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EX-32.B - EXHIBIT 32.B - CAMPBELL SOUP COcpb-822015xexb32b.htm


UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
_______________________________________________________________________________
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended
August 2, 2015
Commission File Number
1-3822
CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY 
New Jersey
21-0419870
State of Incorporation
I.R.S. Employer Identification No.
1 Campbell Place
Camden, New Jersey 08103-1799
Principal Executive Offices
Telephone Number: (856) 342-4800
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
 
 
Capital Stock, par value $.0375
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None   
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. R Yes o No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. o Yes R No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. R Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). R Yes o No
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. R
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller  reporting company)
Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). o Yes R No
As of January 30, 2015 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter), the aggregate market value of capital stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $8,888,874,209. There were 309,777,647 shares of capital stock outstanding as of September 15, 2015.
Portions of the Registrant’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on November 18, 2015, are incorporated by reference into Part III.








TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PART II
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PART III
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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PART I

Item 1. Business
The Company
Unless otherwise stated, the terms "we," "us", "our" and the "company" refer to Campbell Soup Company and its consolidated subsidiaries.
We are a manufacturer and marketer of high-quality, branded convenience food products. We organized as a business corporation under the laws of New Jersey on November 23, 1922; however, through predecessor organizations, we trace our heritage in the food business back to 1869. Our principal executive offices are in Camden, New Jersey 08103-1799.
Background
Our long-term goal is to build shareholder value by driving sustainable, profitable net sales growth. Guided by our purpose - “Real Food That Matters For Life’s Moments,” we expect to deliver this goal by executing against a dual strategy of strengthening our core businesses while also expanding into faster-growing spaces. We have made a number of enterprise design and portfolio changes over the past several years in support of this strategy, including the following:
On January 29, 2015, we announced plans to implement a new enterprise design focused mainly on product categories. Under the new design, which we fully implemented at the beginning of 2016, our businesses are organized in the following divisions: Americas Simple Meals and Beverages, Global Biscuits and Snacks, and Campbell Fresh.
In support of the new enterprise design, we designed and implemented a new Integrated Global Services (IGS) organization to deliver shared services across the company. IGS, which became effective at the beginning of 2016, is expected to reduce costs while increasing our efficiency and effectiveness. We are also pursuing other initiatives to reduce costs and increase effectiveness, such as streamlining our organizational structure and adopting zero-based budgeting over time. See "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" for additional information on these initiatives.
In 2013, we acquired Bolthouse Farms and Plum. In 2014, we acquired Kelsen and divested our European simple meals business. Most recently, on June 29, 2015, we completed the acquisition of the assets of Garden Fresh Gourmet for approximately $230 million. Garden Fresh Gourmet is a provider of refrigerated salsa in North America, and it also produces hummus, dips and tortilla chips. We funded the Garden Fresh Gourmet acquisition through the issuance of commercial paper. See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our recent acquisitions, and Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our divestiture of the European simple meals business.
For additional information on our dual strategy of strengthening our core businesses while also expanding into faster-growing spaces, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”
2015 Reportable Segments
Through the fourth quarter of 2015, we reported the results of our operations in the following reportable segments: U.S. Simple Meals; Global Baking and Snacking; International Simple Meals and Beverages; U.S. Beverages; and Bolthouse and Foodservice. During this period, we had 11 operating segments based on product type and geographic location, and we aggregated the operating segments into the appropriate reportable segment based on similar economic characteristics, products, production processes, types or classes of customers, distribution methods and regulatory environment. See also Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The 2015 reportable segments are discussed in greater detail below.
U.S. Simple Meals
The U.S. Simple Meals segment includes the following products: Campbell’s condensed and ready-to-serve soups; Swanson broth and stocks; Prego pasta sauces; Pace Mexican sauces; Campbell’s gravies, pasta, beans and dinner sauces; Swanson canned poultry; and Plum food and snacks.
Global Baking and Snacking
The Global Baking and Snacking segment aggregates the following operating segments: Pepperidge Farm cookies, crackers, bakery and frozen products in U.S. retail; Arnott’s biscuits in Australia and Asia Pacific; and Kelsen cookies globally.
International Simple Meals and Beverages
The International Simple Meals and Beverages segment aggregates the following operating segments: the retail business in Canada and the simple meals and beverages business in Asia Pacific, Latin America and China. See “Background” and Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information on the sale of the European simple meals business, which was historically

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included in this segment. The results of operations of the European simple meals business have been reflected as discontinued operations.
U.S. Beverages
The U.S. Beverages segment represents the U.S. retail beverages business, including the following products: V8 juices and beverages, and Campbell’s tomato juice.
Bolthouse and Foodservice
Bolthouse and Foodservice comprises the Bolthouse Farms carrot products operating segment (Farms), including fresh carrots, juice concentrate and fiber; the Bolthouse Farms refrigerated beverages and refrigerated salad dressings operating segment (CPG); the North America Foodservice operating segment; and as of June 29, 2015, the Garden Fresh Gourmet operating segment. The North America Foodservice operating segment represents the distribution of products such as soup, specialty entrées, beverage products, other prepared foods and Pepperidge Farm products through various food service channels in the U.S. and Canada. None of these operating segments meets the criteria for aggregation nor the thresholds for separate disclosure.
New Reportable Segments in 2016
As discussed above, we recently announced plans to organize our businesses into three divisions: Americas Simple Meals and Beverages, Global Biscuits and Snacks, and Campbell Fresh. At the beginning of 2016, we implemented this new enterprise design, and we are now managing our operations under the design. Accordingly, we will modify our segment reporting as appropriate in future filings.
Ingredients and Packaging
The ingredient and packaging materials required for the manufacture of our food products are purchased from various suppliers. These items are subject to fluctuations in price attributable to a number of factors, including changes in crop size, cattle cycles, disease, product scarcity, demand for raw materials, commodity market speculation, energy costs, currency fluctuations, government-sponsored agricultural programs, import and export requirements, drought and other weather conditions (including the potential effects of climate change) during the growing and harvesting seasons. To help reduce some of this price volatility, we use a combination of purchase orders, short- and long-term contracts, inventory management practices and various commodity risk management tools for most of our ingredients and packaging. Ingredient inventories are at a peak during the late fall and decline during the winter and spring. Since many ingredients of suitable quality are available in sufficient quantities only at certain seasons, we make commitments for the purchase of such ingredients during their respective seasons. At this time, we do not anticipate any material restrictions on the availability of ingredients or packaging that would have a significant impact on our businesses. For information on the impact of inflation, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”
Customers
In most of our markets, sales and merchandising activities are conducted through our own sales force and our third-party broker and distributor partners. In the U.S., Canada and Latin America, our products are generally resold to consumers in retail food chains, mass discounters, mass merchandisers, club stores, convenience stores, drug stores, dollar stores and other retail, commercial and non-commercial establishments. In the Asia Pacific region, our products are generally resold to consumers through retail food chains, convenience stores and other retail, commercial and non-commercial establishments. We make shipments promptly after receipt and acceptance of orders.
Our five largest customers accounted for approximately 38% of our consolidated net sales from continuing operations in 2015, 35% in 2014 and 36% in 2013. Our largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates, accounted for approximately 20% of our consolidated net sales in 2015 and 19% in 2014 and 2013. All of our reportable segments sold products to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. or its affiliates. No other customer accounted for 10% or more of our consolidated net sales.
Trademarks and Technology
As of September 15, 2015, we owned over 3,700 trademark registrations and applications in over 160 countries. We believe our trademarks are of material importance to our business. Although the laws vary by jurisdiction, trademarks generally are valid as long as they are in use and/or their registrations are properly maintained and have not been found to have become generic. Trademark registrations generally can be renewed indefinitely as long as the trademarks are in use. We believe that our principal brands, including Arnott's, Bolthouse Farms, Campbell's, Garden Fresh Gourmet, Goldfish, Kjeldsens, Pace, Pepperidge Farm, Plum, Prego, Swanson, and V8, are protected by trademark law in the major markets where they are used. In addition, some of our products are sold under brands that have been licensed from third parties.
Although we own a number of valuable patents, we do not regard any segment of our business as being dependent upon any single patent or group of related patents. In addition, we own copyrights, both registered and unregistered, and proprietary trade secrets, technology, know-how, processes, and other intellectual property rights that are not registered.

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Competition
We experience worldwide competition in all of our principal products. This competition arises from numerous competitors of varying sizes across multiple food and beverage categories, and includes producers of generic and private label products, as well as other branded food and beverage manufacturers. All of these competitors vie for trade merchandising support and consumer dollars. The number of competitors cannot be reliably estimated. The principal areas of competition are brand recognition, taste, quality, price, advertising, promotion, convenience and service.
Working Capital
For information relating to our cash and working capital items, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”
Capital Expenditures
During 2015, our aggregate capital expenditures were $380 million. We expect to spend approximately $350 million for capital projects in 2016. Major 2016 capital projects include an ongoing Bolthouse Farms beverage and salad dressing capacity expansion project, an ongoing North American warehouse capacity expansion project, a new Australian multi-pack biscuit capacity expansion project and a new refrigeration replacement project at our Virginia, Australia, plant.
Research and Development
During the last three fiscal years, our expenditures on research and development activities relating to new products and the improvement and maintenance of existing products were $113 million in 2015, $121 million in 2014, and $128 million in 2013. The decrease from 2014 to 2015 was primarily due to savings from cost reduction and restructuring initiatives. The decrease from 2013 to 2014 was primarily due to lower incentive compensation costs and cost savings from restructuring initiatives, partially offset by the impact of acquisitions.
Environmental Matters
We have requirements for the operation and design of our facilities that meet or exceed applicable environmental rules and regulations. Of our $380 million in capital expenditures made during 2015, approximately $12 million was for compliance with environmental laws and regulations in the U.S. We further estimate that approximately $10 million of the capital expenditures anticipated during 2016 will be for compliance with U.S. environmental laws and regulations. We believe that continued compliance with existing environmental laws and regulations (both within the U.S. and elsewhere) will not have a material effect on capital expenditures, earnings or our competitive position. In addition, we continue to monitor existing and pending environmental laws and regulations within the U.S. and elsewhere, including the recently-enacted regulations in the U.S. to limit carbon dioxide emissions from electric utilities, relating to climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. While the impact of these laws and regulations cannot be predicted with certainty, we do not believe that compliance with these laws and regulations will have a material effect on capital expenditures, earnings or our competitive position.
Seasonality
Demand for our products is somewhat seasonal, with the fall and winter months usually accounting for the highest sales volume due primarily to demand for our soup products. Sales of Kelsen products are also highest in the fall and winter months due primarily to holiday gift giving. Demand for our other products is generally evenly distributed throughout the year.
Employees
On August 2, 2015, we had approximately 18,600 employees.
Financial Information
Financial information for our reportable segments and geographic areas is found in Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. For risks attendant to our foreign operations, see “Risk Factors.”
Websites
Our primary corporate website can be found at www.campbellsoupcompany.com. We make available free of charge at this website (under the “Investor Center — Financial Information — SEC Filings” caption) all of our reports (including amendments) filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including our annual report on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and our current reports on Form 8-K. These reports are made available on the website as soon as reasonably practicable after their filing with, or furnishing to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.
All websites appearing in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are inactive textual references only, and the information in, or accessible through, such websites is not incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K, or into any of our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors
In addition to the factors discussed elsewhere in this Report, the following risks and uncertainties could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations and financial condition.
We operate in a highly competitive industry
We operate in the highly competitive food industry and experience international competition in all of our principal products. The principal areas of competition are brand recognition, taste, quality, price, advertising, promotion, convenience and service. A number of our primary competitors have substantial financial, marketing and other resources. A strong competitive response from one or more of these competitors to our marketplace efforts, or a consumer shift towards private label offerings, could result in us reducing pricing, increasing marketing or other expenditures, and/or losing market share.
Our results are dependent on strengthening our core businesses while diversifying into faster-growing spaces
Our strategy is focused on strengthening our core businesses while diversifying our portfolio into faster-growing spaces. Our core businesses are concentrated in slower-growing center-store categories in traditional mass and grocery channels. Factors that may impact our success include:
our ability to identify and capitalize on faster-growing spaces;
our ability to identify and capitalize on customer or consumer trends, including those related to new or improved products or packaging or to our existing products;
our ability to design and implement effective retail execution plans;
our ability to design and implement effective advertising and marketing programs, including digital programs;
our ability to secure or maintain sufficient shelf space at retailers; and
changes in underlying growth rates of the categories in which we compete.
If we are not successful in addressing theses factors, our strategy may not be successful and/or our business or financial results may be negatively impacted.
We may not realize anticipated benefits from our cost reduction, organizational design or other initiatives
We recently implemented a new enterprise design focused mainly on product categories. We are also pursuing related initiatives to reduce costs and increase effectiveness, such as streamlining our organization and adopting zero-based budgeting over time. The success of these initiatives presents significant organizational challenges and in some cases may require extensive negotiations with third parties, such as suppliers and other business partners. As a result, we may not realize all or part of the anticipated cost savings or other benefits from the initiatives. Other events and circumstances, such as financial or strategic difficulties, delays or unexpected costs, may also adversely impact our ability to realize all or part of the anticipated cost savings or other benefits, or cause us not to realize the anticipated cost savings or other benefits on the expected timetable. If we are unable to realize the anticipated cost savings, our ability to fund other initiatives may be adversely affected. In addition, the initiatives may not advance our strategy as expected. Finally, the complexity of the initiatives will require a substantial amount of management and operational resources. Our management team must successfully execute the administrative and operational changes necessary to achieve the anticipated benefits of the initiatives. These and related demands on our resources may divert the organization’s attention from other business issues, have adverse effects on existing business relationships with suppliers and customers, and impact employee morale.
From time-to-time, we may also implement other supply chain, information technology or related initiatives. Our success is partly dependent upon properly executing, and realizing cost savings or other benefits from, these additional initiatives, which are often complex.
Any failure to implement our cost reduction, organizational design or other initiatives in accordance with our plans could adversely affect our business or financial results.
Our results may be adversely affected by the failure to execute acquisitions and divestitures successfully
Our ability to meet our objectives with respect to the acquisition of new businesses or the divestiture of existing businesses may depend in part on our ability to identify suitable buyers and sellers, negotiate favorable financial terms and other contractual terms, and obtain all necessary regulatory approvals. Potential risks of acquisitions also include:
the inability to integrate acquired businesses efficiently into our existing operations;
diversion of management's attention from other business concerns;
potential loss of key employees and/or customers of acquired businesses;

