchising, the mortgage origination business is characterized by a variety of business models. While real estate brokerage owners are our core market for the purchase of Motto franchises, such owners may form independent, non-franchised mortgage brokerages. They may enter into joint ventures with lenders for mortgage originations, and they may elect not to enter the mortgage origination business themselves, but instead earn revenue from providing marketing and other services to mortgage lenders.

Motto Franchising does not originate loans, and therefore does not compete in the mortgage origination business. The Mortgage origination business in which Motto franchisees participate is highly competitive. There are several different marketing channels for mortgage origination services, with some originators, like Motto franchisees, marketing significantly to real estate agents and their customers. Other originators are independent mortgage bankers or correspondent lenders, underwriting and funding mortgage loans and then selling the loans to third parties. Retail lenders, both traditional and on-line-only companies, and both banks and non-bank lenders, typically market their loan products directly to consumers.

Intellectual Property

We protect the RE/MAX and Motto brands through a combination of trademarks and copyrights. We have registered “RE/MAX” as a trademark in the U.S., Canada, and over 150 other countries and territories, and have registered various versions of the RE/MAX balloon logo and real estate yard sign design in numerous countries and territories as well. We also have filed other trademark applications in the U.S. and certain other jurisdictions, and will pursue additional trademark registrations and other intellectual property protection to the extent we believe it would be beneficial and cost effective. We also are the registered holder of a variety of domain names that include “remax,” “motto,” and similar variations.

Corporate Structure and Ownership

RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. (“RE/MAX Holdings”) is a holding company incorporated in Delaware and its only business is to act as the sole manager of RMCO, LLC, or “RMCO”. In that capacity, RE/MAX Holdings operates and controls all of the business and affairs of RMCO.  As of December 31, 2016, RE/MAX Holdings owns 58.43% of the common units in RMCO, while RIHI, Inc. (“RIHI”) owns the remaining 41.57% of common units in RMCO. RIHI is majority owned and controlled by David Liniger, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder, and by Gail Liniger, our Vice Chair and Co-Founder.

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The diagram below depicts our organizational structure:

Picture 9

The holders of RE/MAX Holdings Class A common stock collectively own 100% of the economic interests in RE/MAX Holdings, Inc., while RIHI owns 100% of the outstanding shares of RE/MAX Holdings Class B common stock. The shares of Class B common stock have no economic rights but entitle the holder, without regard to the number of shares of Class B common stock held, to a number of votes on matters presented to stockholders of RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. that is equal to two times the aggregate number of common units of RMCO held by such holder. As a result of RIHI’s ownership of shares of RE/MAX Holdings Class B common stock, and its ownership of 12,559,600 common units in RMCO, it holds effective control of a majority of the voting power of RE/MAX Holdings outstanding common stock.

 

 

Picture 8

Picture 5

RIHI’s voting rights will be reduced to equal the aggregate number of RMCO common units held—and RIHI would therefore be expected to lose its controlling vote of RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.—after any of the following occur: (i) October 7, 2018; (ii) the death of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder, David Liniger; or (iii) RIHI’s ownership of RMCO common units falls below 5,320,380 common units.

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Due to RIHI’s control of a majority of the voting power of RE/MAX Holdings’ common stock, RE/MAX Holdings constitutes a “controlled company” under the corporate governance standards of the New York Stock Exchange and therefore are not required to comply with certain corporate governance requirements. Due to RIHI’s ownership interest in RMCO, RE/MAX Holdings’ results reflect a significant non-controlling interest and our pre-tax income excludes RIHI’s proportionate share of RMCO’s net income. RE/MAX Holding’s only source of cash flow from operations is in the form of distributions from RMCO and management fees paid by RMCO pursuant to a management services agreement between RE/MAX Holdings and RMCO.

Segments in Which We Operated Prior to 2016

Before 2016, we operated in two reportable segments, (1) Real Estate Franchise Services and (2) Brokerages. The Real Estate Franchise Services reportable segment comprised the operations of our owned and independent global franchising operations and corporate-wide professional services expenses. The Brokerages reportable segment contained the operations of our owned brokerage offices in the U.S., which we sold in 2015 and January 2016. Therefore, we now report as a single segment for 2016 and all prior segment information has been reclassified to reflect our new segment structure.

Employees

As of December 31, 2016, we had 344 employees, plus six part time and 16 temporary employees.  Our franchisees are independent businesses. Their employees and independent contractor sales associates are therefore not included in our employee count. None of our employees are represented by a union. We believe our relations with our employees are good.

Seasonality

The residential housing market is seasonal, with transactional activity in the U.S. and Canada peaking in the second and third quarter of each year. Our results of operations are somewhat affected by these seasonal trends. Our Adjusted EBITDA margins are often lower in the first and fourth quarters due primarily to the impact of lower broker fees and other revenue as a result of lower overall sales volume, as well as higher selling, operating and administrative expenses in the first quarter for expenses incurred in connection with the RE/MAX annual convention.

Government Regulation

Franchise Regulation. The sale of franchises is regulated by various state laws, as well as by the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). The FTC requires that franchisors make extensive disclosure to prospective franchisees but does not require registration. A number of states require registration or disclosure by franchisors in connection with franchise offers and sales. Several states also have “franchise relationship laws” or “business opportunity laws” that limit the ability of the franchisor to terminate franchise agreements or to withhold consent to the renewal or transfer of these agreements. The states with relationship or other statutes governing the termination of franchises include Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin. Some franchise relationship statutes require a mandated notice period for termination; some require a notice and cure period; and some require that the franchisor demonstrate good cause for termination. Although we believe that our franchise agreements comply with these statutory requirements, failure to comply with these laws could result in our company incurring civil liability. In addition, while historically our franchising operations have not been materially adversely affected by such regulation, we cannot predict the effect of any future federal or state legislation or regulation.

Real Estate and Mortgage Regulation. The Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (“RESPA”) and state real estate brokerage laws and mortgage regulations restrict payments which real estate brokers, mortgage brokers, and other service providers in the real estate industry may receive or pay in connection with the sales of residences and referral of settlement services, such as real estate brokerage, mortgages, homeowners insurance and title insurance. Such laws affect the terms that we may offer in our franchise agreements with Motto franchisees and may to some extent restrict preferred vendor programs, both for Motto and RE/MAX. Federal, state and local laws, regulations and ordinances related to the

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origination of mortgages, may affect other aspects of the Motto business, including the extent to which we can obtain data on Motto franchisees’ compliance with their franchise agreements. These laws and regulations include (i) the Federal Truth in Lending Act of 1969 (“TILA”), and Regulation Z (“Reg Z”) thereunder; (ii) the Federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act ("ECOA'') and Regulation B thereunder; (iii) the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act and Regulation V thereunder; (iv) RESPA, and Regulation X thereunder; (v) the Fair Housing Act; (vi) the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act; (vii) the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and its implementing regulations; (viii) the Consumer Financial Protection Act and its implementing regulations; (ix) the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act-FACT ACT and its implementing regulations; and (x) the Do Not Call/Do Not Fax Act and other state and federal laws pertaining to the solicitation of consumers.

Available Information

RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. is a Delaware corporation and its principal executive offices are located at 5075 South Syracuse Street, Denver, Colorado 80237, telephone (303) 770-5531. The Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports are available free of charge through the “Investor Relations” portion of the Company’s website, www.remax.com, as soon as reasonably practical after they are filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The content of the Company’s website is not incorporated into this report. The SEC maintains a website, www.sec.gov, which contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information filed electronically with the SEC by the Company.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 

RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company,” “we,” “our” or “us”) could be adversely impacted by various risks and uncertainties. An investment in our Class A common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the following risk factors, as well as all of the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto before making an investment decision. If any of these risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, operating results, cash flow and prospects may be materially and adversely affected. As a result, the trading price of our Class A common stock could decline and you could lose some or all of your investment.

We have grouped our risks according to:

·

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry;

·

Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure; and

·

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Class A Common Stock.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Our results are tied to the residential real estate market and we may be negatively impacted by downturns in this market and general global economic conditions.

The residential real estate market tends to be cyclical and typically is affected by changes in general economic conditions which are beyond our control. These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, fluctuations in debt and equity capital markets, levels of unemployment, consumer confidence and the general condition of the U.S. and the global economy. The residential real estate market also depends upon the strength of financial institutions, which are sensitive to changes in the general macroeconomic and regulatory environment. Lack of available credit or lack of confidence in the financial sector could impact the residential real estate market, which in turn could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

For example, the U.S. residential real estate market has steadily improved in recent years after a significant and prolonged downturn, which began in the second half of 2005 and continued through 2011. Based on our experience, we

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believe gradually improving market conditions in the U.S. will enable us to continue to recruit and retain more agents, increasing our revenue and profitability.

We cannot predict whether the market will continue to improve.  If the residential real estate market or the economy as a whole does not continue to improve, we may experience adverse effects on our business, financial condition and liquidity, including our ability to access capital and grow our business.

Any of the following could cause a decline in the housing or mortgage markets and have a material adverse effect on our business by causing periods of lower growth or a decline in the number of home sales and/or home prices which, in turn, could adversely affect our revenue and profitability:

·

an increase in the unemployment rate;

·

a decrease in the affordability of homes due to changes in interest rates, home prices, and rates of wage and job growth;

·

slow economic growth or recessionary conditions;

·

weak credit markets;

·

low consumer confidence in the economy and/or the residential real estate market;

·

instability of financial institutions;

·

legislative, tax or regulatory changes that would adversely impact the residential real estate or mortgage markets, including but not limited to potential reform relating to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and other government sponsored entities (“GSEs”) that provide liquidity to the U.S. housing and mortgage markets;

·

increasing mortgage rates and down payment requirements and/or constraints on the availability of mortgage financing, including but not limited to the potential impact of various provisions of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) or other legislation and regulations that may be promulgated thereunder relating to mortgage financing, including restrictions imposed on mortgage originators as well as retention levels required to be maintained by sponsors to securitize certain mortgages;

·

excessive or insufficient home inventory levels on a regional level;

·

high levels of foreclosure activity, including but not limited to the release of homes already held for sale by financial institutions;

·

adverse changes in local or regional economic conditions;

·

the inability or unwillingness of homeowners to enter into home sale transactions due to negative equity in their existing homes;

·

demographic changes, such as a decrease in household formations slowing rate of immigration or population growth; decrease in home ownership rates, declining demand for real estate and changing social attitudes toward home ownership

·

changes in local, state and federal laws or regulations that affect residential real estate transactions or encourage ownership, including but not limited to tax law changes, such as limiting or eliminating the deductibility of certain mortgage interest expense, the application of the alternative minimum tax, and real property taxes and employee relocation expense; and/or

·

acts of nature, such as hurricanes, earthquakes and other natural disasters that disrupt local or regional real estate markets.

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The failure of the U.S. residential real estate market growth to be sustained, or a prolonged decline in the number of home sales and/or home sale prices could adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

The U.S. residential real estate market has gradually improved since 2011. However, not all U.S. markets have participated to the same extent in the improvement. A lack of a continued or widespread growth or a prolonged decline in existing home sales, a decline in home sale prices or a decline in commission rates charged by our franchisees/brokers could adversely affect our results of operations by reducing the recurring fees we receive from our franchisees and our agents.

A lack of financing for homebuyers in the U.S. residential real estate market at favorable rates and on favorable terms could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and results of operations.

