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EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - Cleantech Solutions International, Inc.,f10k2015ex23i_cleantech.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - Cleantech Solutions International, Inc.,f10k2015ex32i_cleantech.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - Cleantech Solutions International, Inc.,f10k2015ex31i_cleantech.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION - Cleantech Solutions International, Inc.,f10k2015ex31ii_cleantech.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549 

FORM 10-K

 (Mark One)

 ☒  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015

   or

 ☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 For the transition period from ______________ to ______________

 Commission file number: 001-34591

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

NEVADA   90-0648920
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

No. 9 Yanyu Middle Road

Qianzhou Village, Huishan District, Wuxi City

Jiangsu Province, China 214181

(Address of principal executive offices)

 (86) 51083397559

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 Copies to:

Asher S. Levitsky P.C.

Ellenoff Grossman & Schole LLP

1345 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY 10105-0302
Telephone: (212) 370-1300

Fax: (212) 370-7889

alevitsky@egsllp.com

Securities registered under Section 12(b) of the Act: common stock, par value $0.001 per share

Securities registered under Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes☐ No ☒

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐    No ☒

Indicate by check whether the issuer: (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒    No ☐

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

(Do not check if smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes☐ No ☒

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was sold, or the average bid and asked prices of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Approximately $7,206,000 on June 30, 2015.

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 4,403,986 shares of common stock are outstanding as of March 30, 2016.

Documents Incorporated by Reference: None.

 

 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

    Page No.
Part I
Item 1. Business. 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 12
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments. 23
Item 2. Properties. 23
Item 3. Legal Proceedings. 23
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 23
 
Part II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

24

Item 6. Selected Financial Data. 25
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 25
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk. 39
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. 39
Item 9. Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure. 40
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures. 40
Item 9B. Other Information. 41
 
Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance. 42
Item 11. Executive Compensation 44
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

46

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence. 46
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services. 47
 
Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules. 48

 

 

 

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

 

This report contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements were based on various factors and were derived utilizing numerous assumptions and other factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, the risk of doing business in the People’s Republic of China (“PRC”), our ability to implement our strategic initiatives, our access to sufficient capital,  economic, political and market conditions and fluctuations, government and industry regulation, Chinese and global competition, and other factors. Most of these factors are difficult to predict accurately and are generally beyond our control. You should consider the areas of risk described in connection with any forward-looking statements that may be made herein. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and readers should carefully review this report in its entirety, including the risks described in “Item 1A. - Risk Factors” and “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Except for our ongoing obligations to disclose material information under the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to release publicly any revisions to any forward-looking statements, to report events or to report the occurrence of unanticipated events. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this report, and you should not rely on these statements without also considering the risks and uncertainties associated with these statements and our business.

 

OTHER PERTINENT INFORMATION

 

References in this annual report to “we,” “us,” and words of like import refer to Cleantech Solutions International, Inc., its wholly-owned subsidiaries, and Wuxi Huayang Dyeing Machinery Co., Ltd. (“Dyeing”) and Wuxi Huayang Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd., formerly known as Wuxi Huayang Electrical Power Equipment Co., Ltd. (“Heavy Industries”), both of which are variable interest entities under contractual arrangements with us whose financial statements are consolidated with ours, unless the context specifically states or implies otherwise. Dyeing and Heavy Industries are collectively referred to as the “Huayang Companies.”

 

Our reporting currency is the United States dollar.  Our business is conducted by our subsidiaries and variable interest entities in China, using RMB, the currency of China, and our consolidated financial statements are presented in United States dollars.   In this annual report, we refer to assets, obligations, commitments and liabilities in our consolidated financial statements in United States dollars.   These dollar references are based on the exchange rate of RMB to United States dollars, determined as of a specific date.   Changes in the exchange rate will affect the amount of our obligations and the value of our assets in terms of United States dollars which may result in an increase or decrease in the amount of our obligations (expressed in dollars) and the value of our assets, including accounts receivable (expressed in dollars).

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

We are engaged in three business segments - (1) the dyeing and finishing equipment segment, in which we manufacture and sell textile dyeing and finishing machines, (2) the forged rolled rings and related components segment, in which we manufacture and sell precision forged rolled rings, shafts, flanges, and other forged components for the energy industry including wind power and other industries, and (3) the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, in which we manufacture and sell petroleum and chemical equipment.

 

Dyeing and finishing equipment segment

 

Through our dyeing and finishing equipment segment, we design, manufacture and distribute a line of proprietary high and low temperature dyeing and finishing machinery to the textile industry. Our products feature a high degree of both automation and mechanical-electrical integration. Our products are used in dyeing yarns such as pure cotton, cotton-polyester, terylene, polyester wool, poly-acrylic fiber, nylon, cotton ramie, and wool yarn. We are continuing to seek to utilize our expertise in manufacturing precision products to meet demand in new and existing end markets.

 

We design and produce airflow dyeing machines, which use air instead of water. Water is used in the traditional dyeing process. We believe that our air-flow technology, which is designed to enable users to meet the stricter environmental standards, results in reduced input costs, fewer wrinkles, less damage to the textile, and reduced emissions. With the China government’s mandate to phase out older machinery in China’s textile industry that does not meet the new environmental standards, although our revenue from this segment declined in 2015 from 2014, in the long-term we expect to increase our revenue from this segment. Our new after-treatment drying and compacting machine is used in the final finishing of knitted material, such as cotton, and is designed to improve the softness, reduce shrinkage and ensure better dimensional stability. We developed a new garment washing machine for denim. Made of stainless steel and customized for use by Chinese jeans manufacturers, the machine is capable of stone wash, enzyme wash and other water washing techniques.

 

Forged rolled rings and related components segment

 

Through our forged rolled rings and other related products segment, we produce precision forged rolled rings and other forged components to the energy industry including wind power and other industries. Our forged rolled rings and other related products are sold for use by manufacturers of industrial equipment for the various industries. Forged rolled rings and other forged components for the wind industry are used in wind turbines, which are used to generate wind power.

 

The demand for products used in manufacturing in general, and the wind power industries, in particular, is uncertain. Our revenues from this segment declined from approximately $34,000,000 in 2014 to approximately $12,000,000 in 2015. Additionally, as discussed elsewhere, in 2015, we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $5,100,000 relating to a write down of the carrying value of certain manufacturing equipment used in this segment to its estimated fair value. Although we believe that over the long term, the forged rolled rings and related components segment will expand, and the government of the PRC has announced its desire to increase the use of wind power and other alternative energy such as solar as an energy source, in the short term, other factors such as economic factors and the fluctuations in the price of oil and coal, may affect the requirements by our customers and potential customers for our products. To the extent that the demand for our forged rolled rings and related components declines, our revenue and net income will be affected.

 

Petroleum and chemical equipment segment

 

Through our petroleum and chemical equipment segment, we produce and sell coal chemical equipment, formaldehyde plant and downstream products, a variety of heat exchangers, separators, tanks, towers, cryogenic equipment, reaction kettles and other products to petroleum and chemical industries. In December 2015, we received a notice of contract termination in writing from our largest customer in this segment alleging breach of contract for late delivery of product and for delivery of product with quality defects. Pursuant to the sales contract, this customer, which was our largest customer, accounting for approximately 13% or our consolidated revenues for 2015, demanded payment of a penalty of 20% of the contract price plus penalties for late delivery and damages in the amounts of 36,103,640 RMB, and, in connection with this contingent liability, we recorded a loss from sales contract dispute of approximately $5,807,000 which is reflected in operating expenses on the statement of operations and comprehensive loss, and the amount of the claim is reflected in accrued expenses at December 31, 2015. Additionally, in December 2015, we increased our allowance for doubtful accounts by approximately $1,759,000 which represents this customer’s full amount of outstanding accounts receivable, we increased our reserve for obsolete inventory in the amount of $836,000, representing the remaining inventory manufactured to the specifications of this customer, and we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $1,900,000 to property and equipment which was used to manufacture products for this customer and is not otherwise used by us. We are currently discussing this issue with the customer and we are unable to determine if the accounts receivable balance will be collected. We expect that our revenues from petroleum and chemical equipment segment will significantly decrease in 2016 and beyond due to the loss of this customer, and, it may be necessary for us to discontinue this segment.

 

 1 

 

 

Organization

 

We are a Nevada corporation. We were incorporated in Delaware on June 24, 1987 under the name Malex, Inc. We changed our corporate name to China Wind Systems, Inc. on December 18, 2007. On June 13, 2011, we changed our corporate name to Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. On August 7, 2012, we were converted into a Nevada corporation.

 

We are the sole stockholder of Fulland Limited, a Cayman Islands limited liability company organized on May 9, 2007. Fulland owns 100% of the capital stock of Green Power Environment Technology (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. (“Green Power”) and Wuxi Fulland Wind Energy Equipment Co., Ltd. (“Fulland Wind Energy”), which are wholly foreign-owned enterprises organized under the laws of the PRC.  We formed Fulland Wind Energy in August 2008.  We currently manufacture our forged products, which are sold for use in the wind, steel and other industries through Fulland Wind Energy.

 

Green Power is a party to a series of contractual arrangements dated October 12, 2007 with the Huayang Companies, both of which are limited liability companies organized under the laws of, and based in, the PRC, and their stockholders, who are our chief executive officer, Jianhua Wu, and his wife, Lihua Tang. Our corporate organizational structure, including the contractual arrangements with the Huayang Companies, is designed to comply with certain laws and regulations of the PRC which restrict the manner in which Chinese companies, particularly companies owned by Chinese residents, may raise funds from non-Chinese sources.

 

The following table sets forth our relationship our subsidiaries and the variable interest entities whose financial statements are consolidated with ours.

 

Name of Entity  Relationship to Us  Nature of Business
Cleantech Solutions International, Inc   N.A.  Holding company
Fulland Limited  100% owned by us  Holding company
Wuxi Fulland Wind Energy Equipment Co., Ltd.  100% owned by Fulland Limited  Manufacture of forged rolled rings and related products
Green Power Environment Technology (Shanghai) Co., Ltd.  100% owned by Fulland Limited  Operates business of Dyeing and Heavy Industries pursuant to contracts
Wuxi Huayang Dyeing Machinery Co., Ltd.  Variable interest entity operated by Green Power pursuant to contracts  Operates dyeing and finishing equipment segment
Wuxi Huayang Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (formerly Wuxi Huayang Electrical Power Equipment Co., Ltd.)  Variable interest entity operated by Green Power pursuant to contracts  Operated electric power equipment segment; manufactures and sells forged rolled ring segment pursuant to existing contracts.  The business of this entity is being phased out and new business is being generated through Wuxi Fulland Wind Energy Equipment Co., Ltd.

 

Our executive offices are located No. 9 Yanyu Middle Road, Qianzhou Village, Huishan District, Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province, China 214181, telephone (86)51083397559.

 

Our website is www.cleantechsolutionsinternational.com.  Information on our website or any other website does not constitute a part of this annual report.

 

Contractual arrangements with the Huayang Companies and their stockholders

 

We have contractual arrangements with the Huayang Companies and their stockholders, who are our chief executive officer, Jianhua Wu, and his wife, Lihua Tang, pursuant to which we provide these companies with technology consulting and other general business operation services. Through these contractual arrangements, we also have the ability to substantially influence these companies’ daily operations and financial affairs, appoint their senior executives and approve all matters requiring stockholder approval. As a result of these contractual arrangements, which enable us to control the Huayang Companies, we are considered the primary beneficiary of the Huayang Companies. Accordingly, we consolidate the results, assets and liabilities of the Huayang Companies in our financial statements.

 

 2 

 

 

Our relationships with the Huayang Companies and their stockholders are governed by a series of contractual arrangements between Green Power, our wholly foreign owned enterprise in the PRC, and each of the Huayang Companies, which are our operating companies in the PRC. Under PRC laws, each of Green Power, Fulland Wind Energy, Dyeing and Heavy Industries is an independent legal person and none of them is exposed to liabilities incurred by the other parties. Other than pursuant to the contractual arrangements between Green Power and the Huayang Companies described below, generally, neither of the Huayang Companies transfers any other funds generated from its operations to the other Huayang Company. On October 12, 2007, we entered into the following contractual arrangements with each of the Huayang Companies.

 

Consulting Services Agreement. Pursuant to the exclusive consulting services agreements between Green Power and each of the Huayang Companies, Green Power has the exclusive right to provide to the Huayang Companies general business operation services, including advice and strategic planning, as well as consulting services related to the technological research and development of dye and finishing machines, electrical equipment and related products. Under this agreement, Green Power owns the intellectual property rights developed or discovered through research and development, in the course of providing its services under the agreement, or derived from the provision of the services. The Huayang Companies shall pay a quarterly consulting service fees to Green Power that is equal to all of the Huayang Companies’ profits for such quarter. The term of this agreement, as amended on November 1, 2008, is 20 years from October 12, 2007 and may be extended only upon Green Power’s written confirmation prior to the expiration of the agreement, with the extended term to be mutually agreed upon by the parties.

 

Operating Agreement. Pursuant to the operating agreement among Green Power, the Huayang Companies and all stockholders of the Huayang Companies, Green Power provides guidance and instruction on the Huayang Companies’ daily operations, financial management and employment issues. The Huayang Companies stockholders must designate the candidates recommended by Green Power as their representatives on the boards of directors of each of the Huayang Companies. Green Power has the right to appoint senior executives of the Huayang Companies. In addition, Green Power agrees to guarantee the Huayang Companies’ performance under any agreements or arrangements relating to the Huayang Companies’ business arrangements with any third party. The Huayang Companies, in return, agrees to pledge their accounts receivable and all of their assets to Green Power. Moreover, the Huayang Companies agree that without the prior consent of Green Power, the Huayang Companies will not engage in any transactions that could materially affect their respective assets, liabilities, rights or operations, including, without limitation, incurrence or assumption of any indebtedness, sale or purchase of any assets or rights, incurrence of any encumbrance on any of their assets or intellectual property rights in favor of a third party or transfer of any agreements relating to their business operation to any third party. The term of this agreement, as amended on November 1, 2008, is 20 years from October 12, 2007 and may be extended only upon Green Power’s written confirmation prior to the expiration of the this agreement, with the extended term to be mutually agreed upon by the parties.

 

Equity Pledge Agreement. Under the equity pledge agreement between the Huayang Companies stockholders and Green Power, the Huayang Companies’ stockholders pledged all of their equity interests in the Huayang Companies to Green Power to guarantee the Huayang Companies’ performance of their obligations under the consulting services agreement. If the Huayang Companies or the Huayang Companies’ stockholders breach their respective contractual obligations, Green Power, as pledgee, will be entitled to certain rights, including the right to sell the pledged equity interests. The Huayang Companies stockholders also agreed that upon occurrence of any event of default, Green Power shall be granted an exclusive, irrevocable power of attorney to take actions in the place and stead of the Huayang Companies stockholders to carry out the security provisions of the equity pledge agreement and take any action and execute any instrument that Green Power may deem necessary or advisable to accomplish the purposes of the equity pledge agreement. The Huayang Companies’ stockholders agreed not to dispose of the pledged equity interests or take any actions that would prejudice Green Power’s interest. The equity pledge agreement will expire two years after the Huayang Companies’ obligations under the consulting services agreements have been fulfilled.

 

Option Agreement. Under the option agreement between the Huayang Companies’ stockholders and Green Power, the Huayang Companies’ stockholders irrevocably granted Green Power or its designated person an exclusive option to purchase, to the extent permitted under PRC law, all or part of the equity interests in the Huayang Companies for the cost of the initial contributions to the registered capital or the minimum amount of consideration permitted by applicable PRC law. Green Power or its designated person has sole discretion to decide when to exercise the option, whether in part or in full. The term of this agreement, as amended, is 20 years from October 12, 2007 and may be extended prior to its expiration by written agreement of the parties.

 

 3 

 

 

The Dyeing and Finishing Equipment Segment

 

In recent years, China has been one of the world’s leading textile producers, and the textile industry has been a pillar in the Chinese national economy, experiencing generally steady growth over the last few decades.  We believe that the textile business has continued to improve due to the tax reimbursement for export incentive given by the PRC government, and we believe that the market for dyeing and finishing equipment is improving, in large part because of the environmental policies of the Chinese government which are resulting in an increased market for equipment designed to enable dyeing companies to comply with the environmental standards.

 

In our dyeing and finishing equipment segment, we design, manufacture and distribute a line of proprietary high and low temperature dyeing and finishing machinery. We believe that we are one of the leading domestic Chinese manufacturers of textile dyeing machines, and our Huayang brand is nationally recognized. We currently have the capacity to manufacture and assemble approximately 600 textile-dyeing machines annually. Our state-of-the-art and automated production line enables us to manufacture our products efficiently, with lower labor and energy costs compared to traditional manufacturing methods. As part of our manufacturing process, we make corrosion-resistant stainless steel pumps and pressure vessels, which are not only critical components for our dyeing and finishing products but have other industrial applications as well.

 

We have received the “Advanced Enterprise for Progress in Science and Technology Award” from Wuxi City in 1999, and the “Star of Brilliance Medal” from the Wuxi City Bureau of Industrial and Commercial Administration in the same year. In 2002, we were recognized as an “Advanced Enterprise for Technical Reform Input” by Qianzhou, a municipality within Wuxi City for our dyeing products.

 

We hold 33 Chinese patents, of which eight are described under “Intellectual Property Rights.” These patents cover an innovative production technique enabling more-effective cloth washing in dyeing machines under high temperature and pressure, the dyeing liquid mixing device, dyeing liquid atomizing device, horizontal manipulated devices, mechanical seal and atomizer of its airflow dyeing machine and cover components of the hot air circulation system of low emission air flow dyeing machines.

 

Our dyeing and finishing products are generally compact in design compared with alternatives on the market and feature a high degree of both automation and mechanical-electrical integration. Our products are used in dyeing a wide variety of yarns such as pure cotton, cotton-polyester, terylene, polyester wool, poly-acrylic fiber, nylon, cotton ramie, and wool yarn. In 2010, we introduced an advanced dyeing technology enabling a quick, economic and environment-friendly operation designed for optimal performance. The liquid pressure and quantity are adjusted to the respective type and quantity of fabric. The special layout of the pressure pump circuit is designed to provide constant and safe operations of the machine reducing resources wastage and enhancing performance.

 

We developed a high (low) temperature airflow dyeing machine.  We believe that this new model of dyeing machine is efficient and cost effective and meets the requisite Chinese environmental standards. In September 2014, we received two patents which cover components of the hot air circulation system of our low emission air flow dyeing machines. We believe that the hot air circulation system helps to enhance the machines’ ability to produce higher quality textiles with a better look and feel.

 

We have developed a new air-fluid, dual-use dyeing machine which uses both air flow and fluid flow in the dyeing process. It allows users to customize the dyeing process according to the specific type of textile. It is equipped with a series of specialized and patented components, including nozzles, cloth wheels and cloth spreaders, which are designed to permit greater color evenness and reduce defects. It can be used on a wider range of textiles and uses 60% to 70% less water, about 30% less power and 40% to 50% less steam than traditional models of high-temperature, high-pressure dyeing machines and reduces the use of additives by about 50% while shortening dyeing time by 1 to 2 hours.

 

Marketing and Distribution

 

All of our revenue from the textile dyeing machine segment is derived from sales in China. We presently sell our products in Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces, both regions with significant textile production, as well as in many of the coastal regions of China such as Shandong and Guangdong provinces.

 

 4 

 

 

We market and sell our products through our internal sales force, which is based in our facilities in Wuxi. Our marketing programs include industrial conferences, trade fairs, sales training and advertising. Our sales and marketing groups work closely with our manufacturing groups to coordinate our product development activities, product launches and ongoing demand and supply planning. We sell our products directly to many of China’s largest textile producers.

 

Growth Strategies

 

According to China’s National Development and Reform Commission, the main focus of the country’s textile industry has shifted from gaining competitive advantages based on labor costs toward the objectives of developing scientific and technological innovation as well as brand creation. Under the auspices of China’s Twelfth Five Year Plan, which was implemented in 2011, the next stage for the textile and dyeing industries in China is to strengthen pollution control, according to the Bureau of Economic Operation under the National Development and Reform Commission. 

 

In support of this objective, we are continuing our efforts to develop and implement next-generation low energy consumption and high heating efficiency features to our machines. The current emphasis of our efforts continues to be on increasing automation features in our existing products and implementing power line communication technology throughout our production facilities to enable our customers to reduce their use of electricity and water. However, we experienced softer demand for our low-emission airflow dyeing machines as many of our customers already upgraded to newer models and much of our remaining customer base does not have the ability to make significant capital expenditures at this time. As a result, our sales in this segment declined from approximately $42,000,000 in 2014 to approximately $29,000,000 in 2015.

 

Competition

 

Because of the importance of the Chinese textile industry in the world market, we face competition from both domestic and foreign suppliers. However, we believe that, due to the high quality of our products, our principal competition is from suppliers based in foreign countries, including Japan, Germany, Italy and France. Domestically, our chief competitor is Fong’s National Engineering (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of Fong’s Industries Company Ltd., a Hong-Kong based conglomerate.

 

We believe that we can effectively compete with these companies on the basis of the quality and performance of our products, our after-sales service, and cost. We provide one year of maintenance and repair services for all of our products and based on historical we experience, maintenance and repair service calls have been minimal. Moreover, we provide customers in the Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces, our top markets, with on-site support which is generally provided within 24 hours of receiving a request. However, many of our competitors have longer operating histories and significantly greater financial or technological resources than we do and presently enjoy greater brand recognition.

 

The Forged Rolled Rings and Related Components Segment

 

We manufacture rolled rings and other related components designed to be used for issue in the wind power industry as well as other uses. We employ axial close-die forging technology in producing precision forgings, a technology for producing rotary precision forgings. We made the forging machine, which we believe provides us with an advantage in machine maintenance and cost compared with other companies using foreign equipment. Our rolled rings are essentially hollow cylindrical sections forged from a stainless steel stock of varying thickness and height. The rings are called rolled rings because of the nature of the forging process. Forging is a manufacturing process where metal is pressed, pounded or squeezed under great pressure to create high strength parts. Rolled ring forging turns a hollow round piece of metal under extreme pressure against a rotating roller, thereby squeezing out a single-piece ring without any welding required.

 

Rings can also be manufactured through machining or casting. We believe that forging provides increased strength and flexibility for the finished product. A ring’s strength affects its fatigue resistance, and is determined by the orientation of the grain flow of the ring’s metal material. Unlike the machining process, which creates a unidirectional grain flow, or the casting process, which creates no grain flow, the forging process is designed to cause alignment and orientation of the grain flow in a direction creating maximum strength, thereby providing maximum fatigue resistance. This high strength property also reduces sectional thickness and overall weight of the ring without compromising the overall integrity of the finished product.

 

High tangential strength and ductility make forged rings well-suited for torque- and pressure-resistant components, such as gears, engine bearings for aircraft, wheel bearings, couplings, rotor spacers, sealed discs and cases, flanges, pressure vessels and valve bodies. As such, rolled rings have a wide variety of applications. Presently, the majority of Chinese rolled ring producers rely on technologies such as the steam hammer and friction press, which consume large amounts of energy and cause pollution, and which, we believe, result in a less desirable product than our products.

 

 5 

 

 

Yaw bearings, which are found in every wind turbine, are made from rolled rings. Essentially, a yaw bearing is a large ring with teeth, all of which are either pointing outward or inward. The teeth allow the yaw bearing to engage with a smaller wheel attached to the yaw motor. The yaw motor turns the wind turbine so that the rotor (to which blades are attached) faces the wind in order to optimize electricity generation. The yaw bearing is used by the yaw motor to turn the wind turbine.

