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EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Technology Applications International Corpex31_2apg.htm
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EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Technology Applications International Corpex31_1apg.htm


UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


(Mark One)                                                                                                                                                                                               


[X]

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.  For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2012


[   ]

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

For the transition period from ________ to ________



TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)



Florida

0-53698

27-1116025

(State or other jurisdiction of Incorporation)

 

(Commission File Number)

(IRS Employer Identification Number)

 

18851 N.E. 29th Avenue, Suite 700, Adventura, Florida, 33180

 (Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

 

 

 

(786) 787-0402

(Registrant’s Telephone Number)

 

 

 

 

 

Copy of all Communications to:

Law Office of Andrew Coldicutt

1220 Rosecrans Street, PMB 258

San Diego, CA 92106

Phone: 619-228-4970

 


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes [   ]  No [X]


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes [   ]  No [X]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.


Yes [X]  No [   ].


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes [   ]  No [X]





Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [   ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.


Large accelerated filer

[   ]

 Accelerated filer

[   ]

Non-accelerated filer

[   ](Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Smaller reporting company

[X]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes [   ]   No [X]


The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2012 was NIL based upon the price ($NIL) at which the common stock was last sold as of the last business day of the most recently completed second fiscal quarter, multiplied by the approximate number of shares of common stock held by persons other than executive officers, directors and five percent stockholders of the registrant without conceding that any such person is an “affiliate” of the registrant for purposes of the federal securities laws. Our common stock is not traded in the over-the-counter market and quoted on the Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board.


As of April 16, 2013, there were 117,263,000 shares of the registrant’s $0.001 par value common stock issued and outstanding.


Documents incorporated by reference: None



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Table of Contents


 

 

Page

 

PART I

5

 

 

 

Item 1

Business

5

Item 1A

Risk Factors

14

Item 1B

Unresolved Staff Comments

14

Item 2

Properties

14

Item 3

Legal Proceedings

14

Item 4

[REMOVED AND RESERVED]

14

 

 

 

 

PART II

14

 

 

 

Item 5

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

14

Item 6

Selected Financial Data

15

Item 7

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

15

Item 7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

19

Item 8

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

F-1 to F-17

Item 9

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

20

Item 9A

Controls and Procedures

20

Item 9B

Other Information

21

 

 

 

 

PART III

22

 

 

 

Item 10

Directors and Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

22

Item 11

Executive Compensation

25

Item 12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

26

Item 13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

26

Item 14

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

27

 

 

 

 

PART IV

28

 

 

 

Item 15

Exhibits

28




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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS


This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These forward-looking statements are not historical facts but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections. We may use words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “foresee,” “estimate” and variations of these words and similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and other factors, some of which are beyond our control, are difficult to predict and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or forecasted. These risks and uncertainties include the following:


·

The availability and adequacy of our cash flow to meet our requirements;


·

Economic, competitive, demographic, business and other conditions in our local and regional markets;


·

Changes or developments in laws, regulations or taxes in our industry;


·

Actions taken or omitted to be taken by third parties including our suppliers and competitors, as well as legislative, regulatory, judicial and other governmental authorities;


·

Competition in our industry;


·

The loss of or failure to obtain any license or permit necessary or desirable in the operation of our business;


·

Changes in our business strategy, capital improvements or development plans;


·

The availability of additional capital to support capital improvements and development; and


·

Other risks identified in this report and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission or the SEC.


This report should be read completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. The forward looking statements included in this report are made as of the date of this report and should be evaluated with consideration of any changes occurring after the date of this Report. We will not update forward-looking statements even though our situation may change in the future and we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.



Use of Term


Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this report to “Company”, “TAIC”, “Technology”, “we”, “us” and “our” are references to Technology Applications International Corporation. All references to “USD” or United States Dollars refer to the legal currency of the United States of America.



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PART I


ITEM 1. BUSINESS


Corporate History


The Company was incorporated as Raj Ventures, Inc., in the State of Florida on October 14, 2009, to effect a merger, exchange of capital stock, asset acquisition or other similar business combination, including being used as a vehicle for a reverse merger acquisition with an operating or development stage business which desired to utilize its status as a reporting corporation under the Exchange Act.


On April 12, 2010, one hundred percent of the issued and outstanding common stock of the Company was transferred and sold to Raj Ventures Funding, Inc., a company owned and controlled by Charles J. Scimeca, which resulted in a change in control of the Company. Ms. Colleen Foyo, Raj Ventures, Inc. sole officer and director resigned on April 12, 2010, and Mr. Scimeca replaced such person, as the President, Secretary and Treasurer and sole director of the Company and he continues to serve in such capacity.


On August 26, 2010, the Company, completed the purchase of a semi-trailer mountable mobile electron beam accelerator unit contained therein (collectively, the “e-beam”) from High Voltage Environmental Applications, a Florida corporation (“HVEA”), in exchange for Ten Dollars ($10) and the issuance of one hundred thousand (100,000) shares of common stock of the Company to HVEA, which was payable as purchase price consideration for the transaction.


On April 12, 2011, the Company filed Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the Company with the Secretary of State of Florida and changed the corporate name from “Raj Ventures, Inc.” to “Technology Applications International Corporation”. The Company also increased the authorized capital from 100 million shares of common stock to 350 million shares of capital stock, of which 300 million shares are common stock, par value $.001 per share, and 50 million shares are preferred stock, par value $.001 per share (“Preferred Stock”). The Company also adopted Amended and Restated Bylaws of the Company on the same date.


On April 12, 2011, the Company launched its new business NueEarth, Inc., which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of TAIC with the plan to develop, build and sell environmental solutions for the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater and sludge, as well as cosmetic cross-linking, medical waste disinfecting and many other possible applications. The Company owns and intends to operate the mobile electron beam particle accelerator unit installed in a semi-tractor trailer, which it plans to use for the commencement of operations and making sales presentations to prospective customers throughout the United States, and to other countries.


On August 9, 2011, the Company founded its wholly-owned subsidiary Renuéll Int’l, Inc., that distributes markets and sells a line of molecularly enhanced skin cream products, under the brand name Renuéll.  On December, 29, 2011, and amended on January 23, 2012, May 7, 2012, and December 13, 2012, the Company entered into a distribution agreement with Regenetech, Inc., whereby, Renuéll shall act as a distributor for a series of cosmetics created in a rotatable perfused time varying electromagnetic force bioreactor developed and patented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (“NASA”) and Regenetech, Inc., then manufactured and sold by Regenetech.


The Company has commenced business operations and generated minimal revenues. The Company has a specific business plan and is seeking the funds to execute its business plan. The Company does not consider itself to be a blank check company as defined in Rule 419 of Regulation C of the Securities Act of 1933.  It is aggressively pursuing its business plan given the current financial status of the Company and the fact that the Board of Directors is active and supportive of the plan. The Company was acquired for the purpose of executing a specific business plan developed by its founder, Charles J. Scimeca, as set forth in the prospectus.  The Company is moving forward with development as defined in its business development objectives.  Based upon the above, the Company believes it is not within the scope of Rule 419.


The 12-month budget is based on minimum operations which will be completely funded by the $3,000,000 the Company intends to raise through this offering.  The Company estimates increased sales to begin within 6 months after the completion of this offering. Because its business is customer-driven, its revenue requirements will be reviewed and adjusted based on sales.  The costs associated with operating as a public company are included in



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its budget.  Management will be responsible for the preparation of much of the required documents to keep the costs to a minimum.  The Company cannot however guarantee that it will have sales and the amount raised in this offering may not be enough to meet the operating expenditures of the Company.  Management has agreed, but has not made any formal commitment to advance to the Company money to fund limited operations over the next twelve months.


The Company has been issued an opinion by the Company’s auditors that raised substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern based on its current financial position.  The ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon the Company generating profitable operations in the future and/or to obtain the necessary financing to meet its obligations and repay its liabilities arising from normal business operations when they come due. Management intends to finance operating costs over the next twelve months with existing cash on hand, loans from directors and/or issuance of common shares; however, there has been no formal commitment by management or directors to make any loans to the Company, and any additional issuance of common stock will result in a significant dilution in the equity interests of our shareholders.


The Company


The Company is engaged in the distribution, marketing and sale of skin care products, as well as the marketing and sale of environment management solutions. It is focused on distributing a cosmetic line produced by Regenetech, under our own brand name, further developing and manufacturing our own line of technologically advanced skin care products and is planning on developing the e-beam technology for uses in the cosmetic industry. The Company also provides environmental management solutions that use electron particle accelerator technology. The Company maintains a website at www.tapplic.com in order to help provide more information to its potential customers. The company structure is set forth in the following chart:



 

TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

a Florida Corporation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Renuéll Int’l, Inc.

a Florida Corporation

(100% owned subsidiary)

NueEarth, Inc.

a Florida Corporation

(100% owned subsidiary)



Corporate Strategy


The Company’s business strategy is aimed at building value through positioning each of the operating subsidiaries as a niche provider of technologically advanced products or services within its specific area of operation. The Company anticipates updating and refining the business strategy as new opportunities present themselves. In general, the component functions of the business model are to:


  incrementally invest, market, and refine the acquired technology;


  concentrate initial sales efforts on focused market entry opportunities; and


  increase sales to a level that establishes market acceptance, as determined by the Company’s management.



Products


Renuéll Int’l, Inc.


Through Renuéll Int’l, Inc., the Company is currently distributing a line of technologically advanced skin care products, produced and developed by Regenetech, Inc.; in the future the Company will develop its own line of advanced skin care products. On July 27, 2011, it commenced providing to the marketplace its first product, the Renuéll skin cream, and had generated revenues in the amount of $9,479 as of December 31, 2012. The Renuéll



6



skin cream product is a high quality cosmetic product that uses 3 dimensional biomolecules created in simulated microgravity that is formulated with a branded compound which is a breakthrough facial repair cream that allows skin cell expansion, and is enhanced using National Aeronautics and Space Administration (“N.A.S.A.”) technology to create a skin care product that promotes the appearance of age defying skin.  Renuèll and Regenetech are recognized by the Space Foundation for their use of products and processes designed by the space industry.


The Space Foundation is an international nonprofit organization and the foremost advocate for all sectors of the space industry - civil, commercial, national security, new space entrepreneurship, and finance. A leader in space awareness activities, major industry events, and educational enterprises, the Space Foundation is based in Colorado Springs, Colo., has an office in Washington, D.C., and has a field office in Houston, Texas. The Space Foundation employs a variety of programs and initiatives that educate and raise awareness about the importance and impact of the space industry.


In order for a company to be certified by the Space Foundation it must be a product or service that directly results from Space technology or space program development such that the product exists because of advances in space technology. Examples of certified space technologies include Fisher Space Pens, GPS, and Tempur-Pedic foam mattresses.  Recently Regenetech, the manufacturer of the product we distribute was inducted into the Space Foundation’s Space Technology Hall of Fame.  The Space Foundation has also officially certified Renuéll as a Certified product that is produced using Regenetechs technology.  


Neither the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nor any other regulatory authority or similar regulator has approved the Renuéll skin cream product.