Our business is significantly impacted by the availability of financing at favorable rates or on favorable terms for homebuyers, which may be affected by government regulations and policies. Certain potential reforms such as the U.S. federal government’s conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, proposals to reform the U.S. housing market, attempts to increase loan modifications for homeowners with negative equity, monetary policy of the U.S. government, increases in interest rates and the Dodd-Frank Act may adversely impact the housing industry, including homebuyers’ ability to finance and purchase homes.

 

The monetary policy of the U.S. government, and particularly the Federal Reserve Board, which regulates the supply of money and credit in the U.S., significantly affects the availability of financing at favorable rates and on favorable terms, which in turn affects the domestic real estate market. Policies of the Federal Reserve Board can affect interest rates available to potential homebuyers. Further, we are affected by any rising interest rate environment. Changes in the Federal Reserve Board’s policies, the interest rate environment and mortgage market are beyond our control, are difficult to predict, and could restrict the availability of financing on reasonable terms for homebuyers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, the possibility of the elimination of the tax deductibility of mortgage interest could have an adverse effect on the housing market by reducing incentives for buying or refinancing homes and negatively affecting property values. In both December 2015 and December 2016, the Federal Open Market Committee of the Federal Reserve Board raised the target range for federal funds, after leaving the federal funds interest rate near zero since late 2008. The pace of future increases in the federal funds rate is uncertain, although the Federal Open Market Committee has indicated it expects additional increases to occur. Historically, changes in the federal funds rate have led to changes in interest rates for other loans but the extent of the impact on the future availability and price of mortgage financing cannot be predicted with certainty.

In addition, a reduction in government support for home financing, including the possible winding down of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, could further reduce the availability of financing for homebuyers in the U.S. residential real estate market. In connection with the U.S. federal government’s conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, it provided billions of dollars of funding to these entities during the real estate downturn, in the form of preferred stock investments to backstop shortfalls in their capital requirements. No consensus has emerged in Congress concerning potential reforms relating to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, so we cannot predict either the short or long term effects of such regulation and its impact on homebuyers’ ability to finance and purchase homes.

Furthermore, many lenders significantly tightened their underwriting standards since the real estate downturn, and many subprime and other alternative mortgage products are no longer common in the marketplace. If these mortgage loans continue to be difficult to obtain, including in the jumbo mortgage markets, the ability and willingness of prospective buyers to finance home purchases or to sell their existing homes could be adversely affected, which would adversely affect our operating results.

The Dodd-Frank Act, which was passed to more closely regulate the financial services industry, created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”), an independent federal bureau, which enforces consumer protection laws, including various laws regulating mortgage finance. The Dodd-Frank Act also established new standards and practices for mortgage lending, including a requirement to determine a prospective borrower’s ability to repay a loan, removing incentives to originate higher cost mortgages, prohibiting prepayment penalties for non-qualified mortgages, prohibiting mandatory arbitration clauses, requiring additional disclosures to potential borrowers and restricting the fees that

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mortgage originators may collect. Rules implementing many of these changes protect creditors from certain liabilities for loans that meet the requirements for “qualified mortgages.” The rules place several restrictions on qualified mortgages, including caps on certain closing costs. These and other rules promulgated by the CFPB could have a significant impact on the availability of home mortgages and how mortgage brokers and lenders transact business. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act contained provisions that require GSEs, including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, to retain an interest in the credit risk arising from the assets they securitize. This may serve to reduce GSEs’ demand for mortgage loans, which could have a material adverse effect on the mortgage industry, which may reduce the availability of mortgages to certain borrowers.

While we are continuing to evaluate all aspects of legislation, regulations and policies affecting the domestic real estate market, we cannot predict whether or not such legislation, regulation and policies may increase down payment requirements, increase mortgage costs, or result in increased costs and potential litigation for housing market participants, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We may fail to execute our strategies to grow our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and results of operations.

We intend to pursue a number of different strategies to grow our revenue and earnings and to deploy the cash generated by our business. We constantly strive to increase the value proposition for our agents and brokers. If we do not reinvest in our business in ways that support our agents and brokers and make the RE/MAX network attractive to agents and brokers, we may become less competitive. Additionally, we are exploring opportunities to acquire other businesses, including select RE/MAX independent regional franchises, or other businesses in the U.S. and Canada that are complementary to our core business. If we fail to develop, execute, or focus on our business strategy, fail to make good business decisions, fail to enforce a disciplined management process to ensure that our investment of resources aligns with our strategic plan and our core management and franchising competencies or fail to properly focus resources or management attention on strategic areas, any of these could negatively impact the overall value of the Company.  If we are unable to execute our business strategy, for these or any other reasons, our prospects, financial condition and results of operations may be harmed and our stock price may decline.

We may be unable to reacquire regional franchise rights in independent RE/MAX regions in the U.S. and Canada or successfully integrate the independent RE/MAX regions that we have acquired.

We are pursuing a key growth strategy of reacquiring select RE/MAX independent regional franchises in the U.S. and Canada. The reacquisition of a regional franchise increases our revenue and provides an opportunity for us to drive enhanced profitability. This growth strategy depends on our ability to find regional franchisees willing to sell the franchise rights in their regions on favorable terms, as well as our ability to finance and complete these transactions. We may have difficulty finding suitable regional franchise acquisition opportunities at an acceptable price.  Further, in the event we acquire a regional franchise, we may not be able to achieve the expected returns on our acquisition after we integrate the reacquired region into our business.

Integrating acquired regions involves complex operational and personnel-related challenges and we may encounter unforeseen difficulties and higher than expected integration costs or we may not be able to deliver expected cost and growth synergies.

Future acquisitions may present other challenges and difficulties, including:

·

the possible departure of a significant number of key employees;

·

regulatory constraints and costs of executing our growth strategy may vary by geography;

·

the possible defection of franchisees and agents to other brands or independent real estate companies;

·

the disruption of our respective ongoing business;

·

problems we may discover post-closing with the operations, including the internal controls and procedures of the regions we reacquire;

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·

the failure to maintain important business relationships and contracts of the selling region;

·

impairment of acquired assets;

·

legal or regulatory challenges or litigation post-acquisition, which could result in significant costs;

·

unanticipated expenses related to integration; and

·

potential unknown liabilities associated with acquired businesses.

A prolonged diversion of management’s attention and any delays or difficulties encountered in connection with the integration of any acquired region or region that we may acquire in the future could prevent us from realizing anticipated cost savings and revenue growth from our acquisitions.

We may not be able to manage growth successfully.

In order to successfully expand our business, we must effectively recruit, develop and motivate new franchisees, and we must maintain the beneficial aspects of our corporate culture. We may not be able to hire new employees with the expertise necessary to manage our growth quickly enough to meet our needs. If we fail to effectively manage our hiring needs and successfully develop our franchisees, our franchisee and employee morale, productivity and retention could suffer, and our brand and results of operations could be harmed. Effectively managing our potential growth could require significant capital expenditures and place increasing demands on our management. We may not be successful in managing or expanding our operations or in maintaining adequate financial and operating systems and controls. If we do not successfully manage these processes, our brand and results of operations could be adversely affected.

The failure to attract and retain highly qualified franchisees could compromise our ability to expand the RE/MAX network.

Our most important asset is the people in our network, and the success of our franchisees depends largely on the efforts and abilities of franchisees to attract and retain high quality agents. If our franchisees fail to attract and retain agents, they may fail to generate the revenue necessary to pay the contractual fees owed to us.

Additionally, although we believe our relationship with our franchisees and agents is open and strong, the nature of such relationships can give rise to conflict. For example, franchisees or agents may become dissatisfied with the amount of contractual fees and dues owed under franchise or other applicable arrangements, particularly in the event that we decide to increase fees and dues further. They may disagree with certain network-wide policies and procedures, including policies such as those dictating brand standards or affecting their marketing efforts. They may also be disappointed with any marketing campaigns designed to develop our brand. There are a variety of reasons why our franchisor-franchisee relationship can give rise to conflict. If we experience any conflicts with our franchisees on a large scale, our franchisees may decide not to renew their franchise agreements upon expiration or may file lawsuits against us or they may seek to disaffiliate with us, which could also result in litigation. These events may, in turn, materially and adversely affect our business and operating results.

Our financial results are affected by the ability of our franchisees to attract and retain agents.

Our financial results are heavily dependent upon the number of agents in our global network. The majority of our revenue is derived from recurring dues paid by our agents and contractual fees paid by our franchisees or regional franchise owners based on the number of agents within the franchisee’s or regional franchise owner’s network. If our franchisees are not able to attract and retain agents (which is not within our direct control), our revenue may decline. In addition, our competitors may attempt to recruit the agents of our franchisees.

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Competition in the residential real estate franchising business is intense, and we may be unable to grow our business organically, including increasing by our agent count, expanding our network of franchises and agents, and increasing franchise and agent fees, which could adversely affect our brand, our financial performance, and results of operations.

We generally face strong competition in the residential real estate services business from other franchisors and brokerages (i.e. national, regional, independent, boutique, discount and web-based brokerages), as well as web-based companies focused on real estate. As a real estate brokerage franchisor, one of our primary assets is our brand name. Upon the expiration of a franchise agreement, a franchisee may choose to renew their franchise with us, operate as an independent broker or to franchise with one of our competitors. Competing franchisors may offer franchises monthly ongoing fees that are lower than those we charge, or that are more attractive in particular market environments. Further, our largest competitors in this industry in the U.S. and Canada include the brands operated by Realogy Holdings, Corp., (which include Coldwell Banker, Century 21, ERA, Sothebys and Better Homes and Gardens, among others), Berkshire Hathaway Home Services, Keller Williams Realty, Inc. and Royal LePage. Some of these companies may have greater financial resources and larger budgets than we do to invest in technology to build their brands and enhance their value proposition to agents, brokers and consumers. To remain competitive in the sale of franchises and to retain our existing franchisees at the time of the renewal of their franchise agreements, we may have to reduce the cost of renewals and/or the recurring monthly fees we charge our franchisees. Further, in certain areas, regional and local franchisors provide additional competitive pressure.

As a result of this competition, we may face many challenges in achieving organic growth by adding franchises and attracting agents in new and existing markets to expand our network in the U.S., Canada and globally, as well as other challenges such as:

·

selection and availability of suitable markets;

·

finding qualified franchisees in these markets who are interested in opening franchises on terms that are favorable to us;

·

increasing our local brand awareness in new markets;

·

attracting and training of qualified local agents; and

·

general economic and business conditions.

A significant increase in private sales of residential property, including through the Internet, could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects and results of operations.

A significant increase in the volume of private sales completed without the involvement of a full-service real estate agent or using a low cost provider due to, for example, increased access to information on real estate listings over the Internet and the proliferation of websites and online tools that facilitate private sales, and a corresponding decrease in the volume of sales through real estate agents could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects and results of operations.

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Our financial results are affected directly by the operating results of franchisees and agents, over whom we do not have direct control.

Our real estate franchises generate revenue in the form of monthly ongoing fees, including monthly management fees and broker fees (which are tied to agent gross commissions) charged by our franchisees to our agents. Our agents pay us annual dues to have access to our network and utilize our services. Accordingly, our financial results depend upon the operational and financial success of our franchisees and their agents, whom we do not control, particularly in Independent Regions where we exercise less control over franchisees than in Company-owned Regions. If industry trends or economic conditions are not sustained or do not continue to improve, our franchisees’ financial results may worsen and our revenue may decline. We may also have to terminate franchisees more frequently in the future due to non-reporting and non-payment. Further, if franchisees fail to renew their franchise agreements, or if we decide to restructure franchise agreements in order to induce franchisees to renew these agreements, then our revenue from ongoing monthly fees may decrease, and profitability from new franchisees may be lower than in the past due to reduced ongoing monthly fees and other non-standard incentives we may need to provide.