 

Manufacturing

 

In 2009, we opened our state-of-the-art forging facility. Our operations feature a 4,500-ton press and a ring-rolling mill, employing our advanced axial close-die forging technology, to manufacture rolled rings measuring up to 6.3 meters in diameter and a cross section up to 700mm and shafts used in wind turbine units that are designed to generate wind power in the range of 1MW-3MW. We also have a series of workshops dedicated for fabrication, welding, machining and assembly of high strength materials.

 

We believe that our forging facility, which is able to meet the quality requirements of our most demanding customers, has an annual capacity of 50,000 tons.

 

The melting, forging, heat-treating and machining capability at our facility allows for the manufacturing of a wide range of custom-forged products. Multi-diameter shafts, gear blanks, mandrel-forged rings and specialized shapes, are available in a wide range of sizes and weights ranging from a few hundred pounds to over 25,000 pounds. Most popular carbon and alloy AISI/SAE grades such as 1026, 1045, 4140, 4150F, 4340, and 8620 are readily available. We also have experience with the melting and forming of specialized alloys. We believe that we are capable of producing components that meet various industry specifications as well as product-specific specifications.

 

Our manufacturing site covers over 1.1 million square feet. In addition to our forging operation we have established state-of-the-art fabrication, machining, assembly and finishing workshops to meet the manufacturing needs of our clean technology focused customer base.

 

We believe that we are a major Chinese manufacturer of:

 

  Large forged rolled rings, yaw bearings, tower flanges and shafts used in large-scale windmills;
     
  Stainless steel pressure vessel/chambers used in the manufacturing of multi-crystalline solar wafers;
     
  Specialty, high tolerance, fabricated components and assemblies used in various clean technology industries;
     
  Other fabricated and machined components, assemblies and equipment requiring high precision manufacturing.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, we generated revenue from one customer for products which required the use of our electro-slag remelted (“ESR”) equipment.  We had purchased the equipment in anticipation of a demand for ESR products which did not materialize.  On March 3, 2014, we entered into an equipment operating lease with Shanghai Liangting Metallurgy Roll Manufacture Co., Ltd. pursuant to which we leased the ESR equipment to for a quarterly rate of RMB 1,450,000, which, at the present exchange rate is approximately $236,000.  The lease has an eight-year term commencing April 1, 2014.  The equipment remains on our premises, and the lease gave the lessee a right of access to our premises for the purpose of using the equipment.  The equipment is shown on our consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2015 and 2014 as equipment held for sale. In early 2015, the lessee stopped using the equipment and stopped paying rent to us on the equipment. As a result, we incurred an impairment loss on the ESR equipment in the amount of approximately $0.4 million and $3.8 million during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Additionally, as discussed elsewhere, in 2015, we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $4,700,000 relating to a write down of the carrying value of certain manufacturing equipment used in this segment to its estimated fair value.

 

Marketing and Distribution

 

Our marketing efforts include participation at industrial conferences and trade fairs, sales training, and advertising. Our sales team works closely with our product development and manufacturing teams to coordinate our product development activities, product launches and ongoing demand and supply planning. Our products are currently sold to companies in cities and provinces throughout China including Luoyang, Shenyang, Zhenjiang province, Jiangsu province, Qingdao, Jinan, Shanghai, Chongqing, Beijing, Xinjiang, and Zhengzhou.  We are an ISO9001:2000 certified supplier.

 

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Competition

 

The markets for products in our forged rolled rings and related products are intensely competitive. Many of our competitors have established more prominent market positions, and if we fail to attract and retain customers and establish successful distribution networks in our target markets for our products, we will be unable to increase our sales. Many of our existing and potential competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, manufacturing and other resources than we do. Our competitors’ greater size in some cases provides them with a competitive advantage with respect to manufacturing costs because of their economies of scale and their ability to purchase raw materials at lower prices, as well as securing supplies at times of shortages. Many of our competitors also have greater brand name recognition, more established distribution networks and larger customer bases. In addition, many of our competitors have well-established relationships with our current and potential distributors and have extensive knowledge of our target markets. As a result, they may be able to devote greater resources to the research, development, promotion and sale of their products or respond more quickly to evolving industry standards and changes in market conditions than we can. Our failure to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with existing or new competitors may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We believe there has been an increase in overall competition in the forged product market as industry capacity has increased and the market for the product has slowed, which is reflected in our decline in sales from this segment from approximately $34,000,000 in 2014 to approximately $12,000,000 in 2015.  Additionally, we believe some turbine manufacturers that use forged products and are not our customers or potential customers, have built their own forging capacity to save costs by vertical integration and to have better leverage when negotiating with the component suppliers. This resulted in downward pressure on our pricing and may indirectly affect our sales as a result of increased competition for a smaller number of potential customers. Our products are sold for use by manufacturers of industrial equipment.  The demand for products such as ours which are used both for manufacturing in general and for wind power specifically is uncertain.  Although we believe that over the long term, our forged rolled rings and related components segment will expand and the government of the PRC has announced its desire to increase the use of wind power as an energy source, in the short term other factors have affected the requirements of our wind power customers and potential customers for our products which has had an effect of lessening the demand for wind power products such as ours.  To the extent that the demand for our forged rolled rings and related components for both wind power and other industries declines, our revenue and net income will continue to be affected.

 

We believe that we are well positioned to capitalize on the opportunities provided by the demand for products by the wind power industry and other industries in China by supplying superior quality, high performance forged products. We believe that we offer:

 

  High quality manufacturing facilities and production quality;
     
  A prime location in Jiangsu province near major transportation routes which can provide shipping cost savings and a good response time;
     
  Strong management, engineering and technical capabilities;
     
  ISO9001 certification, which covers machining and related service of shaft-shaped forging, ring forging, tubular forging and component assembly.

 

However, the demand for products used in manufacturing in general, including wind power industry and other industries, is uncertain. Although we believe that over the long term, the forged rolled rings and related components segment will expand, and the government of the PRC has announced its desire to increase the use of wind power as an energy source, in the short term, other factors, such as economic factors and the availability of credit, may affect the requirements of our customers and potential customers for our products. To the extent that the demand for our forged rolled rings and related components declines, our revenue and net income will be affected. We also believe that there is a degree of market saturation for forged rolled rings and related components for wind power and other industries and this market saturation, combined with the effects of lower oil and gas prices has reduced the demand for construction of wind power facilities, and we expect that our revenues from forged rolled rings and related components will continue to decrease in the near future.

 

The Petroleum and Chemical Equipment Segment

 

In our petroleum and chemical equipment segment, we produce and sell coal chemical equipment, formaldehyde plant and downstream products, a variety of heat exchangers, separators, tanks, towers, cryogenic equipment, reaction kettles and other product to petroleum and chemical industries.

 

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Marketing and Distribution

 

All of our revenue from the petroleum and chemical equipment segment is derived from sales in China. We presently sell our products in Zhejiang Province, Guangdong Province, Shanxi Province and Xinjiang. We started to sell our petroleum and chemical equipment in February 2015.

 

We market and sell our products through our internal sales force, which is based in our facilities in Wuxi. Our marketing programs include industrial conferences, trade fairs, sales training and advertising. Our sales and marketing groups work closely with our manufacturing groups to coordinate our product development activities, product launches and ongoing demand and supply planning.

 

Competition

 

The markets for products in our petroleum and chemical equipment segment are intensely competitive. Many of our competitors have established more prominent market positions, and if we fail to attract and retain customers and establish successful distribution networks in our target markets for our products, we will be unable to increase our sales. Many of our existing and potential competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, manufacturing and other resources than we do. Our competitors’ greater size in some cases provides them with a competitive advantage with respect to manufacturing costs because of their economies of scale and their ability to purchase raw materials at lower prices, as well as securing supplies at times of shortages. Many of our competitors also have greater brand name recognition, more established distribution networks and larger customer bases. In addition, many of our competitors have well-established relationships with our current and potential distributors and have extensive knowledge of our target markets. As a result, they may be able to devote greater resources to the research, development, promotion and sale of their products or respond more quickly to evolving industry standards and changes in market conditions than we can. Our failure to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with existing or new competitors may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We believe that we can effectively compete with our competitors on the basis of the quality and performance of our products, and our cost. However, many of our competitors have longer operating histories and significantly greater financial or technological resources than we do and presently enjoy greater brand recognition.

 

During 2015, 13% from our consolidated revenues was derived from one customer in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment. In December 2015, we received a letter from this customer, pursuant to which the customer claimed that we were delinquent in the delivery of the products and those products that were delivered did not meet the required quality standards.  The customer claimed that it is entitled to damages of RMB 36,103,640, or approximately $5,562,365 at December 31, 2015.  As a result of the dispute with this customer, the Company, in 2015:

 

  Incurred a loss from sales contract dispute of approximately $5,800,000, reflecting the potential liability to this customer based on the customer’s claim;
     
  Increased our accounts receivable reserve to fully reserve the approximately $1,800,000 due from this customer;
     
  Increased our reserve for obsolete inventory by approximately $800,000, representing the remaining inventory manufactured to the specifications of this customer; and
     
  Recorded an impairment charge of approximately $1,900,000 relating to the manufacturing equipment which was used to manufacture products for this petroleum and chemical equipment customer and is not otherwise used by us.

 

We are engaged in discussions with this customer, but cannot predict the results of these discussions. We are also evaluating our ability to continue in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to operate in this segment.

 

Source of Supply

 

Stainless steel and other metals are the principal raw material for the manufacture of all of our products. We purchase stainless steel tubes from Wuxi City Zhongtian Stainless Steel Co., Ltd. and stainless steel plates from Wuxi City Fanshun Materials Co., Ltd.   While we do not have long-term contracts with these suppliers, we have long-term business relationship with them, and these companies have generally met our supply requirements. For the textile machinery business, the price of steel can have more significant impact.  Any significant rise in the price of or demand for stainless steel could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.  Inflation has recently affected raw materials generally, and inflationary pressures could have a significant effect on our business, particularly on our dyeing and finishing equipment segment.  To the extent that we are not able to pass along price increases for stainless steel to our forging and petroleum and chemical customers, these factors will affect these two segments as well.

 

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Other raw materials, such as stainless steel planks and transducers, are readily available from a number of suppliers on commercially reasonable terms.

 

Research and Development

 

We incurred research and development expense in the amount of approximately $99,000 and $116,000 related to the development and improvement of our new dyeing machinery in 2015 and 2014, respectively.  We are continuing product development with respect to the new dyeing machinery.

 

Government Regulations

 

Environmental Regulations

 

Our manufacturing processes generate noise, waste water, gaseous and other industrial wastes, and we use, generate and discharge toxic, volatile and otherwise hazardous chemicals and wastes in our operations. As a result, we are required to comply with all national and local regulations regarding protection of the environment. Our operations are subject to regulations promulgated by China’s Environmental Protection Administration, Jiangsu Province Environmental Protection Administration and the Wuxi City Environmental Administration. We are also subject to periodic monitoring by local environmental protection authorities in Wuxi. We have installed various types of anti-pollution equipment in our facilities to reduce, treat, and, where feasible, recycle the wastes generated in our manufacturing processes. We believe that our manufacturing facilities and equipment are in substantial compliance with all applicable environmental regulations. Based on the requirement of present law, we do not expect that any additional measures that may be required to maintain compliance will materially affect our capital expenditures, competitive position, financial position or results of operations.

 

The Chinese government has expressed a concern about pollution and other environmental hazards. Although we believe that we comply with current national and local government regulations, if it is determined that we are in violation of these regulations, we can be subject to financial penalties as well as the loss of our business license, in which event we would be unable to continue in business. Further, if the national or local government adopts more stringent regulations, we may incur significant costs in complying with such regulations. If we fail to comply with present or future environmental regulations, we may be required to pay substantial fines, suspend production or cease operations. Any failure by us to control the use of or to restrict adequately the discharge of, hazardous substances could subject us to potentially significant monetary damages and fines or suspensions in our business operations.

 

Our products must also comply with applicable environmental regulations, and we believe we are in material compliance with all applicable environmental laws and regulations applicable to our products.

 

Business License

 

Green Power, Fulland Wind Energy and both of the Huayang Companies have been issued business licenses with the appropriate municipal and provincial governments which specifically authorize the companies to operate their respective businesses. All of these business licenses, which are subject to annual review by the issuing agencies, are current as of the date of this annual report. No additional approval or license is required for the manufacturing and sale of the textile dyeing and finishing machines or the rolled rings or petroleum and chemical equipment.

 

ISO Certification

 

We received the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) certificate for our new facility in Wuxi City on July 15, 2009. The certificate accredits our quality management system as compliant with ISO9001:2008 and covers machining and related service of shaft-shaped forging, ring forging, tubular forging and component assembly. The certification was renewed on December 17, 2015 and expires on December 16, 2018.

 

We also received the certificate of Level A Pressure Vessel from the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic China on August 18, 2009 and covers the manufacturing of pressure vessel pipelines. This certificate was renewed on June 19, 2014 and expires on June 18, 2018.

 

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Our dyeing and finishing equipment segment also has received the certificate to manufacture D1 and D2 levels of pressure vessels, which includes our current line of dyeing machines, from the Quality and Technical Supervision Bureau of Jiangsu Province.  We received the certificate on December 7, 2007 and renewed it on December 21, 2015. This certificate expires on December 20, 2019.

 

Our Petroleum and chemical equipment segment also has received the certificate of conformity of quality management system certification from Beijing Zhongjiaoyuanhang Certification Company on December 28, 2015. This certificate accredits our quality management system as compliant with ISO9001:2008 and covers plant auxiliary equipment, chemical equipment, dyeing and finishing equipment, rolling mill and roll, wind turbine spindle, ring gear manufacturing and processing and service. This certificate expires on December 27, 2018.

 

Circular 106 Compliance and Approval

 

On May 31, 2007, the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, issued an official notice known as “Circular 106,” which requires the owners of any Chinese companies to obtain SAFE’s approval before establishing any offshore holding company structure for foreign financing as well as subsequent acquisition matters in China. Accordingly, in early September 2007, the owners of 100% of the equity in the Huayang Companies, namely Jianhua Wu and Lihua Tang, submitted their application to SAFE. On October 11, 2007, SAFE approved their application, permitting them to establish an offshore company, Fulland, as a “special purpose vehicle” for any foreign ownership and capital raising activities by the Huayang Companies.  After SAFE’s approval, Mr. Wu and Ms. Tang became the majority owners of Fulland on October 11, 2007.  Fulland was acquired by us in November 2007.

 

Draft Foreign Investment Law

 

On January 19, 2015, the Ministry of Commerce of China (“MOFCOM”) published a draft version of a proposed Foreign Investment Law with an explanatory note. The draft Foreign Investment Law, if and when promulgated, will replace and integrate the three existing laws over foreign investment, the Law of the PRC on Chinese-Foreign Equity Joint Ventures, the Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprise Law and the Law of the PRC on Sino-foreign Cooperative Enterprises. The draft Foreign Investment Law was formulated with a view to opening wider to the outside, promoting and regulating foreign investment, protecting the legitimate rights and interests of foreign investors, safeguarding national security and public interests, and facilitating the healthy development of the socialist market economy. MOFCOM has requested comments from the public on the draft Law by February 17, 2015.

 

Some of the more significant concepts in the draft Foreign Investment Law include the following:

 

Effective Control

 

The proposed law has adopted the concept of effective control in the foreign investment area. The draft Foreign Investment Law notes that a company established in China but controlled by foreign investors shall be deemed a foreign investor and foreign entities controlled by Chinese investors can, in some circumstances, be deemed Chinese domestic investors. According to the draft Foreign Investment Law, “control” refers to several circumstances including the contractual control by imposing decisive influences on the operation, finance, personnel or technology of the enterprise by contract, trust or other means.

 

Negative List Management

 

Most foreign investments will not need pre-approval as was previously required. It means that the Chinese market could be more open and efficient in some sectors to set up foreign invested companies. However, the draft Foreign Investment Law sets out a negative list, or catalogue of prohibitions. Foreign investors are not allowed to invest in any sector set out in the catalogue of prohibitions. Further, a catalogue of restrictions will note those sectors with restrictions imposed on foreign investors. The use of negative lists represents a method of management or administration of foreign investments.

 

How domestic VIEs, potentially deemed to be foreign enterprises under the draft Foreign Investment Law and currently operating in Negative List sectors, will be treated is unclear.

 

National Security Reviews

 

The draft Foreign Investment Law also establishes a united foreign investment national security review system which will conduct examinations on the foreign investments that endangers or may endanger the national security.

 

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Information Reporting System

 

The draft Foreign Investment Law establishes a foreign investment information reporting system. The new rules include submission of a foreign investment report (such as when setting up a company), a report of any changes of foreign investment (any adjustments of investment) and an annual report. Generally, reporting obligations arise when a foreign investor purchases not less than 10% of the stock of a domestic entity, or less than 10% but the purchase results in a change of control of the domestic entity.

 

Supervision and Inspection

 

The draft Foreign Investment Law establishes a mechanism for the supervision and inspection of foreign investors and foreign invested enterprises from industrial and commercial, taxation, foreign exchange, auditing and other administrative departments. The government’s eye on foreign investments and foreign investment management has shifted from the approval prior to a foreign invested company being established to the supervision and inspection after it is set up.

 

PRC laws and regulations governing the validity of these contractual arrangements are uncertain and the relevant government authorities have broad discretion in interpreting these laws and regulations. If the PRC government determines that our contractual arrangements do not comply with applicable laws and regulations, it could revoke our business and operating licenses, require us to discontinue or restrict our operations, restrict our right to collect revenues, block our website, require us to restructure our operations, impose additional conditions or requirements with which we may not be able to comply, or take other regulatory or enforcement actions against us that could be harmful to our business. The imposition of any of these penalties would result in a material and adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business.

 

Intellectual Property Rights

 

We rely on a combination of trademark, copyright and trade secret protection laws in China and other jurisdictions, as well as confidentiality procedures and contractual provisions to protect our intellectual property and our brand. In addition to 24 other patents held by us, the eight Chinese patents, all of which relate to our dyeing products, are our principal patents.   The patents were issued by the State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China in November 2012, as to the first patent, and June 2013 as to the other five and September 2014 as to the last two.  

 

The following table sets forth information concerning our eight principal patents.

 

Patent No.  Description   Expiration 
ZL 2012 2 0165878.7  a process to enable more-effective cloth washing in dyeing machines under high temperature and pressure   November 2022 
ZL 2012 2 0752919.2  atomizer of airflow dyeing machine   June 2023 
ZL 2012 2 0752924.3  mechanical seal for dyeing machine   June 2023 
ZL 2012 2 0752922.4  horizontal manipulated devices for dyeing machine   June 2023 
ZL 2012 2 0752921.X  dyeing liquid atomizing device for dyeing machine   June 2023 
ZL 2012 2 0752917.3  dyeing liquid mixing device for dyeing machine   June 2023 
ZL 2013 1 0004772.8  hot air circulation system of air flow dyeing machines   September 2034 
ZL 2013 1 0004736.1  hot air circulation system of air flow dyeing machines   September 2034 

 

We intend to apply for more patents to protect our core technologies.  We also have confidentiality and non-competition policies in place as part of our company employment guideline which is given to each employee, and we enter into nondisclosure agreements with third parties. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights.

 

Employees

 

As of March 15, 2016, we had 151 full time employees. Of these, 117 employees are in the dyeing and finishing equipment segment (ten executives, managers and administrative staff, four accounting staff, four quality control staff, five engineers and technicians, four marketing and salespeople, one purchasing staff and 89 manufacturing staff), 27 employees are in our forged rolled rings and related products segment (three executive, managers and administrative staff, one accounting staff, two engineers, and 21 manufacturing staff), and 7 employees are with our petroleum and chemical equipment segment (7 manufacturing staff).

 

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Our manufacturing employees usually work in two shifts, based upon our manufacturing requirements.  We may also send our engineers and technicians to our customers’ work sites to provide after-sale customer service for them.

 

All of these employees are members of a union, organized by the Union for Huishan District, Wuxi City, as mandated by the PRC Union Law. We have not experienced a work strike.  We believe that our relations with our employees are good.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk.  You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this report, before making an investment decision, and you should only consider an investment in our common stock if you can afford to sustain the loss of your entire investment. You should carefully consider the risks described below together with all of the other information included in this report before making an investment decision with regard to our securities. If any of the following risks occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be harmed. In that case, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We are incurring significant obligations in developing the manufacture of forged rolled rings for use in the wind power industry and other industries with no assurance that we can or will be successful in this business.

 

Wind power account for a small percentage of the power generated in the PRC, and our ability to market to this segment is dependent upon both an increased acceptance of wind power as an energy source in the PRC and the acceptance of our products. We are making the financial and manpower commitment in our belief that there will be an increased demand for wind power in China and elsewhere and that the companies that manufacture wind power generation equipment and other equipment that uses our products will purchase our products. We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully develop this business, and our failure to develop the business will have a material adverse effect on our overall financial condition and the results of our operations.

 

Because of problems with a major customer in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, we have taken significant write-offs and may not be able to continue to operate in this business.

 

During 2015, our largest customer for the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, which was our largest customer and accounted revenues of approximately $6,200,000, or approximately 13% of our consolidated revenues, advised us that, because we were delinquent in delivering product and those products which we delivered did not the required quality standard, we incurred accrued expenses of approximately $6,000,000 representing the potential liability to that customer, as well as write-offs of accounts receivable of $1,759,000, and inventory of $836,000 and we incurred impairment losses on equipment relating to the project of approximately $1,900,000. Although we have engaged in discussions with the customer, we cannot assure you that we will be able to satisfactorily resolve the customer’s complaints or that we will incur liabilities in excess of the amounts we reserved. Further, since this customer accounted for most of our revenue from this segment, and the problems with this contract may make other companies in the petroleum and chemical industries less willing to purchase our products, we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to operate in the petroleum and chemical segment. In such event, we may incur further impairment charges in 2016.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, we incurred a loss from operations of approximately $11,200,000 and a net loss of approximately $12,800,000, and we cannot assure you that our losses will not continue.

 

As a result of a decrease in revenues of approximately $26,400,000, or 37.7%, impairment losses of approximately $1,900,000 relating to the petroleum and chemical equipment segment and approximately $5,100,000 of impairment losses relating to forged rolled rings and related products segment, and a loss from the sales contract dispute in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, we sustained a loss from operations of approximately $11,200,000 and a net loss of approximately $12,800,000. In order for us to generate profits in the future, we need to increase our revenues. We cannot assure you that we will be able to either increase our revenues significantly or operate profitably in the future. We expect that a net loss will be continuing in the first quarter of 2016.

 

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We will require additional funds to expand our operations.

 

In view of both our decline in revenues, our loss for 2015 and in connection with any expansion projects for our business, we will incur significant capital and operational expenses. We do not presently have any funding commitments other than our present credit arrangements which we do not believe are sufficient to enable us to expand our business. If we are unable to generate cash flow from operations and obtain necessary bank or other financing to pay for significant capital or operational expenses, we may be unable to finance our business, which may impair our ability to operate profitably.  Because of our stock price and the worldwide economic situation, we may not be able to raise any additional funds that we require on favorable terms, if any.  The failure to obtain necessary financing may impair our ability to expanse or business and remain profitable.

 

We rely on short term financing to fund our operations.