On December 29, 2011, and then Amended on January 23, 2012, May 7, 2012 and December 13, 2012, the Company, through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Renuéll Int’l Inc., a Florida corporation (“Renuéll”) entered into that certain distribution agreement (the “Distribution Agreement”) with Regenetech, Inc., a Texas corporation (“RGT”), see section “Distribution Agreement” for further details of the agreement. Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Distribution Agreement, Renuéll shall act as an exclusive distributor for a series of cosmetics created in a rotatable perfused time varying electromagnetic force bioreactor developed, manufactured and sold by RGT.


The rotatable perfused time varying electromagnetic force bioreactor is operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In use, the rotatable perfused time varying electromagnetic force bioreactor supplies a time varying electromagnetic force to the rotatable perfusable culture chamber of the rotatable perfused time varying electromagnetic force bioreactor to expand cells contained therein.  Lab-grown cell cultures tend to be small, flat and two-dimensional, unlike normal tissues in the body. However, tissues grown in the bioreactor are larger and three-dimensional, with structural and chemical characteristics similar to normal tissue. The bioreactor has no internal moving parts, which minimizes forces that might damage the delicate cell cultures.


[taic10k_123112apg2001.jpg]


Cells cultured on Earth (left) typically settle quickly on the bottom of culture vessels due to gravity. In microgravity (right), cells remain suspended and aggregate to form three-dimensional tissue. The NASA patented Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. The bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tissue found in the body.




7



These expanded cells when placed on the skin in cream form help repair, hydrate and expand the cells in the skin, thereby, giving a rejuvenated and fresher appearance to a person’s skin. Regenetech has licensed the patented process from N.A.S.A; Regenetech and Renuéll are the only cosmetic companies that use this process and to be endorsed by the Space Foundation.


NueEarth, Inc.


Through NueEarth, Inc., the Company plans to develop, build and sell environmental solutions for the treatment of drinking water, municipal and industrial wastewater, sludge and produced water from oil and gas fracturing activities utilizing an electron particle accelerator technology combined with conventional methods. The e-beam works by using an electron beam particle accelerator unit that creates high energy electrons which produce free radicals in the waste water leading to decomposition of organic compounds (pollutants). We plan to develop various applications to use e beam technology for removal of pollutants from wastewater, drinking water, municipal sludge and fracking liquids.


The e-beam has the dual ability to also enhance cosmetic products and has the capacity to eliminate organic compounds present in water from parts per million concentrations to non-detectable concentrations in most cases. The Company owns and operates a mobile e-beam unit installed on a trailer that can be attached to a semi-truck, which it intends to use for the commencement of operations and making sales presentations and focusing on pilot opportunities with prospective customers.


Distribution Agreement


On December 29, 2011, Renuéll Int’l, Inc. entered into a Distribution Agreement (the “Distribution Agreement”) with Regenetech, Inc., a Texas corporation, pursuant to which Renuéll will act as a distributor and marketer of Regenetech’s cosmetic products. The Distribution Agreement was first amended on January 23, 2012 to more clearly define section 9.2, that Regentech makes no warranty as to materials provided to them by Renuéll.  On May 7, 2012 the Company reached a second amendment to the Distribution Agreement; whereby, Regenetech gave permission to Renuell to use Regenetech’s Lab Report findings. The Distribution Agreement was amended a third time on December 13, 2012 (the “Third Amendment”), amends the Terms, Territories, Exhibit A and Exhibit B sections of the Distribution Agreement. The Third Amendment provides a worldwide exclusivity to Renuéll of the Regenetech cosmetic products, for an initial period of five (5) years and two (2) five (5) year extensions that are predicated on meeting quota requirements. The Third Amendment also requires a deposit of $50,000 to be made by the Company. The Distribution Agreement contains quota requirements that Renuéll must meet in order to retain the worldwide exclusivity, territory and extensions to the contract.  The Company has paid the $50,000 deposit that is required by the Third Amendment.


Terms


At the execution of the Third Amendment, Renuéll shall now have a worldwide exclusive contract for an initial period of five (5) years and two (2) five (5) year possible extensions that are available upon meeting Exhibit B quota requirements. Renuéll shall also deposit Fifty Thousand dollars ($50,000) which will be applied first to the down payment of any purchase order that Renuéll shall make.  On or before January 15, 2013, or upon the successful completion of stability testing of newly developed shampoo and approval by testing authority, whichever occurs later, Renuéll shall place a purchase order for 100,000 Duo-Packs (which consist of 100,000 .5 Oz units and 100,000 units for 100,000 10oz shampoo) or any order for any product that equates to the same dollar amount. The stability testing will comprise of ingredient consistency testing for the shampoo product to ensure that all the ingredients are compatible; this testing will be performed by LaDove Labs, Inc., which is located in Hialeah, Florida. The purchase order requires a 50% down payment, which was paid in December 2012.


Territories


The Third Amendment provides Renuéll with a worldwide exclusive rights to distribute and market the Regenetech cream. Renuéll has worldwide exclusive rights, as further detailed in the December 13, 2012 amendment, to any hair care products and any current or future topical SKU’s developed by Regenetech.  Regenetech will have the exclusive right to provide their bio-molecules to all topical current or future topical products developed by Renuéll.




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The worldwide exclusive rights do not apply to seven countries (Saudi Arabia, Kenya, Morocco, New Zealand, Nigeria, and Turkey), as Regenetech has previously licensed these countries to other distributors.


Quota Requirements


The Third Amendment of the Distribution Agreement quota requirements for Renuéll have been changed, if Renuéll fails to meet any quota requirements, the worldwide exclusivity shall be revoked and the Renuéll territories shall revert back to those in the original Exhibit B. The Quota requirements are as follows:


(1)

Purchase 300,000 units in the first six (6) months;

(2)

Purchase 1,000,000 units by the end of the first (1) year;

(3)

Purchase 2,000,000 units by the end of the second (2) year;

(4)

Purchase 2,500,000 units by the end of the third (3) year;

(5)

Purchase 3,000,000 units by the end of the fourth (4) year; and

(6)

Purchase 4,000,000 units by the end of the fifth (5) year



In order to fulfill the quota requirements of the Distribution Agreement the Company will have to order 1,000,000 units by the end of the first year. The minimum amount that the Company will have to purchase per the Distribution Agreement in the first year is Six Million Seven Hundred Thousand Dollars ($6,700,000) in products from Regenetech, in order to retain the worldwide exclusivity contained in the Third Amendment.


The foregoing summary description of the terms of the Distribution Agreement may not contain all information that is of interest to the reader. For further information regarding the terms and conditions of the Distribution Agreement, this reference is made to such agreement, which was originally filed on November 29, 2012 and the amended contract is filed as 10.07 hereto and is incorporated herein by this reference.


Customers

Renuéll Int’l, Inc.

The Renuéll skin cream will have several potential target customers such as; retail customers, online purchasers from our website www.Renuell.com, skin care professionals, spas, doctors, and retail stores that sell cosmetic products. These potential customers will include the end user who can purchase the product online, management believes this customer will typically be middle aged persons, but also anyone who has a need or desire to have their skin look refreshed and younger. The other main potential customer that the Renuéll skin cream will attempt to obtain is in the retail market, such as established pharmacies, retail and grocery store chains, where the product can be put on the shelves and start to gain brand recognition.


NueEarth, Inc.

The Company has three major types of potential customers for the e-beam water purification system: national and international corporations; municipalities, governments (domestic and foreign) and governmental agencies. With the e-beam unit mounted in a semi-trailer it is capable of being moved anywhere in North America with relative ease. Therefore, the Company can access most any site that has a road leading up to it.

Markets


Renuéll Int’l, Inc


The target markets for the skin cream are located domestically in all 50 states, internationally in Europe as well as in the developing economies of Asia and Latin America. Management believes that through an online presence, retail presence and word of mouth that anywhere where people are looking for a non-surgical method to enhance their look that the skin cream has a potential market.




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NueEarth, Inc.


Domestic Water Supply Crisis


Per capita usage of water in the United States is among the highest in the world. The supply of fresh water continues to tighten, especially in the Western half of the United States where we face a potential water crisis due to limited supply and increasing demand. Increasing usage of water in the industries such as oil and gas exploration and production, agriculture, and food processing continue to constrain supply of fresh water in the United States. For example, there are over 21 billion barrels of produced water created annually in the U.S. from fracking activity in the oil and gas industry, as each well requires millions of gallons of water for fracking over its life. In many areas, such as the Bakken or Marcellus shale plays, there is limited access to large scale, industry specific water treatment and recycling facilities which could drastically decrease the need for usage of fresh water in fracking.


Inadequate Regulatory Action


Poor quality of existing water management resources, combined with regulatory inaction, have failed to provide the leadership and guidance to mandate recycling and reuse of water resources in many industries. While there has been a general lack of adequate water management regulation in many industries, management believes that recent regulatory action requiring more responsible water usage management in oil and gas fracking in states such as Pennsylvania is a trend that should drive similar action in other states, such as North Dakota. North Dakota’s oil and gas industry has no readily available, affordable source of water recycling and treatment. The current practice in North Dakota for wastewater created during fracking is to inject produced water back into the ground, a practice that has unknown effects on the environment and has come under heavy regulatory scrutiny in other States. Each horizontal new well requires millions of gallons of fresh water over its life, contributing heavily to the supply crisis. Any regulatory actions affecting the legality of fresh water usage in fracking or injection of produced water back into the ground could negatively affect the oil and gas industry in North Dakota and increase industry demand for water treatment and recycling services.


In addition to the oil and gas industry, the domestic agricultural industry is generally lacking in sufficient water management regulations. Until a concerted private/public effort is expended, the contaminated acreage will continue to expand. Management believes the excess use of water and lack of regulation in the agricultural industry will result in regulatory changes which drastically increase the domestic demand for various water treatment and recycling services.


Growing Need for Affordable Regulatory Compliance


In the United States the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) 2009 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report, states that there were over 150,000 public rural water districts in the United States serving over 300 million users. The majority of these are considered very small, small and medium-sized public water systems, which support populations of fewer than 10,000 people. Small systems comprise the vast majority of all systems. Noncompliance occurs more frequently at smaller systems often because they may have fewer resources to operate and maintain compliance. This problem is expected to worsen as more stringent EPA rules are implemented for small public water systems. Approximately 28 percent of all systems in the U.S. had at least one significant violation reported in 2009. This rate is comparable to those reported in previous years. The data submitted by primacy agencies indicate that 7 percent of all public water systems in the U.S., serving approximately 17,693,000 users, had violations of health-based standards in 2009.  In 2009, about 18 percent of all public water systems had significant monitoring and reporting violations. Substantial expenditures will be needed in the coming years for repair, rehabilitation, operation, and maintenance of the water and wastewater treatment infrastructure. Management believes that water districts using conventional treatment methods will be unable to comply with the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Act (“SDWA”) without massive installations of on-site chemical filter aids and disinfection equipment.