Our franchisees and agents could take actions that could harm our business.

Our regional franchisees are independent businesses and the agents who work within these brokerages are independent contractors and, as such, are not our employees, and we do not exercise control over their day-to-day operations. Broker franchisees may not operate real estate brokerage businesses in a manner consistent with industry standards, or may not attract and retain qualified independent contractor agents. If broker franchisees and agents were to provide diminished quality of service to customers, engage in fraud, defalcation, misconduct or negligence or otherwise violate the law or realtor codes of ethics, our image and reputation may suffer materially and we may become subject to liability claims based upon such actions of our franchisees and agents. Any such incidence could adversely affect our results of operations.

Brand value can be severely damaged even by isolated incidents, particularly if the incidents receive considerable negative publicity or result in litigation. Some of these incidents may relate to the way we manage our relationship with our franchisees, our growth strategies or the ordinary course of our business or our franchisees’ business. Other incidents may arise from events that are or may be beyond our control and may damage our brand, such as actions taken (or not taken) by one or more franchisees or their agents relating to health, safety, welfare or other matters; litigation and claims; failure to maintain high ethical and social standards for all of our operations and activities; failure to comply with local laws and regulations; and illegal activity targeted at us or others. Our brand value could diminish significantly if any such incidents or other matters erode consumer confidence in us, which may result in a decrease in our total agent count and, ultimately, lower continuing franchise fees and annual dues, which in turn would materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

The failure of Independent Region owners to successfully develop or expand within their respective regions could adversely impact our revenue.

We have sold regional master franchises in the U.S. and Canada and have sold and continue to sell regional master franchises in our global locations outside of Canada. While we are pursuing a strategy to reacquire select regional franchise rights in a number of regions in the U.S. and Canada, we still rely on independent regional master franchises in Independent Regions, and in all regions located outside the U.S. and Canada. We derive only a limited portion of our revenue directly from master franchises. However, we depend on Independent Regions, which have the exclusive right to grant franchises within a particular region, to successfully develop or expand within their respective regions and to monitor franchisees’ use of our brand. The failure of any of these Independent Region owners to do these things, or the termination of an agreement with a regional master franchisee could delay the development of a particular franchised area, interrupt the operation of our brand in a particular market or markets while we seek alternative methods to develop our franchises in the area, and weaken our brand image. Such an event could result in lower revenue for us, which would adversely impact our business and results of operations.

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We are subject to a variety of additional risks associated with our franchisees.

Our franchise system subjects us to a number of risks, any one of which may impact our ability to collect recurring, contractual fees and dues from our franchisees, may harm the goodwill associated with our brand, and/or may materially and adversely impact our business and results of operations.

Bankruptcy of U.S. Franchisees. A franchisee bankruptcy could have a substantial negative impact on our ability to collect fees and dues owed under such franchisee’s franchise arrangements. In a franchisee bankruptcy, the bankruptcy trustee may reject its franchise arrangements pursuant to Section 365 under the U.S. bankruptcy code, in which case there would be no further payments for fees and dues from such franchisee, and there can be no assurance as to the proceeds, if any, that may ultimately be recovered in a bankruptcy proceeding of such franchisee in connection with a damage claim resulting from such rejection.

Franchisee Insurance. The franchise arrangements require each franchisee to maintain certain insurance types and levels. Certain extraordinary hazards, however, may not be covered, and insurance may not be available (or may be available only at prohibitively expensive rates) with respect to many other risks. Moreover, any loss incurred could exceed policy limits or the franchisee could lack the required insurance at the time the claim arises, in breach of the insurance requirement, and policy payments made to franchisees may not be made on a timely basis. Any such loss or delay in payment could have a material and adverse effect on a franchisee’s ability to satisfy its obligations under its franchise arrangement, including its ability to make payments for contractual fees and dues or to indemnify us.

Franchise Arrangement Termination. Each franchise arrangement is subject to termination by us as the franchisor in the event of a default, generally after expiration of applicable cure periods, although under certain circumstances a franchise arrangement may be terminated by us upon notice without an opportunity to cure. The default provisions under the franchise arrangements are drafted broadly and include, among other things, any failure to meet operating standards and actions that may threaten the licensed intellectual property.

Franchise Nonrenewal.  Each franchise agreement has an expiration date. Upon the expiration of the franchise arrangement, we or the franchisee may or may not elect to renew the franchise arrangement. If the franchisee arrangement is renewed, such renewal is generally contingent on the franchisee’s execution of the then-current form of franchise arrangement (which may include terms the franchisee deems to be more onerous than the prior franchise agreement), the satisfaction of certain conditions and the payment of a renewal fee. If a franchisee is unable or unwilling to satisfy any of the foregoing conditions, the expiring franchise arrangement will terminate upon expiration of the term of the franchise arrangement.

We may fail to protect the privacy and personally identifiable information of our franchisees, agents and consumers.

We rely on the collection and use of personally identifiable information from franchisees, agents and consumers to conduct our business. We disclose our information collection and dissemination practices in a published privacy statement on our websites, which we may modify from time to time. We may be subject to legal claims, government action and damage to our reputation if we act or are perceived to be acting inconsistently with the terms of our privacy statement, consumer expectations, or the law. In the event we, or the vendors with which we contract to provide services on behalf of our customers, were to suffer a breach of personally identifiable information, our customers could terminate their business with us. Further, we may be subject to claims to the extent individual employees or independent contractors breach or fail to adhere to company policies and practices and personally identifiable information is jeopardized as a result.

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The real estate business of our franchisees is highly regulated and any failure to comply with such regulations or any changes in such regulations could adversely affect our business.

The businesses of our franchisees are highly regulated and must comply with the requirements governing the licensing and conduct of real estate brokerage and brokerage-related businesses in the jurisdictions in which we and they do business. These laws and regulations contain general standards for and prohibitions on the conduct of real estate brokers and agents, including those relating to licensing of brokers and agents, fiduciary and agency duties, administration of trust funds, collection of commissions, advertising and consumer disclosures. Under state law, the franchisees and our real estate brokers have certain duties to supervise and are responsible for the conduct of their brokerage business.

Our franchisees (other than in commercial brokerage transactions) must comply with RESPA. RESPA and comparable state statutes, among other things, restrict payments which real estate brokers, agents and other settlement service providers may receive for the referral of business to other settlement service providers in connection with the closing of real estate transactions. Such laws may to some extent restrict preferred vendor arrangements involving our franchisees. RESPA and similar state laws also require timely disclosure of certain relationships or financial interests that a broker has with providers of real estate settlement services. Pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, administration of RESPA has been moved from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”) to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”). The CFPB’s interpretation or application of RESPA may differ from HUD’s, particularly with respect to a range of informal interpretations that HUD staff provided over many years; that possibility presents an increased regulatory risk. 

There is a risk that we could be adversely affected by current laws, regulations or interpretations or that more restrictive laws, regulations or interpretations will be adopted in the future that could make compliance more difficult or expensive. There is also a risk that a change in current laws could adversely affect our business or our franchisees’ businesses.

Regulatory authorities also have relatively broad discretion to grant, renew and revoke licenses and approvals and to implement regulations. Accordingly, such regulatory authorities could prevent or temporarily suspend our franchisees from carrying on some or all of our activities or otherwise penalize them if their financial condition or our practices were found not to comply with the then current regulatory or licensing requirements or any interpretation of such requirements by the regulatory authority. Our failure to comply with any of these requirements or interpretations could limit our ability to renew current franchisees or sign new franchisees or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our operations.

We, or our franchisees, are also subject to various other rules and regulations such as:

·

the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which governs the disclosure and safeguarding of consumer financial information;

·

various state and federal privacy laws protecting consumer data;

·

the USA PATRIOT Act;

·

restrictions on transactions with persons on the Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons list promulgated by the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the Department of the Treasury;

·

federal and state “Do Not Call,” “Do Not Fax,” and “Do Not E-Mail” laws;

·

the Fair Housing Act;

·

laws and regulations, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, that impose sanctions on improper payments;

·

laws and regulations in jurisdictions outside the U.S. in which we do business;

·

state and federal employment laws and regulations, including any changes that would require reclassification of independent contractors to employee status, and wage and hour regulations;

·

increases in state, local or federal taxes that could diminish profitability or liquidity; and

·

consumer fraud statutes.

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Our failure to comply with any of the foregoing laws and regulations may subject us to fines, penalties, injunctions and/or potential criminal violations. Any changes to these laws or regulations or any new laws or regulations may make it more difficult for us to operate our business and may have a material adverse effect on our operations.

Our franchising activities are subject to a variety of state and federal laws and regulations regarding franchises, and any failure to comply with such existing or future laws and regulations could adversely affect our business.

The sale of franchises is regulated by various state laws as well as by the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). The FTC requires that franchisors make extensive disclosure to prospective franchisees but does not require registration. A number of states require registration and/or disclosure in connection with franchise offers and sales. In addition, several states have “franchise relationship laws” or “business opportunity laws” that limit the ability of franchisors to terminate franchise agreements or to withhold consent to the renewal or transfer of these agreements. We believe that our franchising procedures, as well as any applicable state-specific procedures, comply in all material respects with both the FTC guidelines and all applicable state laws regulating franchising in those states in which we offer new franchise arrangements. However, noncompliance could reduce anticipated revenue, which in turn may materially and adversely affect our business and operating results.

Most of our domestic and global regional franchisees self-report their agent counts, agent commissions and fees due to us, and we have limited tools to validate or verify these reports and a few of our domestic and global master franchise agreements do not contain audit rights. This could impact our ability to collect revenue owed to us by our Independent Regions, franchisees, and agents, and could affect our ability to forecast our performance accurately.

Under our regional franchise agreements, owners in our Independent Regions report the number of agents, monthly management fees and broker service fees received by the brokers from the agents and the monthly ongoing fees (continuing franchise fees and broker fees) payable to us by the brokers. Generally, our regional agreements require that the regional franchisee provide us with certain financial reports, including reports that we may reasonably request from time to time. Additionally, many of these agreements also provide us with audit rights. For those agreements that do not, we may have limited methods of validating the monthly ongoing fees due to us from these regions and must rely on reports submitted by such regional franchisees and our internal protocols for verifying agent counts. If such regional franchisees were to underreport or erroneously report these amounts payable, even if unintentionally, we may not receive all of the annual agent dues or monthly ongoing fees due to us. In addition, to the extent that we were underpaid, we may not have a definitive method for determining such underpayment. If a material number of our regional franchisees were to under report or erroneously report their agent counts, agent commissions or fees due to us, it could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and results of operations. Further, agent count is a key performance indicator (KPI), and incomplete information, or information that is not reported in a timely manner could impair our ability to evaluate and forecast key business drivers and financial performance. 

We are subject to certain risks related to litigation filed by or against us, and adverse results may harm our business and financial condition.

We cannot predict with certainty the costs of defense, the costs of prosecution, insurance coverage or the ultimate outcome of litigation and other proceedings filed by or against us, including remedies or damage awards, and adverse results in such litigation and other proceedings may harm our business and financial condition.

Such litigation and other proceedings may include, but are not limited to, complaints from or litigation by franchisees, usually related to alleged breaches of contract or wrongful termination under the franchise arrangements, actions relating to intellectual property, commercial arrangements and franchising arrangements.