 

We have historically financed our operations through short-term bank loans, which have been refinanced upon maturity. At December 31, 2015, we had outstanding short-term bank loans of approximately $3.1 million. We cannot assure you that we would be able to obtain alternative financing in the event that our lenders did not renew our short-term loans. Our failure to have the bank loans refinanced could materially impair our ability to operate our business.

 

A decrease in supply or increase in cost of the materials used in our products could harm our profitability.

 

Any restrictions on the supply or the increase in the cost of the materials used by us in manufacturing our products, especially steel, could significantly reduce our profit margins. Efforts to mitigate restrictions on the supply or price increases of materials by entering into long-term purchase agreements, by implementing productivity improvements or by passing cost increases on to our customers may not be successful. Increased competition may affect our ability to pass on to our customers’ price increases in raw materials, particularly, stainless steel, which is our principal raw material for all of our products.  Our profitability depends largely on the price and continuity of supply of the materials used in the manufacture of our products, which in many instances are supplied by a limited number of sources.

 

Because of the significant decline in revenues from the forged rolled rings and related products segment and other factors relating to this segment, we incurred impairment losses and we are evaluating our ability to continue to operate in this segment.

 

Our revenues from the forged rolled ring and related products decreased by approximately $21,700,000, or 64.2%, in 2015 from 2014 and we sustain a negative gross margin in this segment for 2015, reflecting both tight credit policies in China as well as a degree of market saturation. We expect that our revenues from this segment will continue to decrease for the near future. Additionally, in 2015, we recorded an impairment loss of approximately $5,100,000 related to write-down of equipment used in this segment from its carrying value to its estimated fair value. We are evaluating the viability of this segment on an ongoing basis and, if we determine that it is not likely that we will be able to operate this segment profitably, we may discontinue operating in this segment.  To the extent that we discontinue this segment, we anticipate that we will incur additional impairment charges with respect to assets associated with this segment. 

 

Inflationary and competitive pressures may affect our ability to maintain our margins.

 

In recent years, raw materials, including steel, which is our principal raw material, have been subject to significant price fluctuation.  The Chinese government has expressed concern about inflation in certain segments of the economy.  We cannot predict the extent or effect of inflationary pressures with respect to steel and steel products.  To the extent that we have to raise our prices to maintain our margins, our sales may suffer.  If we are unable to raise prices, either because of competitive factors or customer resistance, our margins and net income may suffer.  We cannot assure you that our business will not be impaired by inflation.

 

The nature of our products creates the possibility of significant product liability and warranty claims, which could harm our business.

 

Customers use some of our products in potentially hazardous applications that can cause injury or loss of life and damage to property, equipment or the environment. In addition, some of our products are integral to the production process for some end-users and any failure of our products could result in a suspension of operations. We cannot be certain that our products will be completely free from defects. Moreover, we do not have any product liability insurance and may not have adequate resources to satisfy a judgment in the event of a successful claim against us. The successful assertion of product liability claims against us could result in potentially significant monetary damages and require us to make significant payments.

 

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If we fail to introduce enhancements to our existing products or to keep abreast of technological changes in our markets, our business and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Although certain technologies in the industries that we occupy are well established, we believe our future success depends in part on our ability to enhance our existing products and develop new products in order to continue to meet customer demands.  In particular, the next generation of wind turbines requires components that are stronger than the present generation.  Although we are seeking to address these requirements with our forged products, our failure to introduce and develop a market for these and any other new or enhanced products on a timely and cost-competitive basis, as well as the development of processes that make our existing technologies or products obsolete, could harm our business and results of operations.

 

Because we face intense competition for all of our operating segments from companies that have greater resources than we do, we may not be able to compete successfully and we may lose or be unable to gain market share.

 

The markets for products in all three of our business segments are intensely competitive. Many of our competitors have established more prominent market positions as well as existing relationship with potential customers, and if we fail to attract and retain customers and establish successful distribution networks in our target markets for our products, we will be unable to increase our sales. Many of our existing and potential competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, manufacturing and other resources than we do. Our competitors’ greater size in some cases provides them with a competitive advantage with respect to manufacturing costs because of their economies of scale and their ability to purchase raw materials at lower prices, as well as securing supplies at times of shortages. Many of our competitors also have greater brand name recognition, more established distribution networks and larger customer bases. In addition, many of our competitors have well-established relationships with our current and potential distributors and have extensive knowledge of our target markets. As a result, they may be able to devote greater resources to the research, development, promotion and sale of their products or respond more quickly to evolving industry standards and changes in market conditions than we can. Our failure to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with existing or new competitors may materially and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Further, from time to time, we have had to adjust the prices of our products to remain competitive. In addition, our problems with our customer in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment may affect our ability to market product in that segment as well as in other segments.

 

Compliance with environmental regulations can be expensive, and noncompliance with these regulations may result in adverse publicity and potentially significant monetary damages and fines.

 

As our manufacturing processes generate noise, wastewater, gaseous and other industrial wastes, we are required to comply with all national and local regulations regarding protection of the environment. If we fail to comply with present or future environmental regulations, we may be required to pay substantial fines, suspend production or cease operations. We use, generate and discharge toxic, volatile and otherwise hazardous chemicals and wastes in our activities. Any failure by us to control the use of or to restrict adequately, the discharge of hazardous substances could subject us to potentially significant monetary damages and fines or suspensions in our business operations. We do not have insurance to cover any liability which we may incur as a result of personal injury or property damages resulting from emissions of toxic material into the environment.

 

Our ISO certifications expire in 2018, and our failure to maintain these certifications could impair our ability to obtain customers for our products.

 

Since our ISO certifications expire in 2018, we need to complete the renewal process in order to continue to maintain these certifications. The renewal process requires an inspection of our facilities by an independent inspection company. Our failure to maintain, or any delay in obtaining, a continuation of our ISO certification could impair our ability to attract business which could affect both our revenue and our gross margin.

 

Our products are subject to PRC regulations, which may materially adversely affect our business.

 

Government regulations influence the design, components or operation of our products. New regulations and changes to current regulations are always possible and, in some jurisdictions, regulations may be introduced with little or no time to bring related products into compliance with these regulations. Our failure to comply with these regulations may restrict our ability to sell our products in the PRC. In addition, these regulations may increase our cost of supplying the products by forcing us to redesign existing products or to use more expensive designs or components. In these cases, we may experience unexpected disruptions in our ability to supply customers with products, or we may incur unexpected costs or operational complexities to bring products into compliance. This could have an adverse effect on our revenues, gross profit margins and results of operations and increase the volatility of our financial results.

 

 14 

 

 

The success of our businesses will depend on our ability to effectively develop and implement strategic business initiatives.

 

In connection with the development and implementation of our growth plans, we will incur additional operating expenses and capital expenditures. The development and implementation of these plans also requires management to divert a portion of its time from day-to-day operations. These expenses and diversions could have a significant impact on our operations and profitability, particularly if our plans for any new initiative prove to be unsuccessful. Moreover, if we are unable to implement any of our plans in a timely manner, or if those plans turn out to be ineffective or are executed improperly, our business and operating results would be adversely affected.

 

Failure to successfully reduce our production costs may adversely affect our financial results.

 

A significant portion of our strategy relies upon our ability to successfully rationalize and improve the efficiency of our operations.  If we are not able to implement cost reduction measures, especially in times of either an economic downturn or inflationary pressures, or if these efforts do not generate the level of cost savings that we expect going forward or result in higher than expected costs, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

If we are unable to make necessary capital investments or respond to pricing pressures, our business may be harmed.

 

In order to remain competitive, we need to invest in product development, manufacturing, customer service and support, and marketing. We do not have any significant research and development activities.   We may not have available sufficient financial or other resources to continue to make investments necessary to maintain our competitive position. Currently, our research and development is not significant.

 

Unforeseen or recurring operational problems at our facilities may cause significant lost production, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Our manufacturing processes could be affected by operational problems that could impair our production capability. Our facilities contain complex and sophisticated machines that are used in our manufacturing process. Disruptions at our facilities could be caused by maintenance outages; prolonged power failures or reductions; a breakdown, failure or substandard performance of any of our machines; the effect of noncompliance with material environmental requirements or permits; disruptions in the transportation infrastructure, including railroad tracks, bridges, tunnels or roads; fires, floods, earthquakes or other catastrophic disasters; labor difficulties; or other operational problems. Any prolonged disruption in operations at our facilities could cause significant lost production, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Our officers and directors own a substantial portion of our outstanding common stock, which will enable them to influence many significant corporate actions and in certain circumstances may prevent a change in control that would otherwise be beneficial to our shareholders.

 

As of March 30, 2016, our officers and directors and members of their families beneficially owned approximately 33.4% of our outstanding voting shares. Our by-laws provide that a quorum for action by stockholders is one-third of the outstanding shares. Consequently, these stockholders, acting together, could have a substantial impact on matters requiring the vote of the shareholders, including the election of our directors and most of our corporate actions. This control could delay, defer or prevent others from initiating a potential merger, takeover or other change in our control, even if these actions would benefit our shareholders and us. This control could adversely affect the voting and other rights of our other shareholders and could depress the market price of our common stock.

 

Our business depends substantially on the continuing efforts of our executive officers and our ability to maintain a skilled labor force, and our business may be severely disrupted if we lose their services.

 

Our future success depends substantially on the continued services of our executive officers, especially Mr. Jianhua Wu, our chief executive officer and the chairman of our board of directors. We do not maintain key man life insurance on any of our executive officers. If one or more of our executive officers are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, we may not be able to replace them readily, if at all. Therefore, our business may be severely disrupted, and we may incur additional expenses to recruit and retain new officers. In addition, if any of our executives joins a competitor or forms a competing company, we may lose some of our customers. Our chief executive officer is a party to contractual agreements as described elsewhere in our annual report.

 

 15 

 

 

A significant portion of our business is conducted through the Huayang Companies, which are owned by our chief executive officer and his wife.

 

In 2015, approximately 4.7% of our forged rolled rings and related products revenue and all of our dyeing and finishing equipment business and all of our petroleum and chemical equipment revenue conducted by the Huayang Companies, which are variable interest entities that are owned by our chief executive officer and his wife and whose financial results are included with ours because the Huayang Companies are deemed as variable interest entities and we are the sole beneficiary of their operations.  The variable interest entity relationship is derived from a series of agreements between us and our chief executive officer and his wife, as the sole stockholders of the Huayang Companies.  Pursuant to these agreements, we are responsible for the operations of the Huayang Companies and receive the benefits of those operations.  However, in the event that we have to seek to enforce these agreements, such enforcement would be sought in Chinese courts, and we cannot assure you that we will prevail or that we will be able to obtain the benefits intended by these agreement.  Any inability to enforce our rights under these agreements would materially impair our operations, financial position and cash flows.

 

If we are unable to attract, train and retain technical and financial personnel, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our future success depends, to a significant extent, on our ability to attract, train and retain technical and financial personnel. Recruiting and retaining capable personnel, particularly those with expertise in our industries and in the industries to which we market, are vital to our success. There is substantial competition for qualified technical and financial personnel, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to attract or retain our technical and financial personnel. If we are unable to attract and retain qualified employees, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our failure to protect our intellectual property rights may undermine our competitive position, and litigation to protect our intellectual property rights or defend against third-party allegations of infringement may be costly.

 

We rely primarily on trade secret and contractual restrictions to protect our intellectual property. Nevertheless, these afford only limited protection and the actions we take to protect our intellectual property rights may not be adequate and we may not be able to protect our intellectual property under Chinese laws. As a result, third parties may infringe or misappropriate our proprietary technologies or other intellectual property rights, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results. In addition, policing unauthorized use of proprietary technology can be difficult and expensive. Litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights, protect our trade secrets or determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others and the enforcement of intellectual property rights in China may be difficult. We cannot assure you that the outcome of any litigation will be in our favor. Intellectual property litigation may be costly and may divert management attention as well as expend our other resources away from our business. An adverse determination in any such litigation will impair our intellectual property rights and may harm our business, prospects and reputation. In addition, we have no insurance coverage against litigation costs and would have to bear all costs arising from such litigation to the extent we are unable to recover them from other parties. The occurrence of any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Implementation of China’s intellectual property-related laws has historically been lacking, primarily because of ambiguities in China’s laws and difficulties in enforcement. Accordingly, intellectual property rights and confidentiality protections in China may not be as effective as in the United States or other countries. Although we have received patents for our new dyeing machines, we cannot assure you that there patents will provide us with protection against infringers or other parties who design around our patents.

 

We do not have business liability or disruption insurance coverage.

 

The insurance industry in China is still at an early stage of development. Insurance companies in China offer limited business insurance products. We do not have any business liability or disruption insurance coverage for our operations in China. Any business disruption, litigation or natural disaster may result in our incurring substantial costs and the diversion of our resources.

 

 16 

 

 

You may suffer significant dilution if we raise additional capital.

 

If we need to raise additional capital to expand or continue operations, it may be necessary for us to issue additional equity or convertible debt securities. If we issue equity or convertible debt securities, our net tangible book value per share may decrease, and the percentage ownership of our current stockholders would be diluted, and any equity securities we may issue may have rights, preferences or privileges senior or more advantageous to our common stockholders.

 

We may experience major accidents in the course of our operations, which may cause significant property damage and personal injuries.

 

We may experience major accidents in the course of our operations, which may cause significant property damage and personal injuries. Significant industry-related accidents and disasters may cause interruptions to various parts of our operations, or could result in property or environmental damage, increase in operating expenses or loss of revenue. We do not carry any insurance policy covering our capital assets. In accordance with customary practice in China, we do not carry any business interruption insurance or third party liability insurance for personal injury or environmental damage arising from accidents on our property or relating to our operations other than our automobiles. Losses or payments incurred may have a material adverse effect on our operating performance if such losses or payments are not fully insured.

 

Our status as an emerging growth company may result in reduced disclosure obligations.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, which we refer to as the “JOBS Act,” and we are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting and financial disclosure requirements that are applicable to other public companies, that are not emerging growth companies, including, but not limited to, (1) not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), (2) reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and (3) exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We intend to take advantage of these exemptions. Because of the reduced disclosure and because our business is conducted in the PRC, investors may find investing in our common shares less attractive as a result, which could have an adverse effect on our stock price.

 

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, for complying with new or revised accounting standards. As a result, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We elected to opt out of such extended transition period and acknowledge such election is irrevocable pursuant to Section 107 of the JOBS Act.

 

We could remain an emerging growth company for up to five years, or until the earliest of (1) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion, (2) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter and we have been publicly reporting for at least 12 months, or (3) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three-year period.

 

Risks Related to Conducting Business in the PRC

 

PRC laws and regulations governing our businesses and the validity of certain of our contractual arrangements are uncertain. If we are found to be in violation, we could be subject to sanctions. In addition, changes in such PRC laws and regulations may materially and adversely affect our business.

 

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations, including, but not limited to, the laws and regulations governing our business, or the enforcement and performance of our contractual arrangements with our affiliated Chinese entities, the Huayang Companies, and its shareholders. We are considered a foreign person or foreign invested enterprise under PRC law. As a result, we are subject to PRC law limitations on foreign ownership of Chinese companies. These laws and regulations are relatively new and may be subject to change, and their official interpretation and enforcement may involve substantial uncertainty. The effectiveness of newly enacted laws, regulations or amendments may be delayed, resulting in detrimental reliance by foreign investors. New laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively.

 

 17 

 

 

The PRC government has broad discretion in dealing with violations of laws and regulations, including levying fines, revoking business and other licenses and requiring actions necessary for compliance. In particular, licenses and permits issued or granted to us by relevant governmental bodies may be revoked at a later time by higher regulatory bodies. We cannot predict the effect of the interpretation of existing or new PRC laws or regulations on our businesses. We cannot assure you that our current ownership and operating structure would not be found in violation of any current or future PRC laws or regulations. As a result, we may be subject to sanctions, including fines, and could be required to restructure our operations or cease to provide certain services. Any of these or similar actions could significantly disrupt our business operations or restrict us from conducting a substantial portion of our business operations, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

The PRC government restricts foreign investment in businesses in China. Accordingly, we operate our business in China through the Huayang Companies and, recently through a wholly-owned subsidiary which is a wholly foreign owned entity known as a WFOE. The Huayang Companies and the subsidiary hold the licenses and approvals necessary to operate our businesses in China. We have contractual arrangements with the Huayang Companies and its shareholders that allow us to substantially control the Huayang Companies. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to enforce these contracts.

 

Although we believe we comply with current PRC regulations, we cannot assure you that the PRC government would agree that these operating arrangements comply with PRC licensing, registration or other regulatory requirements, with existing policies or with requirements or policies that may be adopted in the future. If the PRC government determines that we do not comply with applicable law, it could revoke our business and operating licenses, require us to discontinue or restrict our operations, restrict our right to collect revenues, require us to restructure our operations, impose additional conditions or requirements with which we may not be able to comply, impose restrictions on our business operations or on our customers, or take other regulatory or enforcement actions against us that could be harmful to our business.

 

There are significant uncertainties under the   Draft   Foreign   Investment   Law   relating to the status of businesses in China controlled by foreign invested enterprises primarily through contractual arrangements, such as our business.

 

On January 19, 2015, MOFCOM published a draft of the PRC Law on Foreign Investment (Draft for Comment), or the Draft Foreign Investment Law, which is open for public comments until February 17, 2015. At the same time, MOFCOM published an accompanying explanatory note of the Draft Foreign Investment Law, or the Explanatory Note, which contains important information about the Draft Foreign Investment Law, including its drafting philosophy and principles, main content, plans to transition to the new legal regime and treatment of business in China controlled by foreign invested enterprises, or FIEs, primarily through contractual arrangements. The draft Foreign Investment Law utilizes the concept of “actual control” for determining whether an entity is considered to be a foreign-invested enterprise, and defines “control” broadly to include, among other things, voting or board control through contractual arrangements.

 

The draft   Foreign   Investment   Law proposes significant changes to the PRC foreign investment legal regime and may have a material impact on Chinese companies listed or to be listed overseas. The proposed draft   Foreign   Investment   Law   is to regulate FIEs the same way as PRC domestic entities, except for those FIEs that operate in industries deemed to be either “restricted” or “prohibited” in a “negative list.” Because the negative list has yet to be published, it is unclear whether it will differ from the current list of industries subject to restrictions or prohibitions on foreign investment. The draft Foreign Investment Law also provides that only FIEs operating in industries on the negative list will require entry clearance and other approvals that are not required of PRC domestic entities. As a result of the entry clearance and approvals, certain FIE’s operating in industries on the negative list may not be able to continue to conduct their operations through contractual arrangements. It states that entities established in China but controlled by foreign investors will be treated as foreign-invested enterprises, while entities set up outside of China which are controlled by PRC persons or entities, would be treated as domestic enterprises after completion of market entry procedures.

 

There is substantial uncertainty regarding the draft Foreign Investment Law, including, among others, what the actual content of the law will be as well as the adoption and effective date of the final form of the law. While such uncertainty exists, we cannot assure you that the new foreign investment law, when it is adopted and becomes effective, will not have a material and adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business through our contractual arrangements.

 

If the draft Foreign Investment Law is enacted and goes into effect in its current form, if we are deemed to have a non-PRC entity as a controlling shareholder, the provisions regarding control through contractual arrangements could reach our VIE arrangements, and as a result our VIEs could become subject to restrictions on foreign investment, which may materially impact the viability of our current corporate structure and operations. Specifically, we may be required to modify our corporate structure, change our current scope of operations, obtain approvals or face penalties or other additional requirements, compared to entities which do have PRC controlling shareholders.

 

 18 

 

 

Regulations relating to offshore investment activities by PRC residents may limit our ability to acquire PRC companies and could adversely affect our business.

 

In July 2014, SAFE promulgated the Circular on Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Administration Over the Overseas Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment by Domestic Residents Via Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 37, which replaced Relevant Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Domestic Residents’ Corporate Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Offshore Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 75. Circular 37 requires PRC residents to register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct establishment or indirect control of an offshore entity, referred to in Circular 37 as a “special purpose vehicle” for the purpose of holding domestic or offshore assets or interests. Circular 37 further requires amendment to a PRC resident’s registration in the event of any significant changes with respect to the special purpose vehicle, such as an increase or decrease in the capital contributed by PRC individuals, share transfer or exchange, merger, division or other material event. Under these regulations, PRC residents’ failure to comply with specified registration procedures may result in restrictions being imposed on the foreign exchange activities of the relevant PRC entity, including the payment of dividends and other distributions to its offshore parent, as well as restrictions on capital inflows from the offshore entity to the PRC entity, including restrictions on its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Further, failure to comply with the SAFE registration requirements could result in penalties under PRC law for evasion of foreign exchange regulations.

 

As Circular 37 is newly-issued, it is unclear how these regulations will be interpreted and implemented. In addition, different local SAFE branches may have different views and procedures as to the interpretation and implementation of the SAFE regulations, and it may be difficult for our ultimate shareholders or beneficial owners who are PRC residents to provide sufficient supporting documents required by the SAFE or to complete the required registration with the SAFE in a timely manner, or at all. Any failure by any of our shareholders who is a PRC resident, or is controlled by a PRC resident, to comply with relevant requirements under these regulations could subject us to fines or sanctions imposed by the PRC government, including restrictions on WFOE’s ability to pay dividends or make distributions to us and on our ability to increase our investment in the WFOE.

 

Although we believe that our agreements relating to our structure are in compliance with current PRC regulations, we cannot assure you that the PRC government would agree that these contractual arrangements comply with PRC licensing, registration or other regulatory requirements, with existing policies or with requirements or policies that may be adopted in the future.

 

If we become directly subject to the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, stock price and reputation.

 

U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China, particularly companies like us that have completed so-called reverse acquisition transactions, have been the subject of intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered on financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies has sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on us, our business and our stock price. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend our company. This situation will be costly and time consuming and distract our management from developing our growth. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, we and our business operations will be severely affected and you could sustain a significant decline in the value of our stock.

 

The disclosures in our reports and other filings with the SEC and our other public pronouncements are not subject to the scrutiny of any regulatory bodies in the PRC. 

 

We are regulated by the SEC and our reports and other filings with the SEC are subject to SEC review in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act and the Exchange Act.  Our SEC reports and other disclosure and public pronouncements are not subject to the review or scrutiny of any PRC regulatory authority.  For example, the disclosure in our SEC reports and other filings are not subject to the review by China Securities Regulatory Commission, a PRC regulator that is responsible for oversight of the capital markets in China. Accordingly, you should review our SEC reports, filings and our other public pronouncements with the understanding that no local regulator has done any review of us, our SEC reports, other filings or any of our other public pronouncements.

 

 19 

 

 

Our contractual arrangements with the Huayang Companies and its shareholders may not be as effective in providing control over these entities as direct ownership.

 

Since the law of the PRC limits foreign equity ownership in companies in China, we operate a significant portion of our business through the Huayang Companies.  The equity in these companies is owned by our chief executive officer and his wife, and we have no equity ownership interest in the Huayang Companies.  We rely on contractual arrangements to control and operate such businesses. These contractual arrangements may not be effective in providing control over the Huayang Companies as direct ownership. For example, the Huayang Companies could fail to take actions required for our businesses despite its contractual obligation to do so. If the Huayang Companies fail to perform under their agreements with us, we may have to incur substantial costs and resources to enforce such arrangements and may have to rely on legal remedies under the law of the PRC, which may not be effective. In addition, we cannot assure you that the Huayang Companies’ shareholders would always act in our best interests.

 

Adverse changes in political and economic policies of the Chinese government could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of China, which could reduce the demand for our products and materially and adversely affect our competitive position.