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potential assumption of unknown liabilities;
the inability to implement promptly an effective control environment;
potential impairment charges if purchase assumptions are not achieved or market conditions decline; and
the risks inherent in entering markets or lines of business with which we have limited or no prior experience.
Acquisitions outside the U.S. may present unique challenges and increase our exposure to risks associated with foreign operations, including foreign currency risks and risks associated with local regulatory regimes. For divestitures, potential risks may also include the inability to separate divested businesses or business units from us effectively and efficiently and to reduce or eliminate associated overhead costs. Our business or financial results may be negatively affected if acquisitions or divestitures are not successfully implemented or completed.
Disruption to our supply chain could adversely affect our business
Our ability to manufacture and/or sell our products may be impaired by damage or disruption to our manufacturing or distribution capabilities, or to the capabilities of our suppliers or contract manufacturers, due to factors that are hard to predict or beyond our control, such as adverse weather conditions, natural disasters, fire, terrorism, pandemics, strikes or other events. Production of the agricultural commodities used in our business may also be adversely affected by drought, water scarcity, temperature extremes, scarcity of suitable agricultural land, crop disease and/or crop pests. Failure to take adequate steps to mitigate the likelihood or potential impact of such events, or to effectively manage such events if they occur, may adversely affect our business or financial results, particularly in circumstances where a product is sourced from a single supplier or location. Disputes with significant suppliers or contract manufacturers, including disputes regarding pricing or performance, may also adversely affect our ability to manufacture and/or sell our products, as well as our business or financial results.
Our non-U.S. operations pose additional risks to our business
In 2015, approximately 21% of our consolidated net sales from continuing operations were generated outside of the U.S. Sales outside the U.S. are expected to continue to represent a significant portion of consolidated net sales. Our business or financial performance may be adversely affected due to the risks of doing business in markets outside of the U.S., including but not limited to the following:
unfavorable changes in tariffs, quotas, trade barriers or other export and import restrictions;
the difficulty and/or costs of complying with a wide variety of laws, treaties and regulations, including anti-corruption laws and regulations such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act;
the difficulty and/or costs of designing and implementing an effective control environment across diverse regions and employee bases;
the adverse impact of foreign tax treaties and policies;
political or economic instability, including the possibility of civil unrest, armed hostilities or terrorist acts;
the possible nationalization of operations;
the difficulty of enforcing remedies and protecting intellectual property in various jurisdictions; and
restrictions on the transfer of funds to and from countries outside of the U.S., including potentially negative tax consequences.
In addition, we hold assets and incur liabilities, generate revenue, and pay expenses in a variety of currencies other than the U.S. dollar, primarily the Australian dollar and the Canadian dollar. Our consolidated financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars, and we must translate our assets, liabilities, sales and expenses into U.S. dollars for external reporting purposes. As a result, changes in the value of the U.S. dollar due to fluctuations in currency exchange rates or currency exchange controls may materially and negatively affect the value of these items in our consolidated financial statements, even if their value has not changed in their local currency.
We face risks related to recession, financial and credit market disruptions and other economic conditions
Customer and consumer demand for our products may be impacted by weak economic conditions, recession, equity market volatility or other negative economic factors in the U.S. or other nations. Similarly, disruptions in financial and/or credit markets may impact our ability to manage normal commercial relationships with our customers, suppliers and creditors. In addition, changes in tax or interest rates in the U.S. or other nations, whether due to recession, financial and credit market disruptions or other reasons, could impact us.
Increased regulation or regulatory-based claims could adversely affect our business or financial results
The manufacture and marketing of food products is extensively regulated. The primary areas of regulation include the processing, packaging, storage, distribution, marketing, advertising, labeling, quality and safety of our food products, as well as

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the health and safety of our employees and the protection of the environment. In the U.S., we are subject to regulation by various government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Federal Trade Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as various state and local agencies. We are also regulated by similar agencies outside the U.S. Changes in regulatory requirements (such as proposed labeling requirements), or evolving interpretations of existing regulatory requirements, may result in increased compliance cost, capital expenditures and other financial obligations that could adversely affect our business or financial results. In addition, the marketing of food products has come under increased scrutiny in recent years, and the food industry has been subject to an increasing number of legal proceedings and claims relating to alleged false or deceptive marketing under federal, state and foreign laws or regulations. Legal proceedings or claims related to our marketing could damage our reputation and/or could adversely affect our business or financial results.
Our results may be adversely impacted by increases in the price of raw and packaging materials
The raw and packaging materials used in our business include tomato paste, grains, beef, poultry, vegetables, steel, glass, paper and resin. Many of these materials are subject to price fluctuations from a number of factors, including crop size, cattle cycles, disease, product scarcity, demand for raw materials, commodity market speculation, energy costs, currency fluctuations, government-sponsored agricultural programs, import and export requirements, drought and other weather conditions (including the potential effects of climate change). To the extent any of these factors result in an increase in raw and packaging material prices, we may not be able to offset such increases through productivity or price increases or through our commodity hedging activity.
Adverse changes in the global climate or extreme weather conditions could adversely affect our business or operations
Our business or financial results could be adversely affected by changing global temperatures or weather patterns or by extreme or unusual weather conditions. Adverse changes in the global climate or extreme or unusual weather conditions could:
unfavorably impact the cost or availability of raw or packaging materials, especially if such events have a negative impact on agricultural productivity or on the supply of water;
disrupt our ability, or the ability of our suppliers or contract manufacturers, to manufacture or distribute our products;
disrupt the retail operations of our customers; or
unfavorably impact the demand for, or the consumer's ability to purchase, our products.
In addition, there is growing concern that the release of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere may be impacting global temperatures and weather patterns and contributing to extreme or unusual weather conditions. This growing concern may result in more regional, federal, and/or global legal and regulatory requirements to reduce or mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases. Adoption of such additional regulation may result in increased compliance costs, capital expenditures, and other financial obligations that could adversely affect our business or financial results.
Price increases may not be sufficient to cover increased costs, or may result in declines in sales volume due to pricing elasticity in the marketplace
We intend to pass along to customers some or all cost increases in raw and packaging materials and other inputs through increases in the selling prices of, or decreases in the packaging sizes of, some of our products. Higher product prices or smaller packaging sizes may result in reductions in sales volume. To the extent the price increases or packaging size decreases are not sufficient to offset increased raw and packaging materials and other input costs, and/or if they result in significant decreases in sales volume, our business results and financial condition may be adversely affected.
We may be adversely impacted by a changing customer landscape and the increased significance of some of our customers
Our businesses are largely concentrated in the traditional retail grocery trade. In recent years, alternative retail grocery channels, such as dollar stores, drug stores, club stores and Internet-based retailers, have increased their market share. This trend towards alternative channels is expected to continue in the future. If we are not successful in pursuing our strategy to expand sales in alternative retail grocery channels, our business or financial results may be adversely impacted. In addition, consolidations in the traditional retail grocery trade have produced large, sophisticated customers with increased buying power and negotiating strength who may seek lower prices, increased promotional programs funded by their suppliers or more favorable terms. These customers may use more of their shelf space for their private label products. If we are unable to use our scale, marketing expertise, product innovation and category leadership positions to respond to these customer dynamics, our business or financial results could be negatively impacted.
In 2015, our five largest customers accounted for approximately 38% of our consolidated net sales, with the largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates, accounting for approximately 20% of our consolidated net sales. Disruption of sales to any of these customers, or to any of our other large customers, for an extended period of time could adversely affect our business or financial results.

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If our food products become adulterated or are mislabeled, we might need to recall those items, and we may experience product liability claims if consumers are injured
We may need to recall some of our products if they become adulterated or if they are mislabeled, and we may also be liable if the consumption of any of our products causes injury to consumers. A widespread product recall could result in significant losses due to the costs of a recall, the destruction of product inventory, and lost sales due to the unavailability of product for a period of time. We could also suffer losses from a significant adverse product liability judgment. A significant product recall or product liability claim could also result in adverse publicity, damage to our reputation, and a loss of consumer confidence in the safety and/or quality of our products, ingredients or packaging. Such a loss of confidence could occur even in the absence of a recall or a major product liability claim.
We may be adversely impacted by inadequacies in, or security breaches of, our information technology systems
Our information technology systems are critically important to our operations. We rely on our information technology systems (some of which are outsourced to third parties) to manage the data, communications and business processes for all of our functions, including our marketing, sales, manufacturing, logistics, customer service, accounting and administrative functions. If we do not allocate and effectively manage the resources necessary to build, sustain and protect an appropriate technology infrastructure, our business or financial results could be negatively impacted. Furthermore, our information technology systems may be vulnerable to material security breaches (including the access to or acquisition of customer, consumer or other confidential data), cyber-based attacks or other material system failures. If we are unable to prevent material failures, our operations may be impacted, and we may suffer other negative consequences such as reputational damage, litigation, remediation costs and/or penalties under various data privacy laws and regulations.
Our results may be negatively impacted if consumers do not maintain their favorable perception of our brands
We have a number of iconic brands with significant value. Maintaining and continually enhancing the value of these brands is critical to the success of our business. Brand value is based in large part on consumer perceptions. Success in promoting and enhancing brand value depends in large part on our ability to provide high-quality products. Brand value could diminish significantly due to a number of factors, including consumer perception that we have acted in an irresponsible manner, adverse publicity about our products, packaging and/or ingredients (whether or not valid), our failure to maintain the quality of our products, the failure of our products to deliver consistently positive consumer experiences, or the products becoming unavailable to consumers. The growing use of social and digital media by consumers increases the speed and extent that information and opinions can be shared. Negative posts or comments about us, our brands, products or packaging on social or digital media could seriously damage our brands and reputation. If we do not maintain the favorable perception of our brands, our results could be negatively impacted.
An impairment of the carrying value of goodwill or other indefinite-lived intangible assets could negatively affect our financial results and net worth
As of August 2, 2015, we had goodwill of $2.3 billion and other indefinite-lived intangible assets of $960 million. Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are initially recorded at fair value and not amortized, but are tested for impairment at least annually or more frequently if impairment indicators arise. We test goodwill at the reporting unit level by comparing the carrying value of the net assets of the reporting unit, including goodwill, to the unit's fair value. Similarly, we test indefinite-lived intangible assets by comparing the fair value of the assets to their carrying values. Fair value for both goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets is determined based on a discounted cash flow analysis. If the carrying values of goodwill or indefinite-lived intangible assets exceed their fair value, the goodwill or indefinite-lived intangible assets are considered impaired and reduced to fair value. Factors that could result in an impairment include a change in revenue growth rates, operating margins, weighted average cost of capital, future economic and market conditions or assumed royalty rates. An impairment of the carrying value of goodwill or other indefinite-lived intangible assets could negatively affect our financial results and net worth.
We may be adversely impacted by legal proceedings or claims
We are party to a variety of legal proceedings and claims arising out of the normal course of business. Since litigation is inherently uncertain, there is no guarantee that we will be successful in defending ourselves against such proceedings or claims, or that our assessment of the materiality or immateriality of these matters, including any reserves taken in connection with such matters, will be consistent with the ultimate outcome of such proceedings or claims. In addition, our reputation could be damaged by allegations made in legal proceeding or claims (even if untrue). In the event we are unable to successfully defend ourselves against these proceedings or claims, or if our assessment of the materiality of these proceedings or claims proves inaccurate, our business or financial results may be adversely affected.
We may be adversely impacted by increased liabilities and costs related to our defined benefit pension plans
We sponsor a number of defined benefit pension plans for employees in the U.S. and various non-U.S. locations. The major defined benefit pension plans are funded with trust assets invested in a globally diversified portfolio of securities and other investments. Changes in regulatory requirements or the market value of plan assets, investment returns, interest rates and mortality rates may affect the funded status of our defined benefit pension plans and cause volatility in the net periodic benefit cost, future

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funding requirements of the plans and the funded status as recorded on the balance sheet. A significant increase in our obligations or future funding requirements could have a material adverse effect on our financial results.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2. Properties
Our principal executive offices are company-owned and located in Camden, New Jersey. The following table sets forth our principal manufacturing facilities and the business segment that primarily uses each of the facilities:
Principal Manufacturing Facilities
Inside the U.S.
 