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In addition, litigation against a franchisee or its affiliated sales agents by third parties, whether in the ordinary course of business or otherwise, may also include claims against us for liability by virtue of the franchise relationship. Franchisees may fail to obtain insurance naming the Company as an additional insured on such claims. We could face similar claims for direct liability related our former operation of Company-owned brokerages, the last of which we sold in 2015 and early 2016. In addition to increasing franchisees’ costs and limiting the funds available to pay us contractual fees and dues and reducing the execution of new franchise arrangements, claims against us (including vicarious liability claims) divert our management resources and could cause adverse publicity, which may materially and adversely affect us and our brand, regardless of whether such allegations are valid or whether we are liable.

Our global operations may be subject to additional risks related to litigation, including difficulties in enforcement of contractual obligations governed by foreign law due to differing interpretations of rights and obligations, compliance with multiple and potentially conflicting laws, new and potentially untested laws and judicial systems and reduced protection of intellectual property. A substantial unsatisfied judgment against us or one of our subsidiaries could result in bankruptcy, which would materially and adversely affect our business and operating results.

Our global operations, including those in Canada, are subject to risks not generally experienced by our U.S. operations.

Although our global operations provide a relatively small portion of our revenue, they are subject to risks not generally experienced by our U.S. operations. The risks involved in our global operations and relationships could result in losses against which we are not insured and therefore affect our profitability. These risks include:

·

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, primarily related to changes in the Canadian dollar to U.S. dollar exchange rates, as well as the Euro to U.S. dollar exchange rate and foreign exchange restrictions;

·

exposure to local economic conditions and local laws and regulations, including those relating to the agents of our franchisees;

·

economic and/or credit conditions abroad;

·

potential adverse changes in the political stability of foreign countries or in their diplomatic relations with the U.S.;

·

restrictions on the withdrawal of foreign investment and earnings;

·

government policies against businesses owned by foreigners;

·

investment restrictions or requirements;

·

diminished ability to legally enforce our contractual rights in foreign countries;

·

difficulties in registering, protecting or preserving trade names and trademarks in foreign countries;

·

restrictions on the ability to obtain or retain licenses required for operation;

·

increased franchise regulations in foreign jurisdictions;

·

withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments by subsidiaries; and

·

changes in foreign tax laws.

Our global operations outside Canada generally generate substantially lower average revenue per agent than our U.S. and Canadian operations.

Loss or attrition among our senior management or other key employees or the inability to hire additional qualified personnel could adversely affect our operations, our brand and our financial performance.

Our future success depends on the efforts and abilities of our senior management, including our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder, David Liniger, our senior management and other key employees. The loss of these

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employees’ services could make it more difficult to successfully operate our business and achieve our business goals. In addition, we do not maintain key employee life insurance policies on David Liniger or our other key employees. As a result, we may not be able to cover the financial loss we may incur in losing the services of any of these individuals.

In the event of the loss of the services of members of our senior management or other key employees, we may be unable to implement or execute upon our corporate succession plan due to factors including the timing of the loss relative to the development of key successor employees or the loss of those successors themselves.

Our ability to retain our employees is generally subject to numerous factors, including the compensation and benefits we pay, our ability to provide pathways for professional development, and overall employee morale. As such, we could suffer significant attrition among our current key employees unexpectedly. Competition for qualified employees in the real estate franchising industry is intense, and we cannot assure you that we will be successful in attracting and retaining qualified employees.

We only have one primary facility, which serves as our corporate headquarters, and are in the process of implementing business continuity procedures. If we encounter difficulties associated with this facility, we could face management issues that could have a material adverse effect on our business operations.

We only have one primary facility, in Denver, Colorado, which serves as our corporate headquarters where most of our employees are located. A significant portion of our computer equipment and senior management, including critical resources dedicated to financial and administrative functions, is also located at our corporate headquarters. Our management and employees would need to find an alternative location if we were to encounter difficulties at our corporate headquarters, including by fire or other natural disaster, which would cause disruption and expense to our business and operations.

We recognize the need for, and continue to develop business continuity and document retention plans that would allow us to be operational despite casualties or unforeseen events impacting our corporate headquarters. If we encounter difficulties or disasters at our corporate headquarters and our business continuity and document retention plans are not adequate, our operations and information may not be available in a timely manner, or at all, and this would have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our business depends on a strong brand, and any failure to maintain, protect and enhance our brand would hurt our ability to grow our business, particularly in new markets where we have limited brand recognition.

We have developed a strong brand that we believe has contributed significantly to the success of our business. Maintaining, protecting and enhancing the “RE/MAX” brand is critical to growing our business, particularly in new markets where we have limited brand recognition. If we do not successfully build and maintain a strong brand, our business could be materially harmed. Maintaining and enhancing the quality of our brand may require us to make substantial investments in areas such as marketing, community relations, outreach and employee training. We actively engage in television, print and online advertisements, targeted promotional mailings and email communications, and engage on a regular basis in public relations and sponsorship activities. These investments may be substantial and may fail to encompass the optimal range of traditional, online and social advertising media to achieve maximum exposure and benefit to the brand.

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We may be unable to obtain approval of independent regional owners to fund network wide advertising and promotional initiatives.

Regional RE/MAX master franchisees, as independent business operators, may from time to time disagree with us and our strategies regarding the business and how best to promote the RE/MAX brand on a national or network-wide basis. Both Company-owned and Independent Regions in the U.S. concentrate advertising expenditures with our respective regional advertising funds. Our focus on regional and local advertising in the U.S. may fail to leverage franchisee contributions to achieve maximum group purchasing power in our media buys, having an adverse impact on our business and results of operation in future periods. To the extent that the advertising funds in Independent Regions choose not to contribute to national or pan-regional creative development and media purchases, this may reduce economies of scale in the purchase of advertising, or may result in different marketing messages being associated with the RE/MAX brand in different areas of the country.  If Independent Regions and their advertising funds choose not to invest in common technology platforms, this likewise may reduce economies of scale and may result in fragmented web presences for the RE/MAX brand in various areas of the country and less web traffic to remax.com, resulting in fewer leads to RE/MAX agents, potentially affecting our results of operations.

Loss of market leadership could weaken our brand awareness and brand reputation among consumers, agents, and brokers.

We derive significant benefit from our market share leadership and our ability to make claims regarding the same, including through use of our slogan that “Nobody sells more real estate than RE/MAX” as measured by residential transaction sides. Loss of market leadership, and as a result an inability to tout the same, may hinder public and industry perception of RE/MAX as a leader in the real estate industry and hurt agent recruitment and franchise sales as a result. 

Infringement, misappropriation or dilution of our intellectual property could harm our business.

We regard our RE/MAX trademark, balloon logo and yard sign design trademarks as having significant value and as being an important factor in the marketing of our brand. We believe that this and other intellectual property are valuable assets that are critical to our success. Not all of the trademarks or service marks that we currently use have been registered in all of the countries in which we do business, and they may never be registered in all of those countries. There can be no assurance that we will be able to adequately maintain, enforce and protect our trademarks or other intellectual property rights.

We are commonly involved in numerous proceedings, generally on a small scale, to enforce our intellectual property and protect our brand. Unauthorized uses or other infringement of our trademarks or service marks, including uses that are currently unknown to us, could diminish the value of our brand and may adversely affect our business. Effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every market. Failure to adequately protect our intellectual property rights could damage our brand and impair our ability to compete effectively. Even where we have effectively secured statutory protection for our trademarks and other intellectual property, our competitors may misappropriate our intellectual property, and in the course of litigation, such competitors occasionally attempt to challenge the breadth of our ability to prevent others from using similar marks or designs. If such challenges were to be successful, less ability to prevent others from using similar marks or designs may ultimately result in a reduced distinctiveness of our brand in the minds of consumers. Defending or enforcing our trademark rights, branding practices and other intellectual property could result in the expenditure of significant resources and divert the attention of management, which in turn may materially and adversely affect our business and operating results. Even though competitors occasionally attempt to challenge our ability to prevent infringers from using our marks, we are not aware of any challenges to our right to use, and to authorize our franchisees to use, any of our brand names or trademarks.

In addition, franchisee noncompliance with the terms and conditions of our franchise agreements and our brand standards may reduce the overall goodwill of our brand, whether through diminished consumer perception of our brand, dilution of our intellectual property, the failure to meet the FTC guidelines or applicable state laws, or through the participation in improper or objectionable business practices. Moreover, unauthorized third parties may use our intellectual property to trade on the goodwill of our brand, resulting in consumer confusion or dilution. Any reduction of

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our brand’s goodwill, consumer confusion, or dilution is likely to impact sales, and could materially and adversely impact our business and operating results.

Our new information technology infrastructure for certain key aspects of our internal operations may take more time to integrate than we expected.

In 2016, we implemented a new information technology infrastructure for certain key aspects of our operations. The systems may not perform as desired or we may experience cost overages, delays, or other factors that may distract our management from our business, which could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

Further, we may not be able to obtain future new technologies and systems, or to replace or introduce new technologies and systems as quickly as our competitors or in a cost-effective manner. Also, we may not achieve the benefits anticipated or required from any new technology or system, and we may not be able to devote financial resources to new technologies and systems in the future.

We rely on third parties for certain important functions and/or technology. Any failures by those vendors and service providers could disrupt our business operations.

We have outsourced certain key functions to external parties, including some that are critical to financial reporting, our franchise and membership tracking/billing and a number of critical consumer- and franchise/agent-facing websites. We may enter into other key outsourcing relationships in the future. If one or more of these external parties were not able to perform their functions for a period of time, perform them at an acceptable service level, or handle increased volumes, our business operations could be constrained, disrupted, or otherwise negatively affected. Our use of vendors also exposes us to the risk of losing intellectual property or confidential information and to other harm. Our ability to monitor the activities or performance of vendors may be constrained, which makes it difficult for us to assess and manage the risks associated with these relationships. 

We rely on traffic to our websites, including our flagship website, remax.com, directed from search engines like Google and Bing. If our websites fail to rank prominently in unpaid search results, traffic to our websites could decline and our business could be adversely affected.

Our success depends in part on our ability to attract home buyers and sellers to our websites, including our flagship website, remax.com, through unpaid Internet search results on search engines like Google and Bing. The number of users we attract from search engines is due in large part to how and where our websites rank in unpaid search results. These rankings can be affected by a number of factors, such as changes in ranking algorithms, many of which are not under our direct control, and they may change frequently. In addition, our website faces increasing competition for audience from real estate portal websites, such as Zillow, Trulia and Realtor.com. As a result, links to our websites may not be prominent enough to drive traffic to our websites, and we may not be in a position to influence the results. In some instances, search engine companies may change these rankings in order to promote their own competing services or the services of one or more of our competitors. Our websites have experienced fluctuations in search result rankings in the past, and we anticipate fluctuations in the future. Any reduction in the number of users directed to our websites could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

Any disruption or reduction in our information technology capabilities or websites or other threats to our cybersecurity or the physical security of our business records could harm our business.

Our information technologies and systems and those of our third-party hosted services are vulnerable to breach, damage or interruption from various causes, including: (i) natural disasters, war and acts of terrorism, (ii) power losses, computer systems failure, Internet and telecommunications or data network failures, operator error, losses and corruption of data, and similar events and (iii) computer viruses, penetration by individuals seeking to disrupt operations or misappropriate information and other physical or electronic breaches of security. Our physical filing systems are vulnerable to security breaches or damage from a variety of possible causes. We may not be able to prevent a disruption to or a material adverse effect on our business or operations in the event of a disaster, theft of data or other business interruption. Any extended interruption in our technologies or systems, significant breach or damage of electronic or physical files could

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significantly curtail our ability to conduct our business and generate revenue or could expose us to liability for improper handling of personally identifiable information. Additionally, our business interruption insurance may be insufficient to compensate us for losses that may occur.