 

All of our business operations are conducted and all of our revenues are made in China. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects are affected significantly by economic, political and legal developments in China. The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including:

 

  the amount of government involvement;
     
  the level of development;
     
  the growth rate;
     
  the control of foreign exchange; and
     
  the allocation of resources.

 

While the Chinese economy has grown significantly in the past 20 years, the growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy, and the worldwide economic downturn has affected China. The Chinese government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may also have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations that are applicable to us.

 

The Chinese economy has been transitioning from a planned economy to a more market-oriented economy. Although in recent years the Chinese government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets and the establishment of sound corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of the productive assets in China is still owned by the Chinese government. The continued control of these assets and other aspects of the national economy by the Chinese government could materially and adversely affect our business. The Chinese government also exercises significant control over Chinese economic growth through the allocation of resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies. Efforts by the Chinese government to slow the pace of growth of the Chinese economy could result in decreased capital expenditure by our customers and potential customers, which in turn could reduce demand for our products.  Furthermore, in response to the worldwide economic downturn, the Chinese government may seek to increase its control over businesses which could affect our business.

 

Any adverse change in the economic conditions or government policies in China could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth and the level of renewable energy investments and expenditures in China, which in turn could lead to a reduction in demand for our products and consequently have a material adverse effect on our businesses.

 

 20 

 

 

Uncertainties with respect to the Chinese legal system could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We conduct substantially all of our business through our Chinese subsidiaries and affiliates, which are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investment in China and, in particular, laws applicable to wholly foreign-owned enterprises. China’s legal system is based on written statutes. Prior court decisions may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value. Since 1979, Chinese legislation and regulations have significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, since these laws and regulations are relatively new and China’s legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involve uncertainties, which may limit legal protections available to us. In addition, any litigation in China may be protracted and result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

 

We rely on dividends and working capital advances paid by our subsidiaries and VIEs for our cash needs.

 

We conduct substantially all of our operations through our subsidiaries and variable interest entities. We rely on dividends and working capital advances from our subsidiaries for our cash needs, including the funds necessary to pay any dividends which we may declare and other cash distributions to our shareholders, to service any debt we may incur and to pay our operating expenses. The payment of dividends and working capital advances by entities organized in China is subject to limitations. Regulations in China currently permit payment of dividends only out of accumulated profits as determined in accordance with accounting standards and regulations in China. Each subsidiary and VIE entity is also required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profit based on China’s accounting standards each year to its general reserves until the accumulated amount of such reserves reach 50% of its registered capital. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends. Our subsidiaries are also required to allocate a portion of their after-tax profits to their staff welfare and bonus funds, which may not be distributed to equity owners except in the event of liquidation. In addition, if our subsidiaries incur debt, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to us.

 

China’s Unified Corporate Income Tax Law also imposes a withholding income tax of 10% on dividends distributed by a foreign invested enterprise to its immediate holding company outside of China, if such immediate holding company is considered as a non-resident enterprise without any establishment or place within China or if the received dividends have no connection with the establishment or place of such immediate holding company within China, unless such immediate holding  company’s jurisdiction of incorporation has a tax treaty with China that provides for a different withholding arrangement.

 

Fluctuation in the value of the Renminbi may have a material adverse effect on your investment.

 

The change in value of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies is affected by, among other things, changes in China’s political and economic conditions. On July 21, 2005, the Chinese government changed its decade-old policy of pegging the value of the Renminbi to the U.S. dollar. Under the new policy, the Renminbi is permitted to fluctuate within a narrow and managed band against a basket of certain foreign currencies. This change in policy has resulted in appreciation of Renminbi against U.S. dollar. While the international reaction to the Renminbi revaluation has generally been positive, there remains significant international pressure on the Chinese government to adopt an even more flexible currency policy, which could result in a further and more significant appreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar. As substantially all of our costs and expenses are denominated in Renminbi, the revaluation in July 2005 and potential future revaluation has and could further increase our costs. Any significant revaluation of the Renminbi may have a material adverse effect on our revenues and financial condition, and the value of, and any of our dividends payable on our ordinary shares in foreign currency terms.

 

Restrictions on currency exchange may limit our ability to receive and use our revenues effectively.

 

Under China’s existing foreign exchange regulations, our Chinese subsidiaries are able to pay dividends in foreign currencies without prior approval from SAFE by complying with certain procedural requirements. However, we cannot assure you that the Chinese government will not take further measures in the future to restrict access to foreign currencies for current account transactions.  Foreign exchange transactions by our Chinese subsidiaries under the capital account continue to be subject to significant foreign exchange controls and require the approval of China’s governmental authorities, including the SAFE. In particular, if a subsidiary borrows foreign currency loans from us or other foreign lenders, these loans must be registered with the SAFE, and if we finance the subsidiary by means of additional capital contributions, these capital contributions must be approved by certain government authorities including the Ministry of Commerce or its local counterparts. These limitations could affect the ability of our subsidiaries to obtain foreign exchange through debt or equity financing.

 

 21 

 

 

Failure to comply with PRC regulations relating to the establishment of offshore special purpose companies by PRC residents may subject our PRC resident stockholders to personal liability, limit our ability to acquire PRC companies or to inject capital into our PRC subsidiaries, limit our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to distribute profits to us or otherwise materially adversely affect us.

 

In October 2005, the PRC State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, issued the Notice on Relevant Issues in the Foreign Exchange Control over Financing and Return Investment Through Special Purpose Companies by Residents Inside China, generally referred to as Circular 75, which required PRC residents to register with the competent local SAFE branch before establishing or acquiring control over an offshore special purpose company for the purpose of engaging in an equity financing outside of China on the strength of domestic PRC assets originally held by those residents. Internal implementing guidelines issued by SAFE, which became public in June 2007 (known as Notice 106), expanded the reach of Circular 75 by (i) purporting to cover the establishment or acquisition of control by PRC residents of offshore entities which merely acquire “control” over domestic companies or assets, even in the absence of legal ownership; (ii) adding requirements relating to the source of the PRC resident’s funds used to establish or acquire the offshore entity; (iii) covering the use of existing offshore entities for offshore financings; (iv) purporting to cover situations in which an offshore special purpose vehicle establishes a new subsidiary in China or acquires an unrelated company or unrelated assets in China; and (v) making the domestic affiliate of the special purpose vehicle responsible for the accuracy of certain documents which must be filed in connection with any such registration, notably, the business plan which describes the overseas financing and the use of proceeds. Amendments to registrations made under Circular 75 are required in connection with any increase or decrease of capital, transfer of shares, mergers and acquisitions, equity investment or creation of any security interest in any assets located in China to guarantee offshore obligations, and Notice 106 makes the offshore special purpose vehicle jointly responsible for these filings. In the case of an special purpose vehicle which was established, and which acquired a related domestic company or assets, before the implementation date of Circular 75, a retroactive SAFE registration was required to have been completed before March 31, 2006; this date was subsequently extended indefinitely by Notice 106, which also required that the registrant establish that all foreign exchange transactions undertaken by the special purpose vehicle and its affiliates were in compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Failure to comply with the requirements of Circular 75, as applied by SAFE in accordance with Notice 106, may result in fines and other penalties under PRC laws for evasion of applicable foreign exchange restrictions. Any such failure could also result in the special purpose vehicle’s affiliates being impeded or prevented from distributing their profits and the proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the special purpose vehicle, or from engaging in other transfers of funds into or out of China. We cannot provide any assurances that their existing registrations have fully complied with, and they have made all necessary amendments to their registration to fully comply with, all applicable registrations or approvals required by Circular 75. Moreover, because of uncertainty over how Circular 75 will be interpreted and implemented, and how or whether SAFE will apply it to us, we cannot predict how it will affect our business operations or future strategies.

 

Risks Related to our Common Stock

 

Our stock price has been and may continue to be volatile.

 

The trading price of our common stock has been and is expected to continue to be highly volatile as well as subject to wide fluctuations in price in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors include:

 

  Quarterly variations in our results of operations.
     
  Announcements by us or our competitors of acquisitions, new products, significant contracts, commercial relationships or capital commitments.
     
  Our ability to develop and market new and enhanced products on a timely basis.
     
  Changes in governmental regulations or in the status of our regulatory approvals.
     
  Changes in earnings estimates or recommendations by securities analysts.
     
  Market reaction to problems encountered by other Chinese companies that became public companies in the United States through the reverse merger process.
     
  Market reaction to reports written by investors about us and about Chinese companies in general.
     
  Market reaction to the slowdown in the Chinese wind power industry.
     
  General economic conditions and slow or negative growth of related markets.

 

These broad market and industry factors may seriously affect the market price of our Common Stock, regardless of our actual operating performance.

 

Any failure to meet the Nasdaq continued listing requirements may result in our delisting.

 

During 2011, our stock failed to meet the Nasdaq continued listing requirement resulting from our failure to maintain a $1.00 bid price and our failure to maintain a minimum market value of publicly held common stock.  In order to maintain our listing on Nasdaq we transferred our listing from the Nasdaq Global Market to the Nasdaq Capital Market, and we effected a one-for-ten reverse split.  In the event that our stock price falls below $1.00 per share, we may not be able to maintain our Nasdaq listing, which could have a material adverse effect on the market for and the market price of our common stock.

 

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If we fail to develop and maintain effective internal controls, our ability to provide accurate financial statements and comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 could be impaired, which could cause our stock price to decrease substantially.

 

Prior to November 2007, the Huayang Companies operated as private companies without public reporting obligations, and they committed limited personnel and resources to the development of the external reporting and compliance obligations that would be required of a public company. We are continuing to institute changes to satisfy our obligations in under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In Item 9A of this annual report, we report that our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal controls over financial reporting were not adequate at December 31, 2015.  We are continuing to institute changes to satisfy our obligations under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.  Any failure of our internal controls or our ability to provide accurate financial statements could cause the trading price of our common stock to decrease substantially.

 

We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends.

 

We presently do not anticipate that we will pay any dividends on any of our capital stock in the foreseeable future. We presently intend to retain all earnings, if any, to implement our business plan; and we do not anticipate the declaration of any dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Our main office and our manufacturing facilities are located in Wuxi, China, in seven buildings with approximately 215,000 square feet. We have been issued a land use right certificate for the land until June 7, 2025 by the municipal government of Wuxi City, which may be renewed at our option with no expected capital requirement. The seven buildings are an office building, warehouse, raw material processing hall, metal processing hall, assembling hall, laboratory and quality control, and guard house. We believe that our existing facilities are well maintained and in good operating condition.

 

In 2003, we acquired land use rights to a plot of land approximately 5.1 acres from the local government of the Town of Qianzhou in Wuxi City. This land, along with the land use rights acquired from a related party as discussed in the following paragraph, house our new factory and employee housing facilities. The land lease has a term of 50 years, expiring October 30, 2053.

 

During 2008, we completed the purchase of land use rights for an approximately 100,000 square foot factory, employee housing facilities and other leasehold improvements from a related party, Wuxi Huayang Boiler Company, Ltd. (“Huayang Boiler”) for approximately $10.9 million. The land use rights expire on January 1, 2053. In March 2009, we received the title to the buildings.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

There are no material legal proceedings pending against us.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information.

 

Our common stock has traded on The NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “CLNT” since December 29, 2011. Our stock was previously traded on The NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “CLNT” from June 16, 2011 to December 28, 2011 and under the symbol “CWS” from December 24, 2009 until June 15, 2011. Prior to December 24, 2009, it was traded on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “CHWY” from October 13, 2009 until December 23, 2009, and prior to October 13, 2009, it was traded under the symbol “CWSI.”  The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the reported high and low closing bid quotations for our common stock by calendar quarters during 2015 and 2014. These prices reflect inter-dealer quotations, do not include retail markups, markdowns or commissions and do not necessarily reflect actual transactions.

 

   2015   2014 
    High     Low    High    Low 
First quarter  $3.84   $2.97   $6.41   $5.11 
Second quarter   3.49    2.92    6.41    5.25 
Third quarter   3.01    1.14    5.76    4.03 
Fourth quarter  $1.98   $1.09   $4.40   $2.94 

 

On March 29, 2016, the last sale price of our common stock as reported by NASDAQ was $1.29 per share.

 

Shareholders

 

As of March 30, 2016, we had approximately 1,121 record holders of our common stock.

 

Transfer Agent

 

The transfer agent for the common stock is Empire Stock Transfer Inc. The transfer agent’s address is 1859 Whitney Mesa Dr., Henderson, Nevada 89014, and its telephone number is (702) 818-5898.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We have not paid cash dividends on our common stock since we became public through reverse acquisition. We intend to keep any future earnings to finance the expansion of our business, and we do not anticipate that any cash dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future.

 

In addition, due to various restrictions under PRC laws on the distribution of dividends by our PRC operating companies, we may not be able to pay dividends to our shareholders.  The Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise Law (1986), as amended and The Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise Law Implementing Rules (1990), as amended and the Company Law of the PRC (2006) contain the principal regulations governing dividend distributions by wholly foreign owned enterprises. Under these regulations, wholly foreign owned enterprises may pay dividends only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. Additionally, such companies are required to set aside a certain amount of their accumulated profits each year, if any, to fund certain reserve funds. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation and cannot be used for working capital purposes.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, we may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from the Company’s profits. Furthermore, if our subsidiaries and affiliates in China incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments. If we or our subsidiaries and affiliates are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations through the current contractual arrangements, we may be unable to pay dividends on our common stock.

 

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Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The following table summarizes the equity compensation plans under which our securities have been or may be issued as of December 31, 2015. 

 

Plan Category   Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options and warrants    Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options and warrants    Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans 
Equity compensation plans approved  by security holders   0   $0    172,509 
Equity compensation plan not approved by security holders   0   $0    0 

 

In January 2010, our board of directors adopted, and in March 2010, the stockholders approved, the 2010 long-term incentive plan (the “2010 plan”), covering 200,000 shares of common stock.  In October 2013, the directors adopted and in December 2013, the stockholders approved, an amendment to the 2010 plan which increased the number of shares subject to the 2010 plan from 200,000 shares to 500,000 shares. As of December 31, 2015, there were 172,509 shares of common stock available for issuance pursuant to the 2010 plan.

 

We did not have any equity compensation plans that were not approved by stockholders.

 

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

We had no sales of unregistered securities during the fourth quarter of 2015.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information called for by Item 6 of Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

Overview

 

We are currently engaged in three business segments:

 

the dyeing and finishing equipment segment, in which we manufacture and sell textile dyeing and finishing machines;

 

the forged rolled rings and related components segment, in which we manufacture and sell high precision forged rolled rings, shafts, flanges, and other forged components; and

 

the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, in which we manufacture and sell equipment, such as reaction kettle, heat exchangers, separators, tanks, towers and other components, to the petroleum and chemical industries. Sales in this segment commenced in the first quarter of 2015. We did not operate in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment during 2014.

 

The following table sets forth information as to revenues of our dyeing and finishing equipment, forged rolled rings and related components, and petroleum and chemical equipment segments in dollars and as a percent of revenues (dollars in thousands):

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
    Dollars    %    Dollars    % 
Dyeing and finishing equipment  $29,011    58.5%  $42,209    55.6%
Forged rolled rings and related components  $12,081    24.4%  $33,750    44.4%
Petroleum and chemical equipment   8,474    17.1%   -    - 
Total  $49,566    100.0%  $75,959    100.0%

 

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In 2015, challenging economic conditions, falling steel prices and limited availability of credit in China and well as challenges in operating in a new segment – the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, presented numerous challenges for our business. In our dyeing and finishing equipment segment, we experienced softer demand for our low-emission airflow dyeing machines as many of our customers already upgraded to newer models last year and much of our remaining customer base does not have the ability to make significant capital expenditures at this time. Our forged rolled rings and related products segment in particular experienced a significant reduction in sales and operated at a loss during 2015.

 

We began to deliver parts and equipment in our petroleum and chemical equipment segment in 2015, which helped offset the decreases in revenue from our other two segments. In December 2015, we received a letter from this customer, pursuant to which the customer claimed that we were in breach of agreement because we were delinquent in the delivery of the products and those products that were delivered did not meet the required quality standards.  The customer claimed that it is entitled to damages of RMB 36,103,640, or approximately $5,806,778 at December 31, 2015.  As a result of the dispute with this customer, the Company, at December 31, 2015:

 

Recognized a loss from sales contract dispute of $5,806,778, which is reflected as an operating expense relating to the liability claimed by the customer in its letter;
   
Increased our accounts receivable reserve to fully reserve the approximately $1,759,000 due from this customer;
   
Increased our reserve for obsolete inventory by approximately $836,000, representing the remaining inventory manufactured to the specifications of this customer; and
   
Recorded an impairment charge of approximately $1,900,000 relating to the manufacturing equipment which is specially designed to manufacture products for petroleum and chemical customer and is not otherwise used by the Company.

We are engaged in discussions with this customer, but cannot predict the results of these discussions. We are also evaluating our ability to continue in the petroleum and chemical segment, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to operate in this segment or that we will not suffer an impairment charge in 2016.

 

We conducted an impairment assessment to determine the estimated fair market value of property and equipment as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. Such analysis considered future use of such equipment, consultation with equipment resellers, and other industry factors. Upon completion of the 2015 and 2014 impairment analysis, we determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on certain equipment used in these segments. Accordingly, in connection with the impairment of such equipment and equipment held for sale, we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $7,000.000 and $3,800,000 in December 2015 and 2014, respectively.  The charge for 2015 reflected impairment charges of approximately $5,100,000 relating to the forged rolled rings and related products segment, of which approximately $400,000 related to the equipment held for sale, and approximately $1,900,000 relating to the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, as described above. All of the impairment charges for 2014 related to the equipment held for sale.

 

The factors that affected our revenue, gross margin and net income in our segments during the year ended December 31, 2015, including the factors which resulted in significant declines in revenues in both our dyeing and finishing equipment segment and our forged rolled rings and related components segments, which are described below, are likely to continue to affect our operations in the near future. Our ability to expand our operations and increase our revenue is largely affected by the PRC government’s policy on such matters as the availability of credit, which affects all of our operations, and its policies relating to alternative energy such as wind power, which affect our products for these industries. Our business is also affected by general economic conditions, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to increase our revenues in any segment in the near future, if at all. Because of the nature of our products, our customers’ projection of future economic conditions are an integral part of their decisions as to whether to purchase capital equipment at this time or defer such purchases until a future date.

 

Dyeing and Finishing Equipment Segment

 

Revenues from our dyeing and finishing equipment segment decreased $13.2 million, or 31.3%, for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014, and in 2015, dyeing and finishing equipment segment revenues accounted for 58.5% of our total revenues. In order to reduce our business risk, we tightened our credit review policies in 2015.

 

Additionally, we experienced a slowdown in shipments of our low-emission airflow dyeing machines as many companies in the dyeing industry had already replaced older dyeing equipment with new equipment, and orders for new low-emission airflow dyeing machines slowed down in 2015.

 

We expect our revenue from dyeing and finishing equipment segment will remain at or near the current yearly level for the near future.

 

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Forged Rolled Rings and Related Components Segment

 

Through our forged rolled rings and other related components division, we produce precision forged rolled rings and other forged components to the wind power and other industries. Our forged rolled rings and other related components are sold to manufacturers of industrial equipment. Forged rolled rings and other forged components for the wind industry are used in wind turbines, which are used to generate wind power.

 

Revenues from our forged rolled rings and related components segment decreased $21.7 million, or 64.2%, for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The demand for products used in manufacturing in general, including wind power industry and other industries, is uncertain. Although we believe that over the long term, the forged rolled rings and related components segment will expand, and the government of the PRC has announced its desire to increase the use of wind power as an energy source, in the short term, other factors, such as economic factors and the availability of credit, may affect the requirements of our customers and potential customers for our products. To the extent that the demand for our forged rolled rings and related components declines, our revenue and net income will be affected. We believe that there is a degree of market saturation for forged rolled rings and related components for wind power and other industries and this market saturation, combined with the effects of lower oil and gas prices, has reduced the demand for construction of wind power facilities, and we expect that our revenues from forged rolled rings and related components will continue to decrease in the near future.

 

We believe that wind power will see its share of China’s national energy mix gradually increase. While interest in wind power is increasing in many countries, we do not have the infrastructure and personnel to market our products in countries other than China, and we are continuing to limit our sales and marketing efforts to China to wind power and other industries customers.

 

We are evaluating the viability of this segment on an ongoing basis and, if we determine that it is not likely that we will be able to operate this segment profitably, we may discontinue operating in this segment.  However, we have not completed our evaluation as of the date of this report.  If we discontinue this segment, we anticipate that we may incur further impairment charges with respect to assets used in this segment. 

 

Petroleum and Chemical Equipment Segment

 

Through our petroleum and chemical equipment division, we produce and sell equipment such as coal chemical equipment, formaldehyde plant and downstream products, reaction kettle, heat exchangers, separators, tanks, towers to petroleum and chemical industries. We started to sell our petroleum and chemical equipment in February 2015. Revenue from our petroleum and chemical equipment segment was $8.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2015. The market for petroleum products is mainly dominated by three major Chinese petroleum companies, and their capital expenditure and purchasing policy will have a significant effect both upon our ability to generate revenue from this segment and the gross margins which we can generate. Furthermore, because we sell our petroleum and chemical equipment products to a very small number of customers, the change in the purchasing policies of one or two customers could have a significant effect on our revenues from this segment. Sales to a large state-owned enterprise for parts and equipment to be used on a major chemical project in Xinjiang, which was generated in the year ended December 31, 2015, accounted for approximately $6.2 million, or 73.4% of the petroleum and chemical equipment segment revenue for the year ended December 31, 2015.

 

As discussed above, in December 2015, we received a notice of contract termination in writing from our largest customer in this segment, which was our largest customer, accounting for approximately 13% or our consolidated revenues for 2015, alleging breach of contract for late delivery of product and for delivery of product with quality defects. Pursuant to the sales contract, this customer demanded payment of a penalty of 20% of the contract price plus penalties for late delivery and damages in the amounts of 36,103,640 RMB. In connection with this contingent liability, we recorded a loss from sales contract dispute of $5,806,778 which has been reflected as a loss from sale contract dispute in operating expenses on the accompanying statements of operations and comprehensive loss and has been reflected in accrued expenses at December 31, 2015. Additionally, in December 2015, we increased our allowance for doubtful accounts by approximately $1,759,000 which represents this customer’s full amount of outstanding accounts receivable. We are currently discussing this issue with the customer and we are unable to determine if the accounts receivable balance will be collected. Also, we increased our reserve for obsolete inventories by approximately $836,000 for all remaining inventories manufactured to the specifications of such customer and not readily saleable to other customers, and we incurred an impairment charge of approximately $1,900,000 for equipment used for this customer’s products which did not have other uses.

 

We expect that our revenues from petroleum and chemical equipment segment will significantly decrease in 2016 and beyond due to the loss of this customer.

 

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We are evaluating the viability of this segment on an ongoing basis and, if we determine that it is not likely that we will be able to operate this segment profitably, we may discontinue operating in this segment. However, we have not completed our evaluation as of the date of this report.  Any discontinuation of this segment may result in further impairment charges relating to the assets associated with this segment.

 

Inventory and Raw Materials

 

A major element of our cost of revenues is raw materials, principally steel as well as other metals. These metals are subject to price fluctuations, and recently these fluctuations have been significant. In times of increasing prices, we need to try to establish the price at which we purchase raw materials in order to avoid increases in costs which we cannot recoup through increases in sales prices. Similarly, in times of decreasing prices, we may have purchased metals at prices which are high in terms of the price at which we can sell our products, which also can impair our margins. Three major suppliers provided approximately 47% and 49% of our purchases of inventories for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. No other supplier accounted for 10% or more of our purchases during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We continually evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, inventories, recovery of long-lived assets, income taxes, and the valuation of equity transactions.