Consumer Safety


Drinking water, regardless of its source, may contain impurities that can affect the health of consumers. Although municipal agencies and water utilities in the United States are required to provide drinking water that complies with the 1996 amendments to the SDWA, the water supplied to homes and businesses from municipalities and utilities may contain high levels of bacteria, toxins, parasites and human and animal-health pharmaceuticals, as



10



well as high levels of chlorine used to eliminate contaminants. In the industrialized world, water quality is often compromised by pollution, aging municipal water systems, and contaminated wells and surface water. In addition, the specter of terrorism directed at intentional contamination of water supplies has heightened awareness of the importance of reliable and secure water purification. The importance of effective water treatment is also critical from an economic standpoint, as health concerns and impure water can impair consumer confidence in food products. Discharge of impaired waters into the environment can further degrade the earth’s water and violate environmental laws, with the possibility of significant fines and penalties from regulatory agencies.


Sales and Marketing


Management plans to focus the marketing strategy on educating prospective customers and the trade industry about the Company, so that the products and services are successfully brought to market. The Company plans to sell and market the products and services through attendance at major trade and industry exhibitions, one-on-one sales meetings with individual customers and using social media and marketing and advertising campaigns.


The Company continues to search for retailers and distributors both nationally and abroad for all of its products.


Manufacturing and Raw Materials


Renuéll Int’l, Inc.


The Company relies on our supplier Regenetech and other third-parties to produce, supply the product, components and to formulate and package the finished goods. Third parties also provide order fulfillment, warehousing and distribution services. The Company plans on purchasing product in larger production batches thereby increasing production efficiency for the outsourced suppliers, which will reduce costs.

Regenetech manufactures the products and provides the raw materials for the skin cream that our Company distributes. Third-parties are responsible for the receipt and storage of raw material, production and packaging and labeling of finished goods. At present, the Company is dependent upon our supplier Regenetech for the production (manufacturing) of all of the products that we distribute. To the extent that Regenetech should discontinue the relationship with the Company; the Company’s sales would be adversely impacted. The Company believes at the present time it will be able to obtain the quantity of products and supplies it will need to meet orders.

The Company purchases all of the raw materials from Regenetech, a third party supplier and manufacturer pursuant to our distribution agreement. We do rely on our principal supplier Regenetech which manufacturers the skin care product that we distribute. In the event that Regenetech, the current supplier, is unable to meet supply or manufacturing requirements at some time in the future, the Company may suffer short-term interruptions of delivery of certain products while it attempts to establish an alternative source. The Company also relies on third party carriers for product shipments, including shipments to and from distribution facilities. It is therefore subject to the risks, including employee strikes and inclement weather, associated with the carriers’ ability to provide delivery services to meet the Company’s fulfillment and shipping needs. Failure to deliver products to customers in a timely and accurate matter would harm the Company’s reputation, business and results of operations.


Inventory


Renuéll Int’l, Inc.


At December 31, 2012, the Company has approximately 3,800 - 1.7 oz. Breakthrough Facial Cream items in stock fully paid for at its shippers, Trans Express located in Miami, Florida.  These products have a retail price of $45.00 to $249.00 per item depending on various types of marketing strategies such as retail pharmacies, discount stores, Internet, info commercials, hotels and spas. The products have a shelf life of two years. Management estimates that the Company can sell the products in inventory within 3 to 4 months. In the initial testing sales the Company sold $1500 worth of its product in approximately 2 months.  In this initial test phase the Company sold 80% of its test product in 8 days, and the last 20% was sold approximately two months later.  The Company has not sold any product in the last three months, as the Company has been working on branding and market strategies.  The Company can market these products in the USA, Canada, Latin America, the countries that make up the Euro Zone member countries and Russia.



11




Patents, Trademarks and Licenses


The trademarks currently owned by the Company, and for which it intends to seek federal transaction registration are the marks NueEarth, Renuéll, Bio-Science, NueCell, NueStem Cell Matrix and NueStem Cell Lattice. The Company may federally register other trademarks in the future as the need arises. It intends to patent the processes and designs as the need arises; however, the Company currently does not have any federally registered patents.


Plan of Operations


(2nd quarter after funding)

Complete and expand Marketing Materials, Domestically and Internationally;


•  Continue to develop and enhance our website; expose the Renuèll name in the USA and abroad,

•  Continue the registration process to distribute our product in USA and abroad,

•  Further design, develop edit and launch Renuèll commercials and info-commercials in various venues (TV, Radio, Cable, Internet and websites),

•  Advertise in Spanish and English language newspapers,

•  Further integrate payment processors like Visa, Master Card, Discover, American Express and Pay Pal domestically and internationally, and

•  Work on securing distribution agreements with chain stores and boutique establishments, salons, hotel chains, spas, dermatologist and skin care professionals.


(2nd and 3rd quarter after funding)

Complete Distribution agreements, and Re-fit e-beam trailer


•  Integrate feedback from early testers,

•  Purchase supplies and increase product inventory,

•  Build customer service and incoming call center,

•  Fix any problems, concerns,

•  Continue to implement mobile browser-friendly version of our websites,

•  Re-fit e-beam trailer,

•  Research and Development for the e-beam,

•  Prospect for e beam potential customers,

•  Use e beam for demonstrations to customers, and

•  Continue to Further establish brand name; through marketing.


(3rd and 4th quarter after funding)


•  Continue to release to public. Renuèll skin care product and begin operations of e-beam,

•  Seek out celebrity sponsors for Renuèll,

•  Tune up marketing pages,

•  Hire full time employees to help with office operations,

•  Enhance user support, feedback and communication with customers, suppliers, distributors, and

•  Research and further development of Renuèll's own line of skin care products cosmetics.


(4th quarter after funding)


•  Expand the brands into new products and markets


After we have Renuèll operating we will then do further research and development on the e-beam and begin developing our own line of skin care products and cosmetics that will enhance the Renuèll brand name. We will continue to enhance our lines of skin care products, cosmetics and e-beam technology as determined by our product research and development.  We will continue to enhance our brands by improving customer responsiveness, delivery, and consistency based on distributor and user feedback, that we will collect on our websites, and through opinion questionnaires.




12



Competition


Renuéll Int’l, Inc.


The skin care and personal care industries are highly competitive. Many of the Company’s competitors are large, well known companies that have considerably greater financial, sales, marketing, research and development and technical resources in the company. Additionally, these competitors have formulary capabilities that may allow them to formulate new and improved products that may compete with product lines that the Company develops and markets. In addition, competitors may elect to devote substantial resources to marketing their products to similar outlets and may choose to develop advertising, educational and information programs like this formulated by the Company to support their marketing efforts. The Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected by any one or more of such developments.

The Company’s product, in general, competes against similar products distributed by national skin care and personal care companies. Management believes the Company’s competitive position is based on the foundation of developing niche products with active ingredients that may not be found in generic products. The Company’s competitive strategy is based on management’s attempt to continually focus on the application of new technologies and efficiencies rather than fashions or trends.

NueEarth, Inc.


The technology industry is highly competitive and varied. Many of the existing and potential competitors have financial, personnel, marketing, customer bases and other financial resources significantly greater than the Companies. These competitors have the flexibility to introduce new products and services and pricing options that may be more attractive than the Companies.  The Company’s water purification process competes with several companies, including but not limited to, Clean Harbors Environmental Services, Vac Vision, and the Zenon Group. The Company will attempt to overcome the competitive advantages of its competitors by pursuing a strategy of developing technologies in niche markets which seek to provide the Company with brand name recognition.


Government Regulation


Renuéll Int’l, Inc.


Unless the FDA extends its regulatory authority to cosmetic products, regulation by governmental authorities in the United States and other countries is not expected to be a significant consideration in the sale of the products by Renuéll Int’l, Inc. and its ongoing activities. Under current regulations, the market introduction of the majority of non-medicated cosmetic products does not require prior formal registration or approval by the FDA, although this could change in the future. The cosmetic industry has established self-regulating procedures and most companies perform their own toxicity and consumer tests. Voluntary filings related to manufacturing facilities are made with the FDA. The Cosmetics Division of the FDA, however, does monitor closely problems of safety, adulteration and labeling. In addition, if the FDA should determine that claims made by the Company for the products involve the cure, mitigation or treatment of disease, the FDA could take regulatory action against the products and us. In addition, the United States Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) monitors product claims made in television and radio commercials and print advertising to ensure that any claim can be substantiated. If the FTC believes that any advertising claim made by the Company with regard to the effect or benefit of the products is not substantiated by adequate data or research and the Company cannot support such claim, the FTC could also take regulatory action against the Company’s products and us.


NueEarth, Inc.


The business activities relating to NueEarth, Inc. are subject to environmental regulation under the same federal, state and local laws and regulations which apply to the Company’s customers, including the Clean Water Act of 1972, as amended, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended. Management believes that the Company conducts its business in an environmentally responsible manner and is in material compliance with applicable laws and regulations. It is possible that future developments, such as increasingly strict requirements of environmental laws and enforcement policies thereunder, could affect the manner in which the Company operates projects and conducts business, including the handling, processing or disposal of the wastes, by-products and residues generated thereby.



13




Employees


Charles J. Scimeca is our sole officer and director who serves on a full-time basis. None of our employees is represented by a labor union for purposes of collective bargaining. We consider our relations with our employees to be good.


WHERE YOU CAN GET ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


We file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. You may read and copy our reports or other filings made with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room, located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549. You can obtain information on the operations of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. You can also access these reports and other filings electronically on the SEC’s web site, www.sec.gov.


ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS


None.


ITEM 2. PROPERTIES


Our corporate headquarters are located at 18851 N.E. 29th Avenue, Suite 700, Adventura, Florida, 33180. The lease term is month to month. As of the date of this filing, the Company has not sought to move our office. Additional space may be required as the Company expands its operations. Management does not foresee any significant difficulties in obtaining any required additional space. The Company currently does not own any real property. The Company does not currently own any real property.


ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS


We know of no material, existing or pending legal proceedings against our company, nor are we involved as a plaintiff in any material proceeding or pending litigation. There are no proceedings in which our director, officer or any affiliates, or any registered or beneficial shareholder, is an adverse party or has a material interest adverse to our interest.


ITEM 4.  [REMOVED AND RESERVED]



PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE COMPANY’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES


Common Stock


As of April 16, 2013, there is no public market for our Common Stock. We intend to contact an authorized OTC Bulletin Board market-maker for sponsorship of our securities on the OTC Bulletin Board.


Record Holders


As of April 16, 2013, there were 117,263,000 shares of the registrant’s $0.001 par value common stock issued and outstanding and were owned by approximately 40 holders of record, based on information provided by our transfer agent.




14



Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities


Between January 1, 2012 and June 30, 2012, the company entered into subscription agreements with certain investors whereby it sold an aggregate of 794 private placement units with each unit consisting of 1,000 shares of common stock (794,000 shares) priced at $.50 per share and one Class A Warrant to purchase 1,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $1.00 per share for a total of three hundred ninety seven thousand ($397,000) dollars.  The warrants expire on the earlier of (i) 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or (ii) one year after the date of issuance.  The private placement was made pursuant to Rule 506 of Regulation D  promulgated  under  Section 4(2) of the  Securities  Act of 1933, as amended.


During March 2012, the Company converted a $100,000 deposit into a convertible debenture.  The convertible debenture bears interest at a rate of five-percent (5%) per annum and is payable March 21, 2014.  At the Holder’s option, principle and unpaid accrued interest shall be convertible into common stock at a rate of $0.50 per share.  In addition to the common stock, the Holder shall receive warrants to purchase an equal number of shares of common stock exercisable at $1.00 per share at the earlier of 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or one year from date of exercise.