We are vulnerable to certain additional risks and uncertainties associated with websites, which include our lead referral system LeadStreet®, remax.com, global.remax.com, theremaxcollection.com and remaxcommercial.com. These risks include changes in required technology interfaces, website downtime and other technical failures, security breaches and consumer privacy concerns. We may experience service disruptions, outages and other performance problems due to a variety of factors, including reliance on our third-party hosted services, infrastructure changes, human or software errors, capacity constraints due to an overwhelming number of users accessing our platform simultaneously, and denial of service, fraud or attacks. Our failure to address these risks and uncertainties successfully could reduce our Internet presence, generate fewer leads for our agents and damage our brand.

Many of the risks relating to our website operations are beyond our control.

We are new to the mortgage brokerage industry, which, along with the intense competition within the industry, may hinder our efforts to establish and grow our new mortgage brokerage franchising business, Motto Mortgage.

We are pursuing a growth strategy to offer and sell residential mortgage brokerage franchises in the U.S under the “Motto Mortgage” brand and trademarks. Our investments in the new Motto business included the cost of our acquisition of certain assets of Full House Mortgage Connection, Inc. (“Full House”) and initial funding for the business. We lack operating experience in the mortgage brokerage industry. Our strategy hinges on our ability to recruit franchisees and loan originators, to develop and maintain strong competencies within the mortgage brokerage market, on favorable conditions in the related regulatory environment and on our success in developing a strong, respected brand. We may fail to understand, interpret, implement and/or train franchisees adequately concerning compliance requirements related to the mortgage brokerage industry or the relationship between us and our franchisees, any of which failures could subject us or our franchisees to adverse actions from regulators. Motto Franchising, LLC, may also have regulatory obligations arising from its relationship with Motto franchisees; we may fail to comply with those obligations, and that failure could also subject us to adverse actions from regulators. As a start-up, the Motto Mortgage brand’s initial lack of brand recognition, may hamper franchise sales efforts. We may experience impairment of acquired assets and/or potential unknown liabilities associated with the acquisition of the business of Full House. This venture could divert resources, including the time and attention of management and other key employees, from our RE/MAX business, and a prolonged diversion could negatively impact operating results. In addition, residential mortgage brokerage is a highly competitive industry and Motto will suffer if we are unable to attract franchisees, which will adversely affect Motto’s growth, operations and profitability.

The terms of RE/MAX, LLC’s senior secured credit facility restrict the current and future operations of RMCO, RE/MAX, LLC and their subsidiaries.

RE/MAX, LLC’s senior secured credit facility includes a number of customary restrictive covenants. These covenants could impair the financing and operational flexibility of RMCO, RE/MAX, LLC and their subsidiaries and make it difficult for them to react to market conditions and satisfy their ongoing capital needs and unanticipated cash requirements. Specifically, such covenants may restrict their ability to, among other things:

·

incur additional debt;

·

make certain investments, acquisitions and joint ventures;

·

enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates;

·

pay dividends or make distributions or other payments to us;

·

use assets as security in certain transactions;

·

repurchase their equity interests;

·

sell certain assets or merge with or into other companies;

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·

guarantee the debts of others;

·

enter into new lines of business; and

·

make certain payments on subordinated debt.

In addition, so long as any revolving loans are outstanding under the senior secured credit facility, RE/MAX, LLC is required to maintain specified financial ratios. As of December 31, 2016, there were no outstanding revolving loans.

The ability to comply with the covenants and other terms of the senior secured credit facility will depend on the future operating performance of RE/MAX, LLC and its subsidiaries. If RE/MAX, LLC fails to comply with such covenants and terms, it would be required to obtain waivers from the lenders or agree with the lenders to an amendment of the facility’s terms to maintain compliance under the facility. If RE/MAX, LLC is unable to obtain any necessary waivers or amendments and the debt under our senior secured credit facility is accelerated or the lenders obtain other remedies, it would likely have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and future operating performance.

We have significant debt service obligations and may incur additional indebtedness in the future.

We have significant debt service obligations, including principal, interest and commitment fee payments due quarterly pursuant to RE/MAX, LLC’s senior secured credit facility. Our currently existing indebtedness, or any additional indebtedness we may incur, could require us to divert funds identified for other purposes for debt service and impair our liquidity position. If we cannot generate sufficient cash flow from operations to service our debt, we may need to refinance our debt, dispose of assets or issue additional equity to obtain necessary funds. We do not know whether we would be able to take such actions on a timely basis, on terms satisfactory to us, or at all. Future indebtedness may impose additional restrictions on us, which could limit our ability to respond to market conditions, to make capital investments or to take advantage of business opportunities. Our level of indebtedness has important consequences to you and your investment in our Class A common stock.

For example, our level of indebtedness may:

·

require us to use a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to pay interest and principal on our debt, which would reduce the funds available to us for working capital, capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes;

·

limit our ability to pay future dividends;

·

limit our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, expansion plans and other investments, which may limit our ability to implement our business strategy;

·

heighten our vulnerability to downturns in our business, the housing industry or in the general economy and limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the housing industry; or

·

prevent us from taking advantage of business opportunities as they arise or successfully carrying out our plans to expand our franchise base and product offerings.

We cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future financing will be available to us in amounts sufficient to enable us to make payments on our indebtedness or to fund our operations.

As a result of these covenants, we are limited in the manner in which we conduct our business and we may be unable to engage in favorable business activities or finance future operations or capital needs. Our ability to make payments to fund working capital, capital expenditures, debt service, and strategic acquisitions will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future, which is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.

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Variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.

As of December 31, 2016, $232.9 million in term loans were outstanding under our senior secured credit facility, net of an unamortized discount, which was at variable rates of interest, thereby exposing us to interest rate risk. We currently do not engage in any interest rate hedging activity. As such, if interest rates increase, our debt service obligations on our outstanding indebtedness would increase even if the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income would decrease.

Our operating results are subject to quarterly fluctuations, and results for any quarter may not necessarily be indicative of the results that may be achieved for the full fiscal year.

Historically, we have realized, and expect to continue to realize, lower Adjusted EBITDA margins in the first and fourth quarters due primarily to the impact of lower broker fees and other revenue primarily as a result of lower overall home sale transactions, and higher selling, operating and administrative expenses in the first quarter for expenses incurred in connection with our annual convention. Accordingly, our results of operations may fluctuate on a quarterly basis, which would cause period to period comparisons of our operating results to not be necessarily meaningful and cannot be relied upon as indicators of future annual performance.

Changes in accounting standards, subjective assumptions and estimates used by management related to complex accounting matters could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and results of operations.

Generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. (“U.S. GAAP”) and related accounting pronouncements, implementation guidance and interpretations with regard to a wide range of matters, such as revenue recognition, accounting for leases, equity-based compensation, asset impairments, valuation reserves, income taxes and fair value accounting, are highly complex and involve many subjective assumptions, estimates and judgments made by management. Changes in these rules or their interpretations or changes in underlying assumptions, estimates or judgments made by management could significantly change our reported results.

Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure

RIHI, Inc. (“RIHI”) has substantial control over us including over decisions that require the approval of stockholders, and its interest in our business may conflict with yours.

RIHI, an entity controlled by David Liniger, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder, and Gail Liniger, our Vice-Chair and Co-Founder, respectively, holds a majority of the combined voting power of our capital stock through its ownership of 100% of our outstanding Class B common stock. Additionally, the shares of Class B common stock entitle the holder, without regard to the number of shares of Class B common stock held, to a number of votes on matters presented to stockholders of RE/MAX Holdings that is equal to two times the aggregate number of common units of RMCO held by such holder, and unless certain events occur, may continue to do so until October 7, 2018.

Accordingly, RIHI, acting alone, has the ability to approve or disapprove substantially all matters submitted to a vote of our stockholders. These rights may enable RIHI to consummate transactions that may not be in the best interests of holders of our Class A common stock or, conversely, prevent the consummation of transactions that may be in the best interests of holders of our Class A common stock. In addition, although RIHI has voting control of us, RIHI’s entire economic interest in us is in the form of its direct interest in RMCO through the ownership of RMCO common units, the payments it may receive from us under its tax receivable agreement and the proceeds it may receive upon any redemption of its RMCO common units, including issuance of shares of our Class A common stock upon any such redemption and any subsequent sale of such Class A common stock. As a result, RIHI’s interests may conflict with the interests of our Class A common stockholders. For example, RIHI may have a different tax position from us which could influence its decisions regarding certain transactions, especially in light of the existence of the tax receivable agreements that we entered into in connection with our IPO, and whether and when we should terminate the tax receivable agreements and accelerate our obligations thereunder. In addition, the structuring of future transactions may take into consideration the tax or other considerations of RIHI, even in situations where no similar considerations are relevant to us.

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Failure to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.

Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we are required to furnish a report by our management on our internal control over financial reporting. Management has concluded that our internal controls over financial reporting were effective as of December 31, 2016. However, if we identify one or more material weaknesses in our financial reporting in the future, we will be unable to assert that our internal controls over financial reporting are effective. Further, our independent registered public accounting firm is required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting. Therefore, even if our management concludes in the future that our internal controls over financial reporting are effective, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our controls.

If material weaknesses or other deficiencies are identified in the future, or if we fail to fully maintain effective internal controls in the future, it could result in a material misstatement of our financial statements that would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis, which could require a restatement, cause investors to lose confidence in our financial information or cause our stock price to decline.

We have incurred and will continue to incur increased costs as a result of operating as a public company, and our management is required to devote substantial time to compliance initiatives.

As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting, insurance and other expenses, and our management and other personnel devote a substantial amount of time to compliance initiatives resulting from operating as a public company. We anticipate that these costs and compliance initiatives will increase as a result of the Company having ceased to be an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, as of December 31, 2016. In particular, because we no longer qualify as an “emerging growth company,” we are required to include in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, an attestation report as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting that is issued by our independent registered public accounting firm. In addition, we have previously taken advantage of the JOBS Act’s reduced disclosure requirements applicable to “emerging growth companies” regarding executive compensation and exemptions from the requirements of holding advisory “say-on-pay” votes on executive compensation. We are no longer eligible for such reduced disclosure requirements and exemptions.

We depend on distributions from RMCO to pay taxes and expenses, including payments under the tax receivable agreements, but RMCO’s ability to make such distributions may be subject to various limitations and restrictions.