 

We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Any future changes to these estimates and assumptions could cause a material change to our reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements.

 

Variable Interest Entities

 

Pursuant to ASC Topic 810 and related subtopics related to the consolidation of variable interest entities, we are required to include in our consolidated financial statements the financial statements of variable interest entities (“VIEs”). The accounting standards require a VIE to be consolidated by a company if that company is subject to a majority of the risk of loss for the VIE or is entitled to receive a majority of the VIE’s residual returns. VIEs are those entities in which we, through contractual arrangements, bear the risk of, and enjoy the rewards normally associated with ownership of the entity, and therefore we are the primary beneficiary of the entity.

 

The Huayang Companies are considered VIEs, and we are the primary beneficiary. On November 13, 2007, we entered into agreements with the Huayang Companies pursuant to which we shall receive 100% of the Huayang Companies’ net income. In accordance with these agreements, the Huayang Companies shall pay consulting fees equal to 100% of its net income to our wholly-owned subsidiary, Green Power, and Green Power shall supply the technology and administrative services needed to service the Huayang Companies.

 

The accounts of the Huayang Companies are consolidated in the accompanying financial statements. As VIEs, the Huayang Companies sales are included in our total sales, their income from operations is consolidated with ours, and our net income includes all of the Huayang Companies’ net income, and their assets and liabilities are included in our consolidated balance sheets. The VIEs do not have any non-controlling interest and, accordingly, we did not subtract any net income in calculating the net income attributable to us. Because of the contractual arrangements, we have pecuniary interest in the Huayang Companies that require consolidation of the Huayang Companies financial statements with our financial statements.

 

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Accounts Receivable

 

We have a policy of reserving for uncollectible accounts based on our best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in our existing accounts receivable. We periodically review our accounts receivable to determine whether an allowance is necessary based on an analysis of past due accounts and other factors that may indicate that the realization of an account may be in doubt. Account balances deemed to be uncollectible are charged to the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote.

 

As a basis for estimating the likelihood of collection has been established, we consider a number of factors when determining reserves for uncollectable accounts. We believe that we use a reasonably reliable methodology to estimate the collectability of our accounts receivable. We review our allowances for doubtful accounts on at least a quarterly basis. We also consider whether the historical economic conditions are comparable to current economic conditions. If the financial condition of our customers or other parties that we have business relations with were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances may be required.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories, consisting of raw materials, work-in-process and finished goods, are stated at the lower of cost or market utilizing the weighted average method. An allowance is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected market value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, we will record additional reserves for the difference between the cost and the market value. These reserves are recorded based on estimates. We review inventory quantities on hand and on order and record, on a quarterly basis, a provision for excess and obsolete inventory, if necessary. If the results of the review determine that a write-down is necessary, we recognize a loss in the period in which the loss is identified, whether or not the inventory is retained. Our inventory reserves establish a new cost basis for inventory and are not reversed until we sell or dispose of the related inventory. Such provisions are established based on historical usage, adjusted for known changes in demands for such products, or the estimated forecast of product demand and production requirements.

 

Advances to Suppliers

 

Advances to suppliers represent the advance payments for the purchase of raw material from suppliers. The advance payments are intended to ensure preferential pricing and delivery.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is computed using straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. The estimated useful lives of the assets are as follows:

 

   Useful Life
Building and building improvements  5 – 20 Years
Manufacturing equipment  5 – 10 Years
Office equipment and furniture  5 Years
Vehicles  5 Years

 

The cost of repairs and maintenance is expensed as incurred; major replacements and improvements are capitalized. When assets are retired or disposed of, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gains or losses are included in the statements of income and comprehensive income in the year of disposition.

 

Included in property and equipment is construction-in-progress which consists of factories and office buildings under construction and machinery pending installation and includes the costs of construction, machinery and equipment, and any interest charges arising from borrowings used to finance these assets during the period of construction or installation. No provision for depreciation is made on construction-in-progress until such time as the relevant assets are completed and ready for their intended use.

 

We examine the possibility of decreases in the value of fixed assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable. We recognize an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

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Land Use Rights

 

There is no private ownership of land in the PRC. All land in the PRC is owned by the government and cannot be sold to any individual or company. The government grants a land use right that permits the holder of the land use right to use the land for a specified period. Our land use rights were granted with a term of 45 or 50 years. Any transfer of the land use right requires government approval. We have recorded as an intangible asset the costs paid to acquire a land use right. The land use rights are amortized on the straight-line method over the land use right terms.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

We recognize revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the purchase price is fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured.

 

We recognize revenues from the sale of dyeing and finishing equipment, forged rolled rings and other components, petroleum and chemical equipment upon shipment and transfer of title. The other elements may include installation and, generally, a one-year warranty. Equipment installation revenue is valued based on estimated service person hours to complete installation and is recognized when the labor has been completed and the equipment has been accepted by the customer, which is generally within a couple days of the delivery of the equipment. Warranty revenue is valued based on estimated service person hours to complete a service and generally is recognized over the contract period. For 2015 and 2014, amounts allocated to installation and warranty revenues were minimal. Based on historical experience, warranty service calls and any related labor costs have been minimal.

 

Rental income is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the operating lease and is presented net of depreciation.

 

All other product sales with customer specific acceptance provisions, including the forged rolled rings, are recognized upon customer acceptance and the delivery of the parts or service. Revenues related to spare part sales are recognized upon shipment or delivery based on the trade terms.

 

Income Taxes

 

We are governed by the income tax laws of the PRC and the United States. Income taxes are accounted for pursuant to ASC 740 “Accounting for Income Taxes,” which is an asset and liability approach that requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. The charge for taxes is based on the results for the period as adjusted for items, which are non-assessable or disallowed. It is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date.

 

Deferred tax is accounted for using the balance sheet liability method in respect of temporary differences arising from differences between the carrying amount of assets and liabilities in the financial statements and the corresponding tax basis used in the computation of assessable tax profit. In principle, deferred tax liabilities are recognized for all taxable temporary differences, and deferred tax assets are recognized to the extent that it is probably that taxable profit will be available against which deductible temporary differences can be utilized.

 

Deferred tax is calculated using tax rates that are expected to apply to the period when the asset is realized or the liability is settled. Deferred tax is charged or credited in the income statement, except when it is related to items credited or charged directly to equity, in which case the deferred tax is changed to equity. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when they related to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority and we intend to settle its current tax assets and liabilities on a net basis.

 

Stock-based Compensation

 

Stock based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of the Share-Based Payment topic of ASC 718 which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award. The Accounting Standards Codification also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award.

 

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Pursuant to ASC Topic 505-50, for share-based payments to consultants and other third-parties, compensation expense is determined at the “measurement date.” The expense is recognized over the period of services or the vesting period, whichever is applicable. Until the measurement date is reached, the total amount of compensation expense remains uncertain. We record compensation expense based on the fair value of the award at the reporting date. The awards to consultants and other third-parties are then revalued, or the total compensation is recalculated based on the then current fair value, at each subsequent reporting date.

 

Currency Exchange Rates

 

Our functional currency is the U.S. dollar, and the functional currency of our operating subsidiaries and VIEs is the RMB. All of our sales are denominated in RMB. As a result, changes in the relative values of U.S. dollars and RMB affect our reported levels of revenues and profitability as the results of our operations are translated into U.S. dollars for reporting purposes. In particular, fluctuations in currency exchange rates could have a significant impact on our financial stability due to a mismatch among various foreign currency-denominated sales and costs. Fluctuations in exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and RMB affect our gross and net profit margins and could result in foreign exchange and operating losses.

 

Our exposure to foreign exchange risk primarily relates to currency gains or losses resulting from timing differences between signing of sales contracts and settling of these contracts. Furthermore, we translate monetary assets and liabilities denominated in other currencies into RMB, the functional currency of our operating subsidiaries. Our results of operations and cash flow are translated at average exchange rates during the period, and assets and liabilities are translated at the unified exchange rate at the end of the period. Translation adjustments resulting from this process are included in accumulated other comprehensive income in our statement of shareholders’ equity. We have not used any forward contracts, currency options or borrowings to hedge our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. We cannot predict the impact of future exchange rate fluctuations on our results of operations and may incur net foreign currency losses in the future.

 

Our financial statements are expressed in U.S. dollars, which is the functional currency of our parent company. The functional currency of our operating subsidiaries and affiliates is RMB. To the extent we hold assets denominated in U.S. dollars, any appreciation of the RMB against the U.S. dollar could result in a charge in our statement of operations and a reduction in the value of our U.S. dollar denominated assets. On the other hand, a decline in the value of RMB against the U.S. dollar could reduce the U.S. dollar equivalent amounts of our financial results.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements 

 

In June 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2015-10, “Technical Corrections and Improvements” (“ASU 2015-10”). The amendments in ASU 2015-10 cover a wide range of Topics in the Accounting Standards Codification (the “ASC”). The amendments in ASU 2015-10 represent changes to clarify the ASC, correct unintended application of guidance, or make minor improvements to the ASC that are not expected to have a significant effect on current accounting practice or create a significant administrative cost to most entities. Additionally, some of the amendments will make the ASC easier to understand and easier to apply by eliminating inconsistencies, providing needed clarifications, and improving the presentation of guidance in the ASC. Transition guidance varies based on the amendments in ASU 2015-10. The amendments in ASU 2015-10 that require transition guidance are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. All other amendments will be effective upon the issuance of ASU 2015-10. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, “Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory” (“ASU 2015-11”). The amendments in this update require an entity to measure inventory within the scope of ASU 2015-11 (the amendments in ASU 2015-11 do not apply to inventory that is measured using last-in, first-out or the retail inventory method. The amendments apply to all other inventory, which includes inventory that is measured using first-in, first-out or average cost) at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal, and transportation. Subsequent measurement is uncharged for inventory measured using last-in, first-out or the retail inventory method. The amendments in ASU 2015-11 more closely align the measurement of inventory in U.S. GAAP with the measurement of inventory in International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). ASU 2015-11 is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in ASU 2015-11 should be applied prospectively with earlier application permitted as of the beginning of an interim or annual reporting period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date”, which defers the effective date of ASU 2014-09 for all entities by one year. Public business entities, certain not-for-profit entities, and certain employee benefit plans should apply the guidance in ASU 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Earlier application is permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes (“ASU 2015-17”). ASU 2015-17 requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The current requirement that deferred tax liabilities and assets of a tax-paying component of an entity be offset and presented as a single amount is not affected by the amendments in ASU 2015-17. ASU 2015-17 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted and the standard may be applied either retrospectively or on a prospective basis to all deferred tax assets and liabilities. The adoption of ASU 2015-17 is not expected to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements upon adoption. We do not discuss recent pronouncements that are not anticipated to have an impact on or are unrelated to our consolidated financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or disclosures.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Comparison of Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

The following table sets forth the results of our operations for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 indicated as a percentage of revenues (dollars in thousands):

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
   Dollars   Percentage   Dollars   Percentage 
Revenues  $49,566    100.0%  $75,959    100.0%
Cost of revenues   42,216    85.2%   58,218    76.6%
Gross profit   7,350    14.8%   17,741    23.4%
Operating expenses   18,595    37.5%   8,831    11.7%
(Loss) income from operations   (11,245)   (22.7)%   8,910    11.7%
Other expense, net   (180)   (0.4)%   (83)   (0.1)%
(Loss) income before provision for income taxes   (11,425)   (23.1)%   8,827    11.6%
Provision for income taxes   1,345    2.7%   4,561    6.0%
Net (loss) income   (12,770)   (25.8)%   4,266    5.6%
Other comprehensive loss:                    
Foreign currency translation adjustment   (4,769)   (9.6)%   (408)   (0.5)%
Comprehensive (loss) income  $(17,539)   (35.4)%  $3,858    5.1%

 

The following table sets forth information as to the revenues, gross profit and gross margin for our three business segments for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 (dollars in thousands).

 

   Year Ended December 31, 2015   Year Ended December 31, 2014 
   Revenues   Cost of revenues   Gross profit   Gross margin   Revenues   Cost of revenues   Gross profit   Gross margin 
Dyeing and finishing
Equipment
  $29,011   $22,514   $6,497    22.4%  $42,209   $32,450   $9,759    23.1%
Forged rolled rings and related components   12,081    12,512    (431)   (3.6)%   33,750    25,768    7,982    23.6%
Petroleum and chemical equipment   8,474    7,190    1,284    15.2%   -    -    -    - 
Total  $49,566   $42,216   $7,350    14.8%  $75,959   $58,218   $17,741    23.4%

 

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Revenues. For the year ended December 31, 2015, we had revenues of $49,566,000, as compared to revenues of $75,959,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $26,393,000 or 34.7%. The decrease in revenues for 2015 was primarily attributable to decreases in revenue from both our forged rolled rings and related components segment and our dyeing and finishing equipment segment, partially offset by revenues generated from petroleum and chemical equipment segment. The change in revenues is summarized as follows (dollars in thousands):

 

   Year Ended December 31,
2015
   Year Ended December 31, 2014   (Decrease) Increase   Percentage Change 
Dyeing and finishing equipment  $29,011   $42,209   $(13,198)   (31.3)%
Forged rolled rings and related components   12,081    33,750    (21,669)   (64.2)%
Petroleum and chemical equipment   8,474    -    8,474    NA 
Total revenues  $49,566   $75,959   $(26,393)   (34.7)%

 

Dyeing and finishing equipment segment

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, revenues from the sale of dyeing and finishing equipment decreased by approximately $13,198,000 or 31.3% as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. In order to reduce our business risk, we tightened our credit review policies in 2015. Additionally, we experienced an anticipated slowdown in shipments of our low-emission airflow dyeing machines as many customers had replaced older dyeing equipment with our low-emission airflow dyeing machine in 2014, and we believe that orders for new low-emission airflow dyeing machines have slowed down in 2015 because the remaining potential customer base included more companies that did not have the ability to make the significant capital expenditures necessary to upgrade their equipment. Accordingly, our revenues from dyeing and finishing equipment segment decreased in 2015 as compared to 2014.

 

Forged rolled rings and related products segment

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, revenue from the sale of forged rolled rings and related components decreased by approximately $21,669,000, or 64.2% as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The demand for products used in manufacturing in general, is uncertain. Although we believe that over the long term, the forged rolled rings and related components segment will expand, and the government of the PRC has announced its desire to increase the use of wind power as an energy source, in the short term other factors, such as economic factors and the fluctuations in the price of oil and coal and the availability of credit, may affect the requirements by our customers and potential customers for our products. To the extent that the demand for our forged rolled rings and related components declines, our revenues and net income will be affected. We believe that there is a degree of market saturation, and we expect that our revenues from customers of forged rolled rings and related components will continue to decrease for the near future.

 

Petroleum and chemical equipment segment

 

We sought to expand our business to oil and natural gas industries since 2013. We received the certifications needed to serve these markets in mid-2013. However, we did not generate revenues or incur manufacturing costs from the petroleum and chemical segment until the first quarter of 2015. Our revenue in this segment is highly dependent upon sales to the three major Chinese petrochemical companies, whose purchasing policies affect both our revenue and gross margin for this segment, one of which accounted for 73.4% of revenue from this segment for the year ended December 31, 2015. In December 2015, we received a notice of contract termination in writing from our largest customer alleging breach of contract for late delivery of product and for delivery of product with quality defects. Accordingly, we do not expect any further revenues from this customer and expect that our revenues from our petroleum and chemical equipment segment will significantly decrease in 2016 and beyond due to the loss of this customer.

 

Cost of revenues. Cost of revenues includes the cost of raw materials, labor, depreciation and other overhead costs.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, cost of revenues was $42,216,000 as compared to $58,218,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $16,002,000, or 27.5%. Cost of revenues for the dyeing and finishing equipment segment was $22,514,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to $32,450,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. Cost of revenues related to the manufacture of forged rolled rings and related components was $12,512,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to $25,768,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. Cost of revenues for the petroleum and chemical equipment was $7,190,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015. Since the manufacture and sale of the petroleum and chemical products commenced in the first quarter of 2015, we had neither revenues nor cost of revenues from this segment in the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

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Gross profit and gross margin. Our gross profit was $7,350,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to $17,741,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, representing gross margins of 14.8% and 23.4%, respectively.

.

Gross profit for the dyeing and finishing equipment segment was $6,497,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to $9,759,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, representing gross margins of approximately 22.4% and 23.1%, respectively, a slight decrease year over year. We expect that our gross margin from dyeing and finishing equipment segment will remain at its current levels.

 

We incurred a negative gross profit from forged rolled rings and related components segment of $431,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to gross profit of $7,982,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, representing gross margins of approximately (3.6)% and 23.6%, respectively.  The significant decrease in our gross margin for the forged rolled rings and related components segment for the year ended December 31, 2015 was primarily attributed to the reduced scale of operations resulting from lower revenues, which is reflected in the allocation of fixed costs, mainly consisting of depreciation, to cost of revenues, combined with a modest increase in labor costs.

 

At December 31, 2015, we conducted an impairment assessment on property and equipment in our forged rolled rings and related components segment to determine the estimated fair market value of property and equipment as of December 31, 2015 and we determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on certain equipment used in the Company’s forged rolled rings and related components segment and reduced the net book value of this equipment as discussed below. In 2016, we expect depreciation to be lower due to the reduction of net book value reflecting the impairment of equipment in the petroleum and chemical equipment and forged rolled rings and related products segments. We expect that our gross margin from forged rolled rings and related components segment will continue to be low in 2016 because we are not optimistic about the market for forged rolled rings and related products. We are evaluating the viability of this segment on an ongoing basis and, if we determine that it is not likely that we will be able to operate this segment profitably, we may discontinue operating in this segment. However, we have not completed our evaluation as of the date of this report.  

 

Gross profit for the petroleum and chemical equipment segment was $1,284,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, representing gross margin of approximately 15.2% and was effected by an increase in our reserve for obsolete inventories by approximately $836,000. As a result of the December 2015 notice of breach of contract, described above, from our largest customer, which was a customer in the petroleum and chemical equipment segment, we increased our reserve for obsolete inventories by approximately $836,000 for all remaining inventories manufactured to the specifications of such customer, which are not readily saleable to other customers. Many companies bid for the petroleum and chemical equipment orders. Since we are a small company and just entered this market in February 2015 and our customer base is small, we have offered a lower price in order to generate orders. Therefore, our gross margin for petroleum and chemical equipment is low. The low gross margin in this segment was one of factors in overall reduced gross margins, along with the negative gross margin from the forged rolled rings and related components in 2015. Due to the loss of our largest customer in this segment, we are evaluating the viability of this segment on an ongoing basis and, if we determine that it is not likely that we will be able to operate this segment profitably, we may discontinue operating in this segment.  However, we have not completed our evaluation as of the date of this report.  

 

Operating expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2015, operating expenses were $18,595,000 as compared to $8,831,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of $9,764,000, or 110.6%, and consisted of the following:

.

Depreciation. Depreciation was $8,129,000 and $8,470,000 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Depreciation for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 was included in the following categories (dollars in thousands):

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
Cost of revenues  $7,300   $7,245 
Operating expenses   829    721 
Rental income, net   -    504 
Total  $8,129   $8,470 

 

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The depreciation expense for cost of revenues for the year ended December 31, 2015 remained roughly consistent as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

The increase in depreciation expense for operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014 was mainly attributable to the increase in depreciation related to newly purchased office equipment and furniture and from office and dormitory buildings and other improvements which we started depreciating in the second half of 2014.

 

The depreciation expense for other expense for the year ended December 31, 2014 was related to the equipment then held for operating lease during 2014 and was reflected as an offset against rental income.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $2,782,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to $3,672,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $890,000 or 24.1%. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 consisted of the following (dollars in thousands):

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
Professional fees  $289   $343 
Payroll and related benefits   821    993 
Travel and entertainment   330    478 
Shipping   916    1,373 
Other   426    485 
Total  $2,782   $3,672 

 

Professional fees for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased by $54,000, or 15.7%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease was primarily attributable to a decrease in investor relations service fees of approximately $11,000, and a decrease in inspection and testing fees for our dyeing and finishing equipment segment of approximately $31,000, and a decrease in other miscellaneous items of approximately $12,000.

 

Payroll and related benefits for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased by $172,000, or 17.3%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease was mainly attributable to a decrease in stock-based compensation of approximately $90,000 which reflected the decrease in stock-based bonuses incurred and paid to our management in 2015, and a decrease in employee salaries and related benefits of approximately $82,000 due to the stricter control in general and administrative personnel.  We expect that payroll and related benefits will remain in its current level with minimal increase in the near future.

 

Travel and entertainment expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased by $148,000, or 31.0%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2015 was primarily attributable to stricter control on corporation expenditure.

 

Shipping expense for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased by $457,000, or 33.3%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease for the year ended December 31, 2015 was mainly attributable to the decrease in our revenues as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Other selling, general and administrative expenses for the year ended December 31, 2015 decreased by $59,000, or 12.2%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. The decrease was primarily attributable to a decrease in vehicle expenses of approximately $18,000, a decrease in office supply of approximately $3,000, a decrease in miscellaneous taxes of approximately $11,000, and a decrease in other miscellaneous items of approximately $27,000.

 

Bad debt expense. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, we recorded bad debt expense of $2,062,000 and $522,000, respectively. Based on our periodic review of accounts receivable balances, we adjusted the allowance for doubtful accounts after considering management’s evaluation of the collectability of individual receivable balances, including the analysis of subsequent collections, the customers’ collection history, the write off of uncollectible receivables against the existing reserve, and recent economic events. In December 2015, based on a notice of contract breach from our largest petroleum and chemical equipment segment customer, as described above, the customer requested some relief and has not paid the remaining outstanding accounts receivable balance of approximately $1,759,000. Accordingly, in addition to general changes in the allowance for doubtful accounts balance, we increased our allowance for doubtful accounts by approximately $1,759,000 which represents this customer’s full amount of outstanding accounts receivable. We are currently discussing this issue with the customer and we are unable to determine if the accounts receivable balance will be collected.

 

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Research and development expenses. Research and development expenses were $99,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to $116,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $17,000, or 14.9%. Research and development expenses related to the development of new dyeing and finishing products.

 

Impairment loss. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, we recorded impairment losses of $7,017,000 and $3,800,000, respectively, consisting of the following:

 

For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, we recorded impairment losses of approximately $417,000 and $3,800,000, respectively, on ESR equipment. The valuations of the ESR equipment which, was reflected as equipment held for sale at December 31, 2015 and 2014 on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, and the amounts of the impairment charge, were based on the impairment assessments conducted on ESR equipment at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the estimated fair value of the ESR equipment which is reflected as equipment held for sale was $0 and $422,500, respectively.

