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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10K/A

Amendment No.1

 ( Mark One)

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010

 

      .

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIESEXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______ to _______

 

 

 

PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware 16-1614060

(State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Indemnification No.)

 

 

7325 Oswego Road, Liverpool, NY 13090

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (315) 451-4889

 

Securities to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

to be so registered

 

Name of each exchange on which

each class is to be registered

     

Common Stock, par value $0.004

 

  Securities to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the Registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the period ended in the report, December 31, 2010 is 35,300,000 shares, all of one class, $.004 par value per share.

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the Registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the date the report was filed, May 9, 2012 is 5,300,000 shares, all of one class, $.004 par value per share.

 

 

 

  

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Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act            

Yes [ ]    No  [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes [ ]    No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [ ] No [X]      

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [X ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

(Check one)

Large accelerated filer [ ] Accelerated filer [ ]

Non-accelerated filer [ ] Smaller reporting company [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes[ ]      . No [X.

 

 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE:

This 12/31/2010 10K Amendment No. 1 is being filed in regards to a 12/31/2010 10K that was filed under an incorrect year end of 12/31/2011 on April 25, 2012 and a second 12/31/2010 10K that was filed incorrectly without classifying it as an Amendment and without an explanatory note directly after on the same date of April 25, 2012.

 

 

 

 

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  PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.  
  TABLE OF CONTENTS  
  PART I  
     
 ITEM 1. BUSINESS 4
     
 ITEM 1.A RISK FACTORS 8
     
 ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 14
     
 ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 14
     
 ITEM 4. MINE SAFTEY DISCLOSURE 14
     
  PART II  
     
 ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 15
     
 ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 15
     
 ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 16
     
 ITEM 7.A QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 20
     
 ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA 21
     
 ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 35
     
 ITEM 9.A CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 35
     
 ITEM 9.B OTHER INFORMATION 37
     
  PART III  
     
 ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 38
     
 ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 41
     
 ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 42
     
 ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 43
     
 ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL  ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES 43
     
  PART IV  
     
 ITEM 15. EXHIBITS 45
     
  SIGNATURES 46

 

 

 

 

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PART I.

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

 

All statements contained in this Form 10K, other than statements of historical facts, which address future activities, events or developments, are forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, statements containing the words "believe," "anticipate," "expect" and words of similar import. These statements are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by us in light of our experience and our assessment of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments as well as other factors we believe are appropriate under the circumstances. However, whether actual results will conform to the expectations and predictions of management is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially.

 

Consequently, all of the forward-looking statements made in this Form 10 are qualified by these cautionary statements and there can be no assurance that the actual results anticipated by management will be realized or, even if substantially realized, that they will have the expected consequences to or effects on our business operations.

 

As used in this Form 10K, unless the context requires otherwise, "we" or "us" or “us" means Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc.

 

BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

The audited financial statements of Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc., a Delaware corporation (“Plantation”, “the Company”, “our”, or “we”), should be read in conjunction with the notes thereto. In the opinion of management, the audited financial statements presented herein reflect all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) necessary for fair presentation.  

 

We prepare our financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principals, which require that management make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts.  Actual results could differ from these estimates.

 

Certain statements contained below are forward-looking statements (rather than historical facts) that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements.

 

ITEM 1. - BUSINESS

 

We (or the “Company”) were incorporated as “Continental Exchange Corporation” in the State of Delaware on October 26, 1927.

 

Later that year, we changed our name to “Northern Exchange Corporation”.  Our original purpose was to use our acquired capital to merge with or acquire any other lawful business or enterprise, the nature of which was left unstated.  Being unable to achieve this intended purpose, we ceased operations and became dormant in 1943, having no assets or liabilities.

 

We remained in this condition until, December 30, 1980, when we were reinstated in the State of Delaware and our corporate name was changed to “Everest International Incorporated”.  In 1988, our name was once again changed to “Comstock Resources Corporation” and then to “Comstock International, Inc.”.  In 2000, our name was changed to “Copernicus International, Inc.”. 

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On October 29, 2001, pursuant to an Agreement of Merger we merged into Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc., a Delaware developing stage company, with the surviving corporation being Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc.

 

On November 8, 2001, a Certificate of Merger and Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation were filed with the State of Delaware. We intended to construct and operate life care communities which  combine modern, specially designed resort villas,  access to assisted-care living and modern skilled nursing hospitals in the Caribbean and South America.

 

On October 29, 2008 a Certificate of Revival and Renewal was filed with the State of Delaware.

 

On April 14, 2009 the Company filed a Registration Statement to become a reporting company.  For the past 28 years, we have been dormant company, and accordingly, a development stage company, having not attained any significant revenue or operations.

 

On September 1, 2010 the Company’s President contributed payphones and payphone equipment. The company is now primarily in the business of providing the use of outdoor payphones, and providing telecommunication services.

 

We are presently seeking a merger, acquisition or other business combination transaction with a privately owned entity seeking to become a publicly owned entity. Our current principal business activity is to seek a suitable acquisition candidate through acquisition, merger, reverse merger or other suitable business combination method.

 

We have very limited capital, and it is unlikely that we will be able to take advantage of more than one such business opportunity.  We intend to seek opportunities demonstrating the potential of long-term growth.  Now, we have not yet identified any business opportunity that we plan to pursue, nor have we reached any agreement or definitive understanding with any person concerning an acquisition.

 

On April 14, 2009, we filed a Registration Statement on Form 10SB (File No.: 0-52269), or the Registration Statement, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC,  to register our common stock under Section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. The Registration Statement went effective by operation of law in 60 days on June 13, 2009, or the Effective Date.  Since the Effective Date of the Registration Statement, we have become a reporting company under the Securities Exchange Act and are responsible for preparing and filing periodic and current reports under the Exchange Act with the SEC.

 

SERVICES AND PRODUCTS

 

We own, operate and manage privately owned public payphones in the State of New York. As of September 1, 2010, we own, operate, and manage 58 payphones.  The Company does not have any long-term agreements with the customers of these payphones and they may terminate their contract at will.  We may pay site owners a commission based on a flat monthly rate or on a percentage of sales. Some of the businesses include, but are not limited to, retail stores, convenience stores, bars, restaurants, gas stations, colleges and hospitals. In the alternative, our agreement with business owners may be to provide the telecommunications services without the payment of any commissions.

 

The local telephone switch controls the traditional payphone technology. The local switch does not provide any services in the payphone that can benefit the owner of the phone. When we purchase phones from other companies, they come with "smart card" payphone technology. These phones have

 

 

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a circuit board with improved technology. The “smart card” technology allows us to determine the operational status of the payphone. It also tells us when the coins in the phone have to be collected, the number and types of calls that have been made from each phone, as well as other helpful information that helps us provide better service to our payphone using public. This upgrade of the phones reduces the number and frequency of service visits due to outages and other payphone-related problems and, in turn, reduces the maintenance costs. Other companies manufacture the components of the payphones for the industry, including Universal Communications and TCI, which provides handsets, key pads, totalizers, and relays.

 

Payphone users can circumvent the usual payment method and avoid inserting a coin by using an access code or 800 number provided by a long distance carrier. These “dial-around” numbers, while convenient for users, leave payphone service providers uncompensated for the call made. The Federal Communications Commission, or the FCC, as instructed by Congress in the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created regulations to ensure that payphone service providers receive compensation for these “dial-around” calls.

 

The FCC requires the sellers of long distance toll free services to pay the payphone owner $0.494 cents per call. These funds are remitted quarterly through a service provided by the American Public Communication Council (APCC).

 

Our installed payphone base generates revenue from two principal sources: coin-calls and non-coin calls.

 

Coin calls:

 

Coin calls represent calls paid for by customers who deposit coins into the payphones. Coin call revenue is recorded as the actual amount of coins collected from the payphones.

 

Non-Coin calls:

 

Non-coin revenue includes commissions from operator service telecommunications companies and a “dial-around” commission of $0.494 per call that the FCC requires sellers of long distance toll free services to pay payphone owners. The commissions for operator services are paid 45 days in arrears. These funds are remitted quarterly through a service provided by the American Public Communication Council (APCC). 

 

Seasonality

 

Our revenues from payphone operation are affected by seasonal variations, geographic distribution of payphones and type of location. Because we operate in the northeastern part of the country with many of the payphones located outdoor, weather patterns affect our revenue streams. Revenues drop off significantly during winter and conversely show an increase in the spring and summer. Revenues are generally lowest in the first quarter and highest in the third quarter.

 

Significant Customers

 

We do not rely on a major customer for our revenue. We have a variety of small single businesses as well as some small chain stores that we service. We do not believe that we would suffer dramatically if any one customer or small chain decided to stop using our phones.

 

 

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Significant Vendors

 

We must buy dial tone for each payphone from the local exchange carrier. As long as we pay the carrier bill, it is required to provide a dial tone. As a regulated utility, the exchange carrier may not refuse to provide us service. Alternate service exists in certain areas where Verizon competitors are located. We use alternate local service providers when we can get a better price for the service. We use long distance providers on all the payphones.

 

Government Regulation:

 

We are subject to varying degrees of regulation by federal, state, local and foreign regulators. The implementation, modification, interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations vary and can limit our ability to provide many of our services. Our ability to compete in our target markets depends, in part, upon favorable regulatory conditions and the favorable interpretations of existing laws and regulations.

 

FCC Regulation and Interstate Rates :

 

Our services are subject to the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) with respect to interstate telecommunications services and other matters for which the FCC has jurisdiction under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended.

 

Payphone users can circumvent the usual payment method and avoid inserting a coin by using an access code or 800 number provided by a long distance carrier. These “dial-around” numbers, while convenient for users, leave payphone service providers uncompensated for the call made. The Federal Communications Commission, as instructed by Congress in the Telecommunications Act of 1996, created regulations to ensure that payphone service providers receive compensation for these “dial-around” calls.

 

The FCC requires the sellers of long distance toll free services to pay the payphone owner $0.494 cents per call. These funds are remitted quarterly through a service provided by the American Public Communication Council (APCC).  If the FCC regulation requiring sellers of long distance toll free services to pay payphone owners $0.494 per call is reduced or repealed, it could have a negative effect upon our revenue stream. We have no control over what rules and regulations the state and federal regulatory agencies require us to follow now or in the future. It is possible for future regulations to be so financially demanding that they cause us to go out of business. We are not aware of any proposed regulations or changes to any existing regulations.    

 

Telecommunications Act of 1996

 

The Telecommunications Act of 1996, regulatory and judicial actions and the development of new technologies, products and services have created opportunities for alternative telecommunication service providers, many of which are subject to fewer regulatory constraints. We are unable to predict definitively the impact that the ongoing changes in the telecommunications industry will ultimately have on our business, results of operations or financial condition. The financial impact will depend on several factors, including the timing, extent and success of competition in our markets, the timing and outcome of various regulatory proceedings and any appeals, and the timing, extent and success of our pursuit of new opportunities resulting from the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and technological advances.

 

 

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Research and Development

 

We have not expended any money in the last two fiscal years on research and development activities.

 

Employees

 

The company does not have any employees.  Joseph Passalaqua is our President and Chief Executive Officer and Ray Willenberg Jr. is our Secretary and Chief Financial Officer, neither of whom have employment agreements.

 

Any person or entity may read and copy our reports with the Commission at the Commission’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Room by calling the Commission toll free at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Commission also maintains an Internet site at http://www.sec.gov where reports, proxies and other disclosure statements on public companies may be viewed by the public.

 

ITEM 1.A - RISK FACTORS

 

In addition to the other information in this report, the following risks should be considered carefully in evaluating our business and prospects as our Company is subject to numerous risk factors, including, but not limited to, the following:

Our limited operating history makes its potential difficult to assess.

 

We have limited assets and financial resources. We will, in all likelihood, continue to sustain operating expenses without corresponding revenue, at least until the consummation of a business combination. This will most likely result in the Company incurring a net operating loss, which will increase continuously until we can consummate a business combination with a target company. There is no assurance that we can identify such a target company and consummate such a business combination.

 

We have no agreement for a business combination and no minimum requirements for a business combination.

 

We have no current arrangement, agreement or understanding with respect to engaging in a business combination with a specific entity. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in identifying and evaluating suitable business opportunities or in concluding a business combination. No particular industry or specific business within an industry has been selected for a target company. We have not established a specific length of operating history or a specified level of earnings, assets, net worth or other criteria which we will require a target company to have achieved, or without which we would not consider a business combination with such business entity. Accordingly, we may enter into a business combination with a business entity having no significant operating history, losses, limited or no potential for immediate earnings, limited assets, negative net worth or other negative characteristics. There is no assurance that we will be able to negotiate a business combination on terms favorable to us.

 

There is no assurance of success or profitability of the Company.

 

There is no assurance that we will acquire a favorable business opportunity. Even if we should become involved in a business opportunity, there is no assurance that we will generate revenue or profits, or that the market price of our outstanding shares will be increased thereby. The type of business to be acquired may be one that desires to avoid effecting its own public offering and the accompanying expense,

 

 

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delays, uncertainties and federal and state requirements which purport to protect investors. Because of our limited capital, it is more likely than not that any acquisition by the Company will involve other parties whose primary interest is the acquisition of control of a publicly traded company. Moreover, any business opportunity acquired may be currently unprofitable or present other negative factors.

 

We may not be able to diversify its business.

 

Because we have limited financial resources, it is unlikely that we will be able to diversify our acquisitions or operations. Our probable inability to diversify our activities into more than one area will subject us to economic fluctuations within a particular business or industry and therefore increase the risks associated with our operations.

 

We have limited officers and directors.

 

Because management consists of only two persons, while seeking a business combination, Joseph Passalaqua, the President of the Company and Ray Willenberg Jr., the Secretary of the Company will be the only individuals responsible in conducting the day-to-day operations of the Company. We do not benefit from having access to multiple judgments that a greater number of directors or officers would provide, and we will rely completely on the judgment of our two officers and one director when selecting a target company. Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg anticipate devoting only a limited amount of time per month to the business of the Company. Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg have not entered into a written employment agreement with the Company and they are not expected to do so. We do not anticipate obtaining key man life insurance on Mr. Passalaqua or Mr. WillenbergNish. The loss of the services of Mr. Passalaqua or Mr. Willenberg would adversely affect development of our business and our likelihood of continuing operations.

 

Conflicts of interest exist between the Company and its management.

 

Certain conflicts of interest exist between the Company and its officers and directors. They have other business interests to which they currently devote attention, and are expected to continue to do so. As a result, conflicts of interest may arise that can be resolved only through their exercise of judgment in a manner that is consistent with their fiduciary duties to the Company.

 

It is anticipated that our principal stockholders may actively negotiate or otherwise consent to the purchase of a portion of their common stock as a condition to, or in connection with, a proposed merger or acquisition transaction. In this process, our principal stockholders may consider their own personal pecuniary benefit rather than the best interest of other Company shareholders. Depending upon the nature of a proposed transaction, Company stockholders other than the principal stockholders may not be afforded the opportunity to approve or consent to a particular transaction.

 

We may need additional financing.

 

We have very limited funds, and such funds, may not be adequate to take advantage of any available business opportunities. Even if our currently available funds prove to be sufficient to pay for our operations until we are able to acquire an interest in, or complete a transaction with, a business opportunity, such funds will clearly not be sufficient to enable it to exploit the opportunity. Thus, the ultimate success of the Company will depend, in part, upon our availability to raise additional capital. In the event that we require modest amounts of additional capital to fund our operations until we are able to complete a business acquisition or transaction, such funds, are expected to be provided by the principal shareholders. However, we have not investigated the availability, source, or terms that might govern the acquisition of the additional capital, which is expected to be required in order to exploit a business

 

 

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opportunity, and will not do so until we have determined the level of need for such additional financing. There is no assurance that additional capital will be available from any source or, if available, that it can be obtained on terms acceptable to the Company. If not available, our operations will be limited to those that can be financed with our modest capital.

 

Our business is seasonal.

 

Our revenues from payphone operation are affected by seasonal variations, geographic distribution of payphones and type of location. Because we operate in the northeastern part of the country with many of the payphones located outdoor, weather patterns affect our revenue streams. Revenues drop off significantly during winter and conversely show an increase in the spring and summer. Revenues are generally lowest in the first quarter and highest in the third quarter. If we do not adequately budget our resources to get us through the low revenue periods, we may not have the resources to operate our business during such periods.

 

We do not have any long term contracts with our customers and the contracts that are in place may be terminated at will.

 

We do not have any long-term agreements with the customers of our payphones and they may terminate our contract to operate at will.  Therefore, there is no continuity to our business. Although we are trying to expand our customer base, our efforts are still in the preliminary stages. If we lose our current customers and do not have any potential new customers at the time of such termination, our results of operations and financial condition will be adversely affected.

 

Government regulations may change or be added that may adversely affect our ability to conduct, or how we conduct, our business.

 

We are subject to varying degrees of regulation by federal, state, local and foreign regulators. The implementation, modification, interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations vary and can limit our ability to provide many of our services. Our ability to compete in our target markets depends, in part, upon favorable regulatory conditions and the favorable interpretations of existing laws and regulations.

 

In addition, while the FCC currently requires the sellers of long distance toll free services to pay us $0.494 cents per call, such regulations may be reduced in scope or effect or repealed, which would have a negative effect upon our revenue stream. We have no control over what rules and regulations the state and federal regulatory agencies require us to follow now or in the future. It is possible for future regulations to be so financially demanding that they cause us to go out of business.

 

Further, the Telecommunications Act of 1996, regulatory and judicial actions and the development of new technologies, products and services have created opportunities for alternative telecommunication service providers, many of which are subject to fewer regulatory constraints. We are unable to predict definitively the impact that the ongoing changes in the telecommunications industry will ultimately have on our business, results of operations or financial condition. The financial impact will depend on several factors, including the timing, extent and success of competition in our markets, the timing and outcome of various regulatory proceedings and any appeals, and the timing, extent and success of our pursuit of new opportunities resulting from the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and technological advances.

 

 

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We may need to depend upon outside advisors.

 

To supplement the business experience of our officers and directors, we may be required to employ accountants, technical experts, appraisers, attorneys, or other consultants or advisors. The selection of any such advisors will be made by our officers, without any input by shareholders. Furthermore, it is anticipated that such persons may be engaged on an as needed basis without a continuing fiduciary or other obligation to the Company. In the event the officers and directors of the Company consider it necessary to hire outside advisors, they may elect to hire persons who are affiliates, if those affiliates are able to provide the required services.

 

We may have significant competition for business opportunities and combinations and may be at a competitive disadvantage in completing a business combination.

 

We are and will continue to be an insignificant participant in the business of seeking mergers with and acquisitions of business entities. A large number of established and well-financed entities, including venture capital firms are active in mergers and acquisitions of companies. Nearly all such entities have significantly greater financial resources, technical expertise and managerial capabilities than us and, consequently, we will be at a competitive disadvantage in identifying possible business opportunities and successfully completing a business combination. Moreover, we will also compete in seeking merger or acquisition candidates with other public companies, some of which may also have funds available for use by an acquisition candidate.

 

The reporting requirements imposed upon us may delay or preclude our ability to enter into a business combination.

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 of the Exchange Act, we are required to provide certain information about significant acquisitions including audited financial statements of the acquired company. Obtaining audited financial statements are the economic responsibility of the target company. The additional time and costs that may be incurred by some potential target companies to prepare such financial statements may significantly delay or essentially preclude consummation of an otherwise desirable acquisition by us. Acquisition prospects that do not have or are unable to obtain the required audited statements may not be appropriate for acquisition so long as the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act are applicable. Notwithstanding a target company’s agreement to obtain audited financial statements within the required time frame, such audited financials may not be available to us at the time of effecting a business combination. In cases where audited financials are unavailable, we will have to rely upon un-audited information that has not been verified by outside auditors in making our decision to engage in a transaction with the business entity. This risk increases the prospect that a business combination with such a business entity might prove to be an unfavorable one for us.