We have no material assets other than our ownership of common units of RMCO and have no independent means of generating revenue. RMCO is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes and, as such, is not subject to U.S. federal income tax. Instead, taxable income is allocated to RMCO’s partners, including us. As a result, we incur income taxes on our allocable share of any net taxable income of RMCO and are responsible for complying with U.S. and foreign tax laws. Under the terms of RMCO’s fourth amended and restated limited liability company operating agreement, which became effective upon the completion of our IPO (the “New RMCO, LLC agreement”), RMCO is obligated to make tax distributions to its members, including us. In addition to tax expenses, we also incur expenses related to our operations and must satisfy obligations under the terms of the tax receivable agreements, which we expect will be significant over the fifteen-year term. As RMCO’s managing member, we cause RMCO to make distributions in an amount sufficient to allow us to pay our taxes and operating expenses, including any payments due under the tax receivable agreements. However, RMCO’s ability to make such distributions may be subject to various limitations and restrictions including, but not limited to, restrictions on distributions that would either violate any contract or agreement to which RMCO is then a party, including debt agreements, or any applicable law, or that would have the effect of rendering RMCO insolvent. If RMCO does not have sufficient funds to pay tax or other liabilities to fund our operations, we may have to borrow funds, which could adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition and subject us to various restrictions imposed by any such lenders. To the extent we are unable to make payments under the tax receivable agreements for any reason, such payments will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid. If RMCO does not have sufficient funds to make distributions, our ability to declare and pay cash dividends may also be restricted or impaired. See “—Risks Related to Ownership of Our Class A Common Stock.”

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Our tax receivable agreements require us to make cash payments based upon future tax benefits to which we may become entitled, and the amounts that we may be required to pay could be significant.

In connection with our IPO, we entered into tax receivable agreements with our historical owners. After one of these historical owners assigned its interest in its tax receivable agreement, these tax receivable agreements are now held by RIHI and Oberndorf Investments LLC (“Oberndorf” and together, the “TRA Parties”). The amount of the cash payments that we may be required to make under the tax receivable agreements could be significant and will depend, in part, upon facts and circumstances that are beyond our control. 

The amount of our obligations pursuant to the tax receivable agreement with RIHI will depend, in part, upon the occurrence of future events, including any redemptions by RIHI of its ownership interest in RMCO.  In general, future redemptions by RIHI will increase our tax receivable agreement obligations to RIHI.    Payments under the tax receivable agreements are anticipated to be made, on an annual basis. Any payments made by us to the TRA Parties under the tax receivable agreements will generally reduce the amount of overall cash flow that might have otherwise been available to us. To the extent we are unable to make timely payments under the tax receivable agreements for any reason, the unpaid amounts will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid by us. Furthermore, our future obligation to make payments under the tax receivable agreements could make us a less attractive target for an acquisition, particularly in the case of an acquirer that cannot use some or all of the tax benefits that may be deemed realized under the tax receivable agreements. The payments under the tax receivable agreement with RIHI are not conditioned upon RIHI maintaining a continued ownership interest in either RMCO or us, and payments under the tax receivable agreement with Oberndorf are not conditioned upon Oberndorf holding any ownership interest in either RMCO or us.

The amounts that we may be required to pay to the TRA Parties under the tax receivable agreements may be accelerated in certain circumstances and may also significantly exceed the actual tax benefits that we ultimately realize.

The tax receivable agreements provide that if certain mergers, asset sales, other forms of business combination, or other changes of control were to occur, or that if, at any time, we elect an early termination of the tax receivable agreements, then our obligations, or our successor’s obligations, to make payments under the tax receivable agreements would be based on certain assumptions, including an assumption that we would have sufficient taxable income to fully utilize all potential future tax benefits that are subject to the tax receivable agreements.

As a result, (i) we could be required to make cash payments to the TRA Parties that are greater than the specified percentage of the actual benefits we ultimately realize in respect of the tax benefits that are subject to the tax receivable agreements, and (ii) if we elect to terminate the tax receivable agreements early, we would be required to make an immediate cash payment equal to the present value of the anticipated future tax benefits that are the subject of the tax receivable agreements, which payment may be made significantly in advance of the actual realization, if any, of such future tax benefits. In these situations, our obligations under the tax receivable agreements could have a substantial negative impact on our liquidity and could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing certain mergers, asset sales, other forms of business combination, or other changes of control. There can be no assurance that we will be able to finance our obligations under the tax receivable agreements.

We will also not be reimbursed for any cash payments previously made to the TRA Parties (or their predecessors) pursuant to the tax receivable agreements if any tax benefits initially claimed by us are subsequently challenged by a taxing authority and are ultimately disallowed. Instead, any excess cash payments made by us to either of the TRA Parties will be netted against any future cash payments that we might otherwise be required to make under the terms of the tax receivable agreements. However, we might not determine that we have effectively made an excess cash payment to either of the TRA Parties for a number of years following the initial time of such payment. As a result, it is possible that we could make cash payments under the tax receivable agreements that are substantially greater than our actual cash tax savings.

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If we were deemed to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”) as a result of our ownership of RMCO, applicable restrictions could make it impractical for us to continue our business as contemplated and could have an adverse effect on our business.

Under Sections 3(a)(1)(A) and (C) of the 1940 Act, a company generally will be deemed to be an “investment company” for purposes of the 1940 Act if (i) it is, or holds itself out as being, engaged primarily, or proposes to engage primarily, in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities or (ii) it engages, or proposes to engage, in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and it owns or proposes to acquire investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis. We do not believe that we are an “investment company,” as such term is defined in either of those sections of the 1940 Act.

As the sole managing member of RMCO, we control and operate RMCO. On that basis, we believe that our interest in RMCO is not an “investment security” as that term is used in the 1940 Act. However, if we were to cease participation in the management of RMCO, our interest in RMCO could be deemed an “investment security” for purposes of the 1940 Act.

We and RMCO intend to conduct our operations so that we will not be deemed an investment company. However, if we were to be deemed an investment company, restrictions imposed by the 1940 Act, including limitations on our capital structure and our ability to transact with affiliates, could make it impractical for us to continue our business as contemplated and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Risks Related to Ownership of Our Class A Common Stock

RIHI directly (through ownership of our Class B common stock) and indirectly (through ownership of RMCO common units) owns interests in us, and RIHI has the right to redeem and cause us to redeem, as applicable, such interests pursuant to the terms of the New RMCO, LLC agreement. We may elect to issue shares of Class A common stock upon such redemption, and the issuance and sale of such shares may have a negative impact on the market price of our Class A common stock.

As of December 31, 2016, we had an aggregate of 149,787,852 shares of Class A common stock authorized but unissued, including 12,559,600 shares of Class A common stock issuable upon redemption of RMCO common units that are held by RIHI. In connection with our IPO, RMCO entered into the New RMCO, LLC agreement, and subject to certain restrictions set forth therein, RIHI is entitled to potentially redeem the RMCO common units it holds for an aggregate of up to 12,559,600 shares of our Class A common stock, subject to customary adjustments. We also have entered into a registration rights agreement pursuant to which the shares of Class A common stock issued upon such redemption are eligible for resale, subject to certain limitations set forth therein.

We cannot predict the size of future issuances of our Class A common stock or the effect, if any, that future issuances and sales of shares of our Class A common stock may have on the market price of our Class A common stock. Sales or distributions of substantial amounts of our Class A common stock, including shares issued in connection with an acquisition, or the perception that such sales or distributions could occur, may cause the market price of our Class A common stock to decline.

The dual class structure of our common stock has the effect of concentrating voting control with RIHI and our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder.

The Class B common stock has no economic rights but entitles the holder, without regard to the number of shares of Class B common stock held, to a number of votes on matters presented to stockholders of RE/MAX Holdings that is equal to two times the aggregate number of common units of RMCO held by such holder. Our Class A common stock has one vote per share.

Based on the voting rights associated with our Class B common stock, and the number of common units of RMCO that RIHI currently owns, RIHI holds nearly 60% of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock. As a result, RIHI controls a majority of the combined voting power of our common stock and therefore is able to control all matters

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submitted to our stockholders for approval. This concentrated control will limit or preclude your ability to influence corporate matters for the foreseeable future.

RIHI is a Delaware corporation that is majority owned and controlled by David Liniger, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Co-Founder, and Gail Liniger, our Vice Chair and Co-Founder.

You may be diluted by future issuances of additional Class A common stock in connection with our incentive plans, acquisitions or otherwise; future sales of such shares in the public market, or the expectations that such sales may occur, could lower our stock price.

Our certificate of incorporation authorizes us to issue shares of Class A common stock and options, rights, warrants and appreciation rights relating to Class A common stock for the consideration and on the terms and conditions established by our board of directors in its sole discretion. This could include issuances as compensation pursuant to our 2013 Omnibus Incentive Plan, in connection with acquisitions (either by issuing shares to raise funds for such an acquisition, or by issuing shares to the seller of the acquired business) or to raise capital for other purposes.  Any Class A common stock that we issue, including under our 2013 Omnibus Incentive Plan or other equity incentive plans that we may adopt in the future, would dilute the percentage ownership held by the investors who own Class A common stock.

Our Class A common stock price may be volatile or may decline regardless of our operating performance and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the price you paid for them.

Many factors, which are outside our control, may cause the market price of our Class A common stock to fluctuate significantly, including those described elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section, as well as the following:

·

our operating and financial performance and prospects;

·

our quarterly or annual earnings or those of other companies in our industry compared to market expectations;

·

conditions that impact demand for our services, including the condition of the U.S. residential housing market unrelated to our performance;

·

future announcements concerning our business or our competitors’ businesses;

·

the public’s reaction to our press releases, other public announcements and filings with the SEC;

·

the size of our public float;

·

coverage by or changes in financial estimates by securities analysts or failure to meet their expectations;

·

market and industry perception of our success, or lack thereof, in pursuing our growth strategy;

·

strategic actions by us or our competitors, such as acquisitions or restructurings;

·

changes in government and environmental regulation;

·

housing and mortgage finance markets;

·

changes in accounting standards, policies, guidance, interpretations or principles;

·

changes in senior management or key personnel;

·

issuances, exchanges or sales, or expected issuances, exchanges or sales of our capital stock;

·

adverse resolution of new or pending litigation against us;

·

changes in general market, economic and political conditions in the U.S. and global economies or financial markets, including those resulting from natural disasters, terrorist attacks, acts of war and responses to such events; and

·

material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting.

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Volatility in the market price of our common stock may prevent investors from being able to sell their common stock at or above the price they paid for the stock. In addition, price volatility may be greater if the public float and trading volume of our common stock is low. As a result, you may suffer a loss on your investment.

We cannot assure you that we will have the available cash to make dividend payments.

We intend to continue to pay cash dividends quarterly. Whether we will do so, however, and the timing and amount of those dividends, will be subject to approval and declaration by our board of directors and will depend upon on a variety of factors, including our financial results, cash requirements and financial condition, our ability to pay dividends under our senior secured credit facility and any other applicable contracts, and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. Any dividends declared and paid will not be cumulative.

Because we are a holding company with no material assets other than our ownership of common units of RMCO, we have no independent means of generating revenue or cash flow, and our ability to pay dividends is dependent upon the financial results and cash flows of RMCO and its subsidiaries and distributions we receive from RMCO. We expect to cause RMCO to make distributions to fund our expected dividend payments, subject to applicable law and any restrictions contained in RMCO’s or its subsidiaries’ current or future debt agreements.

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law might discourage or delay acquisition attempts for us that you might consider favorable.

Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that may make the acquisition of our company more difficult without the approval of our board of directors. These provisions:

·

establish a classified board of directors so that not all members of our board of directors are elected at one time;

·

authorize the issuance of undesignated preferred stock, the terms of which may be established and the shares of which may be issued without stockholder approval, and which may include super voting, special approval, dividend or other rights or preferences superior to the rights of the holders of common stock;

·

provide that our board of directors is expressly authorized to make, alter or repeal our bylaws;

·

delegate the sole power to a majority of the board of directors to fix the number of directors;

·

provide the power of our board of directors to fill any vacancy on our board of directors, whether such vacancy occurs as a result of an increase in the number of directors or otherwise;

·

eliminate the ability of stockholders to call special meetings of stockholders; and

·

establish advance notice requirements for nominations for elections to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at stockholder meetings.

Our certificate of incorporation also contains a provision that provides us with protections similar to Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, and prevents us from engaging in a business combination with a person who acquires at least 15% of our common stock for a period of three years from the date such person acquired such common stock unless board or stockholder approval is obtained prior to the acquisition, except that David and Gail Liniger are deemed to have been approved by our board of directors, and thereby not subject to these restrictions. These anti-takeover provisions and other provisions under Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our Company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and to cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 

Our corporate headquarters is located in leased offices in Denver, Colorado. The lease consists of approximately 231,000 square feet and expires in April 2028. As of December 31, 2015, our Company-owned real estate brokerage business leased approximately 23,000 square feet, respectively, of office space in the U.S. under three leases. These offices are mainly located in shopping centers and small office parks, generally with lease terms of one to 10 years. As discussed in Note 5 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we sold certain operating assets and liabilities related to 21 Company-owned real estate brokerage offices during 2015 and the first quarter of 2016.  In connection with these sales, we assigned the related operating leases to the respective purchasers. We believe that all of our properties and facilities are well maintained.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 

From time to time we are involved in litigation, claims and other proceedings relating to the conduct of our business. Such litigation and other proceedings may include, but are not limited to, actions relating to intellectual property, commercial arrangements, franchising arrangements, brokerage disputes, vicarious liability based upon conduct of individuals or entities outside of our control including franchisees and independent agents, and employment law claims. Litigation and other disputes are inherently unpredictable and subject to substantial uncertainties and unfavorable resolutions could occur. Often these cases raise complex factual and legal issues, which are subject to risks and uncertainties and which could require significant time and resources from management. Litigation and other claims and regulatory proceedings against us could result in unexpected expenses and liabilities and could also materially adversely affect our operations and our reputation.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 

None.

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PART II 

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Shares of our Class A common stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “RMAX” on October 2, 2013. Prior to that date, there was no public trading market for shares of our Class A common stock. As of February 15, 2017, we had 22 stockholders of record of our Class A common stock. This number does not include stockholders whose stock is held in nominee or street name by brokers. All shares of Class B common stock are owned by RIHI, Inc. (“RIHI”), and there is no public market for these shares. 

The following table shows the highest and lowest prices paid per share for our Class A common stock as well as dividends declared per share during the calendar quarter indicated below for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class A Common Stock

 

Dividends

 

 

 

Market Price

 

Declared

 

 

    

Highest

    

Lowest

    

per Share

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

36.54

 

$

30.54

 

$

0.1500

 

Second quarter

 

 

42.25

 

 

34.53

 

 

0.1500

 

Third quarter

 

 

44.33

 

 

39.47

 

 

0.1500

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

56.40

 

 

41.67

 

 

0.1500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First quarter

 

$

38.62

 

$

32.09

 

$

1.6250

 

Second quarter

 

 

35.51

 

 

33.01

 

 

0.1250

 

Third quarter

 

 

39.46

 

 

34.72

 

 

0.1250

 

Fourth quarter

 

 

43.11

 

 

34.58

 

 

0.1250

 

 

During 2016, our Board of Directors declared quarterly cash dividends of $0.15 per share of Class A common stock, which were paid on March 23, 2016, June 2, 2016, August 31, 2016 and December 1, 2016.  During 2015, our Board of Directors declared quarterly cash dividends of $0.125 per share of Class A common stock, which were paid on April 8, 2015, June 4, 2015, September 3, 2015 and November 27, 2015.  Additionally, our Board of Directors declared a special cash dividend of $1.50 per share of Class A common stock during the first quarter of 2015, which was paid on April 8, 2015. On February 22, 2017, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.18 per share on all outstanding shares of Class A common stock, which is payable on March 22, 2017 to stockholders of record at the close of business on March 8, 2017. We intend to continue to pay a cash dividend on shares of Class A common stock on a quarterly basis. Whether we do so, however, and the timing and amount of those dividends will be subject to approval and declaration by our Board of Directors and will depend on a variety of factors, including the financial results and cash flows of RMCO, LLC and its consolidated subsidiaries (“RMCO”), distributions we receive from RMCO, our financial results, cash requirements and financial condition, our ability to pay dividends under our senior secured credit facility and any other applicable contracts, and other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors. All dividends declared and paid will not be cumulative.

46


 

Performance Graph

The following graph and table depict the total return to stockholders from October 2, 2013 (the date our Class A common stock began trading on the NYSE) through December 31, 2016, relative to the performance of the S&P 500 Index, Russell 2000 (Total Return) Index and a peer group of real estate and franchise related companies. The graph and table assume $100 invested at the closing price of $27.00 on October 2, 2013 (rather than the IPO price of $22.00 per share) and that all dividends were reinvested.

The performance graph and table are not intended to be indicative of future performance. The performance graph and table shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), or otherwise subject to the liabilities under that Section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any of the Company’s filings under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act.

Picture 4

Other franchise and real estate related companies include the following: Realogy Holding Corp., Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc., Domino’s Pizza Inc., Yum! Brands Inc., Choice Hotels International Inc., Marriott International Inc., CBRE Group Inc. and Jones Lang LaSalle Inc. For purposes of the chart and table, the companies in this peer group are weighted according to their market capitalization. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 2, 2013

    

December 31, 2013

    

December 31, 2014

    

December 31, 2015

 

December 31, 2016

 

RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.

 

$

100.00

 

$

118.78

 

$

127.94

 

$

147.85

 

$

225.31

 

Other franchise and real estate related companies

 

 

100.00

 

 

110.46

 

 

137.23

 

 

133.28

 

 

163.62

 

S&P 500 Index

 

 

100.00

 

 

109.12

 

 

121.55

 

 

120.67

 

 

132.17

 

Russell 2000 (Total Return) Index

 

 

100.00

 

 

107.83

 

 

113.11

 

 

108.12

 

 

131.16

 

 

 

 

 

47


 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 

The following tables set forth our selected historical consolidated financial results and other data as of the dates and for the periods indicated. The selected consolidated statements of income data for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, and the consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2016 and 2015 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

The selected consolidated statements of income data for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 and the selected consolidated balance sheets data as of December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

After the completion of our initial public offering on October 7, 2013, RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. (“RE/MAX Holdings”) owned 39.56% of the common membership units in RMCO, LLC and its consolidated subsidiaries (“RMCO”) and as of December 31, 2016, RE/MAX Holdings owns 58.43% of the common membership units in RMCO. RE/MAX Holdings’ economic interest in RMCO increased primarily due to the issuance of shares of Class A common stock as a result of RIHI’s redemption of 5,175,000 common units in RMCO during the fourth quarter of 2015 (the “Secondary Offering”). RE/MAX Holdings’ only business is to act as the sole manager of RMCO and, in that capacity, RE/MAX Holdings operates and controls all of the business and affairs of RMCO. As a result, RE/MAX Holdings consolidates the financial condition and results of operations of RMCO, and because RE/MAX Holdings and RMCO are entities under common control, such consolidation has been reflected for all periods presented.  Our selected historical financial data does not reflect what our financial position, results of operations and cash flows would have been had we been a separate, stand-alone public company during those periods.

Our selected historical financial data may not be indicative of our future financial condition, future results of operations or future cash flows.

You should read the information set forth below in conjunction with our historical consolidated financial statements and the notes to those statements and “Item 7.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

48


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 

 

 

    

2016

    

2015

    

2014

    

2013

    

2012

 

 

 

(in thousands, except per share amounts and agent data)

 

Total revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing franchise fees

 

$

81,197

 

$

73,750

 

$

72,706

 

$

64,465

 

$

56,350

 

Annual dues

 

 

32,653

 

 

31,758

 

 

30,726

 

 

29,524

 

 

28,909

 

Broker fees

 

 

37,209

 

 

32,334

 

 

28,685

 

 

24,811

 

 

19,579

 

Franchise sales and other franchise revenue

 

 

25,131

 

 

25,468

 

 

23,440

 

 

23,574

 

 

22,629

 

Brokerage revenue

 

 

112

 

 

13,558

 

 

15,427

 

 

16,488

 

 

16,210

 

Total revenue

 

 

176,302

 

 

176,868

 

 

170,984

 

 

158,862

 

 

143,677

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, operating and administrative expenses

 

 

87,629

 

 

90,986

 

 

91,847

 

 

96,243

 

 

84,337

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

16,094

 

 

15,124

 

 

15,316

 

 

15,166

 

 

12,090

 

Loss (gain) on sale or disposition of assets, net

 

 

178

 

 

(3,397)

 

 

(14)

 

 

373

 

 

1,704

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

103,901

 

 

102,713

 

 

107,149

 

 

111,782

 

 

98,131

 

Operating income

 

 

72,401

 

 

74,155

 

 

63,835

 

 

47,080

 

 

45,546

 

Other expenses, net:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 

(8,596)

 

 

(10,413)

 

 

(9,295)

 

 

(14,647)

 

 

(11,686)

 

Interest income

 

 

160

 

 

178

 

 

313

 

 

321

 

 

286

 

Foreign currency transaction (losses) gains

 

 

(86)

 

 

(1,661)

 

 

(1,348)

 

 

(764)

 

 

208

 

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

 

 

(796)

 

 

(94)

 

 

(178)

 

 

(1,798)

 

 

(136)

 

Equity in earnings of investees

 

 

 —

 

 

1,215

 

 

600

 

 

904

 

 

1,244

 

Total other expenses, net

 

 

(9,318)

 

 

(10,775)

 

 

(9,908)

 

 

(15,984)

 

 

(10,084)

 

Income before provision for income taxes

 

 

63,083

 

 

63,380

 

 

53,927

 

 

31,096

 

 

35,462

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

(15,273)

 

 

(12,030)

 

 

(9,948)

 

 

(2,844)

 

 

(2,138)

 

Net income

 

 

47,810

 

 

51,350

 

 

43,979

 

 

28,252

 

 

33,324

 

Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interests

 

 

25,073

 

 

34,695

 

 

30,543

 

 

26,746

 

 

33,324

 

Net income attributable to RE/MAX Holdings, Inc.

 

$

22,737

 

$

16,655

 

$

13,436

 

$

1,506

 

$

 —

 

Earnings Per Share Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic (1)

 

$

1.29

 

$

1.31

 

$

1.16

 

$

0.13

 

 

 

 

Diluted (1)

 

$

1.29

 

$

1.30

 

$

1.10

 

$

0.12

 

 

 

 

Other Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agent count at period end (unaudited)

 

 

111,915

 

 

104,826

 

 

98,010

 

 

93,228

 

 

89,008

 

Cash dividends declared per share of Class A common stock

 

$

0.60

 

$

2.00

 

$

0.25

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

 


(1)

We consummated our initial public offering on October 7, 2013. Since that date, we have consolidated the results of RMCO due to our role as RMCO’s managing member. Therefore, all income for the periods prior to October 7, 2013 is entirely attributable to the non-controlling interests which existed prior to the initial public offering. As a result, in the computation of earnings per share in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, only the net income attributable to our controlling interests from the period subsequent to the initial public offering is considered. Additionally, the computation of weighted average basic and diluted shares of Class A common stock outstanding for the year ended December 31, 2013 only considers the outstanding shares from the date our Class A common stock started trading on the New York Stock Exchange, October 2, 2013, through December 31, 2013.