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, we conducted an impairment assessment on property and equipment in our forged rolled rings and related components and petroleum and chemical equipment segments to determine the estimated fair market value of property and equipment as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. Such analysis considered future use of such equipment, consultation with equipment resellers, and other industry factors. Upon completion of the 2015 impairment analysis, we determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on certain equipment used in these segments. Accordingly, in connection with the impairment of such equipment, we recorded an impairment charge of approximately $6,600,000 at December 31, 2015. We did not record any impairment charge on the property and equipment for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Loss on sales contract dispute. In December 2015, we received a notice of contract termination in writing from our largest customer alleging breach of contract for late delivery of product and for delivery of product with quality defects, as described above. This customer demanded payment of a penalty of 20% of the contract price plus penalties for late delivery and damages in the amounts of 36,103,640 RMB which was reflect as a liability at December 31, 2015. In connection with this contingent liability, we recorded a loss from sales contract dispute of $5,807,000 which has been reflected in operating expenses on the accompanying statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

 

(Loss) income from operations. As a result of the factors described above, for the year ended December 31, 2015, loss from operations amounted to $(11,246,000), as compared to income from operations of $8,910,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Other income (expense). Other income (expense) includes interest income, interest expense, grant income, foreign currency transaction gain/(loss), rental income, net, and other income.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, total other expense, net, amounted to $180,000 as compared to $83,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, an increase of approximately $97,000. The increase in other expense, net, was primarily attributable to a decrease in grant income of approximately $35,000, and the decrease in rental income, net, of approximately $102,000, offset by the increase in interest income of approximately $22,000, and the increase in other income of approximately $16,000.

 

Grant income for 2014 represents incentives granted and received from the Chinese government to encourage technology innovation and related to the patents we received in 2014 for devices and parts of our airflow dyeing machine.

 

Rental income, net, for the year ended December 31, 2014, included rental income, net of related depreciation which was recognized as a reduction of rental income, from our equipment held for operating lease during 2014.

 

Income tax expense. Income tax expense was $1,345,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to $4,561,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $3,216,000, or 70.5%. The decrease in income tax expense was primarily attributable to the decrease in taxable income generated by our operating entities in the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2014. Certain impairment losses are not treated as expenses under the tax laws of the PRC.

 

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Net (loss) income. As a result of the foregoing, our net loss was $12,770,000, or $(3.24) per share (basic and diluted), for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared with net income $4,266,000, or $1.15 per share (basic and diluted), for the year ended December 31, 2014, a change of $17,036,000, or 399.3%.

 

Foreign currency translation loss. The functional currency of our subsidiaries and variable interest entities operating in the PRC is the Chinese Yuan or Renminbi (“RMB”). The financial statements of our subsidiaries are translated to U.S. dollars using period end rates of exchange for assets and liabilities, and average rates of exchange (for the period) for revenues, costs, and expenses. Net gains and losses resulting from foreign exchange transactions are included in the consolidated statements of operations. As a result of foreign currency translations, which are a non-cash adjustment, we reported a foreign currency translation loss of $4,769,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015, as compared to a foreign currency translation loss of $408,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. This non-cash loss had the effect of increasing/decreasing our reported comprehensive loss/income.

 

Comprehensive (loss) income. As a result of our foreign currency translation loss, we had comprehensive loss for the year ended December 31, 2015 of $17,539,000, compared to comprehensive income of $3,858,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is the ability of a company to generate funds to support its current and future operations, satisfy its obligations and otherwise operate on an ongoing basis. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, we had cash balances of approximately $18,790,000 and $7,836,000, respectively. These funds are located in financial institutions located as follows (dollars in thousands):

 

Country:  December 31, 2015   December 31, 2014 
United States  $13    0.1%  $43    0.5%
China   18,777    99.9%   7,793    99.5%
Total cash and cash equivalents  $18,790    100.0%  $7,836    100.0%

 

The following table sets forth a summary of changes in our working capital from December 31, 2014 to December 31, 2015 (dollars in thousands):

 

           December 31, 2014 to
December 31, 2015
 
   December 31, 2015   December 31, 2014   Change   Percentage Change 
Working capital:                
Total current assets  $39,473   $34,090   $5,383    15.8%
Total current liabilities   14,542    10,493    4,049    38.6%
Working capital:  $24,931   $23,597   $1,334    5.7%

 

Our working capital increased by $1,334,000 to $24,931,000 at December 31, 2015 from $23,597,000 at December 31, 2014. This increase in working capital is primarily attributable to:

 

an increase in cash and cash equivalents of approximately $10,955,000, related to net cash provided by operating activities,

 

an increase in advances to suppliers of approximately $473,000,

 

an increase in prepaid expenses and other of approximately $839,000,

 

a decrease in accounts payable of approximately $832,000,

 

a decrease in VAT and service taxes payable of approximately $231,000, and

 

a decrease in income taxes payable of approximately $271,000,

 

offset by:

 

a significant decrease in accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts, of approximately $4,492,000 primarily due to tighter credit sales policies, and the increase in allowance for doubtful accounts of approximately $1,759,000 at December 31, 2015 which represents an increase in our allowance for doubtful accounts related to a notice of contract termination received by us by our largest petroleum and chemical equipment customer and discussed elsewhere in this report.

 

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a decrease in inventories, net of reserve for obsolete inventories, of approximately $2,414,000 primarily due to the decrease in inventories resulting from the decrease in expected near future sales and an increase in reserve of approximately $801,000 at December 31, 2015 relating to an increase in our reserve for obsolete inventories for all remaining inventories manufactured to the specifications of our largest petroleum and chemical equipment customer who terminated their sales contract,

 

a decrease in deferred tax assets of approximately $155,000, and

 

a significant increase in total accrued expenses of approximately $5,302,000 which was primarily attributable to the increase in accrued expenses of approximately $5,562,000 related to a claimed breach by us of a sales contract as discussed in elsewhere in this report.

 

Because the exchange rate conversion is different for the consolidated balance sheets and the consolidated statements of cash flows, the changes in assets and liabilities reflected on the consolidated statements of cash flows are not necessarily identical with the comparable changes reflected on the consolidated balance sheets.

 

Net cash flow provided by operating activities was $11,731,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to $12,158,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014, a decrease of $427,000.

 

  Net cash flow provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2015 primarily reflected the add-back of non-cash items primarily consisting of depreciation of $8,129,000, amortization of land use rights of $95,000, an increase in allowance for doubtful accounts of $2,062,000 primarily due to the increase such allowance by approximately $1,759,000 related to a notice of contract breach described above, an increase in reserve for obsolete inventories of $962,000, primarily resulting from the increase in such reserve by approximately $801,000 for all remaining inventories manufactured to the specifications of our largest petroleum and chemical equipment customer who claimed we breach the sales contract, impairment of equipment held for sale of $417,000, loss from impairment of property and equipment of $6,599,000 and a loss from contract dispute of $5,807,000 as discussed in elsewhere in this report,  and stock-based compensation of $286,000, and changes in operating assets and liabilities primarily consisting of a decrease in accounts receivable of $1,477,000, a decrease in inventories of $1,318,000, a decrease in deferred tax assets of $140,000, offset by our net loss of $12,770,000, and changes in operating assets and liabilities primarily consisting of an increase in prepaid and other current assets of $791,000, an increase in advances to suppliers of $526,000, a decrease in accounts payable of $624,000, a decrease in accrued expenses of $227,000, a decrease in VAT and service taxes payable of $213,000, and a decrease in income taxes payable of $253,000.
     
  Net cash flow provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2014 primarily reflected net income of $4,266,000 and the add-back of non-cash items primarily consisting of depreciation of $8,470,000, amortization of land use rights of $96,000, an increase in allowance for doubtful accounts of $522,000, an increase in allowance for deferred tax assets of $2,166,000, a loss on impairment of equipment held for sale of $3,800,000 and stock-based compensation of $376,000, and changes in operating assets and liabilities primarily consisting of a decrease in notes receivable of $586,000, a decrease in inventories of $471,000, a decrease in prepaid value-added taxes on purchases of $487,000, a decrease in advances to suppliers of $126,000, an increase in accrued expenses of $164,000, an increase in VAT and service taxes payable of $375,000, offset primarily by an increase in accounts receivable of $5,669,000, an increase in deferred tax assets of $1,080,000, a decrease in accounts payable of $872,000, a decrease in income taxes payable of $1,077,000, and a decrease in advances from customers of $953,000.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, net cash flow used in investing activities reflects the purchase of property and equipment of approximately $12,000. For the year ended December 31, 2014, net cash flow used in investing activities reflects the purchase of property and equipment of $11,059,000, offset by refunds of payments of approximately $3,991,000 made by us with respect to purchase orders we had cancelled. In 2014, we examined and found some faults on the machinery delivered to us in the fourth quarter of 2014. Therefore, we cancelled the purchase order, returned the machinery to the supplier and received a refund of approximately $2,000,000, representing the payment which we had made. In addition, in the fourth quarter of 2014, a supplier did not deliver equipment to us because the supplier advised us that it could not import an important component necessary to complete our order on time. We cancelled the order and received refund of approximately $1,500,000, representing our advance payment for the equipment. Also, in the fourth quarter of 2014, we cancelled a purchase order and received a refund of approximately $491,000, representing the payment we had made with respect to this order.

 

Net cash flow provided by financing activities was approximately $161,000 for the year ended December 31, 2015 as compared to approximately $1,624,000 for the year ended December 31, 2014. During the year ended December 31, 2015, we received proceeds from bank loans of approximately $4,503,000, and proceeds from the increase in bank acceptance notes payable of approximately $193,000, offset by repayments for bank loans of approximately $4,343,000, and payments for the increase in restricted cash of approximately $193,000. During the year ended December 31, 2014, we received proceeds from bank loans of $3,907,000, proceeds from the decrease in restricted cash of $195,000 and net proceeds from sale of common stock of approximately $1,624,000 to our chief executive officer and his wife, offset by the repayments of bank loans of $3,907,000 and the decrease in bank acceptance notes payable of $195,000.

 

 38 

 

 

We believe that our cash flow from operations will be sufficient to meet our anticipated cash requirements for the next twelve months. We generally finance our operations through short term loans from our banks, which we refinance upon expiration. We do not have any long-term financing arrangements. 

 

Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Contractual Obligations

 

We have certain fixed contractual obligations and commitments that include future estimated payments. Changes in our business needs, cancellation provisions, changing interest rates, and other factors may result in actual payments differing from the estimates. We cannot provide certainty regarding the timing and amounts of payments. We have presented below a summary of the most significant assumptions used in our determination of amounts presented in the tables, in order to assist in the review of this information within the context of our consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. The following tables summarize our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2015 (dollars in thousands), and the effect these obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods.

 

   Payments Due by Period 
Contractual obligations:  Total   Less than 1 year   1-3 years   3-5 years   5+ years 
Bank loans (1)  $3,081   $3,081   $-   $-   $- 
Bank acceptance notes payable   647    647    -    -    - 
Total  $3,728   $3,728   $-   $-   $- 

 

(1)Bank loans consisted of short term bank loans. Historically, we have refinanced these bank loans for an additional term of six months to one year and we expect to continue to refinance these loans upon expiration.

 

Off-balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have not entered into any other financial guarantees or other commitments to guarantee the payment obligations of any third parties. We have not entered into any derivative contracts that are indexed to our shares and classified as shareholder’s equity or that are not reflected in our consolidated financial statements. Furthermore, we do not have any retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity that serves as credit, liquidity or market risk support to such entity. We do not have any variable interest in any unconsolidated entity that provides financing, liquidity, market risk or credit support to us or engages in leasing, hedging or research and development services with us.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk

 

We produce and sell almost all of our products in China. Thus, most of our revenues and operating results may be impacted by exchange rate fluctuations between RMB and US dollars. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, we had unrealized foreign currency translation loss of approximately $4,769,000 and $408,000, respectively, because of changes in the exchange rate.

 

Inflation

 

The effect of inflation on our revenue and operating results was not significant.

 

Item 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 

 

Not applicable for smaller reporting companies

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

The financial statements begin on page F-1.

 

 39 

 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Exchange Act, our management, including Jianhua Wu, our chief executive officer, and Wanfen Xu, our chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2015.

 

Disclosure controls and procedures refer to controls and other procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating our disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating and implementing possible controls and procedures.

 

Management conducted its evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures under the supervision of our chief executive officer and our chief financial officer. Based on that evaluation, Mr. Wu and Ms. Xu concluded that, because our internal controls over financial reporting are not effective, as described below, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2015.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act.  Our management is also required to assess and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“Section 404”).   Management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015. In making this assessment, we used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control – Integrated Framework.  During our assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2015, management identified significant deficiencies related to (i) the U.S. GAAP expertise of our internal accounting staff and recently elected chief financial officer, (ii) our internal audit functions and (iii) a lack of segregation of duties within accounting functions. Although management believes that these deficiencies do not amount to a material weakness, our internal controls over financial reporting were not effective at December 31, 2015.

 

We currently have no plans to expand our company-wide Enterprise Resource Planning (“ERP”) system during 2016 and have not implemented further ERP modules to manage inventory and to expand existing ERP systems to other areas of our factory. Due to our working capital requirements and the lack of local professionals with the necessary experience in implementing the ERP system, we postponed the hiring of professional staff to implement ERP system. We have found that engaging professionals who are based outside of Wuxi is very costly and we have not been able to find qualified personnel in the Wuxi area.

 

Due to our size and nature, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible. As a result, we have not been able to take steps to improve our internal controls over financial reporting during the year ended December 31, 2015. However, to the extent possible, we will implement procedures to assure that the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions will be performed by separate individuals.

 

A material weakness (within the meaning of PCAOB Auditing Standard No. 5) is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. A significant deficiency is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting that is less severe than a material weakness, yet important enough to merit attention by those responsible for oversight of the company’s financial reporting.

 

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In light of this significant deficiency, we performed additional analyses and procedures in order to conclude that our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2015 included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K were fairly stated in accordance with the U.S. GAAP. Accordingly, management believes that despite our significant deficiency, our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2015 are fairly stated, in all material respects, in accordance with the U.S. GAAP.

 

Auditor Attestation

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting.  Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit us to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

 

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes (including corrective actions with regard to significant deficiencies or material weaknesses) in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B.  OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCES

 

Our current directors and executive officers are:

 

Name   Age   Position
Jianhua Wu   60   Chief executive officer, chairman and director
Wanfen Xu   35   Chief financial officer
Furen Chen1   71   Director
Xi Liu1,2,3   47   Director
Chengqing Tang1,2,3   51   Director
Baowen Wang2,3   69   Director

 

 

1 Member of the audit committee.

2 Member of the compensation committee.

3 Member of the corporate governance/ nominating committee.

 

Jianhua Wu has been our chief executive officer, chairman and a director since the completion of the reverse acquisition in November 2007.  Mr. Wu founded our predecessor companies, Wuxi Huayang Dyeing Machinery Co., Ltd. and Wuxi Huayang Electrical Power Equipment Co., Ltd., in 1995 and 2004, respectively, and was executive director and general manager of these companies prior to becoming our chief executive officer. Mr. Wu was nominated as a director because of his position as our chief executive officer. Mr. Wu is a certified mechanical engineer.

 

Wanfen Xu has been our chief financial officer since March 1, 2016. Ms. Xu previously served as our chief financial officer from March 14, 2012 through December 12, 2012. From December 2012 until February 2016, Ms. Xu served as the financial controller of the Huayang Companies. Ms. Xu also served as the financial controller of Hauyang Companies from 2009 to 2011.

 

Furen Chen is general manger and chairman of the board of WuXu City ZhengCheng Accounting Services, Ltd., a position he has held since February 2000. From 1990 until February 2000, Mr. Chen was accounting manager at Qian Zhou Agricultural Financial Co., Ltd. Mr. Chen is a certified public accountant in China. We nominated Mr. Chen as a director because we believe that his finance and accounting experience is important to us as we improve our financial accounting controls.

 

 42 

 

 

Xi Liu has an extensive material engineering background, being a 1989 graduate of Jiangsu University of Technology with a degree in metal material and heat treatment, and having been trained at the Volvo facilities in Penta, Sweden in 1999. Immediately after graduating from the university, Mr. Liu worked at China FAW Group Corporation, the oldest and one of largest Chinese automakers, as an engineer, before leaving in 2005 as an assistant manager in the Purchasing Department of the Wuxi Diesel Engine Works plant. He then joined WAM Bulk Handling Machinery (Shanghai) Co., Ltd., part of the Italian industrial giant WAMGROUP, as a purchasing and sourcing manager, which is his current position. Mr. Liu’s background in engineering and his practical industrial experience is important to us as we plan and develop our business.

 

Chengqing Tang is a senior engineer at Wuxi City Wangsheng Mechanical Factory, a position he has held since 2001. Mr. Tang’s experience as an engineer is important in his service as a director.

 

Baowen Wang works as a senior engineer at the National 559th factory research center, a state-owned precision optical research center, a position he has held since 2005, when he retired as head of the Wuxi HuGuang Instrument Research Institute, a position has held from 1979 to 2005. Mr. Wang graduated from NanJing University, majoring in weather station and radar. Mr. Wang’s engineering background and his practical industrial are important qualifications for his service as a director. Mr. Wang served as a director from July 2012 until his resignation in April 2014.

 

Committees

 

Our business, property and affairs are managed by or under the direction of the board of directors. Members of the board are kept informed of our business through discussion with the chief executive and financial officers and other officers, by reviewing materials provided to them and by participating at meetings of the board and its committees.

 

Our board of directors has three committees - the audit committee, the compensation committee and the corporate governance/nominating committee. The audit committee is comprised of Furen Chen, Chengqing Tang and Xi Liu, with Mr. Furen Chen serving as chairman. The compensation committee is comprised of Baowen Wang, Xi Liu and Chengqing Tang, with Mr. Baowen Wang as chairman. The corporate governance/nominating committee is comprised of Xi Liu, Chengqing Tang, and Baowen Wang, with Mr. Xi Liu as chairman.

 

Our audit committee is involved in discussions with our independent auditor with respect to the scope and results of our year-end audit, our quarterly results of operations, our internal accounting controls and the professional services furnished by the independent auditor. Our board of directors has adopted a written charter for the audit committee which the audit committee reviews and reassesses for adequacy on an annual basis.

 

The compensation committee oversees the compensation of our chief executive officer and our other executive officers and reviews our overall compensation policies for employees generally. If so authorized by the board of directors, the committee may also serve as the granting and administrative committee under any option or other equity-based compensation plans which we may adopt. The compensation committee does not delegate its authority to fix compensation; however, as to officers who report to the chief executive officer, the compensation committee consults with the chief executive officer, who may make recommendations to the compensation committee. Any recommendations by the chief executive officer are accompanied by an analysis of the basis for the recommendations. The committee will also discuss compensation policies for employees who are not officers with the chief executive officer and other responsible officers. The compensation committee has the responsibilities and authority relating to the retention, compensation, oversight and funding of compensation consultants, legal counsel and other compensation advisers, as well as the requirement to consider six independence factors before selecting, or receiving advice from, such advisers.  

 

The corporate governance/nominating committee is involved in evaluating the desirability of and recommending to the board any changes in the size and composition of the board, evaluation of and successor planning for the chief executive officer and other executive officers. The qualifications of any candidate for director will be subject to the same extensive general and specific criteria applicable to director candidates generally.

 

The board and its committees held the following number of meetings during 2015:

 

Board of directors   4 
Audit committee   4 
Compensation committee   0 
Nomination committee   0 

 

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The meetings include meetings that were held by means of a conference telephone call, but do not include actions taken by unanimous written consent.

 

Each director attended at least 75% of the total number of meetings of the board and those committees on which he served during the year.

 

Our non-management directors did not meet in executive session during 2015.

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

Aside from his service as director, no member of our compensation committee had any relationship with us as of December 31, 2015.

 

Section 16(a) Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, requires our directors, executive officers and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock to file with the SEC initial reports of ownership and reports of changes in ownership of common stock and other of our equity securities. During the year ended December 31, 2015, Mr. Zhao was late in the filing of one Form 4.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.

 

The following summary compensation table indicates the cash and non-cash compensation earned during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 by each person who served as chief executive officer and chief financial officer during the year ended December 31, 2015. No other executive officer received compensation equal or exceeding $100,000.

 

Summary Annual Compensation Table

 

Name and Principal Position  Fiscal
Year
 

Salary
($)

  

Bonus
($)

  

Stock Awards
($)

  

All Other Compensation
($)

  

Total
($)

 
Jianhua Wu,  2015   35,384    0    68,600    0    103,984 
chief executive officer (1)  2014   32,556    0    110,600    0    143,156 
                             
Adam Wasserman, former  2015   52,000    0    61,740    0    113,740 
chief financial officer (2)  2014   52,000    0    98,303    0    150,303 

  

(1)Mr. Wu’s 2015 compensation consisted of salary of $35,384 and 20,000 shares of common stock, valued at $68,600.  Mr. Wu’s 2014 compensation consisted of salary of $32,556 and 20,000 shares of common stock, valued at $110,600.
(2)Mr. Wasserman had been our chief financial officer from December 2012 until his resignation on February 26, 2016.  Mr. Wasserman’s compensation is paid to CFO Oncall Inc. where he serves as chief executive officer. Mr. Wasserman’s 2015 compensation included salary of $52,000 and 18,000 shares of common stock, valued at $61,740. Mr. Wasserman’s 2014 compensation included salary of $52,000 and 15,000 shares of common stock, valued at $98,303.

 

Employment Agreement

 

Currently, we have no employment agreements with any officer or director.

 

Compensation of Directors

 

We do not have any agreements or formal plan for compensating our current directors for their service in their capacity as directors, although our board may, in the future, award stock options to purchase shares of common stock to our current directors.

 

 44 

 

 

The following table provides information concerning the compensation of each member of our board of directors whose compensation is not included in the Summary Compensation Table for his or her services as a director and committee member for 2015. The value attributable to any stock grants is computed in accordance with ASC Topic 718.

 

Name  Fees earned or paid in cash
($)
   Stock awards
($)
   Total
($)
 
Tianxiang Zhou (1)   0    0    0 
Xi Liu   0    0    0 
Furen Chen   0    0    0 
Baowen Wang (2)   0    0    0 
Frank Zhao (3)   4,825    11,160    15,985 

 

  (1) Mr. Zhou resigned as a director on November 10, 2015.
  (2) Mr. Wang has been our director since November 10, 2015.
  (3) Mr. Zhao resigned as a director in March 2016.

 

2010 Long-Term Incentive Plan

 

In January 2010, the board of directors adopted, and in March 2010, the stockholders approved the 2010 long-term incentive plan, covering 200,000 shares of common stock. In October 2013, the board of directors adopted and in December 2013, the stockholders approved, an amendment to the 2010 plan which increased the number of shares subject to the 2010 plan from 200,000 shares to 500,000 shares. The 2010 plan provides for the grant of incentive and non-qualified options and stock grants to employees, including officers, directors and consultants. The 2010 plan is to be administered by a committee of not less than three directors, each of whom is to be an independent director. In the absence of a committee, the plan is administered by the board of directors. The board has granted the compensation committee the authority to administer the 2010 plan. Members of the committee are not eligible for stock options or stock grants pursuant to the 2010 plan unless such stock options or stock grant are granted by a majority of our independent directors other than the proposed grantee. As of December 31, 2015, we had issued a total of 327,491 shares of common stock pursuant to this plan.

 

The following table sets forth information as options outstanding on December 31, 2015.

 

   OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT FISCAL YEAR-END 
   OPTION AWARDS   STOCK AWARDS 
Name
(a)
  Number
of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
options
(#) (b)
   Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Unearned
Options
(#)
(c)
   Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Unearned
Options
(#)
(d)
   Option
Exercise
Price
($)
(e)
   Option
Expiration
Date
($)
(f)
   Number of
Shares or
Units of
Stock that
have not Vested
(#)
(g)
   Market
Value of
Shares or
Units of
Stock that
Have not Vested
($)
(h)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Number of
Unearned Shares,
Units or
Other
Rights that
have not
Vested
(#)
(i)
   Equity Incentive
Plan Awards:
Market or
Payout Value
of Unearned
Shares, Units
or other
Rights that
have not
Vested
($)
(j)
 
Jianhua Wu   0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0 

 

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ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

The following table provides information as to shares of common stock beneficially owned as of the filing date of this report, by:

 

  each current director;
     
  each current officer named in the summary compensation table;
     
  each person owning of record or known by us, based on information provided to us by the persons named below, to own beneficially at least 5% of our common stock; and
     
  all current directors and executive officers as a group.

 

Name of Beneficial Owner 

Amount and

Nature of

Beneficial

Ownership

   % of Class 
         
Jianhua Wu (1) (3)   1,137,659    25.8%
Wanfen Xu   0    0.0%
Lihua Tang (1) (3)   1,137,659    25.8%
Maxworthy International Limited (1)   544,267    12.4%
Yunxia Ren (2) (4)   327,274    7.4%
Haoyang Wu (2) (4)   327,274    7.4%
Xi Liu   0    0.0%
Baowen Wang   0    0.0%
Frank Zhao   7,500    * 
Furen Chen   0    0.0%
All current officers and directors as a group (two persons owning stock)   1,145,159    26.0%

 

* less than 1%. 

 

  (1) Jianhua Wu and Lihua Tang, who are husband and wife, are majority stockholders of Maxworthy International Ltd.  Mr. Wu is also managing director of Maxworthy.  The shares reflected as being owned by Mr. Wu and Ms. Tang represent (i) 544,267 shares owned by Maxworthy  (ii) 360,917 shares owned by Mr. Wu and (iii) 232,475 shares owned by Ms. Tang. Each of Mr. Wu and Ms. Tang disclaims beneficial ownership in the shares of beneficially owned by the other. The address for Maxworthy is P.O. Box 957, Offshore Incorporations Centre, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands.

 

  (2) Yunxia Ren and Haoyang Wu are the daughter-in-law and son of Jianhua Wu and Lihua Tang.  Ms. Ren owns 259,022 shares of common stock and Mr. Wu owns 68,252 shares of common stock.  Each of Ms. Ren and Mr. Wu disclaims ownership of the shares owned by the other.

 

  (3) Address is No. 9 Yanyu Middle Road, Qianzhou Village, Huishan District, Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province, P.R.C.

 

  (4) Address is No. 25 Jin Xiu Second Village, Qianzhou Town Huishan District, Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province, P.R.C.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

Director Independence

 

Four of our directors, Furen Chen, Chengqing Tang, Xi Liu, and Baowen Wang, are independent directors, using the Nasdaq definition of independence. Except for Furen Chen, each of these directors serves on at least two of our board committees. The audit committee is comprised of Chengqing Tang, Xi Liu and Furen Chen (chair), the compensation committee is comprised of Baowen Wang (chair), Xi Liu, and ChengQing Tang, and the corporate governance/nominating committee is comprised of Xi Liu (chair), Chengqing Tang, and Baowen Wang. Our board has determined that Mr. Chen is an audit committee financial expert.

 

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ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.

 

The following table sets forth the fees billed by our principal independent accountants, RBSM LLP, for each of our last two fiscal years for the categories of services indicated.

 

   Years Ended December 31, 
Category  2015   2014 
Audit Fees  $118,500   $105,500 
Audit Related Fees  $0   $0 
Tax Fees  $5,000   $5,000 
All Other Fees  $0   $5,000 

 

Audit fees.   Consists of fees billed for the audit of our annual financial statements, review of our Form 10-K, review of our interim financial statements included in our Form 10-Q and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with year-end statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

Audit-related fees.    Consists of fees billed for  assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under “Audit Fees”, review of our Forms 8-K filings and services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with non-year-end statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

Tax fees.  Consists of professional services rendered by a company aligned with our principal accountant for tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning.

 

Other fees.     The services provided by our accountants within this category consisted of advice and other services relating to SEC matters, registration statement review, accounting issues and client conferences.

 

Policy on Audit Committee Pre-Approval of Audit and Permissible Non-Audit Services of Independent Auditors

 

The audit committee’s policy is to pre-approve all audit and permissible non-audit services provided by the independent registered public accounting firm. These services may include audit services, audit-related services, tax services and other services. The independent registered public accounting firm and management are required to periodically report to the audit committee regarding the extent of services provided by the independent registered public accounting firm in accordance with this pre-approval, and the fees for the services performed to date. The audit committee may also pre-approve particular services on a case-by-case basis. All services since October 1, 2008 were pre-approved by the audit committee.

 

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PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

Exhibit

Number

  Description
3.1   Articles of incorporation (1)
3.2   Bylaws (2)
10.1   2010 Long-Term Incentive Plan (3)
14.1   Code of ethics and business conduct for officers, directors and employees (4)
14.2   Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. ethics hotline/whistleblower program (4)
21.0   List of subsidiaries (5)
23.1   Consent of  RBSM LLP*
31.1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 *
31.2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 *
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 *
101.INS   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Schema
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Calculation Linkbase
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Definition Linkbase
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Label Linkbase
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Presentation Linkbase

 

(1) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K filed by the Company on April 11, 2013.
(2) Incorporated by reference to the Form 8-K filed by the Company on August 9, 2012.
(3) Incorporated by reference to the Company’s definitive proxy statement for the 2013 annual meeting of shareholders, which was filed by the Company on October 30, 2013.
(4) Incorporated by reference to the Form 10-K filed by the Company on March 31, 2009.
(5) Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Form 10-K filed by the Company on March 28, 2014.
   
 * filed herewith.

  

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned hereunto duly authorized.

 

Date: March 30, 2016 CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC.
   
  By: /s/ Jianhua Wu
    Jianhua Wu, Chief Executive Officer

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities on the dates indicated. Each person whose signature appears below hereby authorizes Jianhua Wu as his or her true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent, with full power of substitution and resubstitution for him or her and in his or her name, place and stead, in any and all capacities to sign any and all amendments to this report, and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
 /s/ Jianhua Wu   Chief Executive Officer and Director   March 30, 2016
Jianhua Wu   (Principal Executive Officer)    
         
 /s/ Wanfen Xu   Chief Financial Officer   March 30, 2016
Wanfen Xu   (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)    
         
 /s/ Baowen Wang   Director   March 30, 2016
Baowen Wang        
         
 /s/ Xi Liu   Director   March 30, 2016
Xi Liu        
         
 /s/ Chengqing Tang   Director   March 30, 2016
Chengqing Tang        
         
 /s/ Furen Chen   Director   March 30, 2016
Furen Chen        

  

 49 

 

  

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

CONTENTS

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Financial Statements:  
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets - As of December 31, 2015 and 2014 F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive (Loss) Income – For the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity – For the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – For the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 F-6
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-7 to F-25

 

 F-1 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors

Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the "Company") as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income, changes in stockholders' equity and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2015.  These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.  The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements.  An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2015 and 2014 and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2015, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

/s/ RBSM LLP

 

New York, New York

March 30, 2016 

 

 F-2 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   December 31, 
   2015   2014 
ASSETS
         
CURRENT ASSETS:        
Cash and cash equivalents  $18,790,370   $7,835,791 
Restricted cash   647,080    488,719 
Notes receivable   132,497    114,034 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts   15,823,859    20,316,037 
Inventories, net of reserve for obsolete inventories   1,827,084    4,241,022 
Advances to suppliers   1,038,884    565,581 
Deferred tax assets   220,895    375,744 
Prepaid expenses and other   992,055    153,260 
           
Total Current Assets   39,472,724    34,090,188 
           
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, net   51,753,964    69,628,597 
           
OTHER ASSETS:          
Equipment held for sale   -    422,540 
Land use rights, net   3,382,071    3,672,420 
           
Total Assets  $94,608,759   $107,813,745 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES:          
Short-term bank loans  $3,081,332   $3,095,219 
Bank acceptance notes payable   647,080    488,719 
Accounts payable   3,489,815    4,322,275 
Accrued expenses   6,361,079    1,059,579 
Advances from customers   433,050    495,461 
VAT and service taxes payable   269,284    500,569 
Income taxes payable   259,987    531,120 
           
Total Current Liabilities   14,541,627    10,492,942 
           
Total Liabilities   14,541,627    10,492,942 
           
Commitments and contingencies          
           
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY:          
Preferred stock ($0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; 0 share issued and outstanding at December 31, 2015 and 2014)   -    - 
Common stock ($0.001 par value; 50,000,000 shares authorized; 3,943,986 and 3,859,986 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively)   3,944    3,860 
Additional paid-in capital   33,803,333    33,517,857 
Retained earnings   37,007,776    50,039,267 
Statutory reserve   3,555,468    3,294,199 
Accumulated other comprehensive income - foreign currency translation adjustment   5,696,611    10,465,620 
           
Total Stockholders' Equity   80,067,132    97,320,803 
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity  $94,608,759   $107,813,745 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 F-3 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 
   2015   2014 
         
REVENUES  $49,565,576   $75,958,676 
           
COST OF REVENUES   42,215,959    58,217,667 
           
GROSS PROFIT   7,349,617    17,741,009 
           
OPERATING EXPENSES:          
Depreciation   829,030    721,449 
Selling, general and administrative   2,782,651    3,671,715 
Bad debt expense   2,061,591    521,928 
Research and development   98,780    116,061 
Impairment loss   7,016,658    3,799,947 
Loss from sales contract dispute   5,806,778    - 
           
Total Operating Expenses   18,595,488    8,831,100 
           
(LOSS) INCOME FROM OPERATIONS   (11,245,871)   8,909,909 
           
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):          
Interest income   40,034    18,127 
Interest expense   (235,366)   (238,226)
Grant income   -    34,835 
Foreign currency transaction (loss) gain   (9)   1,263 
Rental income, net   -    101,539 
Other income   15,710    - 
           
Total Other Income (Expense), net   (179,631)   (82,462)
           
(LOSS) INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES   (11,425,502)   8,827,447 
           
INCOME TAXES   1,344,720    4,561,030 
           
NET (LOSS) INCOME  $(12,770,222)  $4,266,417 
           
COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME:          
NET (LOSS) INCOME  $(12,770,222)  $4,266,417 
           
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE LOSS:          
Unrealized foreign currency translation loss   (4,769,009)   (408,386)
           
COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME  $(17,539,231)  $3,858,031 
           
NET (LOSS) INCOME PER COMMON SHARE:          
Basic  $(3.24)  $1.15 
Diluted  $(3.24)  $1.15 
           
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:          
Basic   3,940,622    3,715,300 
Diluted   3,940,622    3,715,300 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 F-4 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

For the Years Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

   Series A
Preferred Stock
   Common Stock   Additional           Accumulated Other   Total 
   Number of       Number of       Paid-in   Retained   Statutory   Comprehensive   Stockholders' 
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Earnings   Reserve   Income   Equity 
                                     
Balance, December 31, 2013   -   $-    3,503,502   $3,503   $31,532,308   $46,322,329  $2,744,720   $10,874,006   $91,476,866 
                                              
Sale of common stock - related parties   -    -    290,984    291    1,623,400    -    -    -    1,623,691 
                                              
Common stock issued for services   -    -    65,500    66    362,149    -    -    -    362,215 
                                              
Adjustment to statutory reserve   -    -    -    -    -    (549,479)   549,479    -    - 
                                              
Net income for the year   -    -    -    -    -    4,266,417    -    -    4,266,417 
                                              
Foreign currency translation adjustment   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    (408,386)   (408,386)
                                              
Balance, December 31, 2014   -    -    3,859,986    3,860    33,517,857    50,039,267    3,294,199    10,465,620    97,320,803 
                                              
Common stock issued for services   -    -    84,000    84    285,476    -    -    -    285,560 
                                              
Adjustment to statutory reserve   -    -    -    -    -    (261,269)   261,269    -    - 
                                              
Net loss for the year   -    -    -    -    -    (12,770,222)   -    -    (12,770,222)
                                              
Foreign currency translation adjustment   -    -    -    -    -    -    -    (4,769,009)   (4,769,009)
                                              
Balance, December 31, 2015   -   $-    3,943,986   $3,944   $33,803,333   $37,007,776  $3,555,468   $5,696,611   $80,067,132 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 F-5 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the Years Ended 
   December 31, 
   2015   2014 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:        
Net (loss) income  $(12,770,222)  $4,266,417 
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) income from operations to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation   8,128,805    8,469,771 
Amortization of land use rights   95,076    96,226 
Increase in allowance for doubtful accounts   2,061,591    521,928 
Increase in reserve for obsolete inventories   962,029    - 
Increase in allowance for deferred tax assets   -    2,165,677 
Loss from impairment of equipment held for sale   417,171    3,799,947 
Loss from impairment of property and equipment   6,599,487    - 
Loss from sales contract dispute   5,806,778    - 
Stock-based compensation   285,560    375,989 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Notes receivable   (25,734)   586,014 
Accounts receivable   1,477,142    (5,668,901)
Inventories   1,317,739    470,509 
Prepaid value-added taxes on purchases   (93,280)   486,689 
Prepaid and other current assets   (790,832)   (94,718)
Advances to suppliers   (526,138)   126,394 
Deferred tax assets   140,368    (1,080,469)
Accounts payable   (624,196)   (872,178)
Accrued expenses   (226,923)   164,465 
VAT and service taxes payable   (213,092)   374,512 
Income taxes payable   (252,960)   (1,077,373)
Advances from customers   (37,087)   (952,885)
NET CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES   11,731,282    12,158,014 
           
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:          
Purchase of property and equipment   (12,458)   (11,058,530)
Refund of previously purchased property and equipment   -    3,991,405 
NET CASH USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES   (12,458)   (7,067,125)
           
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Proceeds from bank loans   4,503,418    3,906,759 
Repayments of bank loans   (4,342,581)   (3,906,759)
(Increase) decrease in restricted cash   (193,004)   195,338 
Increase (decrease) in bank acceptance notes payable   193,004    (195,338)
Net proceeds from sale of common stock - related parties   -    1,623,691 
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES   160,837    1,623,691 
           
EFFECT OF EXCHANGE RATE ON CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS   (925,082)   6,338 
           
NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS   10,954,579    6,720,918 
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - beginning of year   7,835,791    1,114,873 
           
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - end of year  $18,790,370   $7,835,791 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:          
Cash paid for:          
Interest  $235,366   $238,226 
Income taxes  $2,277,297   $4,553,195 
NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Property and equipment acquired on credit as payable  $-   $256,082 

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements

 

 F-6 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Organization

 

Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated in Delaware on June 24, 1987 under the name of Malex, Inc. On December 18, 2007, the Company’s corporate name was changed to China Wind Systems, Inc., and on June 13, 2011, the Company’s corporate name was changed to Cleantech Solutions International, Inc. On August 7, 2012, the Company was converted into a Nevada corporation.

 

Through its affiliated companies and subsidiaries, the Company manufactures and sells textile dyeing and finishing machines and sells forged products and fabricated products to a range of clean technology customers including high precision forged rolled rings and related components for the wind power industry and other industries. The Company is the sole owner of Fulland Limited (“Fulland”), a Cayman Island limited liability company, which was organized on May 9, 2007. Fulland owns 100% of the capital stock of Green Power Environment Technology (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. (“Green Power”) and Wuxi Fulland Wind Energy Equipment Co., Ltd. (“Fulland Wind Energy”), which are wholly foreign-owned enterprises (“WFOE”) organized under the laws of the People’s Republic of China (“PRC” or “China”). Green Power is a party to a series of contractual arrangements, as fully described below, dated October 12, 2007 with Wuxi Huayang Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd. ("Heavy Industries"), formerly known as Wuxi Huayang Electrical Power Equipment Co., Ltd., and Wuxi Huayang Dyeing Machinery Co., Ltd. (“Dyeing”), both of which are limited liability companies organized under the laws of, and based in, the PRC. Heavy Industries and Dyeing are sometimes collectively referred to as the “Huayang Companies”.

 

Fulland was organized by the owners of the Huayang Companies as a special purpose vehicle for purposes of raising capital, in accordance with requirements of the PRC State Administration of Foreign Exchange (“SAFE”). On May 31, 2007, SAFE issued an official notice known as Hui Zong Fa [2007] No. 106 (“Circular 106”), which requires the owners of any Chinese company to obtain SAFE’s approval before establishing any offshore holding company structure for foreign financing as well as subsequent acquisition matters in China. Accordingly, the owners of the Huayang Companies, Mr. Jianhua Wu and Ms. Lihua Tang, submitted their application to SAFE in early September 2007. On October 11, 2007, SAFE approved their application, permitting these Chinese citizens to establish Fulland as a special purpose vehicle for any foreign ownership and capital raising activities by the Huayang Companies.

 

Dyeing, which was formed on August 17, 1995, produces and sells a variety of high and low temperature dyeing and finishing machinery for the textile industry. The Company refers to this segment as the dyeing and finishing equipment segment.

 

Fulland Wind Energy was formed on August 27, 2008. In 2009, the Company began to produce and sell forged products through Fulland Wind Energy. Through Fulland Wind Energy, the Company manufactures and machines all forged products, including wind products such as shafts, rolled rings, gear rims, gearboxes, bearings and other components and finished products and assemblies for the wind power and other industries, including large-scale equipment used in the manufacturing process for the various industries. The Company refers to this segment of its business as the forged rolled rings and related components segment.

 

Beginning in February 2015, Heavy Industries began to produce equipment for the petroleum and chemical industries, and it produces and sells a variety heat exchangers, separators, tanks, towers, cryogenic equipment, and other products. The Company refers to this new segment of its business as the petroleum and chemical equipment segment.

 

Basis of presentation

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements include the financial statements of its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Fulland, Green Power and Fulland Wind Energy, as well as the financial statements of Huayang Companies - Dyeing and Heavy Industries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 810, the Huayang Companies are considered variable interest entities (“VIE”), and the Company is the primary beneficiary. The Company’s relationships with the Huayang Companies and their shareholders are governed by a series of contractual arrangements between Green Power, the Company’s wholly foreign-owned enterprise in the PRC, and each of the Huayang Companies, which are the operating companies of the Company in the PRC. Under PRC laws, each of Green Power, Dyeing and Heavy Industries is an independent legal entity and none of them is exposed to liabilities incurred by the other parties. The contractual arrangements constitute valid and binding obligations of the parties of such agreements. Each of the contractual arrangements and the rights and obligations of the parties thereto are enforceable and valid in accordance with the laws of the PRC. On October 12, 2007, the Company entered into the following contractual arrangements with each of Dyeing and Heavy Industries:

 

Consulting Services Agreement. Pursuant to the exclusive consulting services agreements between Green Power and the Huayang Companies, Green Power has the exclusive right to provide to the Huayang Companies general business operation services, including advice and strategic planning, as well as consulting services related to the technological research and development of dyeing and finishing machines, electrical equipment and related components (the “ Services ”). Under this agreement, Green Power owns the intellectual property rights developed or discovered through research and development, in the course of providing the Services, or derived from the provision of the Services. The Huayang Companies shall pay a quarterly consulting service fees in Renminbi (“RMB”) to Fulland that is equal to all of the Huayang Companies’ profits for such quarter.

 

 F-7 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Basis of presentation (continued)

 

Operating Agreement. Pursuant to the operating agreement among Green Power, the Huayang Companies and all shareholders of the Huayang Companies, Green Power provides guidance and instructions on the Huayang Companies’ daily operations, financial management and employment issues. The Huayang Companies’ shareholders must designate the candidates recommended by Green Power as their representatives on the boards of directors of each of the Huayang Companies. Green Power has the right to appoint senior executives of the Huayang Companies. In addition, Green Power agrees to guarantee the Huayang Companies’ performance under any agreements or arrangements relating to the Huayang Companies’ business arrangements with any third party. The Huayang Companies, in return, agree to pledge their accounts receivable and all of their assets to Green Power. Moreover, each of the Huayang Companies agrees that, without the prior consent of Green Power, it will not engage in any transactions that could materially affect its assets, liabilities, rights or operations, including, without limitation, incurrence or assumption of any indebtedness, sale or purchase of any assets or rights, incurrence of any encumbrance on any of their assets or intellectual property rights in favor of a third party or transfer of any agreements relating to their business operation to any third party. The term of this agreement, as amended on November 1, 2008, is 20 years from October 12, 2007 and may be extended only upon Green Power’s written confirmation prior to the expiration of the this agreement, with the extended term to be mutually agreed upon by the parties.

 

Equity Pledge Agreement. Under the equity pledge agreement between the Huayang Companies’ shareholders and Green Power, the Huayang Companies’ shareholders pledged all of their equity interests in the Huayang Companies to Green Power to guarantee the Huayang Companies’ performance of their respective obligations under the consulting services agreement. If the Huayang Companies or the Huayang Companies’ shareholders breach their respective contractual obligations, Green Power, as pledgee, will be entitled to certain rights, including the right to sell the pledged equity interests. The Huayang Companies’ shareholders also agreed that, upon occurrence of any event of default, Green Power shall be granted an exclusive, irrevocable power of attorney to take actions in the place and stead of the Huayang Companies’ shareholders to carry out the security provisions of the equity pledge agreement and take any action and execute any instrument that Green Power may deem necessary or advisable to accomplish the purposes of the equity pledge agreement. The Huayang Companies’ shareholders agreed not to dispose of the pledged equity interests or take any actions that would prejudice Green Power’s interest. The equity pledge agreement will expire two years after the Huayang Companies’ obligations under the consulting services agreements have been fulfilled.

 

Option AgreementUnder the option agreement between the Huayang Companies’ shareholders and Green Power, the Huayang Companies’ shareholders irrevocably granted Green Power or its designated person an exclusive option to purchase, to the extent permitted under PRC law, all or part of the equity interests in the Huayang Companies for the cost of the initial contributions to the registered capital or the minimum amount of consideration permitted by applicable PRC law. Green Power or its designated person has sole discretion to decide when to exercise the option, whether in part or in full. The term of this agreement, as amended on November 1, 2008, is 20 years from October 12, 2007 and may be extended prior to its expiration by written agreement of the parties.

 

Pursuant to ASC Topic 810 and related subtopics related to the consolidation of variable interest entities, the accounts of the Huayang Companies are consolidated in the accompanying financial statements. As VIEs, the Huayang Companies’ sales are included in the Company’s total sales, its income from operations is consolidated with the Company’s, and the Company’s net income includes all of the Huayang Companies net income. The Company does not have any non-controlling interest and, accordingly, did not subtract any net income in calculating the net income of the VIEs that is attributable to the Company. Because of the contractual arrangements, the Company has a pecuniary interest in the Huayang Companies that requires consolidation of the Company’s and the Huayang Companies’ financial statements.

 

 F-8 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses, and the related disclosures at the date of the financial statements and during the reporting period. Actual results could materially differ from these estimates. Significant estimates in 2015 and 2014 include the allowance for doubtful accounts, the allowance for obsolete inventory, the useful life of property and equipment and intangible assets, assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-term assets and valuation of deferred tax assets, accruals for taxes due, and the value of stock-based compensation.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

For purposes of the consolidated statements of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less and money market accounts to be cash equivalents. The Company maintains with various financial institutions mainly in the PRC and the U.S. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, cash balances in banks in the PRC of $18,777,228 and $7,792,993, respectively, are uninsured.

 

Fair value of financial instruments

 

The Company adopted the guidance of ASC Topic 820 for fair value measurements which clarifies the definition of fair value, prescribes methods for measuring fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy to classify the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

Level 1-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities available at the measurement date.

 

Level 2-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable, and inputs derived from or corroborated by observable market data.

 

Level 3-Inputs are unobservable inputs which reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions on what assumptions the market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best available information.

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, equipment held for sale was measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis as shown in the following tables.

 

   Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets for
Identical
Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
   Balance at
December 31,
2015
   Impairment
Loss
 
Equipment held for sale  $-   $-   $-   $-   $417,171 

  

   Quoted Prices
in Active
Markets for
Identical
Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
   Balance at
December 31,
2014
   Impairment
Loss
 
Equipment held for sale  $-   $-   $422,540   $422,540   $3,799,947 

 

The Company conducted an impairment assessment on the equipment held for sale based on the guidelines established in ASC Topic 360 to determine the estimated fair market value of the equipment held for sale as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. Upon completion of its 2015 and 2014 impairment analysis, the Company determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on the equipment held for sale. Accordingly, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $417,171 and $3,799,947 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

 F-9 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Fair value of financial instruments (continued)

 

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, notes receivable, accounts receivable, inventories, advances to suppliers, deferred tax assets, prepaid expenses and other, short-term bank loans, bank acceptance notes payable, accounts payable, accrued expenses, advances from customers, VAT and service taxes payable and income taxes payable approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

ASC Topic 825-10 “Financial Instruments” allows entities to voluntarily choose to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value (fair value option). The fair value option may be elected on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable, unless a new election date occurs. If the fair value option is elected for an instrument, unrealized gains and losses for that instrument should be reported in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. The Company did not elect to apply the fair value option to any outstanding instruments.

 

Concentrations of credit risk

 

The Company’s operations are carried out in the PRC. Accordingly, the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations may be influenced by the political, economic and legal environment in the PRC, and by the general state of the PRC’s economy. The Company’s operations in the PRC are subject to specific considerations and significant risks not typically associated with companies in North America. The Company’s results may be adversely affected by changes in governmental policies with respect to laws and regulations, anti-inflationary measures, currency conversion and remittance abroad, and rates and methods of taxation, among other things.

 

Financial instruments which potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash and trade accounts receivable. Substantially all of the Company’s cash is maintained with state-owned banks within the PRC, and none of these deposits are covered by insurance. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts and believes it is not exposed to any risks on its cash in bank accounts. A significant portion of the Company’s sales are credit sales which are primarily to customers whose ability to pay is dependent upon the industry economics prevailing in these areas; however, concentrations of credit risk with respect to trade accounts receivables is limited due to generally short payment terms. The Company also performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers to help further reduce credit risk.

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company’s cash balances by geographic area were as follows:

 

Country:  December 31, 2015   December 31, 2014 
United States  $13,142    0.1%  $42,798    0.5%
China   18,777,228    99.9%   7,792,993    99.5%
Total cash and cash equivalents  $18,790,370    100.0%  $7,835,791    100.0%

 

In December 2015, the Company received a letter from its largest customer which accounted approximately 13% of the Company’s revenues, pursuant to which the customer claimed that the Company was delinquent in the delivery of the products and those products that were delivered did not meet the required quality standards.  The customer claimed that it is entitled to damages of RMB 36,103,640, or approximately $5,806,778 at December 31, 2015.  As a result of the dispute with this customer, the Company, at December 31, 2015:

 

·Included in accrued expenses $5,562,365, representing the potential liability to this customer based on the customer’s claim (See Note 9);

 

·Increased its accounts receivable reserve to fully reserve the approximately $1,759,000 due from this customer (See Note 2);

 

·Increased its reserve for obsolete inventory by approximately $836,000, representing the remaining inventory manufactured to the specifications of this customer (See Note 3); and

 

·Recorded an impairment charge of approximately $1,900,000 relating to the manufacturing equipment which is specially designed to manufacture products for petroleum and chemical customer and is not otherwise used by the Company (See Note 4).

 

The Company is engaged in discussions with this customer, but cannot predict the results of these discussions. 

 

Restricted cash

 

Restricted cash consists of cash deposits held by a bank to secure bank acceptance notes payable.

 

Notes receivable

 

Notes receivable represents trade accounts receivable due from customers where the customers’ bank has guaranteed the payment of the receivable. This amount is non-interest bearing and is normally paid within six months. Historically, the Company has experienced no losses on notes receivable. The Company’s notes receivable totaled $132,497 and $114,034 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. 

 

 F-10 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Accounts receivable

 

Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company maintains allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses. The Company reviews the accounts receivable on a periodic basis and makes general and specific allowances when there is doubt as to the collectability of individual balances. In evaluating the collectability of individual receivable balances, the Company considers many factors, including the age of the balance, a customer’s historical payment history, its current credit-worthiness and current economic trends. Accounts are written off after exhaustive efforts at collection. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company has established, based on a review of its outstanding balances, an allowance for doubtful accounts in the amounts of $3,218,592 and $1,321,328, respectively. 

 

Inventories

 

Inventories, consisting of raw materials, work in process and finished goods related to the Company’s products are stated at the lower of cost or market utilizing the weighted average method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected market value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the market value. These reserves are recorded based on estimates. The Company recorded an inventory reserve of $1,093,326 and $181,646 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Advances to suppliers

 

Advances to suppliers represent the cash paid in advance for the purchase of raw material from suppliers. The advance payments are intended to ensure preferential pricing and delivery. The amounts advanced under such arrangements totaled $1,038,884 and $565,581 at December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Property and equipment

 

Property and equipment are carried at cost and are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets. The cost of repairs and maintenance is expensed as incurred; major replacements and improvements are capitalized. When assets are retired or disposed of, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gains or losses are included in the statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income in the year of disposition. The Company examines the possibility of decreases in the value of fixed assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable.

 

Included in property and equipment is construction-in-progress which consisted of factory improvements and machinery pending installation and includes the costs of construction, machinery and equipment, and any interest charges arising from borrowings used to finance these assets during the period of construction or installation of the assets. No provision for depreciation is made on construction-in-progress until such time as the relevant assets are completed and ready for their intended use.

 

Equipment held for sale

 

In March 2014, the Company signed an operating lease agreement related to the lease of electro-slag re-melted (“ESR”) equipment for a period of eight years. Equipment held for operating lease was depreciated over its estimated useful life starting from the operating lease commencement date, April 1, 2014.  Rental payments were recorded as rental income over the lease term as earned. The related depreciation on the equipment held for operating lease was recognized as a reduction of rental income on a straight-line basis. For the year ended December 31, 2014, rental income was $605,214 and the related depreciation on the equipment held for operating lease was $503,675, respectively. The lessee stopped using the equipment and stopped paying its lease payments in early 2015 and the Company has not found and does not expect to find other potential lessees in the next twelve months. Therefore, at December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company reflected electro-slag re-melted (“ESR”) equipment that was used in 2010 and 2011 to produce forged products for the high performance components market as equipment held for sale on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

 F-11 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 360, the Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable, or at least annually. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value. 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company incurred impairment charge in operations of $417,171 and $3,799,947, respectively, on electro-slag re-melted equipment. The valuations of the ESR equipment which were reflected as equipment held for sale at December 31, 2015 and 2014 on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, and the amounts of the impairment charge, were based on the impairment assessments conducted on the ESR equipment at December 31, 2015 and 2014.

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company conducted an impairment assessment on property and equipment based on the guidelines established in ASC Topic 360 to determine the estimated fair market value of property and equipment as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. Such analysis considered future use of such equipment, consultation with equipment resellers, and other industry factors. Upon completion of the 2015 impairment analysis, the Company determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on certain equipment used in the Company’s petroleum and chemical equipment segment and forged rolled rings and related components segment. Accordingly, in connection with the impairment of such equipment, the Company recorded an impairment charge of $6,599,487 at December 31, 2015. The Company did not record any impairment charge on the property and equipment for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Advances from customers  

 

Advances from customers at December 31, 2015 and 2014 amounted to $433,050 and $495,461, respectively, and consist of prepayments from customers for merchandise that had not yet been shipped. The Company will recognize the deposits as revenue as customers take delivery of the goods and title to the assets is transferred to customers in accordance with the Company’s revenue recognition policy.

 

Revenue recognition

 

Pursuant to the guidance of ASC Topic 605 and ASC Topic 360, the Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the purchase price is fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured.

 

The Company recognizes revenues from the sale of dyeing and finishing equipment, forged rolled rings and other components, petroleum and chemical equipment upon shipment and transfer of title. The other elements may include installation and, generally, a one-year warranty. Equipment installation revenue is valued based on estimated service person hours to complete installation and is recognized when the labor has been completed and the equipment has been accepted by the customer, which is generally within a couple days of the delivery of the equipment. Warranty revenue is valued based on estimated service person hours to complete a service and generally is recognized over the contract period. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, amounts allocated to installation and warranty revenues were $154,515 and $130,565, respectively. Based on historical experience, warranty service calls and any related labor costs have been minimal.

 

Rental income is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the operating lease.

 

All other product sales with customer specific acceptance provisions, including the forged rolled rings, are recognized upon customer acceptance and the delivery of the parts or service. Revenues related to spare part sales are recognized upon shipment or delivery based on the trade terms.

 

 F-12 

 

  

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Income taxes

 

The Company is governed by the Income Tax Law of the PRC and the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset/liability method prescribed by ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates that will be in effect in the period in which the differences are expected to reverse. The Company records a valuation allowance to offset deferred tax assets if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more-likely-than-not that some portion, or all, of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The effect on deferred taxes of a change in tax rates is recognized as income or loss in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company applied the provisions of ASC 740-10-50, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes,” which provides clarification related to the process associated with accounting for uncertain tax positions recognized in the Company’s financial statements. Audit periods remain open for review until the statute of limitations has passed. The completion of review or the expiration of the statute of limitations for a given audit period could result in an adjustment to the Company’s liability for income taxes. Any such adjustment could be material to the Company’s results of operations for any given quarterly or annual period based, in part, upon the results of operations for the given period. As of December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company had no uncertain tax positions, and will continue to evaluate for uncertain positions in the future.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of the Share-Based Payment topic of ASC Topic 718 which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award.

 

Pursuant to ASC Topic 505-50, for share-based payments to consultants and other third-parties, compensation expense is determined at the “measurement date.” The expense is recognized over the vesting period of the award. Until the measurement date is reached, the total amount of compensation expense remains uncertain. The Company records compensation expense based on the fair value of the award at the reporting date. The awards to consultants and other third-parties are then revalued, or the total compensation is recalculated, based on the then current fair value, at each subsequent reporting date.

 

Shipping costs

 

Shipping costs are included in selling expenses and totaled $916,089 and $1,372,724 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Employee benefits

 

The Company’s operations and employees are all located in the PRC. The Company makes mandatory contributions to the PRC government’s health, retirement benefit and unemployment funds in accordance with the relevant Chinese social security laws. The costs of these payments are charged to the same accounts as the related salary costs in the same period as the related salary costs incurred. Employee benefit costs totaled $224,359 and $245,267 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

Advertising

 

Advertising is expensed as incurred and is included in selling, general and administrative expenses on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive (loss) income and totaled $29,459 and $24,175 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. 

 

Research and development

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. The costs primarily consist of raw materials and salaries incurred for the development and improvement of the Company’s new dyeing machinery. Research and development costs totaled $98,780 and $116,061 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. 

 

 F-13 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Foreign currency translation

 

The reporting currency of the Company is the U.S. dollar. The functional currency of the parent company is the U.S. dollar and the functional currency of the Company’s operating subsidiaries is the Chinese Renminbi (“RMB”). For the subsidiaries and affiliates, whose functional currencies are the RMB, results of operations and cash flows are translated at average exchange rates during the period, assets and liabilities are translated at the unified exchange rate at the end of the period, and equity is translated at historical exchange rates. As a result, amounts relating to assets and liabilities reported on the statements of cash flows may not necessarily agree with the changes in the corresponding balances on the balance sheets. Translation adjustments resulting from the process of translating the local currency financial statements into U.S. dollars are included in determining comprehensive income (loss). The cumulative translation adjustment and effect of exchange rate changes on cash for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 was $(925,082) and $6,338, respectively. Transactions denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the exchange rates prevailing on the transaction dates. Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the exchange rates prevailing at the balance sheet date with any transaction gains and losses that arise from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are included in the results of operations as incurred. 

 

All of the Company’s revenue transactions are transacted in the functional currency of the operating subsidiaries and affiliates. Other than for the purchase of equipment from non-Chinese suppliers, the Company does not enter into any material transaction in foreign currencies. Transaction gains or losses have not had, and are not expected to have, a material effect on the results of operations of the Company.

 

Asset and liability accounts at December 31, 2015 and 2014 were translated at 6.4907 RMB to $1.00 and at 6.1385 RMB to $1.00, respectively, which were the exchange rates on the balance sheet dates. Equity accounts were stated at their historical rate. The average translation rates applied to the statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 were 6.2175 RMB and 6.1432 RMB to $1.00, respectively. Cash flows from the Company’s operations are calculated based upon the local currencies using the average translation rate.

 

Earnings per share of common stock

 

ASC Topic 260 “Earnings per Share,” requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) with a reconciliation of the numerator and denominator of the basic EPS computation to the numerator and denominator of the diluted EPS computation. Basic EPS excludes dilution. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the earnings of the entity.

 

Basic net (loss) income per share is computed by dividing net (loss) income available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net (loss) income per share is computed by dividing net (loss) income by the weighted average number of shares of common stock, common stock equivalents and potentially dilutive securities outstanding during each period. The Company did not have any common stock equivalents and potentially dilutive common stock outstanding during the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014. The following table presents a reconciliation of basic and diluted net (loss) income per share:

 

   Year Ended December 31, 
   2015   2014 
Net (loss) income for basic and diluted net (loss) income per share of common stock  $(12,770,222)  $4,266,417 
           
Weighted average common stock outstanding– basic and diluted   3,940,622    3,715,300 
Net (loss) income per common share  - basic and diluted  $(3.24)  $1.15 

 

 F-14 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Related parties

 

Parties are considered to be related to the Company if the parties, directly or indirectly, through one or more intermediaries, control, are controlled by, or are under common control with the Company. Related parties also include principal owners of the Company, its management, members of the immediate families of principal owners of the Company and its management and other parties with which the Company may deal with if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests. The Company discloses all related party transactions. All transactions are recorded at fair value of the goods or services exchanged.

 

Comprehensive (loss) income

 

Comprehensive (loss) income is comprised of net (loss) income and all changes to the statements of stockholders’ equity, except those due to investments by stockholders, changes in paid-in capital and distributions to stockholders. For the Company, comprehensive (loss) income for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 included net (loss) income and unrealized loss from foreign currency translation adjustments. 

 

Reclassification

 

Certain reclassifications have been made in prior year’s consolidated financial statements to conform to the current year’s financial presentation. The reclassifications are primarily within operating expenses to reflect bad debt expense as a separate line item.

 

Recent accounting pronouncements

 

In June 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2015-10, “Technical Corrections and Improvements” (“ASU 2015-10”). The amendments in ASU 2015-10 cover a wide range of Topics in the Accounting Standards Codification (the “ASC”). The amendments in ASU 2015-10 represent changes to clarify the ASC, correct unintended application of guidance, or make minor improvements to the ASC that are not expected to have a significant effect on current accounting practice or create a significant administrative cost to most entities. Additionally, some of the amendments will make the ASC easier to understand and easier to apply by eliminating inconsistencies, providing needed clarifications, and improving the presentation of guidance in the ASC. Transition guidance varies based on the amendments in ASU 2015-10. The amendments in ASU 2015-10 that require transition guidance are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. All other amendments will be effective upon the issuance of ASU 2015-10. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, “Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory” (“ASU 2015-11”). The amendments in this update require an entity to measure inventory within the scope of ASU 2015-11 (the amendments in ASU 2015-11 do not apply to inventory that is measured using last-in, first-out or the retail inventory method. The amendments apply to all other inventory, which includes inventory that is measured using first-in, first-out or average cost) at the lower of cost and net realizable value. Net realizable value is the estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal, and transportation. Subsequent measurement is uncharged for inventory measured using last-in, first-out or the retail inventory method. The amendments in ASU 2015-11 more closely align the measurement of inventory in U.S. GAAP with the measurement of inventory in International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). ASU 2015-11 is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in ASU 2015-11 should be applied prospectively with earlier application permitted as of the beginning of an interim or annual reporting period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date”, which defers the effective date of ASU 2014-09 for all entities by one year. Public business entities, certain not-for-profit entities, and certain employee benefit plans should apply the guidance in ASU 2014-09 to annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Earlier application is permitted only as of annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

 F-15 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)

 

Recent accounting pronouncements (continued)

 

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes (“ASU 2015-17”). ASU 2015-17 requires that deferred tax liabilities and assets be classified as noncurrent in a classified statement of financial position. The current requirement that deferred tax liabilities and assets of a tax-paying component of an entity be offset and presented as a single amount is not affected by the amendments in ASU 2015-17. ASU 2015-17 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted and the standard may be applied either retrospectively or on a prospective basis to all deferred tax assets and liabilities. The adoption of ASU 2015-17 is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements upon adoption. The Company does not discuss recent pronouncements that are not anticipated to have an impact on or are unrelated to its consolidated financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or disclosures.

 

NOTE 2 – ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, accounts receivable consisted of the following:

 

   December 31, 2015   December 31, 2014 
Accounts receivable  $19,042,451   $21,637,365 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts   (3,218,592)   (1,321,328)
   $15,823,859   $20,316,037 

 

The Company reviews the accounts receivable on a periodic basis and makes general and specific allowances when there is doubt as to the collectability of individual balances. After evaluating the collectability of individual receivable balances, the Company increased the allowance for doubtful accounts in the amount of approximately $2,062,000 and $522,000 for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. In December 2015, based on a notice of contract termination received by the Company from its largest petroleum and chemical equipment segment customer, the customer requested some relief and has not paid the remaining outstanding accounts receivable balance of approximately $1,759,000. Accordingly, in addition to general changes in the allowance for doubtful accounts balance, the Company increased its allowance for doubtful accounts by approximately $1,759,000 which represents this customer’s full amount of outstanding accounts receivable. The Company is currently discussing this issue with the customer and the Company is unable to determine if the accounts receivable balance will be collected.

 

NOTE 3 – INVENTORIES

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, inventories consisted of the following:

 

   December 31, 2015   December 31, 2014 
Raw materials  $690,824   $835,589 
Work-in-process   1,593,815    1,454,999 
Finished goods   635,771    2,132,080 
    2,920,410    4,422,668 
Less: reserve for obsolete inventories   (1,093,326)   (181,646)
   $1,827,084   $4,241,022 

 

The Company establishes a reserve to mark down its inventories for estimated unmarketable inventories equal to the difference between the cost of inventories and the estimated net realizable value based on assumptions about the usability of the inventories, future demand and market conditions. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company increased the reserve for obsolete inventories in the amount of approximately $962,000 and $0, respectively, which has been included in cost of revenues. In December 2015, based on a notice of contract termination received by the Company from its largest petroleum and chemical equipment segment customer, the Company increased its reserve for obsolete inventories by approximately $836,000 for all remaining inventories manufactured to the specifications of such customer and not readily saleable to other customers.

 

 F-16 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 4 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, property and equipment consisted of the following:

 

   Useful life  December 31,
2015
   December 31,
2014
 
Office equipment and furniture  5 years  $165,403   $166,734 
Manufacturing equipment  5 -10 years   66,381,394    76,870,025 
Vehicles  5 years   194,552    205,714 
Building and building improvements  5 - 20 years   24,668,268    26,083,624 
       91,409,617    103,326,097 
Less: accumulated depreciation      (39,655,653)   (33,697,500)
      $51,753,964   $69,628,597 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, depreciation expense amounted to $8,128,805 and $8,469,771, respectively, of which $7,299,775 and $7,244,647, respectively, was included in cost of revenues. In 2014, $503,675 of the depreciation expense related to the ESR equipment, which was held for operating lease in 2014, was included as a reduction in rental income, and the remainder was included in operating expenses. In 2015 the equipment was treated as equipment held for sale, and no depreciation expense was taken with respect to that equipment.

 

At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company conducted an impairment assessment on property and equipment based on the guidelines established in ASC Topic 360 to determine the estimated fair market value of property and equipment as of December 31, 2015 and 2014. Such analysis considered future use of such equipment, consultation with equipment resellers, and other industry factors. Upon completion of the 2015 impairment analysis, the Company determined that the carrying value exceeded the fair market value on certain equipment used in the Company’s petroleum and chemical equipment segment and forged rolled rings and related components segment. Accordingly, in connection with the impairment of such equipment, the Company recorded an impairment charge of $6,599,487 at December 31, 2015. The Company did not record any impairment charge on the property and equipment for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

NOTE 5 – LAND USE RIGHTS

 

There is no private ownership of land in China. Land is owned by the government and the government grants land use rights for specified terms. The Company’s land use rights have terms of 45 and 50 years and expire on January 1, 2053 and October 30, 2053. The Company amortizes the land use rights over the term of the respective land use right. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, amortization of land use rights amounted to $95,076 and $96,226, respectively. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, land use rights consisted of the following:

 

   Useful life  December 31,
2015
   December 31,
2014
 
Land use rights  45 - 50 years  $4,159,920   $4,398,598 
Less: accumulated amortization      (777,849)   (726,178)
      $3,382,071   $3,672,420 

 

Amortization of land use rights attributable to future periods is as follows:

 

Year ending December 31:  Amount 
2016  $91,075 
2017   91,075 
2018   91,075 
2019   91,075 
2020   91,075 
Thereafter   2,926,696 
   $3,382,071 

 

 F-17 

 

 

CLEANTECH SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2015 and 2014

 

NOTE 6 – EQUIPMENT HELD FOR SALE

 

During the last quarter of 2013, the Company decided to dispose of or lease the ESR equipment that was used in 2010 and 2011 to produce forged products for the high performance components market to a third party and negotiations took place last quarter of 2013 through March 2014. In March 2014, the Company entered into an operating lease agreement with an eight-year term commencing April 1, 2014, with a third party, whereby the lessee leases the ESR equipment from the Company for quarterly lease payments of 1,450,000 RMB, including value-added tax (approximately $236,000 per quarter). Accordingly, at December 31, 2013, the ESR equipment was reflected as equipment held for operating lease. The lessee stopped using the equipment and stopped paying rent in early 2015. The Company has not found and does not expect to find any potential buyer or other lessees in the next twelve months. Therefore, the Company reclassified the equipment held for operating lease to equipment held for sale on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets at December 31, 2015 and 2014. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company evaluated the ESR equipment for impairment. The Company compared the estimated fair values of the equipment to its carrying value with impairment indicators and recorded an impairment charge for the excess of carrying value over fair value. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company recorded an impairment loss on ESR equipment in the amount of $417,171 and $3,799,947, respectively. As of December 31, 2015 and 2014, the equipment held for sale amounted to $0 and $422,540, respectively.

 

Equipment held for operating lease was depreciated over its estimated useful life starting from the operating lease commencement date, April 1, 2014 through December 31, 2014.  Rental payments were recorded as rental income over the lease term as earned. The related depreciation on the equipment held for operating lease was recognized as a reduction of rental income on a straight-line basis. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the Company recorded rental income of $605,214 and recorded related depreciation on the equipment held for operating lease of $503,675, respectively, which were included in rental income, net, on the accompanying consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income.

 

NOTE 7 – SHORT-TERM BANK LOANS

 

Short-term bank loans represent amounts due to various banks that are due within one year. These loans can be renewed with these banks upon maturity. At December 31, 2015 and 2014, short-term bank loans consisted of the following: