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10-Q - SEPTEMBER 30, 2011 QUARTERLY REPORT - CHINA PEDIATRIC PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.cpdu_2012sept30-10q.htm
EX-31.02 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO EXCHANGE ACT RULES 13A-14(A) AND 15D-14(A), AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002. - CHINA PEDIATRIC PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.exhibit_31-2.htm
EX-31.01 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO EXCHANGE ACT RULES 13A-14(A) AND 15D-14(A), AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 302 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002. - CHINA PEDIATRIC PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.exhibit_31-1.htm
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EX-32.01 - CERTIFICATIONS OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002. - CHINA PEDIATRIC PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.exhibit_32-1.htm
v2.4.0.6
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  The Company's functional currency is the Chinese Yuan Renminbi; however the accompanying consolidated financial statements have been translated and presented in United States Dollars.

Principles of Consolidation

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the China Pediatric Pharmaceuticals, Inc., its wholly owned subsidiaries, China Children Pharmaceuticals Co. Limited, and Xi'an Coova Children Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd. as well as Shaanxi Jiali Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., a variable interest entity (“VIE”) for which the Company is the primary beneficiary.  All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.  

Foreign Currency Translation

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The Company’s reporting currency is the U.S. dollar.  The Company’s operation in China uses Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY) as its functional currency.  The financial statements of the subsidiary are translated into United States Dollars (USD) in accordance with ASC 830, “Foreign Currency Matters”.  All assets and liabilities were translated at the current exchange rate, stockholders’ equity was translated at the historical rates and income statement items were translated at the average exchange rate for the period.  The resulting translation adjustments are reported under other comprehensive income in accordance ASC 220, “Comprehensive Income”.  Foreign exchange transaction gains and losses are reflected in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive (Loss) Income.  

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Comprehensive Income

Comprehensive Income

 

Comprehensive income is defined as the change in equity of a company during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances excluding transactions resulting from investments from owners and distributions to owners.  For the Company, comprehensive income for the periods presented includes net income, foreign currency translation adjustments.

Contingencies

Contingencies

 

Certain conditions may exist as of the date the financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur.  The Company’s management and legal counsel assess such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment.  In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or un-asserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company’s legal counsel evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or un-asserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company’s financial statements.  If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, together with an estimate of the range of possible loss if determinable and material would be disclosed.

 

Loss contingencies considered to be remote by management are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantee would be disclosed. There were no contingencies at September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents include cash in hand and cash in time deposits, certificates of deposit and all highly liquid debt instruments with original maturities of three months or less. As of September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, cash and cash equivalents were mainly denominated in CNY and were placed with banks in the PRC. These cash and cash equivalents may not be freely convertible into foreign currencies and the remittance of these funds out of the PRC may be subjected to exchange control restrictions imposed by the PRC government.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable

 

Management periodically reviews the composition of accounts receivable and analyzes historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer credit worthiness, current economic trends and changes in customer payment patterns to evaluate potential credit losses on accounts receivable. The Company grants 90 days payment terms to all credit sales customers.

 

The accounting estimates regarding provision for doubtful accounts was changed during the fourth quarter in 2011. Bad debt expense increased as accounts receivable turnover increased over 300 days during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012. Historically, we did not make any provision for bad debt as all our accounts receivable were collected within 90 days. Provision for doubtful accounts is now estimated as follows: i) 50% on accounts that are outstanding between 91 and 180 days, ii) 75% on accounts that are outstanding between 181 to 365 days, and iii) 100% on accounts that are outstanding for over 365 days.

Inventories

Inventories

 

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost (determined on a weighted average basis) or market.  The Company compares the cost of inventories with the market value and allowance is made for writing down their inventories to market value, if lower.  

Property, Plant & Equipment

Property, Plant & Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost.  Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to earnings as incurred; additions, renewals and betterments are capitalized.  When property and equipment are retired or otherwise disposed of, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts, and any gain or loss is included in operations.  Depreciation of property and equipment is provided using the straight-line method for substantially all assets with estimated lives of:

 

Buildings     30 years
Plant and equipment    5-14 years
Transportation equipment  5-10 years
Office equipment 5-10 years
Goodwill

Goodwill

 

Goodwill represents the excess cost of a business acquisition over the fair value of the net assets acquired.   Under the provisions of ASC 350, we are required to perform an annual impairment test of our goodwill.  Goodwill impairment is determined using a two-step process.  The first step of the goodwill impairment test is used to identify potential impairment by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit, which we define as our business segments, with its net book value or carrying amount including goodwill.  If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of the reporting unit is considered not impaired and the second step of the impairment test is unnecessary.  If the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step of the goodwill impairment test compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill.  If the carrying amount of the reporting unit's goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.  The implied fair value of goodwill is determined in the same manner as the amount of goodwill recognized in a business combination.  The fair value of the reporting unit is allocated to all of the assets and liabilities of that unit including any unrecognized intangible assets as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination and the fair value of the reporting unit was the purchase price paid to acquire the reporting unit.

 

Goodwill as of September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011 were $nil.  Goodwill was arisen from acquisition of assets and liabilities of Baoji facility in fiscal year 2000. During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company recognized an impairment loss equal to the carrying amount of goodwill.

Intangible Assets

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets are amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated period of benefit, ranging from ten to fifty years.  Management evaluate the recoverability of intangible assets periodically and take into account events or circumstances that warrant revised estimates of useful lives or that indicate that impairment exists.  No impairments of intangible assets have been identified during any of the periods presented.  The land use rights will expire in 2056 and 2058.  All of the Company’s intangible assets are subject to amortization with estimated lives of:

 

Land use right     50 years
Proprietary technologies      10 years
Long-Lived Assets

Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company accounts for long-lived assets in accordance with ASC 360, “Property, Plant, and Equipment”. The Company periodically evaluates the carrying value of long-lived assets to be held and used, impairment losses are to be recorded on long-lived assets used in operations, when indicators of impairment are present and the undiscounted cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than the assets carrying amounts.  In that event, a loss is recognized based on the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair market value of the long-lived assets.  Loss on long-lived assets to be disposed of is determined in a similar manner, except that fair market values are reduced for the cost of disposal. Based on its review, the Company believes that, as of September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, there were no significant impairments of its long-lived assets.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

In accordance with FASB ASC 820, fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (i.e., the “exit price”) in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.

 

In determining fair value, the Company uses various valuation approaches.  In accordance with GAAP, a fair value hierarchy for inputs is used in measuring fair value that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the most observable inputs be used when available.  Observable inputs are those that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Fund.  Unobservable inputs reflect the Fund.  Unobservable inputs reflect the Fund’s assumptions about the inputs market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability developed based on the best information available in the circumstances.  

 

The fair value hierarchy is categorized into three levels based on the inputs as follows:

 

  Level 1  - inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.
  Level 2  - inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and inputs that are observable for the assets or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the financial instruments.

 

  Level 3  - inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable and significant to the fair value.
Derivative Financial Instruments

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

Derivative financial instruments, as defined in Financial Accounting Standard, consist of financial instruments or other contracts that contain a notional amount and one or more underlying (e.g. interest rate, security price or other variable), require no initial net investment and permit net settlement.  Derivative financial instruments may be free-standing or embedded in other financial instruments.  Further, derivative financial instruments are initially, and subsequently, measured at fair value and recorded as liabilities or, in rare instances, assets.  The Company generally does not use derivative financial instruments to hedge exposures to cash-flow, market or foreign-currency risks.  

Value Added Tax Payable

Value Added Tax Payable

 

The Company is subject to a value added tax rate of 17% on product sales by the People’s Republic of China.  Value added tax payable is computed net of value added tax paid on purchases for all sales in the People’s Republic of China.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company's revenue recognition policies are in compliance with FASB ASC Topic 605, "Revenue Recognition."

 

Revenue of the Company is primarily derived from the sales of OTC medicines in China. Sales are recognized when the following four revenue criteria are met: i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, ii) shipment has occurred, iii) the selling price is fixed or determinable, and iv) collectability is reasonably assured. Sales are presented net of value added tax (“VAT”) and net of sales rebate.

  

There are two types of sales upon which revenue is recognized:

 

  • Credit sales: revenue is recognized at the date of shipment. Sales arrangements are FOB shipping point.

 

  • Payment received before all of the relevant criteria are satisfied: Cash received is recorded as “deposits from customers,” and revenue is recognized when the products have been shipped to the customers.

 

Advertising

Advertising

 

Advertising expenses consist primarily of costs of promotion for corporate image and product marketing, costs of direct advertising.  The Company expenses all advertising costs as incurred.  

Customer Rebates

Customer Rebates

 

Rebates are paid to customers every quarter and we recorded customer rebates as customers earned.  They are classified as a reduction of revenue according to ASC 605-55-64.  

Shipping and Handling Costs

Shipping and Handling Costs

 

The Company incurs certain expenses related to preparing, packaging and shipping its products to its customers, mainly third-party transportation fees. All costs related to these activities are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statement of operations. For the three months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company incurred shipping charges of $nil and $25,187 respectively. For the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company incurred shipping charges of $983 and $71,352 respectively.

 

Stock based compensation

Stock based compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock based compensation in accordance to ASC 718. Compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the equity instruments awarded and is recognized over the period during which an employee is required to provide service in exchange for that award, or the requisite service period, which is usually the vesting period. For awards to non-employees, the amount of stock-based compensation expense recognized is based on the fair value of the equity instruments issued or the fair value of the goods or services received, whichever is more reliably measurable.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes

 

The Company utilizes ASC 740, “Income Taxes”, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns.  Under this method, deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences in future years of differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their financial reporting amounts at each period end based on enacted tax laws and statutory tax rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income.  Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities will be recognized, if any.

 

 

On January 1, 2007 the Company adopted the provisions of FASB issued Interpretation No. 48 (FIN 48), “Accounting for uncertainty in Income Taxes”, included in the Codification as ASC 740, Income Taxes.  The topic addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements.  Under ASC 740, we may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position.  The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. ASC 740 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

Statement of Cash Flows

Statement of Cash Flows

 

In accordance with ASC 230, “Statement of Cash Flows”, cash flows from the Company’s operations is based upon the local currencies.  As a result, amounts related to assets and liabilities reported on the statement of cash flows will not necessarily agree with changes in the corresponding balances on the balance sheet.

Basic and Diluted Earnings (Loss) per Share (EPS)

Basic and Diluted Earnings (Loss) per Share (EPS)

 

Basic EPS is computed by dividing income available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period.  Diluted EPS is similarly computed, except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive.  Diluted net earnings per share are based on the assumption that all dilutive convertible shares and stock options were converted or exercised.  Dilution is computed by applying the treasury stock method.  Under this method, options and warrants are assumed to have been exercised at the beginning of the period (or at the time of issuance, if later), and as if funds obtained thereby were used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period.

Segment Reporting

Segment Reporting

 

ASC 280-10-50, “Disclosure about Segments of an Enterprise and Related information” requires us of the “management approach” model for segment reporting.  The management approach model is based on the way a Company’s management organizes segments within the company for making operating decisions and assessing performance.  Reportable segments are based on products and services, geography, legal structure, management structure, or any other manner in which management disaggregates a company.  The Company operates in one segment during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011.

Concentration of Credit Risk

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk are cash, accounts receivable and other receivables arising from its normal business activities.  The Company places its cash in what it believes to be credit-worthy financial institutions.  The Company has a diversified customer base, most of which are in China.  The Company controls credit risk related to accounts receivable through credit approvals, credit limits and monitoring procedures.  The Company routinely assesses the financial strength of its customers and, based upon factors surrounding the credit risk, establishes an allowance, if required, for uncollectible accounts and, as a consequence, believes that its accounts receivable credit risk exposure beyond such allowance is limited.

Reclassification

Reclassification

 

Certain items have been reclassified in the accompanying consolidated Financial Statements and Notes for prior periods to be comparable with the classification for the periods ended September 30, 2012. The reclassifications had no effect on previously reported net income.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2011, the FASB issued guidance on offsetting assets and liabilities and disclosure requirements in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-11, Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities (“Update 2011-11). Update 2011-11 requires that entities disclose both gross and net information about instruments and transactions eligible for offsetting the statement of financial position as well as instruments and transactions subject to an agreement similar to a master netting agreement. In addition, the standard requires disclosure of collateral received and posted in connection with master netting agreements or similar arrangements. Update 2011-11 is effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013, and interim periods with those annual periods. The implementation of the disclosure requirement is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

On July 27, 2012, the FASB issued ASU2012-02, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) – Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment. The ASU provides entities with an option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether events or circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that the indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired. If an entity concludes that it is more than 50% likely that an indefinite-lived intangible asset is not impaired, no further analysis is required. However, if an entity concludes otherwise, it would be required to determine the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible assets to measure the amount of actual impairment, if any, as currently required under US GAAP. The ASU is effective for annual and interim impairment test performed for fiscal years beginning September 15, 2012. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this pronouncement will not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

As of September 30, 2012, there is no other recently issued accounting standards not yet adopted that would have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.