 

We lack market research and a marketing organization.

 

We have neither conducted, nor have others made available to it, market research indicating that demand exists for the transactions contemplated by the Company. In the event demand exists for a transaction of the type contemplated by the Company, there is no assurance the Company will be successful in completing any such business combination.

 

We do not own any intellectual property.

 

We do not own any patents or trademarks. Companies in the telecommunications industry and other industries in which we compete own large numbers of patents, copyrights and trademarks. Such companies are know to frequently enter into litigation based on allegations of infringement or other

 

 

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violations of intellectual property rights. As we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property claims against us grows. We might not be able to withstand any third-party claims or rights against their use.

 

It is probable that there will be a change in control of the Company and/or management.

 

In conjunction with completion of a business acquisition, it is anticipated that we will issue an amount of our authorized, but un-issued common stock that represents the greater majority of the voting power and equity of the Company, which will, in all likelihood, result in stockholders of a target company obtaining a controlling interest in the Company. As a condition of the business combination agreement, the current stockholder(s) of the Company may agree to sell or transfer all or a portion of our common stock he/they own(s) so to provide the target company with all or majority control. The resulting change in control of the Company will likely result in removal of the present officers and directors of the Company and a corresponding reduction in or elimination of his/their participation in the future affairs of the Company.

 

Stockholders will likely suffer a dilution of the value of their shares upon a business combination.

 

A business combination normally will involve the issuance of a significant number of additional shares. Depending upon the value of the assets acquired in such business combination, the per-share value of our common stock may increase or decrease, perhaps significantly.

 

No public market exists and no public market may develop for the Company’s common stock.

 

There is currently no public market for our common stock, and no assurance can be given that a market will develop or that a shareholder ever will be able to liquidate his investment without considerable delay, if at all. If a market should develop, the price may be highly volatile. Factors such as those discussed in this "Risk Factors” section may have a significant impact upon the market price of the securities offered hereby. Owing to the low price of the securities, many brokerage firms may not be willing to effect transactions in the securities. Even if a purchaser finds a broker willing to effect a transaction in these securities, the combination of brokerage commissions, state transfer taxes, if any, and any other selling costs may exceed the sales proceeds.

 

There may be restrictions imposed by states on the sale of common stock by investors.

 

Because the securities registered hereunder have not been registered for resale under the Blue Sky laws of any state, the holders of such shares and persons who desire to purchase them in any trading market that might develop in the future, should be aware, that there may be significant state Blue Sky law restrictions upon the ability of investors to sell the securities and of purchasers to purchase the securities. Accordingly, investors should consider the secondary market for our securities to be a limited one.

 

We may be subject to additional risks because of doing business in a foreign country.

 

We may effectuate a business combination with a merger target whose business operations or even headquarters, place of formation or primary place of business are located outside the United States of America. In such event, we may face the significant additional risks associated with doing business in that country. In addition to the language barriers, different presentations of financial information, different business practices, and other cultural differences and barriers that may make it difficult to evaluate such a merger target, ongoing business risks result from the international political situation, uncertain legal systems and applications of law, prejudice against foreigners, corrupt practices, uncertain economic policies and potential political and economic instability that may be exacerbated in various foreign countries.

 

 

12

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

The consummation of a business combination may subject us and our stockholders to federal and state taxes.

 

Federal and state tax consequences will, in all likelihood, be major considerations in any business combination that we may undertake. Currently, such transactions may be structured to result in tax-free treatment to both companies, pursuant to various federal and state tax provisions. We intend to structure any business combination so as to minimize the federal and state tax consequences to both the Company and the target entity; however, there can be no assurance that such business combination will meet the statutory requirements of a tax-free reorganization or that the parties will obtain the intended tax-free treatment upon a transfer of stock or assets. A non-qualifying reorganization could result in the imposition of both federal and state taxes, which may have an adverse effect on both parties to the transaction.

 

Regulation of Penny Stocks

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission") has adopted a number of rules to regulate “penny stocks." Such rules include Rule 3a51-1 and Rules 15g-1 through 15g-9 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Because our securities may constitute “penny stocks" within the meaning of the rules (as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, largely traded in the National Association of Securities Dealers’ (NASD) OTC Bulletin Board or the "Pink Sheets", the rules may apply to us and to our securities.

 

The Commission has adopted Rule 15g-9 that established sales practice requirements low price securities. Unless the transaction is, exempt, it shall be unlawful for a broker or dealer to sell a penny stock to, or to effect the purchase of a penny stock by, any person unless prior to the transaction: (i) the broker or dealer has approved the person’s account for transactions in penny stock pursuant to this rule and (ii) the broker or dealer has received from the person a written agreement to the transaction setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

In order to approve a person's account for transactions in penny stock, the broker or dealer must: (a) obtain from the person information concerning the person's financial situation, investment experience, and investment objectives; (b) reasonably determine that transactions in penny stock are suitable for that person, and that the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters that the person reasonably may be expected to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stock; (c) deliver to the person a written statement setting forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the determination (i) stating in a highlighted format that it is unlawful for the broker or dealer to affect a transaction in penny stock unless the broker or dealer has received, prior to the transaction, a written agreement to the transaction from the person; and (ii) stating in a highlighted format immediately preceding the customer signature line that (iii) the broker or dealer is required to provide the person with the written statement; and (iv) the person should not sign and return the written statement to the broker or dealer if it does not accurately reflect the person’s financial situation, investment experience, and investment objectives; and (d) receive from the person a manually signed and dated copy of the written statement.

 

It is also required that disclosure be made as to the risks of investing in penny stock and the commissions payable to the broker-dealer, as well as current price quotations and the remedies and rights available in cases of fraud in penny stock transactions. Statements, on a monthly basis, must be sent to the investor listing recent prices for the Penny Stock and information on the limited market. Shareholders should be aware that, according to Securities and Exchange Commission Release No. 34-29093, the market for penny stocks has suffered in recent years from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include (i) control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer; (ii) manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases; (iii) "boiler room" practices involving high-pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced sales persons; (iv) excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differential and markups by selling broker-dealers; and (v) the wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the resulting inevitable collapse of those prices and with consequent investor losses. We are aware of the abuses that have occurred historically in the penny stock market. Although we do not expect to be in a position to dictate the behavior of the market or of broker-dealers who participate in the market, we will strive within the confines of practical limitations to prevent the described patterns from being established with respect to our securities.

 

 

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ITEM 2. - LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 3. - PROPERTIES

 

We currently maintain a mailing address at 7325 Oswego Road, Liverpool, NY 13090. Our telephone number there is (315) 451-4889. Other than this mailing address, we do not currently maintain any other office facilities, and do not anticipate the need for maintaining office facilities at any time in the near future. We pay no rent or other fees for the use of the mailing address as these offices are used virtually full-time by other businesses of our President, Mr. Passalaqua. It is likely that we will not establish an office until we have completed a business acquisition transaction, but it is not possible to predict that arrangements will actually be made with respect to future office facilities.

 

We currently have no policy with respect to investments or interests in real estate, real estate mortgages or securities of, or interests in, persons primarily engaged in real estate activities.

 

 

ITEM 4. – MINE SAFTEY DISCLOSURE.

 

Not Applicable.

 

 

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PART II.

 

ITEM 5. – MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND SMALL BUISNESS ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

 (a)    Market Information . There is no trading market for our common stock at present and there has been no trading market to date.  There is no assurance that a trading market will ever develop or, if such a market does develop, that it will continue. The Company's common stock is not trading on any public trading market or stock exchange.

 

 (b) Holders. As of December 31, 2010 there were approximately 274 record holders of 35,300,000 shares of the Company's common stock.

 

 (c)   Dividend Policy . We have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and we do not intend to declare or pay any cash dividend in the foreseeable future.  The payment of dividends, if any, is within the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on our earnings, if any, our capital requirements and financial condition and such other factors as our Board of Directors may consider.

 

 (d)  Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans . We have not authorized the issuance of any of our securities in connection with any form of equity compensation plan.

 

(e)     Recent Sale of Unregistered Securities .  The common stock has a par value of $0.004 per share. During the year ended December 31, 2010, there were the following sales of unregistered securities

 

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

11/3/2010 Purchase of 50,000 shares of C/S @ $0.01 per share

 

(f) Transfer Agent . Holladay Stock Transfer
  2939 North 67 th Place Suite
  Scottsdale, AZ  85251
  Phone: (480) 481-3940
   

 

 

ITEM 6. – SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not required for a smaller reporting company.

 

 

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ITEM 7. – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

GOING CONCERN QUALIFICATION

 

Several conditions and events cast substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.  The Company has incurred net losses of approximately $1,079,382 for the period from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010, has no revenues and requires additional financing in order to finance its business activities on an ongoing basis.  The Company’s future capital requirements will depend on numerous factors including, but not limited to, continued progress in finding a merger candidate and the pursuit of business opportunities. The Company is actively pursuing alternative financing and has had discussions with various third parties, although no firm commitments have been obtained.  In the interim, shareholders of the Company have committed to meeting its minimal operating expenses.  Management believes that actions presently being taken to revise the Company’s operating and financial requirements provide them with the opportunity to continue as a going concern. At December 31, 2009, we had $289 cash on hand, and an accumulated deficit of $1,057,649. At December 31, 2010, we had $1,033 cash on hand, and an accumulated deficit of $1,079,382. See “Liquidity and Capital Resources.”

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES & ESTIMATES

 

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. However, future events are subject to change, and the best estimates and judgments routinely require adjustment. The amounts of assets and liabilities reported in our balance sheet, and the amounts of revenues and expenses reported for each of our fiscal periods, are affected by estimates and assumptions which are used for, but not limited to, the accounting for allowance for doubtful accounts, goodwill and intangible asset impairments, restructurings, inventory and income taxes. Actual results could differ from these estimates. The following critical accounting policies are significantly affected by judgments, assumptions and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. 

 

Off- Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid debt instruments purchased with a maturity of 90 days or less to be cash equivalents to the extent the funds are not being held for investment purposes .

 

 

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COSTS RELATED TO OUR OPERATION

 

The principal costs related to the ongoing operation of our payphones include telecommunication costs, commissions and depreciation. Telecommunication expenses consist of payments made by us to local exchange carriers and long distance carriers for access to and use of their telecommunications networks and service and maintenance costs. Commission expense represents payments to owners or operators of the premises at which a payphone is located.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

At December 31, 2010, we had $1,033 cash on hand and an accumulated deficit of $1,079,382. Our primary source of liquidity for the current year has been from borrowing from a Joseph C. Passalaqua, a principal stockholder. As of December 31, 2010 we have notes payable to Joseph C. Passalaqua in the amount $24,285 for cash provided and $20,000 in exchange for contributed assets.  These notes are unsecured, bear a simple interest rate of 18% per annum and are payable upon demand. As of December 31, 2010 the principal on the notes was $44,285 and the accrued interest on these notes was $6,698.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was $11,486 during the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2010.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities was $0 during the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2010.

 

Net cash provided by financial activities was $12,230 during the twelve-month period ended December 31, 2010.

 

Our expenses to date are largely due to professional fees that include accounting and legal fees.

 

To date, we have had minimal revenues; and we require additional financing in order to finance our business activities on an ongoing basis.  Our future capital requirements will depend on numerous factors including, but not limited to, continued progress in finding a merger candidate and the pursuit of business opportunities. We are actively pursuing alternative financing and have had discussions with various third parties, although no firm commitments have been obtained to date.  In the interim, shareholders of the Company have committed to meet our minimal operating expenses.  We believe that actions presently being taken to revise our operating and financial requirements provide them with the opportunity to continue as a “going concern,” although no assurances can be given.

To date, we have had minimal revenues; and we require additional financing in order to finance our business activities on an ongoing basis.  Our future capital requirements will depend on numerous factors including, but not limited to, continued progress in finding a merger candidate and the pursuit of business opportunities. We are actively pursuing alternative financing and have had discussions with various third parties, although no firm commitments have been obtained to date.  In the interim, shareholders of the Company have committed to meet our minimal operating expenses.  We believe that actions presently being taken to revise our operating and financial requirements provide them with the opportunity to continue as a “going concern,” although no assurances can be given.

 

NET LOSS FROM OPERATIONS

 

The Company has a deficit accumulated during the development stage of $1,079,382 as of December 31, 2010. The company had net loss of $21,733 for year ended December 31, 2010 as compared to a net loss of $18,749 for the year ended December 31, 2009.

 

 

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CASH FLOW

 

Our primary source of liquidity has been cash from shareholder loans.

 

 

WORKING CAPTIAL

 

We had current and fixed assets of $19,823 and current liabilities of $59,741 resulting in a working capital deficit of $39,918 for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010 COMPARED TO THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009

 

REVENUES

 

Our total revenue increased by $4,174, from $0 for the year ended December 31, 2009 to $4,174 for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

Our coin call revenue was $0 for the year ended December 31, 2009 and $521 for the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

Our non-coin call revenue, or commission income, which is comprised primarily of “dial around” revenue, star 88 commission revenue and operator service revenue, was $0 for the year ended December 31, 2009 and $0 for the year ended December 31, 2010. The FCC requires the sellers of long distance toll free services to pay the payphone owner $0.494 cents per “dial-around” call. These funds are remitted quarterly through a service provided by the American Public Communication Council (APCC).

 

Our local service revenue which is comprised primarily of service for payphone customers was $0 for the year ended December 31, 2009 and $3,653 for the year ended December 31, 2010. This is the revenue from monthly invoices billed to payphone customers in which the Company owns the payphone and provides service to operate the payphone on the premises. As of December 31, 2010 eight customers made up the local service revenue:

 

Avotus Corporation (Hannaford Brothers) - New York

Berlin Central School - New York

Coxsackie Correctional Facility – New York

Grafton Lake State Park – New York

Greene Correctional Facility – New York

NYS Office of Parks and Recreation – New York

NYS Park Alegany Region – New York

Taconic Hills Central School District – New York

 

COST OF SALES

 

Our overall cost of services increased by $4,522, from $0 in the year ended December 31, 2009, to $4,522 in the year ended December 31, 2010. The principal costs related to the ongoing operation of our payphones will include telecommunication costs and depreciation.

 

Telecommunication costs consist of payments made by us to local exchange carriers and long distance carriers for access to, use of their telecommunications networks and service and maintenance

 

 

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costs. It also includes APCC commission fees related to “dial-around” processing, and payphone coin collection expenses or repair.

 

Depreciation expense is the quarterly depreciation of the payphone equipment, which is valued at $20,000. The company uses the straight line method, with a useful life of 5 years with $0 salvage value. The payphone equipment was acquired by the company on September 1, 2010.

 

Telecommunication costs were $0 in the year ended December 31, 2009 and $3,189 in the year ended December 31, 2010.   Depreciation expense was $0 in the year ended December 31, 2009 and $1,333 in the year ended December 31, 2010.

 

OPERATING AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 

Operating expenses decreased by $1,152, from $17,290 in the year ended December 31, 2009 to $15,748 in the year ended December 31, 2010. Operating expenses primarily consist of other general and administrative expenses (G&A), outside services, and professional fees. Other G&A expenses, made up primarily of office expense and postage and delivery expenses and franchise tax, decreased by $98, from $1,176 in the year ended December 31, 2009 to $1,078 in the year ended December 31, 2010. Professional fees, made up of accounting and legal fees decreased by $572, from $14,350 in the year ended December 31, 2009 to $13,778 in the year ended December 31, 2010. These are fees we pay to accountants and attorneys throughout the year for performing various tasks. Outside services, made up primarily of stock transfer company fees and incorporating services expenses, decreased by $872, from $1,764 in the year ended December 31, 2009 to $892 in the year ended December 31, 2010.  The bulk of the decrease in expense was due to the Company’s accounting fees and stock transfer fees in 2010, when comparing the same twelve-month period in 2009.

 

COMMON STOCK

 

 

Our board of directors is authorized to issue 250,000,000 shares of common stock, with a par value of $0.0004. All shares of our common stock have one vote per share on all matters, including election of directors, without provision for cumulative voting. The common stock is not redeemable and has no conversion or preemptive rights. The common stock currently outstanding is validly issued, fully paid and non-assessable. In the event of liquidation of the Company, the holders of common stock will share equally in any balance of the Company's assets available for distribution to them after satisfaction of creditors and preferred stockholders, if any. The holders of our common stock are entitled to equal dividends and distributions per share with respect to the Common Stock when, as and if, declared by the board of directors from funds legally available.

 

As of December 31, 2010, 35,300,000 shares of common stock were issued and outstanding.

 

As of December 31, 2010, there are 274 shareholders of our common stock.

 

All outstanding shares of common stock are of the same class and have equal rights and attributes. The holders of common stock are entitled to one vote per share on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders of the Company. All stockholders are entitled to share equally in dividends, if any, as may be declared from time to time by the Board of Directors out of funds legally available. In the event of liquidation, the holders of common stock are entitled to share ratably in all assets remaining after payment of all liabilities. The stockholders do not have cumulative or preemptive rights. We have not paid any dividends to date, and has no plans to do so in the near future.

 

 

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The description of certain matters relating to the securities of the Company is a summary and is qualified in its entirety by the provisions of the Company's Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws, copies of which have been previously filed as exhibits in the Registration Statement Form 10SB filed on April 14, 2009.

 

PREFERRED STOCK

 

Our Original Certificate of Incorporation did not provide for the issuance of Preferred Stock. On November 8, 2001, a Certificate of Amendment was filed with the State of Delaware that stated that the Corporation shall have the authority to issue 260,000,000 shares of capital stock, of which 10,000,000 shares are authorized as Preferred Stock with the par value of $0.0004 per share. There are an aggregate of 0 shares of Preferred Stock issued and outstanding as of the date of this Annual Filing.

 

ITEM 7.A – QUANTITIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not required for a smaller reporting company.

 

 

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 ITEM 8. – FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Our Financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2009, including the notes thereto, together with the report of independent certified public accountants thereon, are presented below.

 

PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

(A Development Stage Company)

DECEMBER 31, 2010

CONTENTS

 

 

  Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accountants (December 31, 2009) 22
Report of Independent Registered Public Accountants (December 31, 2010) 23
Balance Sheets December 31, 2010 and 2009 24
   
Statements of Expenses  
For the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 and  
Cumulative since January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010 25
   
Statement of Stockholders' Deficit  
Since January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010 26
   
Statements of Cash Flows  
For years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009 and  
Cumulative since January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2010 27
   
Notes to Financial Statements 28

 

 

 

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  REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Michael F. Cronin
Certified Public Accountant
Orlando, FL 32708


Board of Directors and Shareholders
Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc.
Liverpool, New York

I have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. (a development stage company) as of December 31, 2010 and the related statements of operations, stockholders' deficit and cash flows for the year then ended and for the period of January 1, 2001 (inception) to December 31, 2010. The financial statements are the responsibility of the directors. My responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my audits. The financial statements as of December 31, 2009 were audited by other auditors whose report thereon, dated February 16, 2010, expressed an unqualified opinion.

I conducted my audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) . Those standards require that I plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The company is not required to have, nor was I engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. My audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, I express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. I believe that my audit provides a reasonable basis for my opinion.

In my opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. as of December 31, 2010 and the results of its operations, its cash flows and changes in stockholders' deficit from inception and for the period then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred a $1,079,000 cumulative loss from operations since inception and consumed $11,486 of cash through its current operating activities. The Company may not have adequate readily available resources to fund operations through December 31, 2012. This raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty


May 9, 2012

 

/s/ Michael F. Cronin
 
Michael F. Cronin

Certified Public Accountant

NY, FL

Orlando, Florida

 

 

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   REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

 

To the Board of Directors

Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc.

Liverpool, New York

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. (the “Company”), as of December 31, 2009 and the related consolidated statements of expenses, changes in stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatements. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2009 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, The Company has suffered recurring losses from operations, which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans regarding those matters are described in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

 

/s/ MALONEBAILEY, LLP

 

www.malonebailey.com

Houston, Texas

April 25, 2012

 

 

 

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 PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

BALANCE SHEETS
     
  December 31,
  2010 2009
ASSETS    
 Current Assets:    
 Cash $1,033 $289
 Accounts Receivable 123 -
 Total Current Assets 1,156 289
     
 Property and Equipment:    
 Payphone equipment 20,000 -
 Less accumulated depreciation (1,333) -
 Net Property and Equipment 18,667 -
     
TOTAL ASSETS $19,823 $289
     
     
     
 LIABILITIES & EQUITY    
 Current Liabilities:    
 Accounts Payable $1,758 $1,246
 Accounts Payable - Related Party 7,000 3,687
 Related Party Note Payable 44,285 15,055
 Interest Payable- Related Party 6,698 1,486
     
 Total Current Liabilities 59,741 21,474
     
 Total Liabilities 59,741 21,474
     
 Stockholder's Deficit    
Preferred Stock, par value $.0004,    
     10,000,000 shares Authorized , 0 shares Issued and    
     Outstanding at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 - -
 Common Stock, par value $.0004,    
      250,000,000 shares Authorized, 35,300,000 shares and 35,000,00 shares    
      Issued and Outstanding at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 14,120 14,000
 Additional Paid-In Capital 1,025,344 1,022,464
 Deficit Accumulated During the Development Stage (1,079,382) (1,057,649)
     
 Total Stockholder's Deficit (39,918) (21,185)
     
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDER'S DEFICIT $19,823 $289
     
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements    

 

 

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 PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.
(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)
STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
       
      Cumulative
  For the Year Ended Since
  December 31, January 1,
  2010 2009 2001 (Unaudited)
       
Revenues:      
 Income $4,174 $- $4,174
 Cost of Services (4,522) - (4,522)
 Gross Margin (348) - (348)
       
Expenses:      
 Accounting and bookkeeping 13,778 14,350 30,075
 Amortization expense - - 3,000
 Other  General and administrative expense 1,078 1,176 4,756
 Insurance - - 471,948
 Legal fee - Merger - - 10,052
 Offering cost - - 411,286
 Outside services 892 1,764 9,165
 Rent expense - - 1,260
 Travel expense - - 2,641
 Total Operating Expenses 15,748 17,290 944,183
       
 Operating Loss (16,096) (17,290) (944,531)
       
Other  Expense      
Interest expense (5,212) (1,459) (133,159)
       
 Loss Before Income Taxes (21,308) (18,749) (1,077,690)
       
 Income Tax Provision (425) - (1,692)
       
 Net Loss $(21,733) $(18,749) $(1,079,382)
       
 Basic & Diluted Loss per Common Share $(0.00) $(0.00)  
       
 Weighted Average Common Shares      
 Outstanding 35,047,671 35,000,000  
       
       
 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements      

 

 

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 PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.
(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)
STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
           
   Common Stock      
   Shares  Par Value Paid in Capital Deficit Accumulated During the Development Stage Total Stockholder' Equity Deficiency
           
Balance at January 1, 2001 (Unaudited) 3,000,170 $1,200 $- $(1,948) $(748)
           
Issuance of Common Stock at October 22, 2001 1,870,707 748 - - 748
           
Issuance of Common Stock at November 8, 2001 25,129,123 10,052 - - 10,052
           
Issuance of Common Stock at November 27, 2001 5,000,000 2,000 - - 2,000
           
Net Loss - - - (31,085) (31,085)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2001 (Unaudited) 35,000,000# 14,000 - (33,033)# (19,033)
           
Net Loss - - - (575,249) (575,249)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2002 (Unaudited) 35,000,000 14,000 - (608,282) (594,282)
           
Net Loss - - - (420,988) (420,988)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2003 (Unaudited) 35,000,000 14,000 - (1,029,270) (1,015,270)
           
Notes Payable and Accrued Interest Satisfied          
through Contributed Capital     1,022,464 - 1,022,464
           
Net Loss - - - (843) (843)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2004 (Unaudited) 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,030,113) 6,351
           
Net Loss - - - (1,134) (1,134)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2005 (Unaudited) 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,031,247) 5,217
           
Net Loss - - - (3,034) (3,034)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2006 (Unaudited) 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,034,281) 2,183
           
Net Loss - - - (749) (749)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2007 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,035,030) 1,434
           
Net Loss - - - (3,870) (3,870)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2008 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,038,900) (2,436)
           
Net Loss - - - (18,749) (18,749)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2009 35,000,000 14,000 1,022,464 (1,057,649) (21,185)
           
Issuance of Common Stock at November 3, 2010 300,000 120 2,880 - 3,000
           
Net Loss - - - (21,733) (21,733)
           
Balance as of December 31, 2010 35,300,000 $14,120 $1,025,344 $(1,079,382) $(39,918)
           
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements      

 

 

 

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 PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

 

 

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
       
      Cumulative
  For the Years Ended Since
  December 31, January 1,
  2010 2009 2001 (Unaudited)
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING      
ACTIVITIES:      
Net Loss $(21,733) $(18,749) $(1,079,382)
Accrued Interest Satisfied through Contributed Capital     126,464
 Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash      
 provided by operating activities:      
  Depreciation and Amortization 1,333   1,333
Changes In:      
Accounts Payable 512 (490) 1,758
Accounts Payable - Related Party 3,313 3,500 7,000
Accounts Receivable (123)   (123)
Accrued Interest 5,212 1,459 6,698
       
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities (11,486) (14,280) (936,252)
       
 CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING      
ACTIVITIES      
       
Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities - - -
       
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING      
 Proceeds from Related Party Note Payable 9,230 14,555 24,285
 Proceeds from Notes Payable - - 896,000
 Proceeds from Sale of Common Stock 3,000 - 17,000
       
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities 12,230 14,555 937,285
       
Net (Decrease) Increase in Cash 744 275 1,033
Cash at Beginning of Period 289 14 -
       
Cash at End of Period $1,033 $289 $1,033
       
 SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:      
Cash paid during the year for:      
Interest $- $- $-
Franchise Taxes $425 $560 $1,692
       
 SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INVESTING AND FINANCING ACTIVITIES    
Notes Payable and Accrued Interest Satisfied through Contributed Capital $- $- $1,022,464
Related Party Note Payable for Contributed Payphone Equipment $20,000 $- $20,000
       
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements      

 

 

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PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

(A DEVELOPMENT STAGE COMPANY)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Organization and Basis of Presentation

This summary of accounting policies for Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. is presented to assist in understanding the Company's financial statements. The accounting policies conform to generally accepted accounting principles and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

The Company, originally named “Continental Exchange Corporation” was originally incorporated on October 26, 1927 under the laws of the State of Delaware. Later than year the corporation changed its name to “Northern Exchange Corporation”. Its original purpose was to use its acquired capital to merge with or acquire any other lawful business or enterprise, the nature of which was left unstated. Being unable to achieve its intended purpose, the company ceased operations and became dormant in 1943 having no assets or liabilities.

The Company remained in this condition until, December 30, 1980, when the company was reinstated in the State of Delaware and the name was changed to “Everest International Incorporated”. In 1988, the name of the corporation was changed to “Comstock Resources Corporation” and then “Comstock International, Inc.”. In 2000, the name of the corporation was changed to “Copernicus International, Inc.”.

In 2001, An Agreement Merger was signed between Copernicus International, Inc., a Delaware Corporation, and Plantation Lifecare Developers, a Delaware Corporation. The surviving corporation is named Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. On November 8, 2001, a certificate of Merger and Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation were filed with the State of Delaware. The company was intended to construct and operate life care communities which combine modern, specially designed resort villas, access to assisted-care living and modern skilled nursing hospitals in the Caribbean and South America.

On October 29, 2008 a Certificate of Revival and Renewal was filed with the State of Delaware.

On April 14, 2009 the Company filed a Registration Statement to become a reporting company.   For the previous 28 years, we had been a dormant company, and accordingly, a development stage company, having not attained any significant revenue or operations. The financial statements have been presented in a “development stage” format. Since reorganization, our primary activities have been raising of capital, obtaining financing. We have not commenced our principal revenue producing activities and currently have no employees.

 

 

On September 1, 2010 the Company’s President contributed payphones and payphone equipment. The company is now primarily in the business of providing the use of outdoor payphones, and providing telecommunication services.

 

 

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Nature of Operations and Going Concern

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on the basis of accounting principles applicable to a “going concern”, which assume that Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. (hereto referred to as the “Company”) will continue in operation for at least one year and will be able to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of operations.

Several conditions and events cast substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred net losses since inception, has no revenues and requires additional financing in order to finance its business activities on an ongoing basis. The Company’s future capital requirements will depend on numerous factors including, but not limited to, continued progress in finding a merger candidate and the pursuit of business opportunities. The Company is actively pursuing alternative financing and has had discussions with various third parties, although no firm commitments have been obtained. In the interim, shareholders of the Company have committed to meeting its minimal operating expenses. Management believes that actions presently being taken to revise the Company’s operating and financial requirements provide them with the opportunity to continue as a going concern.

These financial statements do not reflect adjustments that would be necessary if the Company were unable to continue as a going concern. While management believes that the actions already taken or planned, will mitigate the adverse conditions and events which raise doubt about the validity of the “going concern” assumption used in preparing these financial statements, there can be no assurance that these actions will be successful. If the Company were unable to continue as a “going concern,” then substantial adjustments would be necessary to the carrying values of assets, the reported amounts of its liabilities, the reported revenues and expenses, and the balance sheet classifications used.

Financial Instruments

The Company’s financial assets and liabilities consist of cash and accounts payable. Except as otherwise noted, it is management’s opinion that the Company is not exposed to significant interest or credit risks arising from these financial instruments. The fair values of these financial instruments approximate their carrying values due to the sort-term maturities of these instruments.

Income Taxes

The Company accounts for income taxes under the provisions of ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” ASC 740 requires recognition of deferred income tax assets and liabilities for the expected future income tax consequences, based on enacted tax laws, of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid debt instruments purchased with a maturity of 90 days or less to be cash equivalents to the extent the funds are not being held for investment purposes.

 

 

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Concentration of Credit Risk

The Company has no significant off-balance-sheet concentrations of credit risk such as foreign exchange contracts, options contracts or other foreign hedging arrangements.

Pervasiveness of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles required management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Loss per Share

Basic loss per share has been computed by dividing the loss for the period applicable to the common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the years. There were no common equivalent shares outstanding during the year ended December 31, 2010.

Stock-Based Compensation

 

 

Effective June 1, 2006, the company adopted the provisions of ASC 718 requiring employee equity awards to be accounted for under the fair value method. Accordingly, share-based compensation is measured at grant date, based on the fair value of the award. No stock options were granted to employees during the years ended December 31, 2010 and no compensation expense is required to be recognized under provisions of ASC 718 with respect to employees.

 

Under the modified prospective method of adoption for ASC 718, the compensation cost recognized by the company beginning on June 1, 2006 includes (a) compensation cost for all equity incentive awards granted prior to, but not vested as of June 1, 2006, based on the grant-dated fair value estimated in accordance with the original provisions of ASC 718, and (b) compensation cost for all equity incentive awards granted subsequent to June 1, 2006, based on the grant-date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of ASC 718. The company uses the straight-line attribution method to recognize share-based compensation costs over the service period of the award. Upon exercise, cancellation, forfeiture, or expiration of stock options, or upon vesting or forfeiture of restricted stock units, deferred tax assets for options and restricted stock units with multiple vesting dates are eliminated for each vesting period on a first-in, first-out basis as if each vesting period was a separate award. To calculate the excess tax benefits available for use in offsetting future tax shortfalls as of the dated of implementation, the company followed the alternative transition method discussed in ASC 718. During the period ended December 31, 2010, no stock options were granted to non-employees. Accordingly, no stock-based compensation expense was recognized for new stock option grants in the Statement of Operations and Comprehensive Loss at December 31, 2010.

 

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Nature of Business

The Company is primarily in the business of providing the use of outdoor payphones, and providing telecommunication services.

Revenue Recognition

The Company derives its revenue from the sources described below, which includes dial-around revenues, coin collections, and local payphone customer revenue for telephone service.

Coin revenues are recorded in an equal amount to the coins collected. Local service revenue is realized on the date the payphone customer is invoiced for telecommunication services, these are monthly charges for payphone service for local customers. Dial Around revenues are earned when a customer uses the Company’s payphone to gain access to a different long distance carrier than is already programmed into the phone. The Dial Around revenue is recognized when the billing and collection agent of the Company, APCC, calculates and compensates the Company for the use of the payphone on a quarterly basis by billing the actual party’s long distance carrier that received the calls. The date of the Dial Around revenue recognition is determined when this compensation is collected and deposited into the Company’s bank account.

The Company recognizes revenues in accordance with the Securities and Exchange Commission Staff Accounting Bulletin (SAB) number 104, "Revenue Recognition." SAB 104 clarifies application of U. S. generally accepted accounting principles to revenue transactions. The Company recognizes revenue when the earnings process is complete. That is, when the arrangements of the goods are documented, the pricing becomes final and collectability is reasonably assured. An allowance for bad debt is provided based on estimated losses. For revenue received in advance for goods, the Company records a current liability classified as either deferred revenue or customer deposits. As of December 31, 2010, there was no deferred revenue.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

The Company recognizes an allowance for doubtful accounts to ensure accounts receivable are not overstated due to uncollectibility. Bad debt reserves are maintained for all customers based on a variety of factors, including the length of time the receivables are past due, significant one-time events and historical experience. An additional reserve for individual accounts is recorded when the Company becomes aware of a customer’s inability to meet its financial obligation, such as in the case of bankruptcy filings or deterioration in the customer’s operating results or financial position. If circumstances related to customers change, estimates of the recoverability of receivables would be further adjusted. As of December 31, 2010, the Company has determined an allowance for doubtful accounts is not necessary.

 

 

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Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable will consist of Local Service revenue. The Accounts Receivable was $123 as of December 31, 2010.

Fixed Assets

Fixed assets are stated at cost. On September 1, 2010, Joseph Passalaqua, President of the Company contributed payphone equipment valued at $20,000 in exchange for a promissory note. Depreciation expense for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $1,333. Depreciation and amortization are computed using the straight-line and accelerated methods over the estimated economic useful lives of the related assets as follows:

 

 

Asset   Rate
     
Payphone Equipment            $ 20,000.00   5 years
Accumulation Deprecation   $  (1,333.00)    
Net Value of Equipment       $ 18,667.00    
     

 

 

Upon sale or other disposition of property and equipment, the cost and related accumulated depreciation or amortization are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is included in the determination of income or loss. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. Major overhauls and betterments are capitalized and depreciated over their estimated economic useful lives.

Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations; betterments are capitalized. The cost of property sold or otherwise disposed of and the accumulated depreciation thereon are eliminated from the property and related accumulated depreciation accounts, and any resulting gain or loss is credited or charged to income.

 

Recently Adopted Standards

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASC update No. 2011-04, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820), Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs .  The amendments in this update result in common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements in US generally accepted accounting principles ("U.S. GAAP") and International Financial Reporting Standards ("IFRS").  Consequently, the amendments converge the fair value measurement guidance in U.S. GAAP and IFRS.  Some of the amendments clarify the application of existing fair value measurement requirements, while other amendments change a particular principle in ASC 820. The amendments in this update that change a particular principle or requirement for measuring fair value or disclosing information about fair value measurements include the following:  1) measuring the fair value of financial instruments that are managed within a portfolio, 2) application of premiums and discounts in a fair value measurement, and 3) additional disclosures about fair value measurements.  The amendments in this update are to be applied prospectively and are effective during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011.  We do not believe that adoption of this update will have a material impact on our financial statements.

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASC update No. 2011-05, Comprehensive Income (Topic 220), Presentation of Comprehensive Income .  The FASB decided to eliminate the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders’ equity, among other amendments in this update.  The amendments require that all non-owner changes in stockholder’s equity be presented in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements.  In both choices, the Company is required to present each component of net income along with total net income, each component of other comprehensive income along with a total for other comprehensive income, and a total amount for comprehensive income.  The statement of other comprehensive income should immediately follow the statement of net income and include the components of other comprehensive income and total for other comprehensive income, along with a total for comprehensive income.  

  The entity is also required to present on the face of the financial statements reclassification adjustments for items that are reclassified from other comprehensive income to net income in the statement(s) where the components of net income and the components of comprehensive income are presented.  The amendments in this update should be applied retrospectively, and are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011.

 

NOTE 2 - INCOME TAXES

As of December 31, 2010 and 2009, the Company had a net operating loss carry forward for income tax reporting purposes of approximately $1,079,000 and $1,057,000 that may be offset against future taxable income. The net operating loss will expire between 2021 and 2028. Current tax laws limit the amount of loss available to be offset against future taxable income when a substantial change in ownership occurs. Therefore, the amount available to offset future taxable income may be limited. No tax benefit has been reported in the financial statements, because the Company believes there is a 50% or greater chance the 

 

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carry-forwards will expire unused. Accordingly, the potential tax benefits of the loss carry-forwards are offset by a valuation allowance of the same amount.

 

 

    2010   2009
Net Operating Losses   $             377,650   $            359,380
Valuation Allowance                 (377,650)                (359,380)
    $                   -   $                 -

 

 

The Company evaluates its valuation allowance requirements based on projected future operations. When circumstances change and causes a change in management's judgment about the recoverability of deferred tax assets, the impact of the change on the valuation is reflected in current income.

NOTE 3 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

During 2008-2010 a major shareholder and Presdient of the Company, Joseph Passalaqua, has advanced the Company $24,285. On September 1, 2010, Joseph Passalaqua contributed payphone equipment in exchange for a $20,000 promissory note. All of these notes accrue simple interest at a rate of 18% annually and are payable on demand. As of December 31, 2010 the Company owed $44,285 related to these notes, and had accrued $6,698 in simple interest.

As of December 31, 2010, Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. incurred a liability to Lyboldt-Daly, Inc. in the amount of $7,000. Lyboldt-Daly, Inc. completed the bookkeeping and internal accounting for Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. Joseph Passalaqua is President of Lyboldt-Daly, Inc. and a majority shareholder in Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc.

As of December 31, 2010, all activities of Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. have been conducted by corporate officers from either their homes or business offices. Currently, there are no outstanding debts owed by Plantation Lifecare Developers, Inc. for the use of these facilities and there are no commitments for future use of the facilities.

 

 

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NOTE 4 – COMMON STOCK TRANSACTIONS AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

As of January 1, 2001, the Company had issued 3,000,170 shares of common stock in exchange for cash valued at $1,200.

On October 22, 2001, the Company issued 1,870,707 shares of common stock in exchange for cash valued at $748.

On November 8, 2001, the Company filed an Amended Certificate of Incorporation and there was reverse stock split 1 to 2.4371. This change is retro-actively applied. The par value remains at $ .0004 per share.

On November 8, 2001, the Company issued 25,129,123 shares of common stock in exchange for cash valued at $10,052.

On November 27, 2001, the Company issued 5,000,000 shares of common stock in exchange for cash valued at $2,000.

On November 3, 2010, the Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock in exchange for cash valued at $120.

As of December 31, 2010 the Company has 35,300,000 shares of common stock at $.0004 par value per share issued and outstanding. The Company also has 100,000,000 shares of $.0004 par value of preferred stock authorized, of which there were no shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010.

 

 

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ITEM 9. – CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

On April 19, 2012, we engaged Micheal F. Cronin, CPA, an independent registered public accounting firm, as our principal independent accountant with the approval of our board of directors. We did not consult with Micheal F. Cronin, CPA on any accounting issues prior to engaging them as our auditors.

 

During the previous year ended December 31, 2009, there were no disagreements with MaloneBailey, LLP. on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreements, if not resolved to the satisfaction of MaloneBailey, LLP would have caused MaloneBailey, LLP to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement in its reports on our financial statements for such periods.

 

ITEM 9. A – CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

MANAGEMENT'S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

EVALUATION OF DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

For purposes of this Item 9A, the term disclosure controls and procedures means controls and other procedures of the Company (i) that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (15 U.S.C. 78a  et seq. and hereinafter the “Exchange Act”) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”), and (ii) include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our disclosure controls and procedures do not comply with the requirements in (i) and (ii) above.  

 

Our Chief Executive Officer Joseph Passalaqua, has reviewed the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by the report December 31, 2010 and has concluded that (i) the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are not effective to ensure that material information relating to the Company is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the Commission, and (ii) the Company’s controls and procedures have not been designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.  

 

The material weakness identified relates to the lack of proper segregation of duties. The Company believes that the lack of proper segregation of duties is due to the Company’s limited resources.

 

 

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REPORT OF MANAGEMENT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Internal control over financial reporting is a process to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Internal control over financial reporting includes maintaining records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions; providing reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary for preparation of our financial statements; providing reasonable assurance that receipts and expenditures of Company assets are made in accordance with management authorization; and providing reasonable assurance that unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of Company assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements would be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Because of its inherent limitations, our internal control over financial reporting does not provide assurance that a misstatement of our financial statements would be prevented or detected.

 

As of December 31, 2010, management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and found it to be not effective subsequent to filing our Annual Report on Form 10-K on April 25, 2012 and Amendment to the Annual Report on Form 10-K/A on May 9, 2012 for the year ended December 31, 2010 with the Commission. Management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Management has concluded that the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting are not effective because as noted in this Annual Report, we have limited resources available. As we obtain additional funding and employ additional personnel, we will implement programs recommended by the Treadway Commission to ensure the proper segregation of duties and reporting channels. Our independent public accountant, Michael F. Cronin, CPA, has not conducted an audit of our controls and procedures regarding internal control over financial reporting. Consequently, Michael F. Cronin, CPA expresses no opinion with regards to the effectiveness or implementation of our controls and procedures with regards to internal control over financial reporting.

 

Our independent public accountant, Michael F. Cronin, CPA, has not conducted an audit of our controls and procedures regarding internal control over financial reporting. Consequently, Michael F. Cronin, CPA expresses no opinion with regards to the effectiveness or implementation of our controls and procedures with regards to internal control over financial reporting.

 

CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROLS OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with our evaluation of these controls as of the end of our last (fourth) fiscal quarter as covered by this report on December 31, 2010 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

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INHERENT LIMITATIONS ON EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTROLS

 

The Company's management does not expect that its disclosure controls or its internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system's objectives will be met. The design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Further, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

ITEM 9. B – OTHER INFORMATION

None.

 

 

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PART III.

 

ITEM 10. – DIRECTORS, EXCUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERANCE

 

Set forth below is the name of our Officers and Directors.

 

 

Name Age Position Held 
 Joseph C. Passalaqua 61 President and Director
 Ray Willenberg 59 Secretary and Director

 

Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua and Mr. Ray Willenberg Jr. shall serve as President and Secretary, respectively at the pleasure of the board of directors.

 

Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua and Mr. Ray Willenberg Jr. shall serve as our directors until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until his prior death, resignation or removal and until any successors are duly elected and have qualified.

 

Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua shall serve as our President until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until his prior death, resignation or removal and until any successors are duly elected and have qualified.

 

Mr. Ray Willenberg Jr. shall serve as our Secretary until the next annual meeting of stockholders or until her prior death, resignation or removal and until any successors are duly elected and have qualified.

 

  Directors will be elected for one-year terms at the annual stockholders meeting.  Officers will hold their positions at the pleasure of the board of directors, absent any employment agreement, of which none currently exists or is contemplated.  There is no arrangement or understanding between Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua, Mr. Ray Willenberg Jr. and any other person pursuant to which they were or are to be selected as a director or officer, and there is no arrangement, plan or understanding as to whether non-management shareholders will exercise their voting rights to continue to elect the current director to our board. There are also no arrangements, agreements or understandings between non-management shareholders that may directly or indirectly participate in or influence the management of our affairs.

     

Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua and Mr. Ray Willenberg Jr. and any other directors and officers hereafter appointed or elected will devote their time to our affairs on an as needed basis, this, depending on the circumstances, could amount to as little as two hours per month, or more than forty hours per month, but more than likely will encompass less than five (5) hours per month.  There are no agreements or understandings for any officer or director to resign at the request of another person, and none of the officers or directors is acting on behalf of, or will act

 

Officers and Directors

 

Joseph C. Passalaqua

 

Beginning in 1992, Mr. Passalaqua served as Chief Executive Officer and President of American Telecommunications Enterprises, Inc. (ATI), a domestic long distance carrier. ATI was one of the top forty long distance carriers in the United States. The company was sold in 1999. Since 1997, Mr. Passalaqua has also served as President of Datone Communications, Inc., a pay phone company. In 1989, Mr. Passalaqua was one of the founding members of the North East Dealers of Pay Phones Association. In 1995, the North East Dealers of Pay Phones Association merged with the Empire State Pay Phone

 

 

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Association. From 1995 through 1997, Mr. Passalaqua served as a board member of the Empire State Pay Phone Association. In 1996, Mr. Passalaqua purchased a Chevrolet, Buick franchise called Laqua’s 481. The family added a Pontiac, Oldsmobile and GMC Truck dealership at the same location in 2000. The franchises combined and operated until July 2008.Mr. Passalaqua is the Secretary of Digital Utilities Ventures, Inc. and the sole owner of Greenwich Holdings, LLC.

 

Ray Willenberg Jr.

 

Mr. Willenberg serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors and Executive Vice President of Rim Semiconductor, a fab less semiconductor company, which he founded in 1999. Rim Semiconductor has developed a new DSL-based broad band access protocol, the Internet Protocol Subscriber Line (IPSL) which offers higher speeds and reach that enable service providers to use their existing equipment. He served as President, CEO and Chairman for the Board of Rim Semiconductor from April 1997 to March 2002. He was elected a director in October 1996. Mr. Willenberg joined Rim Semiconductor as Vice President and corporate Secretary in 1996.

 

Mr. Willenberg is currently President of LIT Consulting, Inc which advises and consults with public and private companies on financing, mergers, acquisitions and public awareness.

 

In addition, Ray Willenberg, Jr. served on the Board of Directors for IDO Security, Inc. from August 2009 to November 2009. IDO Security, Inc., headquartered in New York with a subsidiary in Israel, develops and markets the patented and UL-certified MagShoe ™ “shoes on” weapons metal detection system that extends screening to the lower body and feet.

 

He was the Founder and CEO of Mesa Mortgage Company of Southern California from 1972 through 1995, financing single and multi-family homes as a mortgage banker.

 

Mr. Willenberg also founded The Survivors Rehabilitation Foundation (SRF) in 1985 where he is currently Chairman and President. SRF provides scholarships to survivors of traumatic brain injury in the San Diego, CA area to continue with the rehabilitation necessary to reach their fullest potential

 

 

Audit Committee, Nominating Committee and Financial Expert

      

We do not have an Audit Committee or Nominating Committee.  Mr. Joseph Passalaqua, the President, performs some of the same functions of an Audit Committee, such as: recommending a firm of independent certified public accountants to audit the annual financial statements; reviewing the independent auditor’s independence, the financial statements and their audit report; and reviewing management's administration of the system of internal accounting controls.  We do not currently have a written audit committee charter or similar document. We have elected not to have a Nominating Committee in that we are a development stage company with limited operations and resources.

      

We have no financial expert.  We believe the cost related to retaining a financial expert at this time is prohibitive.  Further, because we have no business operations, management believes the services of a financial expert are not warranted.

 

 

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Code of Ethics

 

 A code of ethics relates to written standards that are reasonably designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:

 

  1. Honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent  conflicts of     interest between personal and professional relationships;
     

 

  2. Full,  fair,  accurate,  timely  and  understandable  disclosure  in reports and  documents  that are filed with,  or  submitted  to, the Commission and in other public communications made by an issuer;

 

  3. Compliance with applicable governmental laws, rules and regulations;

 

  4. The prompt internal  reporting  of  violations  of the  code to an appropriate person or persons    identified in the code; and

 

  5. Accountability for adherence to the code.

 

We have not adopted a corporate code of ethics that applies to our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions

 

Conflicts of Interest

     

Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg will only devote a small portion of their time to affairs of the Company.  There will be occasions when the time requirements of our business conflict with the demands of their other business and investment activities.  Such conflicts may require that we attempt to employ additional personnel.  There is no assurance that the services of such persons will be available or that they can be obtained upon terms favorable to us.

 

The officers, directors and principal shareholders of the Company may actively negotiate for the purchase of a portion of their common stock as a condition to, or in connection with, a proposed merger or acquisition transaction. It is anticipated that a substantial premium may be paid by the purchaser in conjunction with any sale of shares by our officers, directors and principal shareholders made as a condition to, or in connection with, a proposed merger or acquisition transaction. The fact that a substantial premium may be paid to members of our management to acquire their shares creates a conflict of interest for them and may compromise their state law a fiduciary duty to our other shareholders. In making any such sale, members of our management may consider their own personal pecuniary benefit rather than the best interests of the Company and our other shareholders, and the other shareholders are not expected to be afforded the opportunity to approve or consent to any particular buy-out transaction involving shares held by members of our management.

     

It is not currently anticipated that any salary, consulting fee, or finders fee shall be paid to any of our directors or executive officers, or to any other affiliate of the Company except as described under Executive Compensation below. Although management has no current plans to cause the Company to do so, it is possible that we will enter into an agreement with an acquisition candidate requiring the sale of all or a portion of the common stock held by our current stockholder to the acquisition candidate or principals thereof, or to other individuals or business entities, or requiring some other form of payment to our current stockholder, or requiring the future employment of specified officers and payment of salaries to them. It is more likely than not that any sale of securities by our current stockholder to an acquisition

 

 

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candidate would be at a price substantially higher than that originally paid by such stockholders. Any payment to our current stockholder in the context of an acquisition involving the Company would be determined entirely by the largely unforeseeable terms of a future agreement with an unidentified business entity.

 

We are in the development stage and currently have no full-time employees.  Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua is our President and Ray Willenberg is our Secretary.  Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg have agreed to allocate a limited portion of her time to the activities of the Company without compensation.  Potential conflicts may arise with respect to the limited time commitment by Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg and the potential demands of our activities.   See Item 13, Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence."

     

The amount of time spent by Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg on the activities of the Company is not predictable.  Such time may vary widely from an extensive amount when reviewing a target company to an essentially quiet time when activities of management focus elsewhere or some amount in between.  It is impossible to predict with any precision the exact amount of time Mr. Passalaqua and Mr. Willenberg will actually be required to spend to locate a suitable target company. Mr. Passalaqua and Mr.Willenberg estimate that the business plan of the Company can be implemented by devoting less than five hours per month but such figure cannot be stated with precision.

 

Indemnification of Directors and Officers

 

Section 16-10a-901 through 909 of the Utah Revised Business Corporation Act authorizes a corporation's board of directors or a court to award indemnification to directors and officers in terms sufficiently broad to permit such indemnification under certain circumstances for liabilities (including reimbursement for expenses incurred, including counsel fees) arising under the Securities Act of 1933. A director of a corporation may only be indemnified if: (1) the conduct was in good faith; and (2) the director reasonably believed that the conduct was in or not opposed to the corporation's best interest; and (3) in the case of any criminal proceeding, the director had no reasonable cause to believe the conduct was unlawful. A corporation may not indemnify a person under the Utah Act unless and until the corporation's board of directors has determined that the applicable standard of conduct set forth above has been met.

 

The Company's Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation do not provide for any additional or different indemnification procedures other than those provided by the Utah Act, nor has the Company entered into any indemnity agreements with its current directors and officers regarding the granting of other or additional or contractual assurances regarding the scope of the indemnification allowed by the Utah Act. At present, there is no pending litigation or proceeding involving a director, officer or employee of the Company regarding which indemnification is sought, nor is the Company aware of any threatened litigation that may result in claims of indemnification. The Company has not obtained director's and officer's liability insurance, although the board of directors of the Company may determine to investigate and, possibly, acquire such insurance in the future.

 

ITEM 11. – EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

None of our officers or directors has received any cash remuneration. Officers will not receive any remuneration upon completion of an offering until the consummation of an acquisition. No remuneration of any nature has been paid for or on account of services rendered by a director in such capacity. None of the officers and directors intends to devote more than a few hours a week to our affairs.

 

It is possible that, after we successfully consummate a business combination with an unaffiliated entity, that entity may desire to employ or retain one or a number of members of our management for the

 

 

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purposes of providing services to the surviving entity. However, we have adopted a policy whereby the offer of any post-transaction employment to members of management will not be a consideration in our decision whether to undertake any proposed transaction.

 

No retirement, pension, profit sharing, stock option or insurance programs or other similar programs have been adopted by us for the benefit of our employees.

 

There is no understanding or agreement regarding compensation our management will receive after a business combination that is required to be included in this table, or otherwise.

 

ITEM 12. – SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth certain information concerning the number of shares of our common stock owned beneficially as of December 31, 2010 by: (i) each person (including any group) known to us to own more than five percent (5%) of any class of our voting securities, (ii) each of our directors and each of our named executive officers (as defined under Item 402(m)(2) of Regulation S-K), and (iii) officers and directors as a group. Unless otherwise indicated, the shareholders listed possess sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares shown.

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner

Amount of Beneficial

Ownership of Common Stock*

 

Percentage 

of Class

5% SHAREHOLDERS (i)          

Mary Evans

P.O. Box 3143

Liverpool, NY 13089

  3,129,872   9%  
           

John F. Passalaqua

4055 Wetzel Rd.

Liverpool, NY 13090

  3,154,872   9%  
           

Joseph J. Passalaqua and Stephanie Passalaqua

8744 Riverside House Path

Brewerton, NY 13029

  3,167,167   9%  
           
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS (ii)          

Joseph C. Passalaqua

106 Glenwood Dr. S.

Liverpool, NY 13090

  18,779,232   54%  
           
ALL OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS AS A GROUP (iii)   18,779,232   54%  
           

 

*The amount is based on 35,300,000 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of December 31, 2010.

 

Under Rule 13d-3, a beneficial owner of a security includes any person who, directly or indirectly, through any contract, arrangement, understanding, relationship, or otherwise has or shares: (i) voting power, which includes the power to vote, or to direct the voting of shares; and (ii) investment power, which includes the power to dispose or direct the disposition of shares. Certain shares may be deemed to be beneficially owned by more than one person (if, for example, persons share the power to vote or the power to dispose of the shares). In addition, shares are deemed to be beneficially owned by a person if the

 

 

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person has the right to acquire the shares (for example, upon exercise of an option) within 60 days of the date as of which the information is provided. In computing the percentage ownership of any person, the amount of shares outstanding is deemed to include the amount of shares beneficially owned by such person (and only such person) by reason of these acquisition rights. As a result, the percentage of outstanding shares of any person as shown in this table does not necessarily reflect the person's actual ownership or voting power with respect to the number.

 

ITEM 13. – CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENCE

 

As of December 31, 2010 an officer of the Company, Joseph Passalaqua, has advanced the Company $24,285 in cash provided and $20,000 in contributed assets. The notes accrue simple interest at a rate of 18% annually and is payable on demand. As of December 31, 2010, the Company owed $44,285 related to these notes, and had accrued $6,698 in simple interest.

As of December 31, 2010, Plantation Lifecare Developers incurred a liability to Lyboldt-Daly in the amount of $7,000. An officer of the Company, Joseph Passalaqua, is also President of Lyboldt-Daly Inc., which has provided internal accounting and bookkeeping services to the Company. As of December 31, 2010, the Company owed $7,000 related to these internal accounting and bookkeeping services.

As of December 31, 2010, all activities of Plantation Lifecare Developers Inc. have been conducted by corporate officers from either their homes or business offices. Currently, there are no outstanding debts owed by Plantation Lifecare Developers for the use of these facilities and there are no commitments for future use of the facilities.

Independent Directors

Our Board of Directors is currently comprised of two directors, namely Mr. Joseph C. Passalaqua and Ray Willenberg, both of whom are not independent directors; as such term is defined under the rules of the Nasdaq Stock Market.

ITEM 14. – PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES

 

As of March 1, 2012 the Company's principal accountant is Michael F. Cronin, CPA for audit services and accounting services.

 

Principal Accounting fees billed by the Company's previous principal accountants, MaloneBailey, LLP, for audit and accounting services and Bowers & Company CPAs PLLC for tax services during the years ended December 31, 2009 and December 30, 2010 were as follows:

 

  FISCAL 2010 FISCAL 2009
Audit Fees (1) $10,000.00 $10,000.00
Tax Fees (2) $465.00  $850.00
Other Fees $0 $0

 

 

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(1) Comprised of the audit of the Company's annual financial statements and reviews of the Company's quarterly financial statements, as well as consents related to and reviews of other documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

(2) Comprised of preparation of all federal and state corporate income tax returns for the Company and its subsidiaries. Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, all audit and non-audit services performed by the Company's independent accountants must now be approved in advance by the Audit Committee to assure that such services do not impair the accountants' independence from the Company. The Company does not have an Audit Committee, therefore, the Board of Directors reviews and approves audit and permissible non-audit services performed by the previous auditor MaloneBailey, LLP and the current auditor Michael F. Cronin, CPA for such services.

 

We do not currently have a standing audit committee. The services described above were approved by our Board of Directors.

 

 

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PART IV.

 

ITEM 15. – EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit No. Description

3 Certificate of Incorporation*

3.1 Certificate of Merger and Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation*

3.2 Certificate of Renewal and Revival of Certificate of Incorporation*

3.3 By-laws*

4.1 Form of Common Stock Certificate*

 31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302.

31.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302.

32.1Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101Interactive Data Files for Highlight Networks, Inc. 10K/A for the Period Ended December 31, 2010 **

101.INS XBRL Instance Document**

101.SCH XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document**

101.CAL XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document**

101.DEF XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document**

101.LAB XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document**

101.PRE XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document**

 

*Previously Submitted and incorporated by reference herein.

**Pursuant to Rule 406T of Regulation S-T, these interactive date files are deemed not filed or part of the registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 and 12 of the Securities Act of 1933 or Section 18 of the Securities Act of 1934 and otherwise are not subject to liability.

 

 

 

 

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 12 of the Securities Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this registration statement to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

PLANTATION LIFECARE DEVELOPERS, INC.

 

Date: May 9, 2012 

 

By: /s/ Joseph C. Passalaqua

Name: Joseph C. Passalaqua

Title: President and Director

Chief Executive Officer

 

 

 

By: /s/ Ray Willenberg Jr.

Name: Ray Willenberg Jr.

Title: Secretary and Director

Chief Financial Officer

 

 

 

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