 

 

49


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 

 

 

    

2016

    

2015

    

2014

    

2013

    

2012

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

    

$

57,609

 

$

110,212

 

$

107,199

 

$

88,375

 

$

68,501

 

Franchise agreements, net

 

$

109,140

 

$

61,939

 

$

75,505

 

$

89,071

 

$

78,338

 

Goodwill

 

$

126,633

 

$

71,871

 

$

72,463

 

$

72,781

 

$

71,039

 

Total assets

 

$

437,153

 

$

383,786

 

$

356,431

 

$

350,470

 

$

248,486

 

Payable pursuant to tax receivable agreements, including current portion

 

$

98,809

 

$

100,035

 

$

67,418

 

$

68,840

 

$

 —

 

Long-term debt, including current portion

 

$

230,820

 

$

200,357

 

$

209,777

 

$

226,051

 

$

229,396

 

Redeemable preferred units

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

78,400

 

Total stockholders' equity/members' deficit

 

$

60,709

 

$

39,414

 

$

39,283

 

$

15,539

 

$

(96,769)

 

 

 

50


 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes thereto included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contains forward-looking statements. See “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Item 1A.—Risk Factors” for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks and assumptions associated with these statements. Actual results may differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

The historical results of operations discussed in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations are those of RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. (“RE/MAX Holdings”) and its consolidated subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company,” “we,” “our” or “us”), including RMCO, LLC. (“RMCO”).

Business Overview

We are one of the world’s leading franchisors in the real estate industry, franchising real estate brokerages globally under the RE/MAX brand and mortgage brokerages within the U.S. under the Motto Mortgage brand. RE/MAX, founded in 1973, has over 110,000 agents operating in over 7,000 offices and a presence in more than 100 countries and territories.  RE/MAX has held the number one market share in residential real estate in the U.S. and Canada since 1999 as measured by total residential transaction sides completed by our agents. The RE/MAX brand has the highest level of unaided brand awareness in real estate in the U.S. and Canada according to a 2016 consumer survey conducted by MMR Strategy Group, and our iconic red, white and blue RE/MAX hot air balloon is one of the most recognized real estate logos in the world. Motto Mortgage (“Motto”), founded in 2016, is the first mortgage brokerage franchise offering in the U.S.

RE/MAX

The RE/MAX strategy is to recruit and retain the best agents and sell franchises.  The RE/MAX brand is built on the strength of its global franchise network, which is designed to attract and retain high quality, top performing agents by maximizing their opportunity to retain a larger portion of their commissions.  We believe that our agents are substantially more productive than the industry average. We consider agent count to be a key measure of our business performance as the majority of our revenue—approximately 65% in 2016—is derived from fixed, contractual fees and dues paid to us based on the number of agents in our franchise network.

RE/MAX generates approximately 95% of its revenue from its operations in the U.S. and Canada, primarily from five sources: (i) continuing franchise fees which are fixed contractual fees paid monthly by regional franchise owners in Independent Regions or franchisees in Company-owned Regions based on the number of agents employed in the franchise region or the franchisee’s office; (ii) annual dues which are membership fees that agents pay directly to RE/MAX to be a part of the RE/MAX network and use the RE/MAX brand; (iii) fees which are assessed to the broker against real estate commissions paid by customers when an agent sells a home for which the broker then pays to us is 1% of the total commission on the transaction—what we refer to as broker fees—; (iv) franchise fees stemming from sales and renewals of individual franchises; and (v) other franchise revenue which includes revenue from preferred marketing arrangements and approved supplier programs, as well as event-based revenue from training and other programs, including our annual conventions in the U.S.

RE/MAX franchisees fund the cost of developing their brokerages, which allows us to grow the RE/MAX network with lower capital requirements.  Combined with consistent revenue from fixed, contractual fees and dues based on agent count, the RE/MAX business model can yield strong returns and significant cash flow.  RE/MAX is 100% franchised—we do not own any of our brokerages—which allows us to capitalize on the economic benefits of the attractive franchise business model. 

RE/MAX franchisees profit by attracting and retaining the most-productive real estate agents.  In our markets outside the U.S. and Canada, we grant geographical rights to the RE/MAX® brand to master franchisees. These master franchisees

51


 

are charged with developing RE/MAX in their geographical area, and they may profit by sub-franchising certain regions within the area, as well as by franchising individual real estate brokerages.

Motto Mortgage

In October 2016, we launched Motto Mortgage, the first mortgage brokerage franchise offering in the U.S.   The Motto concept offers real estate brokers accessibility to the complementary mortgage brokerage business and a model designed to help Motto franchise owners comply with all relevant mortgage regulations.  Motto offers potential homebuyers the opportunity to find both real estate agents and independent Motto loan originators at offices in one location.  Further, Motto loan originators provide home buyers with financing choices by providing access to a variety of loan options from multiple leading wholesalers. Motto franchisees are mortgage brokers and not mortgage bankers; as a result, they will not underwrite any loans.  Likewise, we franchise the Motto system and are not lenders or brokers.

Motto will generate revenue for us primarily from three sources: (i) franchise fees stemming from sales and renewals of individual franchises, (ii) continuing franchise fees which are fixed contractual fees paid monthly by the broker for being a part of the Motto network and for use of the Motto brand, and (iii) additional fees paid monthly by the broker for access to high quality technology products and services.  Initially, Motto franchisees will not pay continuing franchise fees as new franchisees will focus on opening offices and recruiting loan originators.  Motto franchisees will start paying a fraction of their monthly fees beginning three months after attending training, ultimately scaling to the full set of fees after the franchise has been operational for twelve months.  Due to the fourth quarter 2016 launch of Motto, minimal revenue was recognized in 2016. 

Motto franchisees will fund the cost of developing their brokerages, which will allow us to grow the Motto network with relatively low capital requirements.  Although we will have employees dedicated to our Motto business, we will also leverage our existing shared services franchising infrastructure.  As additional Motto franchises are sold and franchisees begin paying their monthly fees, we expect the business to yield positive returns and cash flow over time. 

Motto franchisees should profit by attracting and retaining high-quality, highly productive loan officers who provide superior client service and value.  We will not be compensated based on the volume of loans completed by a franchise; rather, the franchisee retains all upside in the quantity of loans completed by a given Motto loan originator or franchise. 

Financial and Operational Highlights – Year Ended December 31, 2016

(Compared to year ended December 31, 2015 unless otherwise noted)

·

Total agent count grew by 6.8% to 111,915 agents

·

U.S. and Canada combined agent count increased 3.5% to 82,402 agents

·

Acquired the master franchise rights to six Independent Regions in the U.S.

·

Launched Motto franchise on October 25, 2016

·

Revenue of $176.3 million, down 0.3% from the prior-year; revenue would have increased 6.9% after adjusting for the sale of our owned brokerage offices

·

Operating income decreased $1.8 million and 2.4%

·

Net income attributable to RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. increased $6.1 million and 36.5%

·

Adjusted EBITDA of $94.6 million and Adjusted EBITDA margin of 53.7%

·

Refinanced our credit agreement entered into on July 31, 2013 (“2013 Senior Secured Credit Facility”) on December 15, 2016

52


 

During 2016, we grew our business organically through agent increases and franchise sales, supplemented by strategic acquisitions and the launch of a second brand, Motto Mortgage.  We also strategically disposed of our three remaining owned brokerages early in the year.  RE/MAX is now a 100%-franchised business.  We grew our network agent count 6.8% and our U.S. and Canadian agent count by 3.5%, and we sold 903 RE/MAX franchises worldwide and 335 franchises in the U.S. and Canada combined.

In addition, we focused on growth catalysts by acquiring Independent Regions and businesses within our core competencies of franchising and real estate.  We successfully acquired six Independent Regions (New York, Alaska, New Jersey, Georgia, Kentucky/Tennessee and Southern Ohio, collectively, the “2016 Acquired Regions”) for an aggregate purchase price of $105.4 million.  The 2016 Acquired Regions converted more than 8,000 agents and almost 500 offices into the Company-owned Regions.  We also acquired the concept behind Motto along with certain assets from a third-party mortgage brokerage franchisor, Full House Mortgage Connection, Inc., (“Full House”) for $8.0 million plus certain future contingent royalty payments. 

Concurrent with our acquisitions, we reinvested in our business to enhance the value proposition to our network.  We continued our Momentum broker and agent development program, launched the new www.remax.com website and introduced our Office and Agent Portal.  Our new website features a fresh, dynamic design, an improved search and mobile experience, and personalized features for consumers coupled with increased calls-to-action to improve lead generation for our agents. The new Office and Agent Portal streamlines operations for our franchisees and simplifies reporting from our franchisees to us.  In recognition of the increase in value we offer to our network, on July 1, 2016 we modestly increased the monthly continuing franchise fees paid by franchisees to us to be a part of the RE/MAX network.  We believe that our 2016 growth catalysts will contribute to our future organic growth in Company-owned Regions and strengthen our brand in the future.  

In December 2016, we refinanced our 2013 Senior Secured Credit Facility, referred to herein as the “2016 Senior Secured Credit Facility,” in order to take advantage of favorable market conditions and to provide us with enhanced flexibility to pursue the future execution of our growth strategy.  Proceeds from our 2016 Senior Secured Credit Facility were used to repay existing indebtness and fund the multi-territory region covering Georgia, Kentucky/Tennessee and Southern Ohio. 

Financial and Operational Highlights – Year Ended December 31, 2015

(Compared to year ended December 31, 2014 unless otherwise noted)

·

Total agent count grew by 7.0% to 104,826 agents

·

U.S. and Canada combined agent count increased 4.5% to 79,586 agents

·

Revenue grew by 3.4% to $176.9 million

·

Operating income increased $10.3 million and 16.2%

·

Net income attributable to RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. increased $3.2 million and 24.0%.

·

Adjusted EBITDA of $91.4 million and Adjusted EBITDA margin of 51.7%

·

Strengthening U.S. dollar negatively impacted pre-tax income by $5.3 million on a constant currency basis

During 2015, we focused on helping our franchisees recruit quality agents and emphasized franchise sales.  We grew our total agent count 7.0% and our U.S. and Canadian agent count by 4.5%.  We sold 929 RE/MAX franchises across the globe, an increase of 23.5% over 2014. We also continued our commitment to reinvesting in our business, focusing on our top priorities of training and technology. Through our Momentum broker and agent development program, we helped shift the mindset of many of our brokers from expense management to profitable and sustainable growth of their businesses through a renewed focus on recruiting and developing quality agents.  From a technology perspective, we invested in our new website and other critical technology infrastructure projects.   Lastly, demonstrating our commitment to the franchise model and in accordance with our strategic objectives, we sold six of our owned brokerages in April 2015 and 12 of our owned brokerages in December 2015 to independently owned, successful RE/MAX franchisees.

53


 

Selected Operating and Financial Highlights

For comparability purposes, the following tables set forth our agent count and results of operations for the periods presented in our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The period-to-period comparison of agent count, franchise sales and financial results is not necessarily indicative of future performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

  

2016

 

    

2015

 

    

2014

 

 

(in thousands, except percentages, agent data and franchise sales)

Networkwide agent count growth

 

6.8

%

 

7.0

%

 

5.1

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agent Count:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S.

 

61,730

 

 

59,918

 

 

57,105

 

Canada

 

20,672

 

 

19,668

 

 

19,040

 

    U.S. and Canada Total

 

82,402

 

 

79,586

 

 

76,145

 

Outside U.S. and Canada

 

29,513

 

 

25,240

 

 

21,865