On September 25, 2012, the Company issued a $100,000 convertible debenture.  The convertible debenture bears interest at a rate of five-percent (5%) per annum and is payable September 21, 2013.  At the Holder’s option, principle and unpaid accrued interest shall be convertible into common stock at a rate of $0.50 per share.  In addition to the common stock, the Holder shall receive warrants to purchase an equal number of shares of common stock exercisable at $1.00 per share at the earlier of 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or one year from date of exercise.


Other than as previously disclosed, none.


Re-Purchase of Equity Securities


None.


Dividends


We have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock since inception and presently anticipate that all earnings, if any, will be retained for development of our business and that no dividends on our common stock will be declared in the foreseeable future. Any future dividends will be subject to the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, future earnings, operating and financial condition, capital requirements, general business conditions and other pertinent facts. Therefore, there can be no assurance that any dividends on our common stock will be paid in the future.


Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans


None.


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OR PLAN OF OPERATION


This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These forward-looking statements are not historical facts but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections. We may use words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “foresee,” “estimate” and variations of these words and similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and other factors, some of which are beyond our control, are difficult to predict and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or forecasted. You should read this report



15



completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. The forward looking statements included in this report are made as of the date of this report and should be evaluated with consideration of any changes occurring after the date of this Report. We will not update forward-looking statements even though our situation may change in the future and we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Working Capital


 

December 31, 2012

$

December 31, 2011

$

Current Assets

299,919

179,328

Current Liabilities

782,325

228,367

Working Capital (Deficit)

(482,406)

(49,039)



Cash Flows


 

December 31, 2012

$

For the Period from

October 14, 2009

(date of inception) to

December 31, 2012

$

Cash Flows from (used in) Operating Activities

(678,982)

(913,453)

Cash Flows from (used in) Investing Activities

(470)

(23,723)

Cash Flows from (used in) Financing Activities

625,786

1,057,873

Net Increase (decrease) in Cash During Period

(53,666)

120,697



Results for the Year Ended December 31, 2012 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2011


Revenues:


The Company’s revenues were $7,979 for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $1,500 in 2011.  This represents an increase of $6,479 or 431.9%.  The increase is directly attributable to the Company starting to commence marketing for its product.


Cost of Revenues:


The Company’s cost of revenue was $3,869 for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $625 in 2011.  This represents an increase of $3,244 or 519%.  The increase in cost of revenues is directly attributable to the increase in sales during 2012.


Gross Profit/Loss:


For the twelve months ended December 31, 2012, our total gross profit increased by $3,235 or 369.7% to $4,110 from $875 in 2011.  As a percent of sales, gross profit decreased to 51.5% in 2012 as compared to 58.3% in 2011.  The decrease is attributable to product costs.


General and Administrative Expenses:


General and administrative expenses consisted primarily of consulting fees, rent, travel, meals and entertainment, and preparing reports and SEC filings relating to being a public company.  For the year ended December 31, 2012, general and administrative expenses increased to $681,875 from $228,713 compared to the year ended December 31, 2011 representing an increase of $453,162 or 198.1%.  The increase is primarily attributable to increases in advertising and marketing costs, consulting fees and officer compensation fees in the amounts of $72,627, $190,895, $120,000, respectively.  These increases are the result of the Company growing its business.





16



Other Income (Expense):


Other income (expense) consisted of gain on derivative valuation and interest expense.  The gain on derivative valuation is directly attributable to the change in fair value of the derivative liability from date of issuance during 2012 through December 31, 2012.  Interest expense is primarily attributable the initial interest expense associated with the valuation of derivative instruments at issuance and the accretion of the convertible debentures over their respective terms.  Interest associated with the derivative instruments amounted to approximately $219,000.  There was no gain on derivative valuation or interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2011.


Net Loss:


Our net loss for the year ended December 31, 2012 was $834,079 compared to a net loss of $227,838 for the year ended December 31, 2011, an increase of $606,241 or 266.1%.  The net loss is influenced by the matters discussed in the other sections of this MD&A.


Results for the Period from October 14, 2009 (Inception) through December 31, 2012


Revenues:


The Company’s revenues were $7,979 for the year ended December 31, 2012 compare to $9,479 for the period from inception to December 31, 2012.



Cost of Revenues


The Company’s cost of revenue was $3,869 for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to $4,494 for the period from inception to December 31, 2012.



Gross Profit/Loss.


For the twelve months ended December 31, 2012, our total gross profit was $4,110 compared to $4,985 for the period from inception to December 31, 2012.



General and Administrative Expenses.


General and administrative expenses consisted primarily of consulting fees, rent, travel, meals and entertainment, and preparing reports and SEC filings relating to being a public company.  For the year ended December 31, 2012, general and administrative expenses was $681,875 compared to $938,034 for the period from inception to December 31, 2012.



Other Income (Expense):


Other income (expense) for the period October 14, 2009 (inception) through December 31, 2012 was $(156,314).  Other income (expense) consisted of gain on derivative valuation and interest expense.  The gain on derivative valuation is directly attributable to the change in fair value of the derivative liability from date of issuance during 2012 through December 31, 2012.  Interest expense is primarily attributable the initial interest expense associated with the valuation of derivative instruments at issuance and the accretion of the convertible debentures over their respective terms.  Interest associated with the derivative instruments amounted to approximately $219,000.


Net Loss.


Net loss for the period October 14, 2009 (inception) through December 31, 2012 was $(1,089,363). The net loss for this period was primarily related to general and administrative expenses exceeding the amount of revenues for the period indicated.



17




Impact of Inflation


We believe that the rate of inflation has had a negligible effect on our operations.


Liquidity and Capital Resources


The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent on the Company’s ability to raise additional capital and implement its business plan. Since its inception, the Company has been funded by related parties through capital investment and borrowing funds.


As of December 31, 2012, total current assets were $299,919, which consisted primarily of cash, inventory and deposits.


As of December 31, 2012, total current liabilities were $782,325, which consisted primarily of accounts payable and accrued expenses, a loan from a related party, related party advances and convertible debentures. We had negative net working capital of $(482,406) as of December 31, 2012.


During the period from October 14, 2009 (inception) through December 31, 2012, operating activities used cash of $(913,453). The cash used by operating activities related to general and administrative expenses, the purchase of inventory for resale and non-cash items related to derivative instruments. Except for cash in the amount of $7,979 from sales of our products, all of the cash during this period was provided by related party transactions, capital contributions and convertible debentures.


Intangible Assets


The Company’s intangible assets were $2,049 as of December 31, 2012.


Material Commitments


The Company’s material commitments were $0 as of December 31, 2012.


Going Concern


We have not attained profitable operations and are dependent upon obtaining financing to pursue any extensive acquisitions and activities. For these reasons, our auditors stated in their report on our audited financial statements that they have substantial doubt that we will be able to continue as a going concern without further financing.


Future Financings


We will continue to rely on equity sales of our common shares in order to continue to fund our business operations. Issuances of additional shares will result in dilution to existing stockholders. There is no assurance that we will achieve any additional sales of the equity securities or arrange for debt or other financing to fund planned acquisitions and exploration activities.


Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements


We have no significant off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to stockholders.


Critical Accounting Policies


Our financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles applied on a consistent basis. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and



18



liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods.


We regularly evaluate the accounting policies and estimates that we use to prepare our financial statements. A complete summary of these policies is included in the notes to our financial statements. In general, management's estimates are based on historical experience, on information from third party professionals, and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates made by management.


Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements


The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect. These pronouncements did not have any material impact on the financial statements unless otherwise disclosed, and the Company does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.


Contractual Obligations


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.


ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.




19




ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA



TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

( A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY )

 

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

AND

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

DECEMBER 31, 2012

 

TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

F-1

 

 

 

 

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sadler Gibb & Associates, LLC

 

 

F-2

 

 

 

 

Lake & Associates CPA’s LLC

 

 

F-3

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance Sheets

 

 

F-4

 

 

 

 

Statements of Operations

 

 

F-5

 

 

 

 

Statements of Stockholders' Deficit

 

 

F-6

 

 

 

 

Statements of Cash Flows

 

 

F-7

 

 

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

F-8 to F-17




F - 1




[taic10k_123112apg2002.jpg]

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM



To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of

Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries

(A development stage company)


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries (“the Company”) as of December 31, 2012 and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ deficit and cash flows for the year then ended and for the cumulative period from October 14, 2009 (date of inception) through December 31, 2012 .  These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.


We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.


In our opinion the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2012 and the results of their operations and cash flows for the year then ended and for the cumulative period from October 14, 2009 (date of inception) through December 31, 2012, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.


The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has not yet established an ongoing source of revenue sufficient to cover its operating costs which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans concerning these matters are also described in Note 1 The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.



/s/ Sadler, Gibb & Associates, LLC


Salt Lake City, UT

April 16, 2013



F- 2





[taic10k_123112apg2005.gif]




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM


To the Board of Directors and
Stockholders of Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries (a development stage enterprise)(the “Company”) as of December 31, 2011 and the related statements of operations, shareholders’ equity/(deficit), and cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2011, and for the period from October 14, 2009 (inception) through December 31, 2011. These financial statements are the responsibility of the company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Technology Applications International Corporation and Subsidiaries (a Florida corporation) as of December 31, 2011 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended and the period October 14, 2009 (inception) through December 31, 2011, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed further in Note 1, the Company has been in the development stage since its inception (October 14, 2009) and continues to incur significant losses. The Company's viability is dependent upon its ability to obtain future financing and the success of its future operations. These factors raise substantial doubt as to the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plan in regard to these matters is also described in Note 1. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.


/s/ Lake & Associates CPA’s LLC

Lake & Associates CPA’s LLC

Schaumburg, Illinois

April 11, 2012



F- 3





TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31,

ASSETS

 

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

$

120,697 

 

$

174,363 

Inventory

 

 

125,408 

 

Deposits

 

 

50,000 

 

Other current assets

 

3,814 

 

4,965 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

 

299,919 

 

179,328 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intangible assets, net

 

2,049 

 

1,680 

Machinery and equipment, net

 

 

13,462 

 

17,543 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

315,430 

 

$

198,551 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

 

 

$

193,894 

 

$

10,000 

Advances from affiliate

 

 

157,843 

 

Loan from affiliate

 

 

88,880 

 

117,937 

Convertible debentures (net of debt discount of $134,292 and $0, respectively)

 

 

65,708 

 

100,000 

Derivative liability

 

 

276,000 

 

Other current liabilities

 

 

 

430 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

 

 

782,325 

 

228,367 

Shareholders' deficit

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, par value, $0.001 per share, 50,000,000 shares

 

 

 

 

 

authorized, none issued or outstanding

 

 

 

Common stock, par value $0.001 par value, 300,000,000 shares authorized,

 

 

 

 

 

117,248,000 and 116,454,000 shares issued and outstanding at

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

 

117,248 

 

116,454 

Additional paid in capital

 

 

505,220 

 

109,014 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(1,089,363)

 

(255,284)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total shareholders' deficit

 

 

(466,895)

 

(29,816)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders' deficit

 

 

$

315,430 

 

$

198,551 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements




F- 4





TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2012

 

Year Ended December 31, 2011

 

Period from October 14, 2009 (inception of development stage) through December 31, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

 

$

7,979 

 

$

1,500 

 

$

9,479 

Cost of revenues

 

 

3,869 

 

625 

 

4,494 

Gross profit

 

 

4,110 

 

875 

 

4,985 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

 

 

681,875 

 

228,713 

 

938,034 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(677,765)

 

(227,838)

 

(933,049)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on derivative valuation

 

 

77,200 

 

 

77,200 

Interest expense

 

 

(233,514)

 

 

(233,514)

Total other income (expense)

 

 

(156,314)

 

 

(156,314)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

$

(834,079)

 

$

227,838)

 

$

(1,089,363)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

 

$

(0.01)

 

$

(0.01)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

 

117,215,574 

 

25,320,545 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements




F- 5





TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Period from Inception (October 14, 2009 to December 31, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Shares

 

Common Shares

 

Additional Paid-in Capital

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

 Total

Balance, October 14, 2009

 

--

 

$

--

 

$

-- 

 

$

-- 

 

$

-- 

Shares issued for cash

 

3,000,000

 

3,000

 

-- 

 

-- 

 

3,000 

Net loss

 

--

 

--

 

-- 

 

(2,575)

 

(2,575)

Balance, December 31, 2009

 

3,000,000

 

3,000

 

 

(2,575)

 

425 

Shares issued for equipment

 

100,000

 

100

 

 

 

100 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(24,871)

 

(24,871)

Balance, December 31, 2010

 

3,100,000

 

3,100

 

 

(27,446)

 

(24,346)

Shares issued for cancellation of debt

 

101,800,000

 

101,800

 

 

 

101,800 

Shares issued for services rendered

 

11,318,000

 

11,318

 

 

 

11,318 

Shares issued for cash

 

236,000

 

236

 

117,764 

 

 

118,000 

Syndication costs

 

-

 

-

 

(8,750)

 

 

(8,750)

Net loss

 

-

 

-

 

 

(227,838)

 

(227,838)

Balance, December 31, 2011

 

116,454,000

 

116,454

 

109,014 

 

(255,284)

 

(29,816)

Shares issued for cash

 

794,000

 

794

 

396,206 

 

 

397,000 

Net loss

 

-

 

-

 

 

(834,079)

 

(834,079)

Balance, December 31, 2012

 

117,248,000

 

$

117,248

 

$

505,220 

 

$

(1,089.363)

 

$

(466,895)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements



F- 6





TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2012

 

Year Ended December 31, 2011

 

Period from October 14, 2009 (inception of development stage) through December 31, 2012

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

$

(834,079)

 

$

(227,838)

 

$

(1,089,363)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on derivative valuation

 

 

 

(77,200)

 

 

(77,200)

Interest expense

 

 

 

218,908 

 

 

 

218,908 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

4,182 

 

4,123 

 

8,312 

Shares issued for services rendered

 

 

 

 

11,318 

 

11,318 

Change in current assets and current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase in inventory

 

 

 

(125,408)

 

 

(125,408)

Increase in deposits

 

 

 

(50,000)

 

 

(50,000)

(Increase) decrease in other current assets

 

 

 

1,151 

 

(4,965)

 

(3,814)

Increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses

 

183,894 

 

5,125 

 

193,894 

Increase (decrease) in other current liabilities

 

 

 

(430)

 

430 

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

 

(678,982)

 

(211,807)

 

(913,353)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of equipment

 

 

 

 

(21,543)

 

(21,553)

Increase in trademarks

 

 

 

(470)

 

(1,700)

 

(2,170)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

 

(470)

 

(23,243)

 

(23,723)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advances from affiliate

 

 

 

39,906 

 

200,163 

 

259,643 

Proceeds from loan from affiliate

 

 

 

125,000 

 

 

125,000 

Repayment of loan from affiliate

 

 

 

(36,120)

 

 

(36,120)

Proceeds from issuance of convertible debentures

 

 

 

100,000 

 

100,000 

 

200,000 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock

 

 

 

397,000 

 

109,250 

 

509,250 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

 

625,786 

 

409,413 

 

1,057,773 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

 

(53,666)

 

174,363 

 

120,697 

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning balance

 

 

 

174,363 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents, ending balance

 

 

 

$

120,697 

 

$

174,363 

 

$

120,697 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income taxes paid

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

Interest paid

 

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements



F- 7





 

TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

 



1.

Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies


Nature of Operations


Technology Applications International Corporation (formerly Raj Ventures, Inc.) (“Technology”) was incorporated on October 14, 2009 under the laws of Florida.  Renuell Int’l, Inc. and NueEarth, Inc., Technology’s wholly owned subsidiaries and Technology, collectively, are referred to here-in as the “Company”, a development stage company.  The Company is engaged in developing market entry technology products and services into early and mainstream technology products and services.  Through our subsidiaries, we are focused on developing and manufacturing a line of technologically advanced skin care products and providing environmental management solutions that use electron particle accelerator technology.


Principles of Consolidation


The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Technology Applications International Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiaries, Renuell Int’l, Inc. and NueEarth, Inc.  All significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.


These consolidated financial statements present the financial condition, and results of operations and cash flows of the operating companies.


Basis of Presentation and Going Concern Considerations


The accompanying consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) applicable to a going concern which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business.  The Company has not yet established an ongoing source of revenues sufficient to cover its operating costs.  The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is highly dependent upon management’s ability to increase near-term operating cash flows and obtain additional working capital through the issuance of debt and or equity.  If the Company is unable to obtain adequate capital, it could be forced to cease operations.


Development Stage Risk


Since its inception, the Company has been dependent upon the receipt of capital investment to fund its operating activities.  In addition to the normal risks associated with a new business venture, there can be no assurance that the Company’s business plans will be successfully executed.  The Company’s ability to execute its business plans is dependent on its ability to obtain additional debt and equity financing and achieving a profitable level of operations.  There can be no assurance that sufficient financing will be obtained or that we will achieve a profitable level of operations.


The Company has minimal revenues generated from operations due to the sale of sample products.  Accordingly, the Company’s activities have been accounted for as those of a “Development Stage Enterprise” as set forth in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 915 “Development Stage Entities”.  Among the disclosures required are that the Company’s financial statements be identified as those of a development stage company and that the statements of operations, shareholders’ equity / (deficit) and cash flows disclose activity since the date of the Company’s inception.




F- 8




1.

Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)


Use of Estimates


The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and their reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.


Risks and Uncertainties


The Company is subject to substantial risks from, among other things, intense competition associated with the industry in general, other risks associated with financing, liquidity requirements, rapidly changing customer requirements and limited operating history.


Contingencies


Certain conditions may exist as of the date the consolidated financial statements are issued which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  The Company's management and legal counsel assess such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment.  In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company's legal counsel evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought.


If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be provided for in the Company's consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, together with an estimate of the range of possible loss if determinable and material would be disclosed. Loss contingencies considered to be remote by management are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantee would be disclosed.


There were no contingencies which could be evaluated at December 31, 2012.


Cash and Cash Equivalents


Cash and cash equivalents consist of highly-liquid investments with a maturity of less than three months when purchased.


Inventories


Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market value using the FIFO (first-in, first-out) method.


The Company maintains a reserve for the inventory based on the estimated losses that result from inventory that becomes obsolete or for which the Company has excess inventory levels as of period end.  In determining these estimates, the Company performs an analysis on current demand and usage for each inventory item over  historical time periods.  Based on that analysis, the Company reserves a percentage of the inventory amount within each time period based on historical demand and usage patterns of specific items in inventory.


Machinery and Equipment


Machinery and equipment are recorded at cost.  Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to earnings as incurred whereas additions, renewals and betterments are capitalized.  When machinery and equipment are retired or otherwise disposed of, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts, and any gain or loss is included in operations.  Depreciation of machinery and equipment is provided using the straight-line method over the assets estimated useful lives of approximately 5 to 7 years.  Leasehold improvements, if any, are amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease or the estimated useful lives, whichever is shorter.




F- 9




1.

Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)


Intangible Assets


Intangible consist of trademarks which are being amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated period of benefit, twenty years.  We evaluate the recoverability of intangible assets periodically and take into account events or circumstances that warrant revised estimates of useful lives or that indicate that impairment exists.  All of our intangible assets are subject to amortization.  No impairments of intangible assets have been identified during any of the periods presented.


The estimated future amortization expense related to trademarks as of December 31, 2012 is as follows:


2013

$109

2014

109

2015

109

2016

109

2017

109

Thereafter

1,504


Amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 was $101 and $20, respectively.


Long-Lived Assets


The Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.  Recoverability of definite-lived assets to be held and used is measured by comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future undiscounted cash flow expected to be generated by the asset.  If such assets are impaired, the impairment is recognized as the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the estimated future cash flows.  Assets to be sold are reported at the lower of the carrying amount or the fair value less costs to sell.  Indefinite-lived assets are tested for impairment annually or when impairment is suspected by a comparison of the carrying amount of the asset to the net present value of future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset.  There were no impaired assets at December 31, 2012.


Revenue Recognition


The Company's revenue recognition policies are in compliance with Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104, "Revenue Recognition."  Sales revenue which has been insignificant to December 31, 2012, is recognized at the date of shipment to customers when a formal arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, the delivery is completed, no other significant obligations of the Company exist and collectability is reasonably assured.  Payments received before all of the relevant criteria for revenue recognition are satisfied are recorded as unearned revenue.


Research and Development Costs


Research and development costs, which relate primarily to the development, design and testing of products, are expensed as incurred.  Such costs were approximately $7,700 and $18,000 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.


Advertising and Marketing


Advertising and marketing expenses are expensed as incurred.  Expense recorded for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 were approximately $72,600 and $10,400, respectively.


Fair Value of Financial Instruments


In accordance with FASB ASC 820, fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (i.e., the “exit price”) in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.




F- 10




1.

Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)


In determining fair value, the Company uses various valuation approaches.  In accordance with GAAP, a fair value hierarchy for inputs is used in measuring fair value that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the most observable inputs be used when available.  Observable inputs are those that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company.  Unobservable inputs reflect the Company’s assumptions about the inputs market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability developed based on the best information available in the circumstances.  The fair value hierarchy is categorized into three levels based on the inputs as follows:


·

Level 1 — Inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.


·

Level 2 — Inputs to the valuation methodology are other observable inputs, including quoted market prices for similar assets or liabilities and market-corroborated inputs.


·

Level 3 — Inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable inputs based on management’s best estimate of inputs market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date, including assumptions about risk.


As of December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the derivative liabilities amounted to $276,000 and $0, respectively.  In accordance with the accounting standards, the Company determined that the carrying value of these derivatives approximated the fair value using the level 3 inputs.


Derivative Financial Instruments


Derivative financial instruments, as defined in Financial Accounting Standards, consist of financial instruments or other contracts that contain a notional amount and one or more underlying components (e.g. interest rate, security price or other variable), require no initial net investment and permit net settlement.  Derivative financial instruments may be free-standing or embedded in other financial instruments.  Further, derivative financial instruments are initially, and subsequently, measured at fair value and recorded as liabilities or, in rare instances, assets.  The Company generally does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to cash-flow or market or foreign-currency risks.  However, the Company has entered into various types of financing arrangements to fund its business capital requirements, including convertible debt and other financial instruments indexed to the Company’s own stock.  These contracts require careful evaluation to determine whether derivative features embedded in host contracts require bifurcation and fair value measurement or, in the case of freestanding derivatives (principally warrants) whether certain conditions for equity classification have been achieved.  In instances where derivative financial instruments require liability classification, the Company is required to initially, and subsequently, measure such instruments at fair value.  Accordingly, the Company adjusts the fair value of these derivative components at each reporting period through a charge to income until such time as the instruments acquire classification in stockholders’ equity. See Note 8 for additional information.


As previously stated, derivative financial instruments are initially recorded at fair value and subsequently adjusted to fair value at the close of each reporting period.  The Company estimates fair values of derivative financial instruments using various techniques (and combinations thereof) that are considered to be consistent with the objective measuring fair values.  In selecting the appropriate technique, management considers, among other factors, the nature of the instrument, the market risks that it embodies and the expected means of settlement.  For less complex derivative instruments, such as free-standing warrants, the Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton option valuation technique because it embodies all of the requisite assumptions (including trading volatility, dividend yield, estimated terms and risk free rates) necessary to fair value these instruments.  Estimating fair values of derivative financial instruments requires the development of significant and subjective estimates that may, and are likely to, change over the duration of the instrument with related changes in internal and external market factors.  In addition, option-based techniques are highly volatile and sensitive to changes in the trading market price of our common stock, which has a high-historical volatility.  Since derivative financial instruments are initially, and subsequently, carried at fair values, our income (loss) will reflect the volatility in these estimate and assumption changes.





F- 11





1.

Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)


Income Taxes


Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled.  The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income during the period that includes the enactment date.  The Company recognizes the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained.  Recognized income tax positions are measured at the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized.  Changes in recognition or measurement are reflected in the period in which the change in judgment occurs.  The Company records interest related to unrecognized tax benefits in interest expense and penalties in general and administrative expenses.  No interest expense or penalties have been assessed as of, and for the years ended, December 31, 2012 and 2011.


Concentration of Credit Risk


Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash accounts.  The Company places its cash in what it believes to be credit-worthy financial institutions.  Accounts at each financial institution are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to $250,000.  At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the Company’s cash balances did not exceed federally insured limits.


Earnings (Loss) Per Common Share


The Company computes earnings per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings Per Share (“ASC 260”).  Basic earnings (loss) per share are computed by dividing the net income (loss) for the period by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period.  Diluted earnings per share adjusts basic earnings per share for the effects of stock options and other potentially dilutive financial instruments, only in the periods in which the effects are dilutive.  


For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, there were warrants to purchase 794,000 shares and 236,000 shares, respectively, of common stock that were excluded from the diluted earnings per share computation because the impact of the assumed exercise of such warrants would have been anti-dilutive, based on the fact that their exercise price exceeded the market price of the common stock as of December 31, 2012 and 2011.


Recent Accounting Pronouncements


From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standard setting bodies that are adopted by us as of the specified effective date.  Unless otherwise discussed, we believe that the impact of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position or results of operations upon adoption.


Reclassification


Certain amounts in the financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2011 have been reclassified for comparative purposes to conform to the presentation in the financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012.


2.

Major Customers


Three and one customers accounted for approximately 44% and 20% of total sales for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.




F- 12




3.

Commitments and Contingencies


The Company leases its corporate office space under a month to month lease


Rent expense was approximately $37,700 and $34,900 for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.


During August 2012, the Company entered into a two-year commission agreement whereby it will pay a $35 commission for each product sold.  The agreement will automatically renew in one-year increments unless cancelled in writing sixty-days prior to expiration.


As of December 31, 2012 and through the date of these financial statements, the Company has no insurance policies in place.  As of the date of these financial statements, the Company has not been advised of any liability or claims against it.


4.

Inventories


Inventories, as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, consisted of the following:


 

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2012

 

2011

Raw materials

$

-

$

-

Work-in-process

 

-

 

-

Finished goods

 

125,408

 

-

Total Inventories, net

$

125,408

$

-


5.

Machinery and Equipment


Machinery and equipment, as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, consisted of the following:


 

Estimated Useful Lives

2012

 

2011

 

 




Computer Equipment

 3 Years

$

4,162 

 

$

4,162 

Machinery and equipment

 5 Years

3,418 

 

3,418 

Furniture and fixtures

 7 Years

14,073 

 

14,073 

Accumulated depreciation

 

(8,191)

 

(4,110)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

13,462 

 

$

17,543 


Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 was $4,081 and $4,103, respectively.


6.

Convertible Debenture


During December 2011, the Company received $100,000 as a deposit for entering into a distribution agreement.  On March 22, 2012, the Company converted the $100,000 deposit into a convertible debenture.  The convertible debenture bears interest at a rate of five-percent (5%) per annum and is payable March 21, 2014.  At the Holder’s option, principle and unpaid accrued interest shall be convertible into common stock at a rate of $0.50 per share.  In addition to the common stock, the Holder shall receive warrants to purchase an equal number of shares of common stock exercisable at $1.00 per share.  These warrants expire at the earlier of 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or one-year from exercise.


On September 25, 2012, the Company issued a $100,000 convertible debenture.  The convertible debenture bears interest at a rate of five-percent (5%) per annum and is payable September 20, 2013.  At the Holder’s option, principle and unpaid accrued interest shall be convertible into common stock at a rate of $0.50 per share.  In addition to the common stock, the Holder shall receive warrants to purchase an equal number of shares of common stock exercisable at $1.00 per share.  These warrants expire at the earlier of 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or one-year from exercise.



F- 13




6.

Convertible Debenture (Continued)


The following table reflects the components of the initial allocation:


Compound derivative

$     353,200

Convertible debentures payable, net of discount

   -

Interest expense

153,200

 

$     200,000


The Compound derivative comprises certain derivative features embedded in the host convertible debenture contracts including the conversion feature and warrants both of which contain anti-dilution protections.  These instruments were combined into one compound derivative and bifurcated from the host instrument at fair value.  The Company applied the Black-Scholes Merton valuation technique to fair value these derivatives because this technique embodies all of the assumptions necessary to fair value these compound derivative instruments.


Since the derivative financial instruments are required to be recorded, both initially, and subsequently, at fair value, there were insufficient proceeds to allocate any amount to the convertible debentures and, accordingly, it has no carrying value on the date of inception.  Additionally, proceeds were insufficient to record the fair values of the derivative financial instruments, resulting in initial interest expense of $153,200.  It should be noted that the derivative instruments will be adjusted to fair value at each reporting date.  As the Company does not have historical volatility data for its own stock, the expected volatility was based upon the Company’s peer group in the industry in which it does business.  Fair values are highly influenced by the trading stock price and volatility of the peer group, changes in our credit risk and market interest rates.  Please also see Note 9.


The company amortizes the discount on the convertible debentures resulting from the initial allocation over the term of the convertible debt instruments using the effective method.  Amortization expense arising from this method during the period from inception to December 31, 2012 amounted to $65,708 which has been included as a component of interest expense.


7.

Capital Stock


Common Stock


On October 14, 2009, the Company issued 3,000,000 shares of common stock for $3,000.


On August 26, 2010, the Company issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to purchase equipment.


On October 20, 2011, the Company issued 101,800,000 shares of its common stock as payment for cancellation of debt for part of the amount due to its related party.


On October 28, 2011, the Company issued 5,727,000 shares of its common stock to a consultant as payment for services rendered.


On November 8, 2011, the Company issued 5,591,000 shares of its common stock to a consultant as payment for services rendered.


During November and December 2011, the Company issued 236,000 shares of its common stock through a private placement to several investors for total cash consideration of $118,000.


During January and February 2012, the Company issued 794,000 shares of its common stock through a private placement for total cash consideration of $397,000.


Subsequent to December 31, 2012, the Company issued 15,000 shares of its common stock through April 16, 2013.






F- 14





7.

Capital Stock (Continued)


Stock Purchase Warrants


In conjunction with the Private Placement Memorandum dated October 28, 2011, the Company is offering up to 10,000 Units.  Each Unit consists of 1,000 shares of common stock priced at $0.50 per share and one Class A Warrant to purchase 1,000 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $1.00 per share.  These warrants expire on the earlier of (i) 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or (ii) one year after the date of issuance.


Warrants to purchase up to1,030,000 shares of common stock were issued in accordance with the Private Placement Memorandum stated above.  Of these issuances, warrants to purchase up to 236,000 shares of common stock expired during 2012.  Warrants to purchase up to 794,000 shares of common stock remain outstanding at December 31, 2012.  As these warrants were issued as part of a unit sold, there has been no value assigned to them.


In conjunction with the Private Placement Memorandum dated February 13, 2013, the Company is offering up to 3,000,000 units.  Each unit consists of 1 share of common stock priced at $1.00 and one Class A Warrant to purchase 1 share of common stock with an exercise price of $1.50 per share.  These warrants expire on the earlier of (i) 180 days after the common stock commences quotation on the OTC Bulletin Board or (ii) one year after the date of issuance.


Subsequent to December 31, 2012, warrants to purchase up to 15,000 shares of common stock were issued in accordance with the Private Placement Memorandum dated February 13, 2013.  As these warrants were issued as part of a unit sold, there has been no value assigned to them.


The following table summarizes all warrant activity for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011:



 

 

Shares

 

Weighted-Average Exercise Price Per Share

Outstanding, December 31, 2010

$

-

$

-

Granted

 

236,000

 

1.00

Exercised

 

-

 

-

Forfeited

 

-

 

-

Expired

 

-

 

-

Outstanding, December 31, 2011

$

         236,000

$

             1.00

 

 

 

 

-

Exercisable at December 31, 2011

$

         236,000

$

             1.00

 

 

 

 

 

Granted

$

794,000

$

1.00

Exercised

 

-

 

 

Forfeited

 

-

 

 

Expired

 

           236,000

 

                1.00

Outstanding, December 31, 2012

$

           794,000

$

                1.00

 

 

 

 

 

Exercisable at December 31, 2012

$

           794,000

$

                1.00

 

 

 

 

 




F- 15




8.

Fair Value Measurements


On a recurring basis, we measure certain financial assets and liabilities based upon the fair value hierarchy as described in the Company’s significant accounting policies in Note 1.  The following table presents information about the Company’s liabilities measured at fair value as of December 31, 2012:


 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Fair Value at December 31, 2012

Liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derivative liability

 

-

 

-

 

$          276,000

 

$                  276,000



The fair value changes in the fair value of recurring fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3), relate solely to the derivative liability as follows:


Balance as of January 1, 2011

$

-

Derivative liability recorded

 

-

Fair value adjustment

 

-

Balance as of December 31, 2011

 

-

Derivative liability recorded

 

353,200

Fair value adjustment

 

77,200

Balance as of December 31, 2012

$

276,000



9.

Derivative Financial Instruments


The balance sheet caption derivative liability consists of derivative features embedded in convertible debentures including the conversion feature and warrants which have anti-dilution protections.  These derivative financial instruments are indexed to an aggregate of 800,000 shares of the Company’s common stock as of December 31, 2012 and are carried at fair value.  The balance at December 31, 2012 and 2011 was $276,000 and $0, respectively.


The valuation of the derivative liability is determined using a Black-Scholes Merton Model because that model embodies all of the relevant assumptions that address the features underlying these instruments.  Significant assumptions used in the Black-Scholes models at December 31, 2012 include the following:


Risk-free interest rate

0.16% - 0.19%

Estimated volatility

186.0% - 246.0%

Dividend rate

None

Estimated term in years

1.0 – 3.0


10.

Income Taxes


Deferred income taxes for 2012 and 2011 were provided for the temporary differences between the financial reporting basis and the tax basis of the Company’s assets and liabilities.  The effects of temporary differences and carry-forwards at December 31, 2012 and 2011 are as follows:


Deferred tax assets:

 

December 31, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

Net operating loss carry-over

$

(370,383)

$

(86,779)

Change in derivative liability

 

(26,248)

 

Common stock issued for services rendered

 

3,848 

 

3,848 

Valuation allowance

 

(318,355)

 

(82,948)

Income tax expense per books

$

$






F- 16




10.

Income Taxes (Continued)


The income tax provision differs from the amount of income tax determined by applying the estimated U.S. federal and state income tax rates of 34 percent to pretax income from continuing operations for the year ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 due to the following:


 

 

December 31, 2012

 

December 31, 2011

Income tax expense at statutory rate

$

(283,587)

$

(77,865)

Change in derivative liability

 

(26,248)

 

Common stock issued for services rendered

 

-- 

 

3,848 

Interest on derivative

 

74,429 

 

Valuation allowance

 

235,406 

 

73,617 

Income tax expense per books

$

$



As of December 31, 2012, the Company had net operating loss carry forwards for income purposes of approximately $370,383 that may be offset against future taxable income.  The net operating loss carry-forwards expire through the year 2033.  Current tax laws limit the amount of loss available to be offset against future taxable income when a substantial change in ownership occurs or a change in the nature of the business.  Therefore, the amount available to offset future taxable income may be limited.


No tax benefit has been reported in the consolidated financial statements for the realization of loss carry-forwards, as the Company believes there is high probability that the carry-forwards will not be utilized in the foreseeable future.


11.

Related Parties


An affiliate of the Company, an entity owned by the Company’s president, has been funding operations of the Company by making payments directly to third parties or advancing monies to the Company.  These amounts bear no interest and are payable on demand.  Amounts advanced to the Company during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 were approximately $142,700 and $218,300, respectively.  Payments of approximately $102,800 and $120,000 were made during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively, resulting in amounts due to the affiliate at December 31, 2012 and 2011 are approximately $157,000 and $117,900, respectively.


During June 2012, the Company borrowed $125,000 from an affiliate.  The loan bears interest at 10% per annum and is unsecured and payable upon demand.  The Company has paid $36,120 towards the loan amount.  The outstanding balance as of December 31, 2012 is $88,880.


The Company periodically rents a recreational vehicle from an affiliate of the Company, an entity owned by the Company’s president, which is utilized for advertising and promotional events.  The Company is charged $1,729 for each month of use and is payable in arrears.  For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, the Company recorded expense of approximately $10,400 and $0.00, respectively.  No amounts were due at December 31, 2012 or 2011.


12.

Subsequent Events


Pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification 855-10, the Company has evaluated all events or transactions that have occurred from January 1, 2013 through the filing with the SEC.  


Subsequent to December 2012, the Company issued 15,000 shares of its common stock and warrants to purchase up to 15,000 shares of its common stock to several investors for total cash consideration of $15,000.




F- 17




ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.


None.


ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.


Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting


This report includes the certifications of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer required by Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). See Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2. This Item 9A includes information concerning the controls and control evaluations referred to in those certifications.


Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures


Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Management identified certain material weaknesses which together with remedial action taken are described below.


Disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in rules and forms adopted by the SEC, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.


In connection with the preparation of our annual report as of December 31, 2012, the Company’s management, under the supervision and with the participation of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2012. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of December 31, 2012, as a result of the existence of material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting as discussed below.


Evaluation of Internal Control over Financial Reporting


Management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework set forth in “Internal Control—Integrated Framework” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on management’s assessment under this framework, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2012, as a result of the existence of material weaknesses.


A material weakness is a control deficiency (within the meaning of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) Auditing Standard No. 5) or combination of control deficiencies that result in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected.  Management has identified the following four material weaknesses which have caused management to conclude that, as of December 31, 2012, our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting were not effective at the reasonable assurance level:


The Company did not maintain an effective financial reporting process to prepare financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Specifically, our process lacked timely and complete financial statement reviews, appropriate account closing procedures, and appropriate reconciliation processes.


We do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures.  Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act which is applicable to us as of and for the year ended December 31, 2012.  Management evaluated the impact of our failure to have written documentation of our internal controls and procedures on our assessment of our



20



disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting and has concluded that the control deficiency that resulted represented a material weakness.


The Company’s board of directors has no audit committee, independent director or member with financial expertise which causes ineffective oversight of our external financial reporting and internal control over financial reporting.


We do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control.  Due to our size and nature, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible.  However, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals.  Management evaluated the impact of our failure to have segregation of duties on our assessment of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting and has concluded that the control deficiency that resulted represented a material weakness.


Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting


Management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has assessed whether any changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the year ended December 31, 2012 have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. Significant changes are being implemented during the 2013 to remediate our material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting. Management believes that such measures we are implementing to remediate the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting will have a favorable impact on our internal control over financial reporting. Changes in our internal control over financial reporting through the date of this report that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting are described below.


Remediation Actions Relating to Material Weaknesses


Once the Company is engaged in a business of merit and has sufficient personnel available, then our Board of Directors, in particular and in connection with the aforementioned deficiencies, will establish the following remediation measures:


Our Board of Directors will nominate an audit committee or a financial expert on our Board of Directors in fiscal 2013.


We will appoint additional personnel to assist with the preparation of the Company’s financial reporting process.


Conclusion


In light of the material weaknesses described below, we performed additional analysis and other post-closing procedures to ensure our financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  Accordingly, we believe that the financial statements included in this report fairly present, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented.


ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION.


None.



21




PART III


ITEM 10. DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.


Identification of Directors and Executive Officers


The following table sets forth the names and ages of our current directors and executive officers:


Name

Age

Position with the Company

Director Since

Charles J. Scimeca

69

CEO, CFO, President, Treasurer, Secretary, & Director

April 12, 2010

John Stickler

45

Vice President & Director

May 18, 2012



The Board of Directors has no nominating, audit or compensation committee at this time.


Term of Office


Each director is elected by the Board of Directors and serves until his or her successor is elected and qualified, unless he or she resigns or is removed earlier. Each of our officers is elected by the Board of Directors to a term of one (1) year and serves until his or her successor is duly elected and qualified, or until he or she is earlier removed from office or resigns.


Background and Business Experience


The business experience during the past five years of the person presently listed above as an Officer or Director of the Company is as follows:


Charles J. Scimeca – Mr. Scimeca has served as our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and sole director since April 2010. Since February 2003, Mr. Scimeca has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Coast To Coast Equity Group, Inc., which provides consulting services for private companies going public, including investor relations and marketing services. Since January 1998, Mr. Scimeca has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Coast To Coast Realty Group, Inc., which offers commercial and residential real estate services. Mr. Scimeca is a licensed real estate broker.


John Stickler – Mr. Stickler has served as Vice President and Director since May 18, 2012.  He has worked as a sales and marketing professional for over nineteen years. His experience is mainly in the corporate management of sales and in the selling of a product. From January 2007 until January 2011, Mr. Stickler was a consultant for Regenetech, Inc., whom our Company has a distribution agreement with.  While working for Regenetech, Mr. Stickler gained knowledge of the techniques necessary for manufacture and production of our cream as well as forming working relationships with the inventors of the Bio-Reactor that expands the fibroblast cells that make up the key ingredient for our cream. Mr. Stickler assisted Regenetech, Inc. in introducing their technologies and expansion services to healthcare professionals.  He test marketed the cream to individuals of both sexes with positive results. During this time period Mr. Stickler served as vice-president of Renuell, Inc. a Florida corporation that was dissolved in October of 2010. Renuell, Inc. did no business although it was formed.  No other corporations or organizations are a parent, subsidiary or other affiliate of the registrant that Mr. Stickler is or has been involved with. Because of Mr. Sticker’s knowledge of the cream from its inception and hands on relationships with N.A.S.A. and Regenetech, as well as his experience with marketing skin cream we appointed him as Vice-President and as a Director.


Identification of Significant Employees


We have no significant employees, other than Charles J. Scimeca, our President, Chief Executive Officer, and Director and John Stickler our Director.




22



Family Relationship


We currently do not have any officers or directors of our Company who are related to each other.


Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings


During the past ten years no director, executive officer, promoter or control person of the Company has been involved in the following:

(1)

A petition under the Federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law which was filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer was appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within two years before the time of such filing;

(2)

Such person was convicted in a criminal proceeding or is a named subject of a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

(3)

Such person was the subject of any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from, or otherwise limiting, the following activities:

i.

Acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor, commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

ii.

Engaging in any type of business practice; or

iii.

Engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of Federal or State securities laws or Federal commodities laws;

(4)

Such person was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any Federal or State authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (f)(3)(i) of this section, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;

(5)

Such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commission to have violated any Federal or State securities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended, or vacated;

(6)

Such person was found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated any Federal commodities law, and the judgment in such civil action or finding by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has not been subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated;

(7)

Such person was the subject of, or a party to, any Federal or State judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of:

i.

Any Federal or State securities or commodities law or regulation; or



23



ii.

Any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order; or

iii.

Any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or

(8)

Such person was the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26))), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29))), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.


Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert


The Company does not have an audit committee or an audit committee financial expert (as defined in Item 407 of Regulation S-K) serving on its Board of Directors. All current members of the Board of Directors lack sufficient financial expertise for overseeing financial reporting responsibilities. The Company has not yet employed an audit committee financial expert on its Board due to the inability to attract such a person.


The Company intends to establish an audit committee of the Board of Directors, which will consist of independent directors. The audit committee’s duties will be to recommend to the Company’s Board of Directors the engagement of an independent registered public accounting firm to audit the Company’s financial statements and to review the Company’s accounting and auditing principles. The audit committee will review the scope, timing and fees for the annual audit and the results of audit examinations performed by the internal auditors and independent registered public accounting firm, including their recommendations to improve the system of accounting and internal controls. The audit committee will at all times be composed exclusively of directors who are, in the opinion of the Company’s Board of Directors, free from any relationship which would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment as a committee member and who possess an understanding of financial statements and generally accepted accounting principles.


Code of Ethics


Our board of directors has not adopted a code of ethics due to the fact that we presently only have one director and we are in the development stage of our operations. We anticipate that we will adopt a code of ethics when we increase either the number of our directors and officers or the number of our employees.


Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act


Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires our directors and executive officers and persons who beneficially own more than ten percent of a registered class of our equity securities to file with the SEC initial reports of ownership and reports of change in ownership of common stock and other equity securities of the Company. Officers, directors and greater than ten percent stockholders are required by SEC regulations to furnish us with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. Based solely upon a review of Forms 3 and 4 and amendments thereto furnished to us under Rule 16a-3(e) during the year ended December 31, 2012, Forms 5 and any amendments thereto furnished to us with respect to the year ended December 31, 2012, and the representations made by the reporting persons to us, we believe that during the year ended December 31, 2012, our executive officers and directors and all persons who own more than ten percent of a registered class of our equity securities complied with all Section 16(a) filing requirements.




24



ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION


The table set forth below summarizes the annual and long-term compensation for services in all capacities to us payable to our officers and directors for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011. Our Board of Directors may adopt an incentive stock option plan for our executive officers that would result in additional compensation.


Summary Compensation Table


Name

and

Principal

Position

Fiscal

Year

Ended

12/31

 

Salary

($)

 

 

Bonus

($)

 

 

Stock

Awards

($)

 

 

Option

Awards

($)

 

 

Non-Equity

Incentive

Plan

Compensation

($)

 

 

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

($)

 

 

All Other Compensation

($)

 

 

Total

($)

 

Charles J. Scimeca (1)

President, CEO, CFO, Secretary, Treasurer and Director

2012

 

$

120,000

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

120,000-

 

2011

 

$

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

John Stickler

Vice President, Director (1)(2)

2012

$

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

60,000(3)

 

 

$

60,000

 

 

2011

$

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

 

-0-

 

 

$

-0-

 


(4)

The Company’s two officers and directors currently devote approximately 30-40 hours per week to manage the affairs of the Company, including, but not limited to the upkeep of Technology Applications International Corporation and the research and development associated with expanding the Company to new markets. Mr. Scimeca is the President, CEO, CFO, Secretary, Treasurer and a Director of the Company and Mr. Stickler is the Vice President and a Director of the Company.

(2)

Mr. Stickler was appointed as Vice President and Director on May 18, 2012, and is not compensated as a director.

(3)

All Other Compensation for the year ended December 31, 2012 for Mr. Stickler includes $60,000 as compensation for Mr. Stickler’s work as a consultant to the Company as provided for in his Consultant Agreement.

(4)


Narrative Disclosure to Summary Compensation Table


There are no compensatory plans or arrangements, including payments to be received from the Company with respect to any executive officer, that would result in payments to such person because of his or her resignation, retirement or other termination of employment with the Company, or its subsidiaries, any change in control, or a change in the person’s responsibilities following a change in control of the Company.


Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End


No executive officer received any equity awards, or holds exercisable or unexercisable options, as of the year ended December, 2012.


Long-Term Incentive Plans


There are no arrangements or plans in which we provide pension, retirement or similar benefits for directors or executive officers.


Compensation Committee


We currently do not have a compensation committee of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors as a whole determines executive compensation.





25



Compensation of Directors


Our directors receive no extra compensation for their service on our Board of Directors.


ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.


Security Ownership of Management


The following table sets forth certain information concerning the number of shares of our common stock owned beneficially as of April 16, 2013, by: (i) each of our directors; (ii) each of our named executive officers; and (iii) each person or group known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our outstanding shares of common stock. Unless otherwise indicated, the shareholders listed below possess sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares they own.


Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

Title of Class

Amount and Nature of Beneficial

Ownership (1)

(#)

Percent of Class (2)

(%)

Charles J. Scimeca

1001 Brickell Bay Drive, Suite 1716

Miami, Fl 33131

Common

104,800,000

89.4%

All Officers and Directors as a Group (1 Person)

Common

104,800,000

89.4%

 

 

 

 

(2)

The number and percentage of shares beneficially owned is determined under rules of the SEC and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under such rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which the individual has sole or shared voting power or investment power and also any shares which the individual has the right to acquire within 60 days through the exercise of any stock option or other right. The persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock shown as beneficially owned by them, subject to community property laws where applicable and the information contained in the footnotes to this table.


(2)

Based on 117,263,000 issued and outstanding shares of common stock as of April 16, 2013.


Changes in Control


There are no present arrangements or pledges of the Company’s securities which may result in a change in control of the Company.


ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.


Related Party Transactions


An affiliate of the Company, an entity owned by the Company’s president, has been funding operations of the Company by making payments directly to third parties or advancing monies to the Company.  These amounts bear no interest and are payable on demand.  Amounts advanced to the Company during the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 were approximately $142,700 and $218,300, respectively.  Amounts due to the affiliate at December 31, 2012 and 2011 are approximately $157,000 and $117,900, respectively.


During June 2012, the Company borrowed $125,000 from an affiliate.  The loan bears interest at 10% per annum and is unsecured and payable upon demand.  The Company has paid $36,120 towards the loan amount.  The outstanding balance as of December 31, 2012 is $88,880.


The Company periodically rents a recreational vehicle from an affiliate of the Company, an entity owned by the Company’s president, which is utilized for advertising and promotional events.  The Company is charged



26



$1,729 for each month of use and is payable in arrears.  For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, the Company recorded expense of approximately $10,400 and $0.00, respectively.  No amounts were due at December 31, 2012 or 2011.


The Company has entered into a consulting agreement (“Consulting Agreement”) with Mr. John Stickler one of the Company’s directors, as of January 1, 2011. The Consulting Agreement was filed as Exhibit 10.9 on December 27, 2012 as part of the Company’s Amended Registration Statement on Form S-1/A. As per the Consulting Agreement, Mr. Stickler is paid on an invoice basis up to $5,000 a month in payments. The Consulting Agreement may be canceled by either party upon thirty (30) days written notice.


Other than the foregoing, none of the directors or executive officers of the Company, nor any person who owned of record or was known to own beneficially more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding shares of its Common Stock, nor any associate or affiliate of such persons or companies, has any material interest, direct or indirect, in any transaction that has occurred during the past fiscal year, or in any proposed transaction, which has materially affected or will affect the Company.


With regard to any future related party transaction, we plan to fully disclose any and all related party transactions in the following manner:


·

Disclosing such transactions in reports where required;


·

Disclosing in any and all filings with the SEC, where required;


·

Obtaining disinterested directors consent; and


·

Obtaining shareholder consent where required.


Director Independence


For purposes of determining director independence, we have applied the definitions set out in NASDAQ Rule 5605(a)(2). The OTCBB on which shares of Common Stock are quoted does not have any director independence requirements. The NASDAQ definition of “Independent Officer” means a person other than an Executive Officer or employee of the Company or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of the Company's Board of Directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director.


According to the NASDAQ definition, Charles J. Scimeca is not an independent director because he is also an executive officer of the Company.


Review, Approval or Ratification of Transactions with Related Persons


We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.


ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES.


 

 

Year Ended

December 31, 2012

 

Year Ended

December 31, 2011

Audit fees

$

20,000

$

10,000

Audit-related fees

$

3,000

$

0

Tax fees

$

0

$

0

All other fees

$

0

$

0

Total

$

23,000

$

10,000




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Audit Fees


During the fiscal years ended December 31, 2012, we incurred approximately $10,000 in fees to our principal independent accountants for professional services rendered in connection with the audit and reviews of our financial statements for fiscal years ended December 31, 2012.


During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, we incurred approximately $10,000 in fees to our principal independent accountants for professional services rendered in connection with the audit and reviews of our financial statements for fiscal year ended December 31, 2011.


Audit-Related Fees


The aggregate fees billed during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 for assurance and related services by our principal independent accountants that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements (and are not reported under Item 9(e)(1) of Schedule 14A was $0 and $0, respectively.


Tax Fees


The aggregate fees billed during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 for professional services rendered by our principal accountant tax compliance, tax advice and tax planning were $0 and $0, respectively.


All Other Fees


The aggregate fees billed during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011 for products and services provided by our principal independent accountants (other than the services reported in Items 9(e)(1) through 9(e)(3) of Schedule 14A was $0 and $0, respectively.




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PART IV

ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS.


(a) Exhibits


Exhibit

 

 

Number

Description of Exhibit

Filing

 

 

 

3.1

Articles of Incorporation

Filed with the SEC on January 19, 2010 as part of the Company’s Registration of Securities on Form 10-12G.

3.1(a)

Restated Articles of Incorporation

Filed with the SEC on April 18, 2011 as part of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K.

3.2

Bylaws

Filed with the SEC on January 19, 2010 as part of the Company’s Registration of Securities on Form 10-12G.

3.2(a)

Amended Bylaws

Filed with the SEC on April 18, 2011 as part of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K.

10.1

Lease between Brickell Bay Tower Ltd., Inc. and Raj Ventures, Inc. dated October 18, 2010

Filed with the SEC on March 28, 2010 as part of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K.

10.2

Share Purchase Agreement by and among Raj Ventures, Inc., Willowhuasca Wellness, Inc., and Raj Ventures Funding, Inc., dated April 12, 2010

Filed with the SEC on April 12, 2010 as part of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K.

10.3

Bill of Sale and Assignment between Raj Ventures, Inc., and High Voltage Environmental Applications, Inc., dated as of August 26, 2010

Filed with the SEC on September 1, 2010 as part of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K.

10.4

Promissory Note between the Company and Joe-Val, Inc., dated March 27, 2012

Filed with the SEC on March 27, 2012 as part of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K.

10.5

Promissory Note between the Company and Coast To Coast Equity Group, Inc., dated June 25, 2012

Filed with the SEC on August 20, 2012 as part of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q

10.6

Convertible debenture between the Company and Shane Case, dated September 26, 2012

Filed with the SEC on November 19, 2012 as part of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q

10.7

Distribution Agreement between Regenetech, Inc. and Renuéll Int’l, Inc., dated December 29, 2011 and Amended on December 13, 2012.

Filed with the SEC on January 17, 2013 as part of the Company’s S-1/A...

10.8

Form of Subscription Agreement

Filed with the SEC on November 29, 2012 as part of the Company’s S-1/A.

10.9

Consulting Agreement between the Company and John Stickler

Filed with the SEC on December, 27, 2012 as part of the Company’s S-1/A

21.1

List of Subsidiaries

Filed with the SEC on April 16, 2012 as part of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K

31.01

Certification of Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14

Filed herewith.

31.02

Certification of Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14

Filed herewith.

32.01

Certification of CEO and CFO Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

Filed herewith.

101.INS*

XBRL Instance Document

To be filed by Amendment

101.SCH*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

To be filed by Amendment

101.CAL*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

To be filed by Amendment

101.LAB*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels Linkbase Document

To be filed by Amendment

101.PRE*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

To be filed by Amendment

101.DEF*

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

To be filed by Amendment


*To be filed by amendment. Pursuant to Rule 406T of Regulation S-T, the Interactive Data Files on Exhibit 101 hereto are deemed not filed or part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, are deemed not filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise are not subject to liability under those sections.




29





SIGNATURES


Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Company caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.


TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION



Dated: April 16, 2013

/s/ Charles J. Scimeca

By: Charles J. Scimeca

Its: President, Principal Executive Officer & Principal Financial Officer (Principal Accounting Officer)



Pursuant to the requirement of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Company and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:



Dated: April 16, 2013

/s/ Charles J. Scimeca

Charles J. Scimeca – Director


Dated: April 16, 2013

/s/ John Stickler

John Stickler – Director



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