 
 
 
California
 
Michigan
 
Texas
Bakersfield (BFS)
 
Ferndale (BFS)
 
Paris (USSM/USB/ISMB/BFS)
Dixon (USSM/USB)
 
Grand Rapids (BFS)
 
Utah
Stockton (USSM/USB)
 
New Jersey
 
Richmond (GBS)
Connecticut
 
East Brunswick (GBS)
 
Washington
Bloomfield (GBS)
 
North Carolina
 
Everett (BFS)
Florida
 
Maxton (USSM/ISMB)
 
Prosser (BFS)
Lakeland (GBS)
 
Ohio
 
Wisconsin
Illinois
 
Napoleon (USSM/USB/BFS/ISMB)
 
Milwaukee (USSM)
Downers Grove (GBS)
 
Willard (GBS)
 
 
 
 
Pennsylvania
 
 
 
 
Denver (GBS)
 
 
 
 
Downingtown (GBS/BFS)
 
 
Outside the U.S.
 
 
 
 
Australia
 
Canada
 
Indonesia
Huntingwood (GBS)
 
Toronto (USSM/ISMB/BFS)
 
Jawa Barat (GBS)
Marleston (GBS)
 
Denmark
 
Malaysia
Shepparton (ISMB)
 
Nørre Snede (GBS)
 
Selangor Darul Ehsan (ISMB)
Virginia (GBS)
 
Ribe (GBS)
 
 
____________________________________ 
USSM - U.S. Simple Meals
GBS - Global Baking and Snacking
ISMB - International Simple Meals and Beverages
USB - U.S. Beverages
BFS - Bolthouse and Foodservice
Each of the foregoing manufacturing facilities is company-owned, except the Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia, and the East Brunswick, New Jersey, facilities, which are leased. We also maintain executive offices in Norwalk, Connecticut; Santa Monica, California; Emeryville, California; Toronto, Canada; Nørre Snede, Denmark; and North Strathfield, Australia.
We believe that our manufacturing and processing plants are well maintained and are generally adequate to support the current operations of the businesses.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
None.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

10






Executive Officers of the Company
The following list of executive officers as of September 15, 2015, is included as an item in Part III of this Form 10-K:
Name
Present Title
Age
Year First
Appointed
Executive
Officer
Mark R. Alexander
Senior Vice President
51
2009
Carlos J. Barroso
Senior Vice President
56
2013
David B. Biegger
Senior Vice President
56
2014
Ed Carolan
Senior Vice President
46
2015
Adam G. Ciongoli
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
47
2015
Anthony P. DiSilvestro
Senior Vice President - Chief Financial Officer
56
2004
Jeffrey T. Dunn
Senior Vice President
58
2015
Luca Mignini
Senior Vice President
53
2013
Denise M. Morrison
President and Chief Executive Officer
61
2003
Robert W. Morrissey
Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer
57
2012
Michael P. Senackerib
Senior Vice President
50
2012
Carlos J. Barroso served as President and Founder of CJB and Associates, LLC, an R&D consulting firm (2009 - 2013), and Senior Vice President of R&D, Pepsico Global Foods (2008 - 2009), of PepsiCo, Inc. prior to joining us in 2013. Adam G. Ciongoli served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Lincoln Financial Group (2012 - 2015) and Group General Counsel and Secretary of Willis Group Holdings, PLC (2007 - 2012) prior to joining us in 2015. Jeffrey T. Dunn served as President of Bolthouse Farms from 2008 until his promotion to Senior Vice President in 2015. Luca Mignini served as Chief Executive Officer of the Findus Italy division of IGLO Group (2010 - 2012) prior to joining us in 2013. Michael P. Senackerib served as Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer of Hertz Global Holdings, Inc. and The Hertz Corporation (2008 - 2011) prior to joining us in 2012. We have employed Mark R. Alexander, David B. Biegger, Ed Carolan, Anthony P. DiSilvestro, Denise M. Morrison and Robert W. Morrissey in an executive or managerial capacity for at least five years.
Prior to Mr. Dunn's tenure with Bolthouse Farms, he was Chief Executive Officer of Ubiquity Brands, LLC. Ubiquity Brands was the parent company of Jay Foods, Inc., a maker of salty snack foods, that voluntarily filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in October 2007.
There is no family relationship among any of our executive officers or between any such officer and any director that is first cousin or closer. All of the executive officers were elected at the November 2014 meeting of the Board of Directors, except Ed Carolan was appointed an executive officer at the March 2015 meeting with the appointment effective as of April 1, 2015, Adam G. Ciongoli was appointed an executive officer at the June 2015 meeting with the appointment effective as of July 13, 2015, and Jeff Dunn was appointed an executive officer at the January 2015 meeting with the appointment effective as of February 1, 2015.
PART II
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Capital Stock, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Market for Registrant’s Capital Stock
Our capital stock is listed and principally traded on the New York Stock Exchange. On September 15, 2015, there were 21,102 holders of record of our capital stock. Market price and dividend information with respect to our capital stock are set forth in Note 21 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Future dividends will be dependent upon future earnings, financial requirements and other factors.
Return to Shareholders* Performance Graph
The following graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return (TSR) on our stock with the cumulative total return of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index (the S&P 500) and the Standard & Poor’s Packaged Foods Index (the S&P Packaged Foods Group). The graph assumes that $100 was invested on July 30, 2010, in each of our stock, the S&P 500 and the S&P Packaged Foods Group, and that all dividends were reinvested. The total cumulative dollar returns shown on the graph represent the value that such investments would have had on July 31, 2015.


11







* Stock appreciation plus dividend reinvestment.
 
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
Campbell
 
100
 
95
 
99
 
145
 
133
 
160
S&P 500
 
100
 
120
 
131
 
164
 
190
 
212
S&P Packaged Foods Group
 
100
 
120
 
131
 
178
 
188
 
235
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Period
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased (1)
 
Average
Price Paid
Per Share (2) 
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or
Programs (3)
 
Approximate
Dollar Value of
Shares that may yet
be Purchased
Under the Plans or
Programs
($ in Millions) (3)
5/4/15 - 5/31/15
378,000

 
$46.12
 
378,000

 
$582
6/1/15 - 6/30/15
380,000

(4) 
$47.63
(4) 
350,000

 
$565
7/1/15 - 8/2/15
335,300

(5) 
$47.51
(5) 
325,300

 
$550
Total
1,093,300

 
$47.07
 
1,053,300

 
$550
____________________________________ 
(1) 
Includes 40,000 shares repurchased in open-market transactions to offset the dilutive impact to existing shareholders of issuances under stock compensation plans.
(2) 
Average price paid per share is calculated on a settlement basis and excludes commission.
(3) 
During the fourth quarter of 2015, we had a publicly announced strategic share repurchase program. Under this program, which was announced on June 23, 2011, our Board of Directors authorized the purchase of up to $1 billion of our stock. The program has no expiration date. We also expect to continue our longstanding practice, under separate authorization, of purchasing shares sufficient to offset shares issued under our incentive compensation plans.
(4) 
Includes 30,000 shares repurchased in open-market transactions at an average price of $47.63 to offset the dilutive impact to existing shareholders of issuances under stock compensation plans.
(5) 
Includes 10,000 shares repurchased in open-market transactions at an average price of $47.50 to offset the dilutive impact to existing shareholders of issuances under stock compensation plans.

12






Item 6. Selected Financial Data
FIVE-YEAR REVIEW — CONSOLIDATED
Fiscal Year
2015(1)
 
2014(2)
 
2013(3)
 
2012(4)
 
2011(5)
(Millions, except per share amounts)
 
Summary of Operations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
$
8,082

 
$
8,268

 
$
8,052

 
$
7,175

 
$
7,143

Earnings before interest and taxes
1,095

 
1,192

 
1,080

 
1,155

 
1,212

Earnings before taxes
990

 
1,073

 
955

 
1,049

 
1,100

Earnings from continuing operations
691

 
726

 
680

 
724

 
749

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
81

 
(231
)
 
40

 
53

Net earnings
691

 
807

 
449

 
764

 
802

Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company
691

 
818

 
458

 
774

 
805

Financial Position
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plant assets - net
$
2,347

 
$
2,318

 
$
2,260

 
$
2,127

 
$
2,103

Total assets
8,089

 
8,113

 
8,323

 
6,530

 
6,862

Total debt
4,095

 
4,015

 
4,453

 
2,790

 
3,084

Total equity
1,376

 
1,603

 
1,210

 
898

 
1,096

Per Share Data
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company - basic
$
2.21

 
$
2.35

 
$
2.19

 
$
2.30

 
$
2.28

Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company - assuming dilution
2.21

 
2.33

 
2.17

 
2.29

 
2.26

Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company - basic
2.21

 
2.61

 
1.46

 
2.43

 
2.44

Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company - assuming dilution
2.21

 
2.59

 
1.44

 
2.41

 
2.42

Dividends declared
1.248

 
1.248

 
1.16

 
1.16

 
1.145

Other Statistics
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
$
380

 
$
347

 
$
336

 
$
323

 
$
272

Weighted average shares outstanding - basic
312

 
314

 
314

 
317

 
326

Weighted average shares outstanding - assuming dilution
313

 
316

 
317

 
319

 
329

____________________________________ 
(All per share amounts below are on a diluted basis)
The 2014 fiscal year consisted of 53 weeks. All other periods had 52 weeks.
(1) 
The 2015 earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company were impacted by a restructuring charge and administrative expenses of $78 million ($.25 per share) associated with restructuring and cost savings initiatives in 2015.
(2) 
The 2014 earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company were impacted by the following: a restructuring charge and related costs of $36 million ($.11 per share) associated with restructuring initiatives in 2014 and 2013; pension settlement charges of $14 million ($.04 per share) associated with a U.S. pension plan; a loss of $6 million ($.02 per share) on foreign exchange forward contracts used to hedge the proceeds from the sale of the European simple meals business; $7 million ($.02 per share) tax expense associated with the sale of the European simple meals business; and the estimated impact of the additional week of $25 million ($.08 per share). Earnings from discontinued operations included a gain of $72 million ($.23 per share) on the sale of the European simple meals business.
(3) 
The 2013 earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company were impacted by the following: a restructuring charge and related costs of $90 million ($.28 per share) associated with restructuring initiatives in 2013 and $7 million ($.02 per share) of transaction costs related to the acquisition of Bolthouse Farms. Earnings from discontinued operations were impacted by an impairment charge on the intangible assets of the simple meals business in Europe of $263 million ($.83 per share) and tax expense of $18 million ($.06 per share) representing taxes on the difference between the book value and tax basis of the business.
(4) 
The 2012 earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company were impacted by the following: a restructuring charge of $4 million ($.01 per share) associated with the 2011 initiatives and $3 million ($.01 per share) of

13






transaction costs related to the acquisition of Bolthouse Farms. Earnings from discontinued operations included a restructuring charge of $2 million ($.01 per share) associated with the 2011 initiatives.
(5) 
The 2011 earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company were impacted by a restructuring charge of $39 million ($.12 per share) associated with initiatives announced in June 2011. Earnings from discontinued operations included a restructuring charge of $2 million associated with the initiatives.

Five-Year Review should be read in conjunction with the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
OVERVIEW
Description of the Company
Unless otherwise stated, the terms "we," "us","our" and the "company" refer to Campbell Soup Company and its consolidated subsidiaries.
We are a manufacturer and marketer of high-quality, branded convenience food products. Through 2015, we reported the results of operations in the following reportable segments: U.S. Simple Meals; Global Baking and Snacking; International Simple Meals and Beverages; U.S. Beverages; and Bolthouse and Foodservice.
In 2013, we acquired Bolthouse Farms and Plum. In 2014, we acquired Kelsen and divested our European simple meals business. Most recently, on June 29, 2015, we completed the acquisition of the assets of Garden Fresh Gourmet for $232 million, subject to post-closing adjustments. Garden Fresh Gourmet is a provider of refrigerated salsa in North America, and it also produces hummus, dips and tortilla chips. See Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our recent acquisitions, and Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on our divestiture of the European simple meals business.
Key Strategies
Our long-term goal is to build shareholder value by driving sustainable, profitable net sales growth. Guided by our purpose - “Real Food That Matters For Life’s Moments,” we expect to deliver this goal by executing against a dual strategy of strengthening our core businesses while also expanding into faster-growing spaces.
New Enterprise Design
We recently implemented a new enterprise design that better aligns with our dual strategy. Under the new design, which we fully implemented at the beginning of 2016, our businesses are now organized in three divisions focused mainly on product categories. Each division also has a defined portfolio role. The new divisions and their portfolio roles are:
Americas Simple Meals and Beverages is our largest division. We expect to manage this division for moderate growth, consistent with the categories in which we operate, and for margin expansion. Americas Simple Meals and Beverages, which includes U.S. soup, will serve as a key economic engine for many years to come.
Global Biscuits and Snacks is focused on expanding in developed and developing markets while improving margins. This division unifies our Pepperidge Farm, Arnott’s and Kelsen businesses around the world.
Campbell Fresh includes Bolthouse Farms, Garden Fresh Gourmet and our refrigerated soup business. We plan to make focused investments in this division to accelerate sales growth and to expand into new categories in packaged fresh.
In support of our new enterprise design, we designed and implemented a new Integrated Global Services (IGS) organization to deliver shared services across the company. IGS became effective at the beginning of 2016 and is a key element in our efforts to reduce costs while also increasing our efficiency and effectiveness. We are also pursuing other initiatives to reduce costs, such as streamlining our organizational structure and adopting zero-based budgeting over time. In total, we expect the new IGS organization and our other cost savings initiatives to generate approximately $250 million in annual cost savings by the end of fiscal 2018. These savings are above and beyond our existing enabler program. See "Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives" for additional information on these initiatives.
Dual Strategy
With this new enterprise design in place, we plan to pursue our dual strategy by:
Providing greater transparency about the food we make;
Further embracing digital marketing and e-commerce to connect with consumers and customers in new ways;
Increasing our focus on health and wellbeing; and
Expanding our presence in developing markets.

14






Providing Greater Product Transparency
On our www.whatsinmyfood.com website, we are providing consumers with a wide range of detail about how some of our foods and beverages are made and the choices behind the ingredients we use in those products. Initially focused on some of our top U.S. products, such as Campbell’s Condensed Tomato and Chicken Noodle soups, we plan to expand this site to include all of our major products in the U.S. and Canada in 2016, with designs to expand globally over the next three fiscal years. We anticipate this enhanced transparency will lead to, or accelerate, changes in our products, including our continued efforts to remove many artificial ingredients where feasible.
Embracing Digital Marketing and E-Commerce
We plan to complement the growing consumer shift to digital and mobile technologies by focusing a larger percentage of our marketing efforts on digital marketing and e-commerce. For example, in 2016 we expect to spend a larger portion of our overall media budget on digital media, while reducing our spending on traditional television media. We also plan to continue our focus on e-commerce capabilities in 2016.
Increasing Focus on Health and Wellbeing
Capitalizing on recent consumer and retailer trends towards fresh and/or healthy products, we plan to increase our focus on our fresh and packaged fresh products. While other parts of our business will continue to provide shelf-stable products that are appealing to health-conscious consumers, our new Campbell Fresh division has a diverse portfolio of fresh and packaged fresh offerings that should help retailers attract these important customers. We expect the Campbell Fresh division to provide us with the needed scale to better compete in the growing perimeter of traditional retail outlets. The recent acquisition of Garden Fresh Gourmet, which provides refrigerated salsa, hummus and dips, as well as tortilla chips, compliments Campbell Fresh’s existing portfolio.
Expanding Presence in Developing Markets
In 2016, we plan to continue to focus on expanding our presence in developing markets, especially our Global Biscuits and Snacks business in Asia. Our new enterprise design unifies all of our biscuit and snacks brands under a single integrated division - Global Biscuits and Snacks. We expect this new structure to help unlock the value of our biscuit and snack brands and to provide a platform to extend these brands across both faster growing developing markets, as well as our existing developed markets.
To support these four imperatives, we will continue to evaluate external development opportunities, ranging from acquisitions to strategic alliances such as joint ventures and other strategic partnerships.
Executive Summary
This Executive Summary provides significant highlights from the discussion and analysis that follows.
There were 53 weeks in 2014. There were 52 weeks in 2015 and 2013.
Net sales decreased 2% in 2015 to $8.082 billion, primarily due to the impact of currency translation and one less week compared to the prior year, partly offset by higher selling prices.
Gross profit, as a percent of sales, decreased to 34.7% from 35.1% a year ago. The decrease was primarily due to cost inflation and increased supply chain costs, partly offset by productivity improvements and higher selling prices.
Administrative expenses increased 3% to $593 million from $573 million a year ago. The current year included $22 million of costs related to the implementation of the new organizational structure and cost reduction initiatives, and higher incentive compensation costs, partially offset by savings from cost reduction and restructuring initiatives.
Earnings per share from continuing operations were $2.21 in 2015, compared to $2.33 a year ago. The current and prior year included expenses of $.25 and $.20 per share, respectively, from items impacting comparability as discussed below. The additional week contributed approximately $.08 per share to earnings from continuing operations in 2014.
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company - 2015 Compared with 2014
The following items impacted the comparability of earnings and earnings per share:
In 2015, we incurred charges associated with our initiatives to implement a new enterprise design, to reduce costs and to streamline our organizational structure. We recorded a pre-tax restructuring charge of $102 million related to these initiatives. We also incurred pre-tax charges of $22 million recorded in Administrative expenses related to the implementation of the new organizational structure and cost reduction initiatives (aggregate impact of $78 million after tax, or $.25 per share). See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements and "Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives" for additional information;
In 2014, we recognized pre-tax pension settlement charges in Cost of products sold of $22 million ($14 million after tax, or $.04 per share) associated with a U.S. pension plan. The settlements resulted from the level of lump sum distributions from the plan's assets in 2014, primarily due to the closure of the facility in Sacramento, California;

15






On October 28, 2013, we completed the sale of our simple meals business in Europe. In 2014, we recorded a loss of $9 million ($6 million after tax, or $.02 per share) on foreign exchange forward contracts used to hedge the proceeds from the sale of our European simple meals business. The loss was included in Other expenses. In addition, we recorded tax expense of $7 million ($.02 per share) associated with the sale of the business;
In 2014, we recorded a pre-tax restructuring charge of $54 million ($33 million after tax, or $.10 per share) associated with initiatives to streamline our salaried workforce in North America and our workforce in the Asia Pacific region; restructure manufacturing and streamline operations for our soup and broth business in China; improve supply chain efficiency in Australia; and reduce overhead across the organization. See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements and "Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives" for additional information; and
In 2013, we implemented several initiatives to improve our U.S. supply chain cost structure and increase asset utilization across our U.S. thermal plant network; expand access to manufacturing and distribution capabilities in Mexico; improve our Pepperidge Farm bakery supply chain cost structure; and reduce overhead in North America. In 2014, we recorded a pre-tax restructuring charge of $1 million and restructuring-related costs of $3 million in Cost of products sold (aggregate impact of $3 million after tax, or $.01 per share) related to the 2013 initiatives. See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements and "Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives" for additional information.
The items impacting comparability are summarized below:
 
2015
 
2014
(Millions, except per share amounts)
Earnings
Impact
 
EPS
Impact
 
Earnings
Impact
 
EPS
Impact
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
691

 
$
2.21

 
$
737

 
$
2.33

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Restructuring charges and related costs/implementation costs
$
(78
)
 
$
(.25
)
 
$
(36
)
 
$
(.11
)
Pension settlement charges

 

 
(14
)
 
(.04
)
Loss on foreign exchange forward contracts

 

 
(6
)
 
(.02
)
Tax expense associated with sale of business

 

 
(7
)
 
(.02
)
Impact of items on earnings from continuing operations(1)
$
(78
)
 
$
(.25
)
 
$
(63
)
 
$
(.20
)
____________________________________
(1) 
The sum of the individual per share amounts may not add due to rounding.
Earnings from continuing operations were $691 million ($2.21 per share) in 2015, compared to $737 million ($2.33 per share) in 2014. The additional week contributed approximately $25 million ($.08 per share) to earnings from continuing operations in 2014. After adjusting for the 53rd week and other items impacting comparability, earnings decreased primarily due to a lower gross margin percentage and the impact of currency translation, partially offset by an increase in sales on a constant currency basis, lower marketing and selling expenses, lower interest expense and a lower effective tax rate. Currency translation had a negative impact of $.06 on earnings per share in the current year. Earnings per share benefited from a reduction in the weighted average diluted shares outstanding, primarily due to share repurchases under our strategic share repurchase program.
We sold our European simple meals business on October 28, 2013. See "Discontinued Operations" for additional information.
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company - 2014 Compared with 2013
In addition to the 2014 items that impacted comparability of Earnings from continuing operations previously disclosed, the following items impacted the comparability of earnings and earnings per share:
In 2013, we implemented several initiatives to improve our U.S. supply chain cost structure and increase asset utilization across our U.S. thermal plant network; expand access to manufacturing and distribution capabilities in Mexico; improve our Pepperidge Farm bakery supply chain cost structure; and reduce overhead in North America. In 2013, we recorded a pre-tax restructuring charge of $51 million and restructuring-related costs of $91 million in Cost of products sold (aggregate impact of $90 million after tax, or $.28 per share) related to the 2013 initiatives. See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements and "Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives" for additional information; and
In 2013, we incurred pre-tax transaction costs of $10 million ($7 million after tax, or $.02 per share) associated with the acquisition of Bolthouse Farms, which closed on August 6, 2012. The costs were included in Other expenses.

16






The items impacting comparability are summarized below:
 
2014
 
2013
(Millions, except per share amounts)
Earnings
Impact
 
EPS
Impact
 
Earnings
Impact
 
EPS
Impact
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
737

 
$
2.33

 
$
689

 
$
2.17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Restructuring charges and related costs
$
(36
)
 
$
(.11
)
 
$
(90
)
 
$
(.28
)
Pension settlement charges
(14
)
 
(.04
)
 

 

Loss on foreign exchange forward contracts
(6
)
 
(.02
)
 

 

Tax expense associated with sale of business
(7
)
 
(.02
)
 

 

Acquisition transaction costs

 

 
(7
)
 
(.02
)
Impact of items on earnings from continuing operations(1)
$
(63
)
 
$
(.20
)
 
$
(97
)
 
$
(.31
)
____________________________________
(1) 
The sum of the individual per share amounts may not add due to rounding.
Earnings from continuing operations were $737 million ($2.33 per share) in 2014, compared to $689 million ($2.17 per share) in 2013. After adjusting for items impacting comparability, earnings increased primarily due to lower administrative expenses, the benefit of the additional week and lower marketing expenses, partly offset by a lower gross margin percentage, lower sales (excluding the impact of acquisitions and the 53rd week), and a higher effective tax rate. The additional week contributed approximately $25 million ($.08 per share) to earnings from continuing operations in 2014.
Net earnings (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests
We own a 60% controlling interest in a joint venture formed with Swire Pacific Limited to support the development of our soup and broth business in China. The joint venture began operations on January 31, 2011. In 2014, together with our joint venture partner, we agreed to restructure manufacturing and streamline operations for our soup and broth business in China. The after-tax restructuring charge attributable to the noncontrolling interest was $5 million.
We also own a 70% controlling interest in a Malaysian food products manufacturing company.
The noncontrolling interests' share in the net earnings (loss) was included in Net earnings (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests in the Consolidated Statements of Earnings.
DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS
Sales
An analysis of net sales by reportable segment follows:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
% Change
(Millions)
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2015/2014
 
2014/2013
U.S. Simple Meals
$
2,930

 
$
2,944

 
$
2,849

 
—%
 
3%
Global Baking and Snacking
2,375

 
2,440

 
2,273

 
(3)
 
7
International Simple Meals and Beverages
700

 
780

 
869

 
(10)
 
(10)
U.S. Beverages
689

 
723

 
742

 
(5)
 
(3)
Bolthouse and Foodservice
1,388

 
1,381

 
1,319

 
1
 
5
 
$
8,082

 
$
8,268

 
$
8,052

 
(2)%
 
3%

17






An analysis of percent change of net sales by reportable segment follows:
2015 versus 2014
U.S.
Simple
Meals
 
Global
Baking
and
Snacking
 
International
Simple Meals
and
Beverages (3)
 
U.S.
Beverages
 
Bolthouse and Foodservice (3)
 
Total (3)
Volume and Mix
—%
 
2%
 
1%
 
(3)%
 
2%
 
—%
Price and Sales Allowances
1
 
1
 
1
 
1
 
 
1
Increased Promotional Spending(1)
 
 
(1)
 
(1)
 
 
Currency
 
(4)
 
(9)
 
 
(1)
 
(2)
Net Accounting(2)
 
 
(1)
 
 
 
Acquisitions
 
 
 
 
1
 
Estimated Impact of 53rd week
(1)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
—%
 
(3)%
 
(10)%
 
(5)%
 
1%
 
(2)%

2014 versus 2013
U.S.
Simple
Meals
 
Global
Baking
and
Snacking
 
International
Simple Meals
and
Beverages
 
U.S.
Beverages (3)
 
Bolthouse and Foodservice
 
Total
Volume and Mix
—%
 
1%
 
(2)%
 
(5)%
 
3%
 
—%
Price and Sales Allowances
2
 
2
 
(1)
 
 
 
1
Decreased/(Increased) Promotional Spending(1)
(2)
 
(3)
 
 
1
 
(1)
 
(2)
Currency
 
(3)
 
(6)
 
 
 
(1)
Net Accounting(2)
 
 
(3)
 
 
 
Acquisitions
2
 
8
 
 
 
1
 
3
Estimated Impact of 53rd week
1
 
2
 
2
 
2
 
2
 
2
 
3%
 
7%
 
(10)%
 
(3)%
 
5%
 
3%
__________________________________________
(1)
Represents revenue reductions from trade promotion and consumer coupon redemption programs.
(2)
Beginning in 2014, revenue in Mexico is presented on a net accounting basis in connection with a new business model under which the cost of certain services provided by our suppliers is netted against revenue.
(3) 
Sum of the individual amounts does not add due to rounding.
In 2015, U.S. Simple Meals sales were comparable to the year-ago period. U.S. soup sales declined 3%, with 1% due to the impact of the 53rdweek. Further details of U.S. soup include:
Sales of Campbell’s condensed soups decreased 3%, with declines in both eating and cooking varieties. Lower volumes were partially offset by higher selling prices and reduced promotional spending.
Sales of ready-to-serve soups decreased 5%.
Broth sales increased 3% due to gains in aseptically-packaged broth, partially offset by declines in canned broth.
Sales of other simple meals increased 5%, primarily due to growth in Prego pasta sauces, Plum products and Campbell's dinner sauces, partially offset by lower sales in other simple meal products.
In 2014, U.S. Simple Meals sales increased 3%. U.S. soup sales decreased 1%. Excluding the benefit of the 53rd week, U.S. soup sales decreased 2%. Further details of U.S. soup, excluding the benefit of the 53rd week, include:
Sales of Campbell’s condensed soups decreased 3%, with declines in eating varieties partially offset by gains in cooking varieties. Lower volumes and increased promotional spending were partly offset by higher selling prices.
Sales of ready-to-serve soups decreased 6%, primarily due to declines in canned and microwavable soup varieties.
Broth sales increased 8%, primarily due to more effective marketing programs, innovation and distribution gains.
Sales of other simple meals increased 15%, primarily due to the acquisition of Plum in June 2013, which contributed 9 points of growth. Excluding the impact of the acquisition and the benefit of the 53rd week, sales increased due to gains in Prego pasta sauces, which benefited from the launch of Alfredo sauces; and Campbell's dinner sauces, which benefited from the introduction in 2014 of Campbell's Slow Cooker Sauces; partially offset by declines in Campbell's canned gravy products.

18






In 2015, Global Baking and Snacking sales decreased 3%. In Arnott's, sales decreased due to the impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, sales of Arnott's products increased due to volume gains and higher selling prices in Australia and Indonesia. Pepperidge Farm sales declined primarily due to the impact of the 53rdweek. Excluding the impact of the 53rdweek, Pepperidge Farm sales increased due to gains in fresh bakery, and crackers and cookies, partially offset by declines in frozen products.
In 2014, Global Baking and Snacking sales increased 7%. The acquisition of Kelsen contributed $193 million to sales, or 8 points of growth. Excluding the impact of the acquisition and the benefit of the 53rd week, sales decreased primarily due to the impact of currency translation. Excluding the benefit of the 53rd week, Pepperidge Farm sales increased slightly with growth in fresh bakery and Goldfish crackers, partially offset by declines in adult cracker varieties and frozen products. In fresh bakery, sales increased due to gains in sandwich bread and rolls. In Arnott's, sales decreased primarily due to the impact of currency translation and sales declines in Australia in savory and chocolate varieties, partially offset by strong gains in Indonesia and the benefit of the 53rd week. In 2014, we increased trade spending in Arnott's and Pepperidge Farm to remain competitive.
In 2015, International Simple Meals and Beverages sales decreased 10%. In Canada, sales decreased due to the impact of currency translation and declines in beverages, partially offset by gains in baked snacks. In the Asia Pacific region, sales declined due to the impact of currency translation and the 53rd week. In Latin America, sales declined due in part to the impact of presenting revenue on a net basis and currency translation.
In 2014, International Simple Meals and Beverages sales decreased 10%. In Canada, sales decreased due to the impact of currency translation and declines in beverages, partly offset by gains in snacks. In Latin America, sales declined due to the impact of presenting revenue on a net basis and lower selling prices in Mexico. In the Asia Pacific region, sales decreased primarily due to the impact of currency translation and declines in Australia, primarily in soup, partially offset by gains in Malaysia.
In 2015, U.S. Beverages, sales decreased 5%, primarily due to declines in V8 V-Fusion beverages and V8 vegetable juice, partially offset by gains in V8 Splash beverages. U.S. Beverages continued to be under pressure from category weakness in shelf-stable juices, as well as from competition from specialty beverages and packaged fresh juices.
In 2014, U.S. Beverages sales decreased 3%, primarily from declines in V8 V-Fusion multi-serve beverages and softness in single-serve beverages, due in part to the transition in 2014 to a new distribution network for the immediate consumption channel. U.S. Beverages continued to be under pressure from category weakness in shelf-stable juices, as well as from competition from specialty beverages and packaged fresh juices.
In 2015, Bolthouse and Foodservice sales increased 1%, primarily due to gains in Bolthouse premium refrigerated beverages and salad dressings; and the acquisition of Garden Fresh Gourmet, which was acquired on June 29, 2015; partially offset by declines in Bolthouse carrots, juice concentrate and fiber. North America Foodservice sales were comparable, as volume gains and higher selling prices were offset by the impact of currency translation and the 53rdweek.
In 2014, Bolthouse and Foodservice sales increased 5%. The increase was due in part to the benefit of the 53rd week and the additional week of Bolthouse sales in 2014 as the business was acquired one week into 2013. Excluding the additional week of Bolthouse in 2014 and the benefit of the 53rd week, segment sales increased as gains in Bolthouse beverages and salad dressings were partially offset by declines in North America Foodservice. The North America Foodservice decline was due to volume declines in fresh soup sold at retail perimeter and the impact of currency translation.

19






Gross Profit
Gross profit, defined as Net sales less Cost of products sold, decreased by $93 million in 2015 from 2014 and decreased by $14 million in 2014 from 2013. As a percent of sales, gross profit was 34.7% in 2015, 35.1% in 2014 and 36.2% in 2013.
The 0.4 and 1.1 percentage-point decreases in gross margin percentage in 2015 and 2014, respectively, were due to the following factors:
 
2015
 
2014
Cost inflation, supply chain costs and other factors
(2.7)%
 
(2.5)%
Mix
(0.3)
 
(0.4)
Higher level of promotional spending
(0.1)
 
(1.1)
Reduction in restructuring-related costs
 
1.1
Impact of acquisitions (including Plum recall in 2014)
0.3
 
(0.6)
Pension settlement charges in 2014(1)
0.3
 
(0.3)
Higher selling prices
0.5
 
0.7
Productivity improvements
1.6
 
2.0
 
(0.4)%
 
(1.1)%
__________________________________________
(1) 
See Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on the pension settlement charges.
Marketing and Selling Expenses
Marketing and selling expenses as a percent of sales were 10.9% in 2015, 11.3% in 2014 and 11.8% in 2013. Marketing and selling expenses decreased 6% in 2015 from 2014. The decrease was primarily due to the impact of currency translation (approximately 2 percentage points); lower advertising and consumer promotion expenses (approximately 2 percentage points); lower marketing overhead expenses (approximately 1 percentage point); and and lower selling expenses (approximately 1 percentage point). The decline in advertising expenses was primarily in U.S. Simple Meals and U.S. Beverages, partially offset by an increase in Global Baking and Snacking. Marketing and selling expenses decreased 1% in 2014 from 2013. The decrease was primarily due to lower advertising and consumer promotion expenses (approximately 2 percentage points); the impact of currency translation (approximately 1 percentage point); lower marketing overhead expenses (approximately 1 percentage point); and lower selling expenses (approximately 1 percentage point), partially offset by the impact of acquisitions (approximately 4 percentage points).
Administrative Expenses
Administrative expenses as a percent of sales were 7.3% in 2015, 6.9% in 2014 and 8.4% in 2013. Administrative expenses increased 3% in 2015 from 2014. The increase was primarily due to costs of $22 million in 2015 related to the implementation of the new organizational structure and cost reduction initiatives (approximately 4 percentage points) and higher incentive compensation costs (approximately 4 percentage points), partially offset by savings from cost reduction and restructuring initiatives (approximately 3 percentage points) and the impact of currency translation (approximately 2 percentage points). Administrative expenses decreased 15% in 2014 from 2013. The decrease was primarily due to lower incentive compensation costs (approximately 13 percentage points); cost savings from restructuring initiatives (approximately 3 percentage points); and lower pension and other benefit expenses (approximately 2 percentage points), partially offset by the impact of acquisitions (approximately 3 percentage points).
Research and Development Expenses
Research and development expenses decreased $8 million, or 7%, in 2015 from 2014. The decrease was primarily due to savings from cost reduction and restructuring initiatives (approximately 7 percentage points). Research and development expenses decreased $7 million, or 5%, in 2014 from 2013. The decrease was primarily due to lower incentive compensation costs (approximately 4 percentage points) and cost savings from restructuring initiatives (approximately 3 percentage points), partially offset by the impact of acquisitions (approximately 3 percentage points).
Other Expenses/(Income)
Other expenses in 2015 included $17 million of amortization of intangible assets and an impairment charge of $6 million related to minor trademarks used in the Global Baking and Snacking segment. The impairment charge was recorded as a result of our annual review of intangible assets. Other expenses in 2014 included a loss of $9 million on foreign exchange forward contracts used to hedge the proceeds from the sale of the European simple meals business and $18 million of amortization of intangible assets. Other expenses in 2013 included $10 million of transaction costs associated with the acquisition of Bolthouse Farms and $14 million of amortization of intangible assets.

20






Operating Earnings
Segment operating earnings decreased 5% in 2015 from 2014. Segment operating earnings were comparable in 2014 and 2013.
An analysis of operating earnings by segment follows:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
% Change
(Millions)
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2015/2014
 
2014/2013
U.S. Simple Meals
 
$
677

 
$
714

 
$
731

 
(5)%
 
(2
)%
Global Baking and Snacking
 
350

 
332

 
316

 
5
 
5

International Simple Meals and Beverages
 
80

 
106

 
108

 
(25)
 
(2
)
U.S. Beverages
 
113

 
127

 
120

 
(11)
 
6

Bolthouse and Foodservice
 
107

 
117

 
116

 
(9)
 
1

 
 
1,327

 
1,396

 
1,391

 
(5)%
 
 %
Unallocated corporate expenses
 
(130
)
 
(149
)
 
(260
)
 
 
 
 
Restructuring charges(1)
 
(102
)
 
(55
)
 
(51
)
 
 
 
 
Earnings before interest and taxes
 
$
1,095

 
$
1,192

 
$
1,080

 
 
 
 
__________________________________________
(1)
See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on restructuring charges.
Earnings from U.S. Simple Meals decreased 5% in 2015 versus 2014. The decrease was due to cost inflation and higher supply chain costs, and the impact of the 53rd week, partially offset by productivity improvements, lower marketing expenses, higher selling prices and the benefit of lapping the Plum recall in the prior year.
Earnings from U.S. Simple Meals decreased 2% in 2014 versus 2013. The decrease was primarily due to a lower gross margin percentage and expenses related to the Plum product recall in November 2013, partly offset by lower administrative expenses, lower marketing expenses and the benefit of the additional week.
Earnings from Global Baking and Snacking increased 5% in 2015 versus 2014. The increase was primarily due to productivity improvements, higher selling prices and sales volume gains, partially offset by cost inflation and higher supply chain costs, increased marketing expenses and the impact of currency translation. The operating earnings increase reflected improvement in Kelsen due to lapping the negative impact of purchase accounting in 2014 and growth in Pepperidge Farm, partly offset by lower earnings in Arnott's, which were impacted by currency translation.
Earnings from Global Baking and Snacking increased 5% in 2014 versus 2013. Operating earnings increased primarily due to lower administrative expenses, the Kelsen acquisition, lower marketing expenses and the benefit of the additional week, partially offset by a lower gross margin percentage and the impact of currency translation. The operating earnings increase reflected growth in Pepperidge Farm and the addition of Kelsen's operating results, partly offset by lower earnings in Arnott’s.
Earnings from International Simple Meals and Beverages decreased 25% in 2015 versus 2014. The decrease was primarily due to the adverse impact of currency movements on input costs and the impact of currency translation.
Earnings from International Simple Meals and Beverages decreased 2% in 2014 versus 2013. The decrease in operating earnings was primarily due to lower sales volume and the impact of currency translation, partly offset by lower administrative expenses, a higher gross margin percentage and lower selling expenses.
Earnings from U.S. Beverages decreased 11% in 2015 versus 2014, primarily due to a lower gross margin percentage and sales volume declines, partially offset by a reduction in marketing expenses.
Earnings from U.S. Beverages increased 6% in 2014 versus 2013, primarily due to lower administrative and marketing expenses, partly offset by a lower gross margin percentage and sales volume declines.
Earnings from Bolthouse and Foodservice decreased 9% in 2015 versus 2014. The decrease was primarily due to a lower gross margin percentage in Bolthouse carrots, juice concentrate and fiber, reflecting higher carrot costs due in part to adverse weather, partly offset by an improvement in gross margin percentage in Bolthouse premium refrigerated beverages and salad dressings, reflecting lower promotional spending.
Earnings from Bolthouse and Foodservice increased 1% in 2014 versus 2013. The increase was primarily due to lower administrative expenses, the increase in sales and the benefit of the 53rd week, partly offset by a lower gross margin percentage and increased marketing investment for Bolthouse Farms.
Unallocated corporate expenses in 2015 included costs of $22 million related to the implementation of our new organizational structure and cost reduction initiatives. Unallocated corporate expenses in 2014 included pension settlement charges of $22 million

21






associated with a U.S. pension plan. The settlements resulted from the level of lump sum distributions from the plan's assets in 2014, primarily due to the closure of the facility in Sacramento, California. In addition, 2014 included a $9 million loss on foreign exchange forward contracts related to the sale of the European simple meals business and $3 million of restructuring-related costs. The remaining change was primarily due to lower losses on open commodity hedges in 2015. Unallocated corporate expenses in 2013 included $91 million of restructuring-related costs and $10 million of transaction costs associated with the Bolthouse Farms acquisition. The remaining decrease in expenses in 2014 from 2013 was primarily due to lower incentive compensation costs and gains on foreign exchange transactions.
Interest Expense/Income
Interest expense decreased to $108 million in 2015 from $122 million in 2014, reflecting lower average levels of debt.
Interest expense decreased to $122 million in 2014 from $135 million in 2013, reflecting lower interest rates on the debt portfolio. Interest income decreased to $3 million from $10 million in 2013, primarily due to lower levels of cash and cash equivalents.
Taxes on Earnings
The effective tax rate was 30.2% in 2015, 32.3% in 2014 and 28.8% in 2013. In 2015, we recognized a tax benefit of $46 million on $124 million of restructuring charges and implementation costs. In 2014, we recognized a tax benefit of $8 million on $22 million of pension settlement charges associated with a U.S. pension plan. In addition, 2014 also included a tax benefit of $17 million on $58 million of restructuring charges and related costs, a tax expense of $7 million associated with the sale of the European simple meals business and a tax benefit of $3 million on a loss of $9 million on foreign exchange forward contracts used to hedge the proceeds from the sale of the business. After adjusting for items impacting comparability, the remaining decrease in the effective rate in 2015 was primarily due to the favorable resolution of an intercompany pricing agreement between the U.S. and Canada.
In 2013, we recognized a tax benefit of $55 million on $152 million of restructuring charges and related costs and acquisition transaction costs. After adjusting for items impacting comparability, the remaining increase in the effective rate in 2014 was primarily due to the 2013 rate benefiting from lower taxes on foreign earnings and the favorable settlement of state tax matters.
Restructuring Charges and Cost Savings Initiatives
2015 Initiatives
On January 29, 2015, we announced plans to implement a new enterprise design focused mainly on product categories. Under the new design, which we fully implemented at the beginning of 2016, our businesses are organized in the following divisions: Americas Simple Meals and Beverages, Global Biscuits and Snacks, and Campbell Fresh.
In support of the new enterprise design, we designed and implemented a new IGS organization to deliver shared services across the company. IGS, which became effective at the beginning of 2016, is expected to reduce costs while increasing our efficiency and effectiveness. We are also pursuing other initiatives to reduce costs and increase effectiveness, such as streamlining our organizational structure and adopting zero-based budgeting over time.
As part of these initiatives, we commenced a voluntary employee separation program available to certain U.S.-based salaried employees nearing retirement who met age, length-of-service and business unit/function criteria. A total of 471 employees elected the program. The electing employees remained with us through July 31, 2015, with some remaining beyond July 31. We also implemented an initiative to reduce overhead across the organization by eliminating approximately 230 positions. In 2015, we recorded a restructuring charge of $102 million related to these initiatives.
Finally, we incurred charges of $22 million recorded in Administrative expenses related to the implementation of the new organizational structure and cost reduction initiatives.
The aggregate after-tax impact of restructuring charges and implementation and other costs recorded in 2015 was $78 million, or $.25 per share. A summary of the pre-tax costs associated with the 2015 initiatives is as follows:
(Millions)
Recognized
as of
August 2, 2015
Severance pay and benefits
$
94

Implementation and other costs
30

Total
$
124

The total estimated pre-tax costs for the 2015 initiatives are approximately $250 million to $325 million. We expect the costs to consist of approximately $150 million to $163 million in severance pay and benefits, and approximately $100 million to $162 million in implementation and other costs.We expect the total pre-tax costs related to the 2015 initiatives will be associated with

22






segments as follows: U.S. Simple Meals - approximately 21%; Global Baking and Snacking - approximately 28%; International Simple Meals and Beverages - approximately 6%; U.S. Beverages - approximately 5%; Bolthouse and Foodservice - approximately 5%; and Corporate - approximately 35%.
We expect substantially all costs to be cash expenditures, except for $7 million of non-cash postretirement and pension curtailment costs. We expect to incur the costs through 2018, and fund the costs through cash and short-term borrowings.
We expect the 2015 initiatives to generate pre-tax savings of approximately $145 million in 2016, and once fully implemented, annual ongoing savings of approximately $250 million beginning in 2018. In 2015, pre-tax savings were $85 million.
Segment operating results do not include restructuring charges and implementation and other costs because we evaluate segment performance excluding such charges. A summary of the pre-tax costs incurred to date associated with segments is as follows:
(Millions)
U.S.
Simple
Meals
 
Global Baking and Snacking
 
International Simple Meals and Beverages
 
U.S.
Beverages
 
Bolthouse and Foodservice
 
Corporate
 
Total
Severance pay and benefits
$
33

 
$
41

 
$
5

 
$
8

 
$
4

 
$
3

 
$
94

Implementation and other costs
5

 
2

 

 
1

 

 
22

 
30

 
$
38

 
$
43

 
$
5

 
$
9

 
$
4

 
$
25

 
$
124

2014 Initiatives
In 2014, we implemented initiatives to reduce overhead across the organization, restructure manufacturing and streamline operations for our soup and broth business in China and improve supply chain efficiency in Australia. Details of the 2014 initiatives include:
We streamlined our salaried workforce in North America and our workforce in the Asia Pacific region. Approximately 250 positions were eliminated.
Together with our joint venture partner Swire Pacific Limited, we restructured manufacturing and streamlined operations for our soup and broth business in China. As a result, certain assets were impaired, and approximately 100 positions were eliminated.
In Australia, we implemented an initiative to improve supply chain efficiency by relocating production from our biscuit plant in Marleston to Huntingwood. The relocation will continue through 2017 and will result in the elimination of approximately 90 positions.
We implemented an initiative to reduce overhead across the organization by eliminating approximately 85 positions. The actions were completed in 2015.
In 2014, we recorded a restructuring charge of $54 million ($33 million after tax, or $.10 per share, in earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company) related to the 2014 initiatives.
A summary of the pre-tax costs associated with the 2014 initiatives is as follows:
(Millions)
Total Program
Severance pay and benefits
$
41

Asset impairment
12

Other exit costs
1

Total
$
54

As of the fourth quarter of 2015, we incurred substantially all of the costs related to the 2014 initiatives. Of the aggregate $54 million of pre-tax costs, approximately $41 million represented cash expenditures. In addition, we expect to invest approximately $6 million in capital expenditures, primarily to relocate biscuit production and packaging capabilities, of which we invested approximately $3 million as of August 2, 2015. We do not expect the remaining cash outflows related to these restructuring initiatives to have a material adverse impact on our liquidity.
The 2014 initiatives generated pre-tax savings of approximately $26 million in 2014 and $57 million in 2015. We expect to generate annual ongoing savings of approximately $65 million beginning in 2016.
Segment operating results do not include restructuring charges because we evaluate segment performance excluding such charges. The total pre-tax costs of $54 million associated with segments were as follows: U.S. Simple Meals - $8 million; Global Baking and Snacking - $23 million; International Simple Meals and Beverages - $18 million; U.S. Beverages - $2 million; Bolthouse and Foodservice - $2 million; and Corporate - $1 million.

23






2013 Initiatives
In 2013, we implemented initiatives to improve supply chain efficiency, expand access to manufacturing and distribution capabilities and reduce costs. Details of the 2013 initiatives include:
We implemented initiatives to improve our U.S. supply chain cost structure and increase asset utilization across our U.S. thermal plant network, including closing our Sacramento, California, thermal plant, which produced soups, sauces and beverages. The closure resulted in the elimination of approximately 700 full-time positions and was completed in phases. Most of the positions were eliminated in 2013, and operations ceased in August 2013. We shifted the majority of Sacramento's soup, sauce and beverage production to our thermal plants in Maxton, North Carolina; Napoleon, Ohio; and Paris, Texas. We also closed our South Plainfield, New Jersey, spice plant, which resulted in the elimination of 27 positions. We consolidated spice production at our Milwaukee, Wisconsin, plant in 2013.
In Mexico, we entered into commercial arrangements with third-party providers to expand access to manufacturing and distribution capabilities. The third-party providers produce and distribute our beverages, soups, broths and sauces throughout the Mexican market. As a result of these agreements, we closed our plant in Villagrán, Mexico, and eliminated approximately 260 positions in the first quarter of 2014.
We implemented an initiative to improve our Pepperidge Farm bakery supply chain cost structure by closing our plant in Aiken, South Carolina. The plant was closed in May 2014. We shifted the majority of Aiken's bread production to our bakery plant in Lakeland, Florida. Approximately 110 positions were eliminated as a result of the plant closure.
We streamlined our salaried workforce in U.S. Simple Meals, North America Foodservice and U.S. Beverages by approximately 70 positions. This action was substantially completed in August 2013.
In 2014, we recorded a restructuring charge of $1 million related to the 2013 initiatives. In addition, we recorded approximately $3 million of costs related to the 2013 initiatives in Cost of products sold, representing other exit costs. The aggregate after-tax impact of restructuring charges and related costs recorded in 2014 was $3 million, or $.01 per share. In 2013, we recorded a restructuring charge of $51 million. In addition, we recorded approximately $91 million of costs related to these initiatives in 2013 in Cost of products sold, representing accelerated depreciation and other exit costs. The aggregate after-tax impact of restructuring charges and related costs recorded in 2013 was $90 million, or $.28 per share.
A summary of the pre-tax costs associated with the 2013 initiatives is as follows:
(Millions)
Total Program
Severance pay and benefits
$
35

Accelerated depreciation/asset impairment
99

Other exit costs
12

Total
$
146

As of the fourth quarter of 2015, we substantially completed the 2013 initiatives. Of the aggregate $146 million of pre-tax costs, approximately $43 million represented cash expenditures. In addition, we invested approximately $30 million in capital expenditures as of August 2, 2015, primarily to relocate and refurbish a beverage filling and packaging line, and relocate bread production.
Beginning in 2015, the 2013 initiatives generated annual ongoing pre-tax savings of approximately $40 million. In 2014, savings were approximately $30 million.
Segment operating results do not include restructuring charges and related costs because we evaluate segment performance excluding such charges. The total pre-tax costs of $146 million associated with segments were as follows: U.S. Simple Meals - $90 million; Global Baking and Snacking - $14 million; International Simple Meals and Beverages - $9 million; U.S. Beverages - $31 million; and Bolthouse and Foodservice - $2 million.
See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Discontinued Operations
On October 28, 2013, we completed the sale of our European simple meals business to Soppa Investments S.à r.l., an affiliate of CVC Capital Partners. The all-cash preliminary sale price was €400 million, or $548 million, and was subject to certain post-closing adjustments, which resulted in a $14 million reduction of proceeds. We recognized a pre-tax gain of $141 million ($72 million after tax, or $.23 per share) in 2014.
We have reflected the results of the European simple meals business as discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Earnings. The business was historically included in the International Simple Meals and Beverages segment.

24






Results of discontinued operations were as follows:
(Millions)
 
2014
 
2013
 
Net sales
 
$
137

 
$
532

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gain on sale of the European simple meals business
 
$
141

 
$

 
Impairment on the European simple meals business
 

 
(396
)
 
Earnings from operations, before taxes
 
14

 
65

 
Earnings (loss) before taxes
 
$
155

 
$
(331
)
 
Taxes on earnings
 
(74
)
 
100

 
Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations
 
$
81

 
$
(231
)
 
In the fourth quarter of 2013, we recorded an impairment charge on the intangible assets of this business of $396 million ($263 million after tax, or $.83 per share). In addition, we recorded $18 million in tax expense ($.06 per share) representing taxes on the difference between the book value and tax basis of the business. See also Notes 4 and 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
We expect foreseeable liquidity and capital resource requirements to be met through anticipated cash flows from operations; long-term borrowings; short-term borrowings, including commercial paper; and cash and cash equivalents. We believe that our sources of financing will be adequate to meet our future requirements.
We generated cash from operations of $1.182 billion in 2015, compared to $899 million in 2014. The increase in 2015 was primarily due to lower working capital requirements, taxes paid in 2014 on the divestiture of the European simple meals business and lower pension contributions in 2015, partially offset by lower cash earnings.
We generated cash from operations of $899 million in 2014, compared to $1.019 billion in 2013. The decrease in 2014 was primarily due to lower cash earnings and taxes paid on the divestiture of the European simple meals business, partly offset by lower working capital requirements.
Capital expenditures were $380 million in 2015, $347 million in 2014 and $336 million in 2013. Capital expenditures are expected to total approximately $350 million in 2016. Capital expenditures in 2015 included a cracker capacity expansion at Pepperidge Farm (approximately $36 million); a Bolthouse Farms beverage and salad dressing capacity expansion project (approximately $33 million); the ongoing initiative to simplify the soup-making process in North America (also known as the soup common platform initiative) (approximately $30 million); a Bolthouse Farms warehouse capacity expansion project (approximately $13 million); biscuit capacity expansion in Indonesia (approximately $13 million); continued enhancement of our corporate headquarters (approximately $12 million); and aseptic broth capacity expansion (approximately $6 million). Capital expenditures in 2014 included capacity expansion at Pepperidge Farm (approximately $48 million); the ongoing soup common platform initiative in North America (approximately $22 million); broth capacity expansion (approximately $15 million); continued enhancement of our corporate headquarters (approximately $12 million); a flexible beverage production line for Bolthouse Farms (approximately $11 million); the refurbishment of a beverage filling and packaging line for the U.S. Beverages business (approximately $10 million); the packing automation and capacity expansion projects at one of our Australian biscuit plants (approximately $10 million); and an advanced planning system in North America (approximately $4 million). Capital expenditures in 2013 included the soup capacity expansion project for the North America Foodservice business (approximately $42 million); capacity expansion at Pepperidge Farm (approximately $38 million); the ongoing soup common platform initiative in North America (approximately $20 million); the packing automation and capacity expansion projects at one of our Australian biscuit plants (approximately $19 million); and an advanced planning system in North America (approximately $11 million).
On June 29, 2015, we completed the acquisition of the assets of Garden Fresh Gourmet. The purchase price was $232 million, subject to post-closing adjustments, and was funded through the issuance of commercial paper.
On August 8, 2013, we completed the acquisition of Kelsen. The final all-cash purchase price was $331 million and was funded through the issuance of commercial paper.
On June 13, 2013, we completed the acquisition of Plum. The final all-cash purchase price was $249 million, and was funded through the issuance of commercial paper.
In March 2015, we issued $300 million of 3.30% notes that mature on March 19, 2025. Interest on the notes is due semi-annually on March 19 and September 19, commencing on September 19, 2015. The notes may be redeemed in whole, or in part, at our option at any time at the applicable redemption price. In certain circumstances, we may be required to repurchase some or

25






all of the notes upon a change in control of our company and a downgrade of the notes below investment grade. The net proceeds were used for general corporate purposes.
Long-term borrowings in 2013 included:
$400 million floating rate notes that matured on August 1, 2014. Interest on the notes was based on 3-month U.S. dollar LIBOR plus 0.30%. Interest was payable quarterly and commenced on November 1, 2012;
$450 million of 2.50% notes that mature on August 2, 2022. Interest is payable semi-annually and commenced on February 2, 2013. We may redeem the notes in whole or in part at any time at a redemption price of 100% of the principal amount plus accrued interest or an amount designed to ensure that the note holders are not penalized by the early redemption; and
$400 million of 3.80% notes that mature on August 2, 2042. Interest is payable semi-annually and commenced on February 2, 2013. We may redeem the notes in whole or in part at any time at a redemption price of 100% of the principal amount plus accrued interest or an amount designed to ensure that the note holders are not penalized by the early redemption.
The net proceeds from these issuances were used to fund the acquisition of Bolthouse Farms in 2013 for $1.561 billion. The balance of the purchase price was funded through the issuance of commercial paper.
Dividend payments were $394 million in 2015, $391 million in 2014 and $367 million in 2013. Annual dividends declared were $1.248 per share in 2015 and 2014 and $1.16 per share in 2013. The 2015 fourth quarter rate was $.312 per share.
We repurchased approximately 5 million shares at a cost of $244 million in 2015, approximately 2 million shares at a cost of $76 million in 2014, and approximately 4 million shares at a cost of $153 million in 2013. In June 2011, our Board of Directors authorized the purchase of up to $1 billion of our stock. Of the amount spent in 2015, $200 million was used to repurchase shares pursuant to our June 2011 publicly announced share repurchase program. Approximately $550 million remained available to repurchase shares under our June 2011 repurchase program as of August 2, 2015. The program has no expiration date. We also expect to continue our longstanding practice, under separate authorization, of purchasing shares sufficient to offset shares issued under incentive compensation plans. See “Market for Registrant's Capital Stock, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities” for more information.
At August 2, 2015, we had $1.543 billion of short-term borrowings due within one year, of which $1.532 billion was comprised of commercial paper borrowings. As of August 2, 2015, we issued $50 million of standby letters of credit. We have a committed revolving credit facility totaling $2.2 billion that matures in December 2018. This facility remained unused at August 2, 2015, except for $3 million of standby letters of credit that we issued under it. This revolving credit facility supports our commercial paper programs and other general corporate purposes. We may also increase the commitment under the credit facility up to an additional $500 million, upon the agreement of either existing lenders or of additional banks not currently parties to the existing credit agreements.
On October 28, 2013, we completed the sale of our European simple meals business to Soppa Investments S.à r.l., an affiliate of CVC Capital Partners, for €400 million, or $548 million. The sale price was subject to certain post-closing adjustments, which resulted in a $14 million reduction of proceeds. We used the proceeds from the sale to pay taxes on the sale, to reduce debt and for other general corporate purposes.
In September 2014, we filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission that registered an indeterminate amount of debt securities. Under the registration statement, we may issue debt securities, depending on market conditions.
We are in compliance with the covenants contained in our revolving credit facilities and debt securities.
CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER COMMITMENTS
Contractual Obligations
The following table summarizes our obligations and commitments to make future payments under certain contractual obligations as of August 2, 2015. For additional information on debt, see Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Operating leases are primarily entered into for warehouse and office facilities and certain equipment. Purchase commitments represent purchase orders and long-term purchase arrangements related to the procurement of ingredients, supplies, machinery, equipment and services. These commitments are not expected to have a material impact on liquidity. Other long-term liabilities primarily represent payments related to deferred compensation obligations. For additional information on other long-term liabilities, see Note 19 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

26






 
Contractual Payments Due by Fiscal Year
(Millions)
Total
 
2016
 
2017-2018
 
2019-2020
 
Thereafter
Debt obligations(1)
$
4,103

 
$
1,543

 
$
402

 
$
301

 
$
1,857

Interest payments(2)
885

 
103

 
190

 
159

 
433

Derivative payments(3)
20

 
12

 
8

 

 

Purchase commitments
1,004

 
778

 
97

 
76

 
53

Operating leases
139

 
38

 
48

 
32

 
21

Other long-term payments(4)
212

 

 
103

 
37

 
72

Total long-term cash obligations
$
6,363

 
$
2,474

 
$
848

 
$
605

 
$
2,436

_______________________________________
(1) 
Excludes unamortized net discount/premium on debt issuances. For additional information on debt obligations, see Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
(2) 
Interest payments for short-term borrowings are calculated based on par values and rates of contractually obligated issuances at fiscal year end. Interest payments on long-term debt are based on principal amounts and fixed coupon rates at fiscal year end.
(3) 
Represents payments of cross-currency swaps, forward exchange contracts, commodity contracts and deferred compensation hedges. Contractual payments for cross-currency swaps represent future discounted cash payments based on forward interest and spot foreign exchange rates.
(4) 
Represents other long-term liabilities, excluding unrecognized tax benefits, postretirement benefits and payments related to pension plans. For additional information on pension and postretirement benefits, see Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. For additional information on unrecognized tax benefits, see Note 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Other Commitments
We guarantee approximately 2,000 bank loans to Pepperidge Farm independent sales distributors by third-party financial institutions used to purchase distribution routes. The maximum potential amount of the future payments under existing guarantees we could be required to make is $192 million. Our guarantees are indirectly secured by the distribution routes. We do not believe that it is probable that we will be required to make guarantee payments as a result of defaults on the bank loans guaranteed. See also Note 18 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information on off-balance sheet arrangements.
INFLATION
In 2015, inflation in cost of products sold was higher than 2014, and 2014 was higher than 2013. We continue to use a number of strategies to mitigate the effects of cost inflation including increasing prices, commodity hedging and pursuing cost productivity initiatives such as global procurement strategies and capital investments that improve the efficiency of operations.
MARKET RISK SENSITIVITY
The principal market risks to which we are exposed are changes in foreign currency exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices. In addition, we are exposed to equity price changes related to certain deferred compensation obligations. We manage our exposure to changes in interest rates by optimizing the use of variable-rate and fixed-rate debt and by utilizing interest rate swaps in order to maintain our variable-to-total debt ratio within targeted guidelines. International operations, which accounted for 21% of 2015 net sales, are concentrated principally in Australia and Canada. We manage our foreign currency exposures by borrowing in various foreign currencies and utilizing cross-currency swaps and forward contracts. We enter into cross-currency swaps and forward contracts for periods consistent with related underlying exposures, and the contracts do not constitute positions independent of those exposures. We do not enter into contracts for speculative purposes and do not use leveraged instruments.
We principally use a combination of purchase orders and various short- and long-term supply arrangements in connection with the purchase of raw materials, including certain commodities and agricultural products. We also enter into commodity futures, options and swap contracts to reduce the volatility of price fluctuations of diesel fuel, wheat, soybean oil, aluminum, natural gas, cocoa, butter, corn and cheese, which impact the cost of raw materials.
The information below summarizes our market risks associated with debt obligations and other significant financial instruments as of August 2, 2015. Fair values included herein have been determined based on quoted market prices or pricing models using current market rates. The information presented below should be read in conjunction with Notes 13 through 15 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

27






The following table presents principal cash flows and related interest rates by fiscal year of maturity for debt obligations. Interest rates disclosed on variable-rate debt represent the weighted-average rates at August 2, 2015. Notional amounts and related interest rates of interest rate swaps are presented by fiscal year of maturity. For the swaps, variable rates are the weighted-average forward rates for the term of each contract.
 
Expected Fiscal Year of Maturity
 
 
 
Fair Value of Liabilities
(Millions)
2016
 
2017
 
2018
 
2019
 
2020
 
Thereafter
 
Total
 
Debt(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fixed rate
$
10

 
$
401

 
$
1

 
$
301

 
$

 
$
1,857

 
$
2,570

 
$
2,633

Weighted-average interest rate
0.23
%
 
3.05
%
 
2.40
%
 
4.50
%
 
%
 
4.08
%
 
3.95
%
 
 
Variable rate(2)
$
1,533

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
1,533

 
$
1,533

Weighted-average interest rate
0.58
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
0.58
%
 
 
Interest Rate Swaps
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash-flow swaps
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Variable to fixed
$

 
$

 
$
300

 
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
300

 
$
8

Average pay rate
%
 
%
 
3.09
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
3.09
%
 
 
Average receive rate
%
 
%
 
2.75
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
2.75
%
 
 
_______________________________________
(1) 
Excludes unamortized net premium/discount on debt issuances.
(2) 
Represents $1.532 billion of USD borrowings and $1 million equivalent of borrowings in other currencies.
As of August 3, 2014, fixed-rate debt of approximately $2.57 billion with an average interest rate of 3.94% and variable-rate debt of approximately $1.45 billion with an average interest rate of 0.42% were outstanding. As of August 3, 2014, we had swapped $250 million of variable-rate debt to fixed. The average rate to be received on these swaps was 2.73%, and the average rate to be paid was estimated to be 2.18% over the remaining life of the swaps. The swaps matured in 2015.
We are exposed to foreign exchange risk related to our international operations, including non-functional currency intercompany debt and net investments in subsidiaries. The following table summarizes the cross-currency swaps outstanding as of August 2, 2015, which hedge such exposures. The notional amount of each currency and the related weighted-average forward interest rate are presented in the Cross-Currency Swaps table.
Cross-Currency Swaps
(Millions)
 
Fiscal Year of Expiration
 
Interest Rate
 
Notional Value
 
Fair Value
Pay variable CAD
 
2016
 
0.93%
 
$
10

 
$
2

Receive variable USD
 
 
 
0.82%
 
 
 
 
Pay variable CAD
 
2016
 
0.94%
 
$
64

 
$
10

Receive variable USD
 
 
 
0.82%
 
 
 
 
Pay variable AUD
 
2016
 
2.82%
 
$
31

 
$
6

Receive variable USD
 
 
 
1.04%
 
 
 
 
Pay variable CAD
 
2017
 
1.16%
 
$
73

 
$
11

Receive variable USD
 
 
 
1.29%
 
 
 
 
Pay variable CAD
 
2017
 
1.15%
 
$
72

 
$
11

Receive variable USD
 
 
 
1.29%
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
$
250

 
$
40

The cross-currency swap contracts outstanding at August 3, 2014, represented two pay variable AUD/receive variable USD swaps with notional values totaling $86 million and five pay variable CAD/receive variable USD swaps with notional values totaling $273 million. The aggregate notional value of these swap contracts was $359 million as of August 3, 2014, and the aggregate fair value of these swap contracts was a loss of $6 million as of August 3, 2014.
We are also exposed to foreign exchange risk as a result of transactions in currencies other than the functional currency of certain subsidiaries, including subsidiary debt. We utilize foreign exchange forward purchase and sale contracts to hedge these exposures. The following table summarizes the foreign exchange forward contracts outstanding and the related weighted-average contract exchange rates as of August 2, 2015.

28






Forward Exchange Contracts
(Millions)
Notional Value
 
Average Contractual Exchange Rate (currency paid/ currency received)
Receive USD/Pay CAD
$
212

 
1.2448
Receive DKK/Pay USD
$
34

 
0.1564
Receive AUD/Pay NZD
$
17

 
1.0881
Receive USD/Pay AUD
$
13

 
1.2418
We had an additional number of smaller contracts to purchase or sell various other currencies with a notional value of $7 million as of August 2, 2015. The aggregate fair value of all contracts was a gain of $10 million as of August 2, 2015. The total notional value of forward exchange contracts outstanding was $260 million, and the aggregate fair value was a loss of $1 million as of August 3, 2014.
We enter into commodity futures, options and swap contracts to reduce the volatility of price fluctuations for commodities. The notional value of these contracts was $95 million, and the aggregate fair value of these contracts was a loss of $9 million as of August 2, 2015. The notional value of these contracts was $146 million, and the aggregate fair value of these contracts was a loss of $9 million as of August 3, 2014.
We enter into swap contracts which hedge a portion of exposures relating to certain deferred compensation obligations linked to the total return of our capital stock, the total return of the Vanguard Institutional Index, and the total return of the Vanguard Total International Stock Index. Under these contracts, we pay variable interest rates and receive from the counterparty either the total return on our capital stock; the total return of the Standard & Poor's 500 Index, which is expected to approximate the total return of the Vanguard Institutional Index; or the total return of the iShares MSCI EAFE Index, which is expected to approximate the total return of the Vanguard Total International Stock Index. The notional value of the contract that is linked to the total return on our capital stock was $17 million at August 2, 2015, and $25 million at August 3, 2014. The average forward interest rate applicable to this contract, which expires in April 2016, was 0.80% at August 2, 2015. The notional value of the contract that is linked to the return on the Standard & Poor's 500 Index was $24 million at August 2, 2015, and $22 million at August 3, 2014. The average forward interest rate applicable to this contract, which expires in March 2016, was 0.79% at August 2, 2015. The notional value of the contract that is linked to the total return of the iShares MSCI EAFE Index was $8 million at August 2, 2015, and $9 million at August 3, 2014. The average forward interest rate applicable to this contract, which expires in March 2016, was 0.71% at August 2, 2015. The fair value of these contracts was a $1 million gain at August 2, 2015, and a $3 million loss at August 3, 2014.
Our utilization of financial instruments in managing market risk exposures described above is consistent with the prior year. Changes in the portfolio of financial instruments are a function of the results of operations, debt repayment and debt issuances, market effects on debt and foreign currency, and our acquisition and divestiture activities.
SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES
We prepare our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires the use of estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented. Actual results could differ from those estimates and assumptions. See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion of significant accounting policies. The following areas all require the use of subjective or complex judgments, estimates and assumptions:
Trade and consumer promotion programs — We offer various sales incentive programs to customers and consumers, such as feature price discounts, in-store display incentives, cooperative advertising programs, new product introduction fees, and coupons. The mix between promotion programs, which are classified as reductions in revenue, and advertising or other marketing activities, which are classified as marketing and selling expenses, fluctuates between periods based on our overall marketing plans, and such fluctuations have an impact on revenues. The measurement and recognition of the costs for trade and consumer promotion programs involves the use of judgment related to performance and redemption estimates. Estimates are made based on historical experience and other factors. Typically, programs that are offered have a very short duration. Historically, the difference between actual experience compared to estimated redemptions and performance has not been significant to the quarterly or annual financial statements. However, actual expenses may differ if the level of redemption rates and performance were to vary from estimates.
Valuation of long-lived assets — Fixed assets and amortizable intangible assets are reviewed for impairment as events or changes in circumstances occur indicating that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable. Undiscounted cash flow

29






analyses are used to determine if impairment exists. If impairment is determined to exist, the loss is calculated based on estimated fair value.
Goodwill and intangible assets deemed to have indefinite lives are not amortized but rather are tested at least annually for impairment, or more often if events or changes in circumstances indicate that more likely than not the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. Goodwill is tested for impairment at the reporting unit level. A reporting unit represents an operating segment or a component of an operating segment. Goodwill is tested for impairment by either performing a qualitative evaluation or a two-step quantitative test. The qualitative evaluation is an assessment of factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, including goodwill. We may elect not to perform the qualitative assessment for some or all reporting units and perform a two-step quantitative impairment test. Fair value is determined based on discounted cash flow analyses. The discounted estimates of future cash flows include significant management assumptions such as revenue growth rates, operating margins, weighted average cost of capital, and future economic and market conditions. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds fair value, goodwill is considered impaired. The amount of the impairment is the difference between the carrying value of the goodwill and the “implied” fair value, which is calculated as if the reporting unit had just been acquired and accounted for as a business combination.
Indefinite-lived intangible assets are tested for impairment by comparing the fair value of the asset to the carrying value. Fair value is determined based on discounted cash flow analyses that include significant management assumptions such as revenue growth rates, weighted average cost of capital, and assumed royalty rates. If the fair value is less than the carrying value, the asset is reduced to fair value.
As of August 2, 2015, the carrying value of goodwill was $2,344 million. Recent acquisitions include Garden Fresh Gourmet on June 29, 2015, Kelsen in 2014, and Plum and Bolthouse Farms in 2013. As of August 2, 2015, goodwill related to the acquisitions was as follows: Garden Fresh Gourmet - $116 million, Kelsen - $115 million, Plum - $128 million and Bolthouse Farms - $692 million. As of the 2015 measurement, the estimated fair value of each reporting unit significantly exceeded the carrying value, excluding the recent acquisitions. Holding all other assumptions used in the 2015 fair value measurement constant, a 100-basis-point increase in the weighted average cost of capital would not result in the carrying value of any reporting unit, excluding the recent acquisitions, to be in excess of the fair value. Because the Garden Fresh Gourmet acquisition closed on June 29, 2015, the carrying value represents fair value. With respect to the 2013 and 2014 acquisitions, the fair value exceeded the carrying value by at least 7% and as a result, holding all other assumptions used in the 2015 fair value measurement constant, a 100-basis-point increase in the weighted average cost of capital would result in the carrying value to be in excess of the fair value. The fair value was based on significant management assumptions. If assumptions are not achieved or market conditions decline, potential impairment charges could result.
As of August 2, 2015, the carrying value of indefinite-lived trademarks was $960 million. As of August 2, 2015, trademarks related to the acquisitions in 2013 through 2015 were as follows: Garden Fresh Gourmet - $38 million, Kelsen - $120 million, Plum - $115 million and Bolthouse Farms - $383 million. Excluding the Garden Fresh Gourmet trademark acquired on June 29, 2015, holding all other assumptions used in the 2015 measurement constant, a 100-basis-point increase in the weighted average cost of capital would reduce the fair value of trademarks, and result in an impairment charge of approximately $20 million.
In the fourth quarter of 2015, as part of our annual review of intangible assets, we recognized an impairment charge of $6 million on minor trademarks used in the Global Baking and Snacking segment. The trademarks were determined to be impaired as a result of a decrease in the fair value of the brands, resulting from reduced expectations for future sales and discounted cash flows in comparison to the prior year.
In the fourth quarter of 2013, as part of our annual review of intangible assets, we recorded an impairment charge of $360 million on goodwill and $36 million on trademarks for the simple meals business in Europe. The impairment was attributable to a combination of factors, including the existence of a firm offer to purchase the business; a revised future outlook for the business, with reduced expectations for future sales and discounted cash flows, given the economic uncertainty in the region; future investments required to maintain performance; and management's assumptions on the weighted average cost of capital. On October 28, 2013, we completed the sale of our European simple meals business. We have reflected the results of the business as discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Earnings. The business was historically included in the International Simple Meals and Beverages segment. See Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on discontinued operations.
The estimates of future cash flows involve considerable management judgment and are based upon assumptions about expected future operating performance, economic conditions, market conditions, and cost of capital. Inherent in estimating the future cash flows are uncertainties beyond our control, such as capital markets. The actual cash flows could differ materially from management’s estimates due to changes in business conditions, operating performance, and economic conditions.
See also Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on goodwill and intangible assets.
Pension and postretirement benefits — We provide certain pension and postretirement benefits to employees and retirees. Determining the cost associated with such benefits is dependent on various actuarial assumptions, including discount rates, expected

30






return on plan assets, compensation increases, turnover rates and health care trend rates. Independent actuaries, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, perform the required calculations to determine expense. Actual results that differ from the actuarial assumptions are generally accumulated and amortized over future periods.
The discount rate is established as of our fiscal year-end measurement date. In establishing the discount rate, we review published market indices of high-quality debt securities, adjusted as appropriate for duration. In addition, independent actuaries apply high-quality bond yield curves to the expected benefit payments of the plans. The expected return on plan assets is a long-term assumption based upon historical experience and expected future performance, considering our current and projected investment mix. This estimate is based on an estimate of future inflation, long-term projected real returns for each asset class, and a premium for active management. Within any given fiscal period, significant differences may arise between the actual return and the expected return on plan assets. The value of plan assets, used in the calculation of pension expense, is determined on a calculated method that recognizes 20% of the difference between the actual fair value of assets and the expected calculated method. Gains and losses resulting from differences between actual experience and the assumptions are determined at each measurement date. If the net gain or loss exceeds 10% of the greater of plan assets or liabilities, a portion is amortized into earnings in the following year.
Net periodic pension and postretirement expense was $80 million in 2015, $109 million in 2014 and $130 million in 2013.
Significant weighted-average assumptions as of the end of the year were as follows:
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Pension
 
 
 
 
 
Discount rate for benefit obligations
4.19%
 
4.33%
 
4.82%
Expected return on plan assets
7.35%
 
7.62%
 
7.62%
Postretirement
 
 
 
 
 
Discount rate for obligations
4.00%
 
4.00%
 
4.50%
Initial health care trend rate
7.75%
 
8.25%
 
8.25%
Ultimate health care trend rate
4.50%
 
4.50%
 
4.50%
Estimated sensitivities to annual net periodic pension cost are as follows: a 50-basis-point reduction in the discount rate would increase expense by approximately $14 million; a 50-basis-point reduction in the estimated return on assets assumption would increase expense by approximately $11 million. A one-percentage-point increase in assumed health care costs would increase postretirement service and interest cost by approximately $1 million.
No contributions were made to U.S. pension plans in 2015. We contributed $35 million and $75 million, respectively, to U.S. pension plans in 2014 and 2013. Contributions to non-U.S. plans were $5 million in 2015 and $12 million in 2014 and 2013. We do not expect to contribute to the U.S. pension plans in 2016. Contributions to non-U.S. plans are expected to be approximately $5 million in 2016.
See also Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on pension and postretirement expenses.
Income taxes — The effective tax rate reflects statutory tax rates, tax planning opportunities available in the various jurisdictions in which we operate and management’s estimate of the ultimate outcome of various tax audits and issues. Significant judgment is required in determining the effective tax rate and in evaluating tax positions. Income taxes are recorded based on amounts refundable or payable in the current year and include the effect of deferred taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future impact of differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, as well as for operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Valuation allowances are established for deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that a tax benefit will not be realized.
See also Notes 1 and 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion on income taxes.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
See Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information on recent accounting pronouncements.
CAUTIONARY FACTORS THAT MAY AFFECT FUTURE RESULTS
This Report contains “forward-looking” statements that reflect our current expectations regarding our future results of operations, economic performance, financial condition and achievements. We try, wherever possible, to identify these forward-looking statements by using words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “will” and similar expressions. One can also identify them by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. These statements reflect our current plans and expectations and are based on information currently available to us. They rely on a number of assumptions regarding future events and estimates which could be inaccurate and which are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties.

31






We wish to caution the reader that the following important factors and those important factors described in Part 1, Item 1A and elsewhere in this Report, or in our other Securities and Exchange Commission filings, could affect our actual results and could cause such results to vary materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by, or on behalf of, us:
the impact of strong competitive response to our efforts to leverage our brand power with product innovation, promotional programs and new advertising;
the impact of changes in consumer demand for our products;
the risks in the marketplace associated with trade and consumer acceptance of product improvements, shelving initiatives, new products, and pricing and promotional strategies;
our ability to achieve sales and earnings guidance, which is based on assumptions about sales volume, product mix, the development and success of new products, the impact of marketing, promotional and pricing actions, product costs and currency;
our ability to realize projected cost savings and benefits from our efficiency and/or restructuring initiatives;
our ability to successfully manage changes to our organizational structure and/or business processes, including our selling, distribution, manufacturing and information management systems or processes;
the practices and increased significance of certain of our key customers;
the impact of new or changing inventory management practices by our customers;
the impact of fluctuations in the supply of and inflation in energy, raw and packaging materials cost;
the impact of completing and integrating acquisitions, divestitures and other portfolio changes;
the uncertainties of litigation;
the impact of changes in currency exchange rates, tax rates, interest rates, debt and equity markets, inflation rates, economic conditions and other external factors; and
the impact of unforeseen business disruptions in one or more of our markets due to political instability, civil disobedience, armed hostilities, natural disasters or other calamities.
This discussion of uncertainties is by no means exhaustive but is designed to highlight important factors that may impact our outlook. We disclaim any obligation or intent to update forward-looking statements made by us in order to reflect new information, events or circumstances after the date they are made.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk
The information presented in the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations — Market Risk Sensitivity” is incorporated herein by reference.

32






Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY
Consolidated Statements of Earnings
(millions, except per share amounts)
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
52 weeks
 
53 weeks
 
52 weeks
Net sales
$
8,082

 
$
8,268

 
$
8,052

Costs and expenses
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of products sold
5,277

 
5,370

 
5,140

Marketing and selling expenses
878

 
935

 
947

Administrative expenses
593

 
573

 
677

Research and development expenses
113

 
121

 
128

Other expenses / (income)
24

 
22

 
29

Restructuring charges
102

 
55

 
51

Total costs and expenses
6,987

 
7,076

 
6,972

Earnings before interest and taxes
1,095

 
1,192

 
1,080

Interest expense
108

 
122

 
135

Interest income
3

 
3

 
10

Earnings before taxes
990

 
1,073

 
955

Taxes on earnings
299

 
347

 
275

Earnings from continuing operations
691

 
726

 
680

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
81

 
(231
)
Net earnings
691

 
807

 
449

Less: Net earnings (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests

 
(11
)
 
(9
)
Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
691

 
$
818

 
$
458

Per Share — Basic
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
2.21

 
$
2.35

 
$
2.19

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
.26

 
(.74
)
Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
2.21

 
$
2.61

 
$
1.46

Weighted average shares outstanding — basic
312

 
314

 
314

Per Share — Assuming Dilution
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings from continuing operations attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
2.21

 
$
2.33

 
$
2.17

Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations

 
.26

 
(.73
)
Net earnings attributable to Campbell Soup Company
$
2.21

 
$
2.59

 
$
1.44

Weighted average shares outstanding — assuming dilution
313

 
316

 
317

The sum of the individual per share amounts may not add due to rounding.
See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.



33






CAMPBELL SOUP COMPANY
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(millions)
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
Pre-tax amount
 
Tax (expense) benefit
 
After-tax amount
 
Pre-tax amount
 
Tax (expense) benefit
 
After-tax amount
 
Pre-tax amount
 
Tax (expense) benefit
 
After-tax amount
Net earnings
 
 
 
 
$
691

 
 
 
 
 
$
807

 
 
 
 
 
$
449

Other comprehensive income (loss):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(324
)
 
$
1

 
(323
)
 
$
(12
)
 
$
(1
)
 
(13
)
 
$
(95
)
 
$
3

 
(92
)
Reclassification of currency translation adjustments realized upon disposal of business

 

 

 
(22
)
 
3

 
(19
)
 

 

 

Cash-flow hedges:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during period
(5
)
 
3

 
(2
)
 
(12
)
 
4

 
(8
)
 
20

 
(8
)
 
12

Reclassification adjustment for (gains) losses included in net earnings
(1
)
 
1

 

 

 

 

 
4

 
(1
)
 
3

Pension and other postretirement benefits: