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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.Financial_Report.xls
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.cwet_10k-ex3101.htm
EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.cwet_10k-ex3202.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.cwet_10k-ex3201.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.cwet_10k-ex3102.htm
EX-14.1 - CODE OF BUSINESS CONDUCT & ETHICS - SOLAR WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.cwet_10k-ex1401.htm


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549

FORM 10-K
  
x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
  
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011

OR
  
o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ______________ to ______________
  
Commission file number 000-53035
  
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
  
Nevada
82-6008752
 (State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   
1997 Annapolis Exchange Parkway, Annapolis, MD
21401
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
(Zip Code)

(410) 972-4713
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:  None
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
  
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.0001 par value
Over the Counter Bulletin Board
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. o Yes  x No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(b) of the Act. o Yes  x No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. x Yes  o No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). x Yes  o No

Check if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained in this form, and no disclosure will be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. 
   
Large accelerated filer o
 
Accelerated filer o
     
Non-accelerated filer o
 
Smaller reporting company x
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
   

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) o Yes  x No

The aggregate market value of the voting Common Stock held by non-affiliates (based upon the closing sale price of $0.22 per share on the (Over the Counter Bulletin Board) of the registrant as of June 30, 2011: $1,383,754.
 
Number of issued and outstanding shares of the registrant’s par value $0.0001 common stock as of March 22, 2012: 225,547,250.


 
 
 
 
  
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
FORM 10-K
INDEX

   
Page
Part I
     
Item 1.
Description of Business
 4
     
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
12
     
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
22
     
Item 2.
Properties
22
     
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
23
     
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
23
     
Part II
     
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
23
     
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
26
     
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
26
     
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
33
     
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
33
     
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
33
     
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
34
     
Item 9B.
Other Information
35
     
Part III
     
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
38
     
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
40
     
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
42
     
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
44
     
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
45
     
Part IV
     
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
46
  
 
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PART I

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
 
This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this "Annual Report") contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). All statements in this Annual Report other than statements of historical fact are “forward-looking statements” for purposes of these provisions, including any statements of the plan and objectives for future operations and any statement of assumptions underlying any of the foregoing.

In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements made in this Annual Report, particularly in view of the Company’s early stage of operations, the inclusion of this information should not be regarded as a representation by the Company or any other person that its objectives, future results, levels of activity, performance or plans will be achieved. These statements are further qualified by important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contemplated in the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, the following:
 
 
·
the Company’s ability to raise sufficient capital;
 
 
·
the passage of adverse or burdensome government regulation;
 
 
·
litigation and legal liability;
 
 
·
the Company’s ability to attract and retain qualified personnel;
 
 
·
reliance on third-party product providers;
 
 
·
the Company’s ability to attract and retain new customers and increase revenues;
 
 
·
the Company’s ability to market, commercialize and achieve market acceptance of its products;
 
 
·
the Company’s ability to protect its intellectual property;
 
 
·
changes in the competitive environment;
 
 
·
the impact of, and potential challenges in complying with, legislation and regulation in the jurisdictions in which the Company plans to operate, particularly given the global scope of the Company’s proposed businesses and the possibility of conflicting regulatory requirements across jurisdictions in which it proposes to do business;
 
 
·
environmental impacts of the Company’s planned operations and possible adverse publicity; and
 
 
·
political, social and economic conditions in the United States in general.
 
Forward-looking statements can be identified by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. They use words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe” or words of similar meaning. They may also use words such as “would,” “should,” “could” or “may.” Factors that may cause the Company’s actual results to differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements include the risks discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report under the caption “Risk Factors” and risk factors discussed in the documents filed by the Company with the SEC.
  
 
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This Annual Report may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to the Company's ability to produce a cost-effective wind energy conversion device. Among the important factors that could cause actual events to differ materially from those indicated by forward-looking statements in this Annual Report are the failure of  the Company to achieve or maintain necessary zoning approvals with respect to the location of its proposed projects; to successfully complete its proposed projects on time and remain competitive; the inability of the Company to sell its planned products and/or services in the future, if needed, to finance the marketing and sales of its planned products and/or services, general economic conditions, and those risk factors detailed in this Annual Report.
 
All references in this Form 10-K that refer to the “Company,” “Clean Wind Energy Tower”, “Clean Wind,” “we,” “us” or “our” are to Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. and unless otherwise differentiated, its subsidiary, Clean Wind Energy, Inc.  All references to “Clean Wind Energy” are to our subsidiary, Clean Wind Energy, Inc.
 
ITEM 1.  DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

Corporate History

On December 29, 2010, Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc., a Nevada corporation (the “Company” or "Clean Wind"), completed a reverse merger (the “Merger”) with Clean Wind Energy, Inc., a corporation formed under the laws of the State of Delaware on July 26, 2010 (“Clean Wind Energy”).  In connection with the Merger, the Company issued to the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy in exchange for their Clean Wind Energy Common Stock, the right to receive an aggregate of 300,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock.  As a result of the reverse merger, Clean Wind Energy is now a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.

For accounting purposes, Clean Wind Energy was the surviving entity. The transaction was accounted for as a recapitalization of Clean Wind Energy pursuant to which Clean Wind Energy was treated as the surviving and continuing entity although the Company is the legal acquirer rather than a reverse acquisition.  Accordingly, the Company’s historical financial statements are those of Clean Wind Energy immediately following the consummation of the reverse merger. Also, going forward the business operations of Clean Wind Energy will become the Company’s principal business operations.

The Company was incorporated under the laws of the State of Idaho on January 22, 1962, as Superior Mines Company.  In 1964, the Company’s name was changed to Superior Silver Mines, Inc.  On December 27, 2010, the Company reincorporated as a Nevada corporation.  Prior to the Merger, the Company had been dormant for a number of years and had no known mineral reserves.  On January 21, 2011, the Company changed its name from Superior Silver Mines, Inc. to Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc.  In addition, effective January 24, 2011, the Company’s quotation symbol on the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board was changed from SSVM.OB to CWET.OB
   
The Company’s executive offices are located at 1997 Annapolis Exchange Parkway, Suite 300, Annapolis, Maryland 21401.
  
 
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Overview

Our Company’s core objective and focus is to become a leading provider of clean efficient green energy to the world communities at a reasonable cost without the destructive residuals of fossil fuel, while continuing to generate innovative technological solutions for today and tomorrow’s electrical power needs.
 
Clean Wind has assembled a team of experienced business professionals, engineering and scientific consultants with access to the breakthrough energy research upon which this technology is founded and the proven ability to bring the idea to market. Clean Wind has filed several patents that the Company believes will further enhance this potentially revolutionary technology. Clean Wind Energy, Inc. is based in Annapolis MD, and is traded on the OTCBB under the symbol ‘CWET’.
 
Clean Wind has designed and is preparing to develop, and construct large “Downdraft Towers” that use benevolent, non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity and clean water economically by integrating and synthesizing numerous proven as well as emerging technologies. In addition to constructing Downdraft Towers in the United States and abroad, the Company intends to establish partnerships at home and abroad to propagate these systems and meet increasing global demand for clean water and electricity.

A Bold New Energy Solution

For the past decade the United States and many other nations have continuously increased efforts to develop clean, sustainable energy systems that:
 
 
·
Use efficient, cost-effective and non-polluting renewable resources.
 
·
Avoid the adverse effects of fossil and nuclear fuels.
 
·
Operate 24/7 and outperform solar collectors and wind turbines that produce energy only when the sun shines or the wind blows.  Their capacity factor is generally below 30%.

Clean Wind is developing Downdraft Towers that use the sun’s power and water, to create wind energy which is used to economically generate electricity and clean water by integrating and synthesizing a number of proven as well as emerging technologies

Technology
 
The Principle
 
Innovative Renewable Energy Technology
 
The Downdraft Tower is a hollow cylinder with a water spray system at the top. Pumps deliver water to the top of the Downdraft Tower to spray a fine mist across the entire opening. The water evaporates and cools the hot dry air at the top. The cooled air is denser and heavier than the outside warmer air and falls through the cylinder at speeds up to and in excess of 50 mph, driving the turbines located at the base of the structure. The turbines power generators to produce electricity.
  
In geographic areas where atmospheric conditions are conducive, the exterior of the Downdraft Tower may be constructed with vertical “wind vanes” that capture the prevailing wind and channel it to produce supplemental electrical power. This dual renewable energy resource enhances the capability and productivity of the Clean Wind system.
  
 
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Physical Principles
 
Evaporating water to create or diminish energy (for cooling) is a well-understood physical principle.  Evaporative coolers are used not just throughout the United States Southwest region (hot & arid), but widely in the power industry to cool gas, coal and nuclear power plants.
 
Similarly, cooling towers adorn the roofs of countless buildings in large cities, providing affordable energy.  Airline pilots are very familiar with downdrafts and diligently avoid downdrafts associated with thunderstorms, especially when near the ground, where downdrafts can force a 200 ton airplane dangerously downward.
 
Clean Wind’s Energy Tower uses the same fundamental physical principle of evaporative cooling which creates a downdraft. Cool, moist, dense air always falls through hot dry air.  What most people are unaware of is that the wind speed in an energy tower can exceed 50mph.
 
In summary, it is clear that Clean Wind’s Energy Tower creates and harnesses the downdraft, using widely applied and well-understood physical principles, to produce abundant electricity.
 
 
Intellectual Property
 
The Company has filed numerous patent applications with the U.S. Patent Office to protect its intellectual property.  At this time the Company has retained the following patent as well as the patent applications that we feel are instrumental to the core development of our project:
  
A modified mobile base for large tower cranes incorporating a multi - Wheeled air ride suspension system for even load distribution on 20 or more wheels, with the ability to keep the tower plumb in all working conditions.
  
Improved Wind Energy Power Transmission System - To more effectively transmit energy via a new multi-stage variable hydraulic drive system that operates efficiently through a very broad range of wind and turbine speeds.
  
Energy Tower Having External Wind Capturing Capacity - To supplement the available energy of an energy tower by capturing existing winds aloft (800 to 4,000 ft).
 
Patent Allowance Notification
On February 14, 2012 the Company announced the Notice of Allowance of its patent application titled Efficient Energy Conversion Devices & Methods (U.S. Pat. App. No. 13/091,124) by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The patent covers specific aspects of deploying multiple turbines in a wind tunnel coupled to a novel hydraulic system capable of maintaining high efficiency hydraulic to electric conversion under a wide variance of wind speeds. The ultimate goal is to maximize the capture and utilization of all available wind energy in any given wind tunnel, as well as providing a consistency of power output during any deviations in wind speed. The Company considers this patent to be a “Core Patent” providing a significant barrier to entry for any potential competitor.
   
 
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Site Requirements

Clean Wind’s planned Downdraft Tower requires very specific site conditions.  The location must provide appropriate climate and atmospheric conditions. The site must have access to reliable water sources, either fresh or salt water, in which case desalinization may be required.  The foundation for the Downdraft Tower should most appropriately be bedrock.  Additionally, the site should have access to rail service and other logistical ease of access.  The Company is investigating the feasibility of locating a Downdraft Tower in Arizona...
 
Considerations
 
The Downdraft Tower works best in hot, dry climates, near sea level, and near a reliable water source.  Prime production periods are daytime during spring, summer and fall, which closely aligns with electricity demand patterns. 
 
The External Wind Capture keeps working 24/7 including cold winter months and at night whenever a wind is blowing  -  from the surface up to 4,000 feet - where much stronger winds blow far more constantly (at least twice as often as on the surface and at much higher speeds).

There are a number of appropriate sites around the globe that are hot, dry, and near water adequate to support numerous Energy Towers that efficiently turn the sun’s energy into electricity.

The Distinct Advantage
 
Clean Wind enjoys one major advantage over all other wind energy producers: a constant, high speed downdraft that blows for more than half the year.  While ordinary wind turbine farms struggle with 20% to 30% capacity factors and wind speeds that are often useless or marginal (too low or too high), Clean Wind’s Energy Tower can continuously channel 50 mph winds (or higher) into a controlled environment where the vast majority the wind’s energy can be captured to generate electricity. 
 
Power industry experts know that when computing wind power, the velocity is cubed (not squared).  Thus a 50 mph wind in a Clean Wind turbine will produce more than 15 times as much power as a 20 mph wind striking a conventional turbine.

Development
 
The master development plan for a site requires a series of steps:
  
 
explore, select, and qualify site for foundation integrity;
     
 
negotiate and execute land lease (site) and rights of way (water pipeline, transmission line, highway and railway access);
     
 
survey and identify any artifacts and cultural resources that may be impacted by site exploration, project construction or operation;
     
 
acquire water rights;
     
 
determine and design access to and availability of electrical grid, roads, rail transportation, sewer, water, and power for construction and operation;
     
  create project site plan for offices, storage buildings for construction equipment, etc.;
     
 
coordinate and provide, to the extent possible, resource carry-over (i.e., buildings and facilities) to the locale after construction;
     
 
determine the type and number of jobs created during study, construction and operational phases;
     
 
determine the cost of the project (currently estimated at $4.5 billion); and
     
 
determine electricity produced (currently estimated at $900 million annually).
     
 
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Abundant, Clean, Affordable Energy Production
   
As currently designed, the Company anticipates that each Downdraft Tower will be capable of generating up to 2,500 megawatts per hour, gross, of which approximately 1/3 will be used to power its operations. From normal to ideal circumstances the Tower should have a potential yield of 1,100 to 1,500 megawatts per hour available for sale to the power grid. One megawatt equates to 1,000,000 watts or 1,000 kilowatts of electricity. Currently, avoided costs per kilowatt in California are running approximately $0.11 per kilowatt hour.
  
The annual capacity factor for the downdraft portion of the Energy Tower is predicted at approximately 51%. Prime production periods are daytime and evening during spring, summer and fall, which closely align with electricity demand patterns. However, the External Wind Capture keeps working 24/7, whenever a wind is blowing, including cold winter months and at night. Its capacity factor is estimated at approximately 75%, which raises the Energy Tower’s overall capacity factor to above 60%.
 
Transition to Development Stage Company
   
In September 2011 the Company closed their internally staffed engineering office in Warrenton, Virginia and began transitioning to a Development Team to oversee and coordinate the efforts of industry consultants and advisors to develop and construct their first Downdraft Energy Tower. The Company has needed to seek numerous consultants with outside expertise beyond the disciplines of their in-house engineering staff. Management believes that as the Company commences the transition from a “Research and Development Stage” company to the actual development of our first project, the best course of action is to seek the advice of well recognized world class industry participants to work with our Company to bring our Downdraft Renewable Energy Tower to market.

Partners
 
The Company plans to create a strategic relationship with a world class crane manufacturer for the tower construction requirements.  Clean Wind is also in discussions with several world class companies for its hydraulic systems needs and for its generator needs.
 
Customers
 
Energy produced by the Downdraft Tower could provide low cost electricity to the power grid. Clean Wind plans to ultimately build and operate wind energy plants and sell the electricity either through contracts with utilities, which is the traditional method for independent power plants, or directly into the open market or electricity commodities market like a merchant plant similar to many natural gas fired power plants. The Company may also sell the power plants themselves to large customers or utilities and/or operate such plants for customers or utilities.
 
The sale of electricity to power brokers is more profitable than selling directly to the electricity commodities market. If the cost of the marketing infrastructure of selling green energy at a $0.02 per kWh premium is justified as opposed to the wholesale contracting of electricity at a lower price, then Clean Wind plans to market the electricity to green energy brokers. The green power is energy from clean energy production sources like wind energy in which consumers are willing to pay a premium in order to promote clean energy. If Clean Wind chooses to work through power brokers, it believes the potential exists to sell the environmental correct “green” power at a premium price being higher than conventional fuel sources. Power brokers usually receive a premium of $0.015 per kWh above the wholesale price paid on the open market. However, the market is new and subject to uncertainty including price fluctuations.
  
 
8

 
  
Markets
 
Wind energy experienced a 39% annual growth for the past five years according to the American Wind Energy Association, the industry’s trade organization based in Washington, D.C.  Recent national surveys show that approximately 40-70% of the population surveyed indicate a willingness to pay a premium for renewable energy. Although 10% of the respondents say they will participate in such a program, actual participation is estimated at 1%. Currently, more than a dozen utilities have green marketing programs. Public Service Company of Colorado, Central and South West Services Corporation of Texas, and Fort Collins Light and Power Company are leading the effort in wind related green electricity marketing.
 
The Company is investigating the feasibility of locating a Downdraft Tower in California.  California has three major regulated investor-owned utilities and many municipal utilities, all of which are required by state law to have renewable sources of generation in their resource portfolios, whether generated or purchased. Arizona utilities have similar requirements. Due to federal regulations requiring that transmission owners provide service on the same terms to all generators requesting service, known as “open access”, independent power producers (which the Company would be under its business model), are able to develop wind energy projects in areas where such resources are most prevalent and sell power to anyone interconnected with the transmission grid in California. California’s transmission grid is operated by a regional transmission organization (“RTO”), the California Independent System Operator (“CAISO”). Other states belong to other RTOs.
 
Competition

The Downdraft Tower project requires a large land base and specific conditions. Given these constraints and the increasing focus on renewable energy to offset the environmental problems caused by fossil fuels, the renewable energy industry is highly competitive.
 
In the markets where the Company plans to conduct its business, it will compete with many energy producers including electric utilities and large independent power producers. There is also competition from fossil fuel sources such as natural gas and coal, and other renewable energy sources such as solar, traditional wind, hydro and geothermal. The competition depends on the resources available within the specific markets. Although the cost to produce clean, reliable, renewable energy is becoming more competitive with traditional fossil fuel sources, it generally remains more expensive to produce, and the reliability of its supply is less consistent than traditional fossil fuel. Deregulation and consumer preference are becoming important factors in increasing the development of alternative energy projects. The Company believes that governments and consumers recognize the importance of renewable energy resources in the energy mix, and are facilitating the implementation of wind and other renewable technologies through renewable portfolio standards and revenue and tax incentives.
 
Arizona and California are primarily served by large utilities, such as Southern California Edison Company, Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Arizona Public Service Company (“Arizona Public Service”) and UNS. All of these companies have non-regulated subsidiaries or sister companies that develop generating facilities. In addition, utilities from other states and countries have established large wind energy generating companies, such as Florida Power & Light Company, enXco, Inc. and PPM Energy, Inc. (now part of a large Spanish renewable company, Iberdrola Renovables, S.A.).
 
According to the Electric Power Research Institute, the past ten years have seen traditional energy costs increase while wind energy costs have declined.  The advances in technology, larger-scale and more efficient manufacturing processes, and increased experience in wind turbine operations has contributed substantially to this trend. This cost decline is paralleled with a several hundred fold increase in installed wind energy capacity. As a result, maintenance costs have fallen significantly. Wind energy sources comprise less than 1% of the current electricity generating industry.
  
 
9

 
  
A new assessment released by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2010 shows that U.S. wind resources are even larger than previously estimated and potential capacity of the land-based wind resource is more than 10,000 GW, far exceeding the 300 GW required to meet 20% of the nation’s electrical demand with wind in 2030. This figure does not factor the potential of Downdraft Towers. The estimated levelized cost of new generation resources by the Energy Information Administration shows the cost of wind energy is competitive to other conventional means of energy generation. The cumulative capacity-weighted average price of wind power, including the production tax credit, was about 4.4 cents per kilowatt hour in 2009 — a price that competes with fossil fuel-generated electricity.
   
   
Environmental
   
Various parties in the United States and other nations are pursuing clean energy solutions that use efficient and cost- effective renewable resources to serve society while avoiding the adverse effects associated with fossil and nuclear fuels, and also the obvious limitations of solar collectors that work only when the sun shines or wind turbines that work only when the wind blows.
 
The Downdraft Tower has the capability of being operated with virtually no carbon footprint, fuel consumption, or waste production. The technology has the potential to generate clean, cost effective and efficient electrical power without the damaging effects caused by using fossil or nuclear fuels, and other conventional power sources. The Company also believes that increasing emphasis on green technologies and governmental incentives in the energy industry should have a positive long-term effect on the Company’s planned business and the wind energy industry in general
 
Numerous federal and state environmental laws can affect the development of renewable energy, such as the California Environmental Quality Act. These laws require that certain studies be conducted to ensure that there are no significant adverse impacts on wildlife, humans and the environment generally. The significant impacts of wind energy projects are on visibility, noise, birds, wildlife habitat and soil erosion. Changes in environmental laws can pose significant expenses on renewable energy development.
  
 
10

 
  
International treaties and protocols, such as the Kyoto Protocol, have significantly impacted the development and implementation of renewable energy technologies. Certain countries and regions also have established emission trading programs. Under emission trading programs, utilities and factories are permitted to produce a certain level of emissions. If such an entity produces fewer emissions than its allotment, the entity may sell its excess allotment to parties exceeding their emissions allotments. To date, these mechanisms are at an early stage of development within the U.S. Credit trading provides the potential for creating additional income for renewable energy producers, rationalizing of electricity prices for utilities and reducing the overall retail price for green power.
 
The Company believes that increasing emphasis on green technologies and governmental incentives in the energy industry should have a positive long-term effect on the Company’s planned business and the wind energy industry in general.

Industry Analysis
 
According to the American Wind Energy Association (“AWEA”), wind energy was the world’s fastest growing energy source during most of the 1990s, expanding at annual rates ranging from 25% to 35%. The AWEA estimates the global industry growth rate has averaged 32% over the five years from 2004 through 2008, with a growth rate of 39% in 2009. The U.S. wind industry broke all previous records by installing over 10,000 MW of new wind capacity in 2009.  Current installed capacity worldwide at the end of 2009 was 35,086 MW, compared to 25,076 MW at the end of 2008. The major contributing growth factor is the federal stimulus package passed in 2009 that extended a tax credit and provided other investment incentives for alternative energy sources. The U.S. Energy Information Administration attributes 1.9% of total electric generation in the nation to wind power.
 
Not factoring the Company’s planned Downdraft Tower product, World Energy Council expects new wind capacity worldwide to continue to grow. The continued evolution of this technology is evident with the existence of varying wind turbine designs. However, there is division in the wind industry between those who want to capitalize on the emerging respect the business community has for established, mature wind technology, and those who seek new technologies designed to bring about significant cost reductions. Clean Wind chooses to seek new horizons beyond current perception and knowledge by developing new technologies that it believes will be capable of significantly reducing wind energy costs.
 
As wind energy technology gains wider acceptance, competition may increase as large, well-capitalized companies enter the business. Although one or more may be successful, the Company believes that its technological expertise and early entry will provide a degree of competitive protection.
 
Licensing and Regulation
 
In the U.S., many state governments have amended their utility regulations and significantly changed certain competition and marketing rules with respect to generation, transmission and distribution of electric energy. Among other things, deregulation allows consumers to purchase electricity from a source of their choice, and requires utilities to purchase electricity from independent power producers and to offer transmission to independent power producers at reasonable prices.
 
In California, deregulation legislation, such as the Assembly Bill 1890 and the Renewable Energy Program, were implemented in the mid-1990s to encourage the development of renewable power generation projects through various incentives. In addition, Assembly Bill 995 and Senate Bill 1038 were passed to further facilitate the development of renewable resources. In November 2008, the governor of the State of California signed Executive Order S-14-08 requiring that California utilities reach a 33% renewable energy goal by 2020, exceeding the previous legislative mandate that electric utilities supply 20% of their total retail power sales from renewable resources by 2010. In September 2009, the Governor signed Executive Order S-21-09, requiring the Air Resources Board under the California Environmental Protection Agency to adopt a regulation by July 1, 2010 requiring California’s load-serving entities to meet the 33% renewable energy goal through the creation and use of renewable energy sources to ensure reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

In Arizona, access to the electricity market has been established through Arizona’s Retail Electric Competition Rules, which, in the Company’s opinion, provide a favorable environment for renewable energy generators. Electricity producers are subject to the Federal Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (“PURPA”) and state regulations. In addition, power producers must also meet standards set by the Arizona Corporations Commission (the “ACC”).
  
 
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The Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 provided further benefits to independent power producers by requiring transmission companies to provide access to third parties at a reasonable price. On October 3, 2008, the President of the United States signed the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 into law. This legislation contains a number of tax incentives designed to encourage both individuals and businesses to make investments in renewable energy, including an eight-year extension of the business solar investment tax credit (“ITC”). The ITC is a 30% tax credit on solar property effective through December 31, 2016. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 further extended the U.S.$0.021/kWh Production Tax Credit (“PTC”) through December 31, 2012, and provide an option to elect a 30% ITC or an equivalent cash grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Employees

As of March 30, 2012, the Company had a total of 3 full time employees. The Company anticipates that in 2012 it will need to hire additional staff in the areas of engineering, marketing, and administration.

ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS
 
The Company’s results of operations, financial condition and cash flows can be adversely affected by various risks. These risks include, but are not limited to, the principal factors listed below and the other matters set forth in this annual report on Form 10-K. You should carefully consider all of these risks before making an investment decision.

Risks Related to Our Business and the Industry in Which We Compete
 
Our independent auditors have expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, which may hinder our ability to obtain future financing.

The report of our independent auditors dated March 30, 2012 on our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 included an explanatory paragraph indicating that there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our auditors’ doubts are based on our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to sustain our operations without securing additional financing, deficit accumulated during development stage, negative cash flows from operations and our limited cash balances and working capital deficit position. Our ability to continue as a going concern will be determined by our ability to obtain additional funding in the short term to enable us to realize the commercialization of our planned business operations.  Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertain.

We are an early development stage company.  We have not yet commenced with the construction of our Downdraft Towers or the production of electricity.
 
The Company has a limited operating history and has primarily engaged in operations relating to the development of its business plan.  As an early-stage entity, the Company is subject to many of the risks common to such enterprises, including the ability of the Company to implement its business plan, market acceptance of its proposed business, under-capitalization, cash shortages, limitations with respect to personnel, financing and other resources, and uncertainty of the Company’s ability to generate revenues.  There can be no assurance that the Company’s activities will be successful or result in any revenues or profit for the Company, and the likelihood of the Company’s success must be considered in light of the stage in its development.  To date, the Company has generated no revenue and has generated losses.  The Company believes it has engaged professionals and consultants experienced in the type of business contemplated by the Company; however, there can be no assurance that the predictions, opinions, analyses, or conclusions of such professionals will prove to be accurate.  In addition, no assurance can be given that the Company will be able to consummate its business strategy and plans or that financial or other limitations may force the Company to modify, alter, significantly delay, or significantly impede the implementation of such plans or the Company’s ability to continue operations.  If the Company is unable to successfully implement its business strategy and plans, investors may lose their entire investment in the Company.
  
 
12

 
  
Potential investors should also be aware of the difficulties normally encountered by new renewable energy companies. The likelihood of success must be considered in light of the problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays encountered in connection with the inception of the enterprise that we plan to undertake. These potential problems include, but are not limited to, unanticipated problems relating to construction, operation and distribution, and additional costs and expenses that may exceed current estimates.
 
Future financings will involve a dilution of the interests of the stockholders of the Company upon the issuance of additional shares of Common Stock or other securities.
 
We will need to engage in additional financings in the future.  There can be no assurances that such financings will ever be completed, but any such financings will involve a dilution of the interests of our stockholders upon the issuance of additional shares of Common Stock or other securities.  Attaining such additional financing may not be possible, or if additional capital may be otherwise available, the terms on which such capital may be available may not be commercially feasible or advantageous to existing shareholders.  We expect to issue shares of our Common Stock and/or other securities in exchange for additional financing.

We anticipate significant future capital needs and the availability of future capital is uncertain.
 
The Company has experienced negative cash flows from operations since its inception. The Company will be required to spend substantial funds to continue research and development. The Company will need to raise additional capital. The Company’s capital requirements will depend on many factors, primarily relating to the problems, delays, expenses and complications frequently encountered by development stage companies; the progress of the Company’s research and development programs; the costs and timing of seeking regulatory approvals of the Company’s products under development; the Company’s ability to obtain such regulatory approvals; costs in filing, prosecuting, defending, and enforcing any patent claims and other intellectual property rights; the extent and terms of any collaborative research, manufacturing, marketing, or other arrangements; and changes in economic, regulatory, or competitive conditions or the Company’s planned business. To satisfy its capital requirements, the Company may seek to raise funds in the public or private capital markets. The Company may seek additional funding through corporate collaborations and other financing vehicles. There can be no assurance that any such funding will be available to the Company, or if available, that it will be available on acceptable terms. If adequate funds are not available, the Company may be required to curtail significantly one or more of its research or development programs or it may be required to obtain funds through arrangements with future collaborative partners or others that may require the Company to relinquish rights to some or all of its technologies or products under development. If the Company is successful in obtaining additional financing, the terms of the financing may have the effect of diluting or adversely affecting the holdings or the rights of the holders of Common Stock.

We have a history of losses.
 
We expect to incur non-capitalized development costs and general and administrative expenses prior to the completion of construction and commencement of operation of our proposed projects. We cannot predict if we will ever achieve profitability and, if we do, we may not be able to sustain or increase our profitability. If we cannot achieve or maintain profitability, we may not be able to continue to absorb the resulting financial losses. If we continue to suffer financial losses, our business may be jeopardized and our shareholders may lose all of their investment in our shares.

The Company’s strategies for development of the business might not be successful.
 
The Company is currently evaluating potential development strategies for its business. It may take several years, if ever, for the Company to achieve cumulative positive cash flow. The Company could experience significant difficulties in executing its business plan, including: inability to successfully implement the Company’s business plan; changes in market conditions; inability to obtain necessary financing; delays in completion of the Company’s projects or their underlying technologies; inaccurate cost estimates; changes in government or political reform; or the Company may not benefit from the proposed projects as the Company expected. The Company’s inability to develop and market the Company’s business successfully and to generate positive cash flows from these operations in a timely manner would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s ability to meet the Company’s working capital requirements.
  
 
13

 

We expect to rely upon strategic relationships in order to execute our business plan and the Company may not be able to consummate the strategic relationships necessary to execute its business plan.
 
The Company plans to enter into and rely on strategic relationships with other parties, in particular to acquire rights necessary to develop and build proposed projects and to develop and build such projects. These strategic relationships could include licensing agreements, partnerships, joint ventures, or even business combinations. The Company believes that these relationships will be particularly important to the Company’s future growth and success due to the size and resources of the Company and the resources necessary to complete the Company’s proposed projects. The Company may, however, not be able to successfully identify potential strategic relationships. Even if the Company does identify one or more potentially beneficial strategic relationships, it may not be able to consummate these relationships on favorable terms or at all, obtain the benefits it anticipates from such relationships or maintain such relationships. In addition, the dynamics of the Company’s relationships with possible strategic partners may require the Company to incur expenses or undertake activities it would not otherwise be inclined to undertake in order to fulfill the Company’s obligations to these partners or maintain the Company’s relationships. To the extent the Company consummates strategic relationships; it may become reliant on the performance of independent third parties under such relationships. Moreover, certain potentially critical strategic relationships are only in the early stages of discussion and have not been officially agreed to and formalized. If strategic relationships are not identified, established or maintained, or are established or maintained on terms that become unfavorable, the Company’s business prospects may be limited, which could have a negative impact on the Company’s ability to execute the Company’s business plan, diminish the Company’s ability to conduct the Company’s operations and/or materially and adversely affect the Company’s business and financial results.

Project development or construction activities may not be successful and proposed projects may not receive required permits or construction may not proceed as planned.
 
The development and construction of our proposed projects will involve numerous risks. We may be required to spend significant sums for preliminary engineering, permitting, legal, and other expenses before we can determine whether a project is feasible, economically attractive or capable of being built. Success in developing a particular project is contingent upon, among other things: (i) negotiation of satisfactory engineering, procurement and construction agreements; (ii) receipt of required governmental permits and approvals, including the right to interconnect to the electric grid on economically acceptable terms; (iii) payment of interconnection and other deposits (some of which may be non-refundable); (iv) obtaining construction financing; and (v) timely implementation and satisfactory completion of construction.
 
Successful completion of a particular project may be adversely affected by numerous factors, including: (i) delays in obtaining required governmental permits and approvals with acceptable conditions; (ii) uncertainties relating to land costs for projects on land subject to Bureau of Land Management procedures; (iii) unforeseen engineering problems; (iv) construction delays and contractor performance shortfalls; (v) work stoppages; (vi) cost over-runs; (vii) equipment and materials supply; (viii) adverse weather conditions; and (ix) environmental and geological conditions.

The estimates and projections contained in this Annual Report may not be realized.
 
Any estimates or projections in this Annual Report have been prepared on the basis of assumptions and hypotheses, which the Company believes to be reasonable. However, no assurance can be given that the potential benefits described in this Annual Report will prove to be available.  Such assumptions are highly speculative and, while based on management’s best estimates of projected sales levels, operational costs, consumer preferences, and the Company’s general economic and competitive conditions in the industry, there can be no assurance that the Company will operate profitably or remain solvent.  To date, the Company has not operated profitably and has a history of losses.  If the Company’s plans prove unsuccessful, investors could lose all or part of their investment.  There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to generate any revenue or profits.
  
 
14

 
  
Our business is subject to significant government regulation and, as a result, changes to such regulations may adversely affect our business.
   
Although independent and small power producers may generate electricity and engage in wholesale sales of energy without being subject to the full panoply of state and/or provincial and federal regulation to the same extent as a public utility company, our planned operations will nonetheless be subject to changes in government regulatory requirements, such as regulations related to the environment, zoning and permitting, financial incentives, taxation, competition, pricing, and FERC and state PUC regulations on competition. The operation of our proposed projects will be subject to regulation by various U.S. government agencies at the federal, state and municipal level. There is always the risk of change in government policies and laws, including but not limited to laws and regulations relating to income, capital, sales, corporate or local taxes, and the removal of tax incentives. Changes in these regulations could have a negative impact on our potential profitability. Laws and tax policies may change and such changes may be favorable or unfavorable to the Company, which may result in the cancellation of proposed projects or reduce anticipated revenues and cash flow.

We may be unable to acquire or lease land and/or obtain the approvals, licenses and permits necessary to build and operate our proposed projects in a timely and cost effective manner, and regulatory agencies, local communities or labor unions may delay, prevent or increase the cost of construction and operation of our proposed projects.

In order to construct and operate our proposed projects, we need to acquire or lease land and obtain all necessary local, county, state and federal approvals, licenses and permits. We may be unable to acquire the land or lease interests needed, may not receive or retain the requisite approvals, permits and licenses or may encounter other problems which could delay or prevent us from successfully constructing and operating proposed projects.
 
Proposed projects may be located on or require access through public lands administered by federal and state agencies pursuant to competitive public leasing and right-of-way procedures and processes. The authorization for the use, construction and operation of our proposed projects and associated transmission facilities on federal, state and private lands will also require the assessment and evaluation of mineral rights, private rights-of-way and other easements; environmental, agricultural, cultural, recreational and aesthetic impacts; and the likely mitigation of adverse impacts to these and other resources and uses. The inability to obtain the required permits and, potentially, excessive delay in obtaining such permits due, for example, to litigation, could prevent us from successfully constructing and operating our proposed projects. Moreover, project approvals subject to project modifications and conditions, including mitigation requirements and costs, could affect the financial success of our proposed projects.
 
Our ability to manage our growth successfully is crucial to our future.
 
We are subject to a variety of risks associated with a growing business. Our ability to operate successfully in the future depends upon our ability to finance, develop, and construct future renewable energy projects, implement and improve the administration of financial and operating systems and controls, expand our technical capabilities and manage our relationships with landowners and contractors. Our failure to manage growth effectively could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.
 
Notwithstanding the Recovery Act and other regulatory incentives, we may not be able to finance the development or the construction costs of building our planned projects.
 
We do not have sufficient funds from the cash flow of our operations to fully finance the development or the construction costs of building our proposed projects. Additional funds will be required to complete the development and construction of our proposed projects, to find and carry out the development of properties, and to pay the general and administrative costs of operating our business. Additional financing may not be available on acceptable terms, if at all. If we are unable to raise additional funds when needed, we may be required to delay development and construction of our proposed projects, reduce the scope of our proposed projects, and/or eliminate or sell some or all of our development projects, if any.
  
 
15

 
   
We may not be able to obtain access to the transmission lines necessary to deliver the power we plan to produce and sell.
 
We will depend on access to transmission facilities so that we may deliver power to purchasers. If existing transmission facilities do not have available transmission capacity, we would be required to pay for the upgrade of existing transmission facilities or to construct new ones. There can be no assurance that we will be able to secure access to transmission facilities at a reasonable cost, or at all. As a result, expected profitability on a proposed project may be lower than anticipated or, if we have no access to electricity transmission facilities, we may not be able to fulfill our obligations to deliver power or to construct the project or we may be required to pay liquidated damages.

Changes in interest rates and debt covenants and increases in turbine and generator prices and construction costs may result in our proposed projects not being economically feasible.
 
Increases in interest rates and changes in debt covenants may reduce the amounts that we can borrow, reduce the cash flow, if any, generated by our proposed projects, and increase the equity required to complete the construction of our proposed projects. The cost of wind turbines, generators and construction costs have increased significantly over the last four years. Further increases may increase the cost of our proposed projects to the point that such projects are not feasible given the prices utilities are willing to pay. There can be no assurance that we will be able to negotiate power purchase agreements with sufficiently profitable electricity prices in the future.
   
We may not be able to secure power purchase agreements.
 
We may not be able to secure power purchase agreements for our proposed projects. In the event that we do secure power purchase agreements, if we fail to construct our proposed projects in a timely manner, we may be in breach of our power purchase agreements and such agreements may be terminated.
 
The operation of our proposed projects may be subject to equipment failure.
 
After the construction of our proposed projects, the electricity produced may be lower than anticipated because of equipment malfunction. Unscheduled maintenance can result in lower electricity production for several months or possibly longer depending on the nature of the outage, and correspondingly, in lower revenues.
 
Changes in weather patterns may affect our ability to operate our proposed projects.
 
Meteorological data we collect during the development phase of a proposed project may differ from actual results achieved after the project is erected. While long-term precipitation patterns have not varied significantly, short-term patterns, either on a seasonal or on a year-to-year basis may vary substantially. These variations may result in lower revenues and higher operating losses.
 
Environmental damage on our properties may cause us to incur significant financial expenses.
 
Environmental damage may result from the development and operation of our proposed projects. The construction of our proposed initial Downdraft Tower involves, among other things, land excavation and the installation of concrete foundations. Equipment can be a source of environmental concern, including noise pollution, damage to the soil as a result of oil spillage, and peril to certain migratory birds and animals that live, feed on, fly over, or cross the property. In addition, environmental regulators may impose restrictions on our operations, which would limit our ability to obtain the appropriate zoning or conditional use permits for our project. We may also be assessed significant financial penalties for any environmental damage caused on properties that are leased, and we may be unable to sell properties that are owned. Financial losses and liabilities that may result from environmental damage could affect our ability to continue to do business.
  
 
16

 
  
Larger developers have greater resources and expertise in developing and constructing renewable energy projects.

We face significant competition from large power project developers, including electric utilities and large independent power producers that have greater project development, construction, financial, human resources, marketing and management capabilities than the Company. They have a track record of completing projects and may be able to acquire funding more easily to develop and construct projects. They have also established relationships with energy utilities, transmission companies, turbine suppliers, and plant contractors that may make our access to such parties more difficult.
 
Renewable energy must compete with traditional fossil fuel sources.
 
In addition to competition from other industry participants, we face competition from fossil fuel sources such as natural gas and coal, and other renewable energy sources such as solar, traditional wind, hydro and geothermal. The competition depends on the resources available within the specific markets. Although the cost to produce clean, reliable, renewable energy is becoming more competitive with traditional fossil fuel sources, it generally remains more expensive to produce, and the reliability of its supply is less consistent than traditional fossil fuel. However, deregulation, legislative mandates for renewable energy, and consumer preference for environmentally more benign energy sources are becoming important factors in increasing the development of alternative energy projects.
 
The wind energy industry in California is highly competitive since wind plays an integral role in the electricity portfolio in California.
 
The Company is investigating the feasibility of locating a Downdraft Tower in California.  Since wind plays an integral role in the electricity portfolio in California and wind energy requires a significant amount of land resource, the wind energy industry in California is highly competitive. Wind developers compete for leased and owned land with favorable wind characteristics, limited supply of turbines and contractors, and for purchasers and available transmission capacity. There is no guarantee that we will be able to acquire the significant land resources needed to develop projects in California.
 
Our ability to hire and retain qualified personnel and contractors will be an important factor in the success of our business. Our failure to hire and retain qualified personnel may result in our inability to manage and implement our plans for expansion and growth.
 
Competition for qualified personnel in the renewable energy industry is significant. To manage growth effectively, we must continue to implement and improve our management systems and to recruit and train new personnel. We may not be able to continue to attract and retain the qualified personnel necessary to carry on our business. If we are unable to retain or hire additional qualified personnel as required, we may not be able to adequately manage and implement our plans for expansion and growth.
 
The market in which we operate is rapidly evolving and we may not be able to maintain our profitability.
 
As a result of the emerging nature of the markets in which we plan to compete and the rapidly evolving nature of our industry, it is particularly difficult for us to forecast our revenues or earnings accurately. Our current and future expense levels are based largely on our investment plans and estimates of future revenues and are, to a large extent, fixed. We may not be able to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any unexpected revenue shortfall. Accordingly, any significant shortfall in revenues relative to our planned expenditures would have an immediate adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
We depend on key personnel, the loss of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Our performance depends substantially on the continued services and on the performance of our senior management and other key personnel. Our ability to retain and motivate these and other officers and employees is fundamental to our performance.  The unexpected loss of services of one or more of these individuals could have a material adverse effect on us. We are not protected by a material amount of key-person or similar life insurance covering our executive officers and other directors. We have entered into employment agreements with our executive officers, but the non-compete period with respect to certain executive officers could, in some circumstances in the event of their termination of employment with the Company, end prior to the employment term set forth in their employment agreements.
  
 
17

 
   
Certain legal proceedings and regulatory matters could adversely impact our results of operations.
 
We may be subject from time to time to various claims involving alleged breach of contract claims, intellectual property and other related claims, and other litigations. Certain of these lawsuits and claims, if decided adversely to us or settled by us, could result in material liability to the Company or have a negative impact on the Company’s reputation or relations with its employees, customers, licensees or other third parties. In addition, regardless of the outcome of any litigation or regulatory proceedings, such proceedings could result in substantial costs and may require that the Company devotes substantial time and resources to defend itself. Further, changes in governmental regulations in the U.S. could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.
 
Our results may be adversely affected by the impact that disruptions in the credit and financial markets have on our customers and the energy industry.
    
Beginning in late 2008 and continuing throughout 2009, energy and utility companies faced difficult conditions as a result of significant disruptions in the global economy, the repricing of credit risk and the deterioration of the financial markets. Continued volatility and further deterioration in the credit markets may reduce our access to financing. These events could negatively impact our operations and financial condition and our ability to raise the additional capital necessary to finance our operations.
 
The effects of the recent global economic crisis may impact the Company’s business, operating results, or financial condition.
 
The recent global economic crisis has caused disruptions and extreme volatility in global financial markets and increased rates of default and bankruptcy, and has impacted levels of spending. These macroeconomic developments could negatively affect the Company’s business, operating results, or financial condition in a number of ways. For example, potential clients may delay or decrease spending with the Company or may not pay the Company.
 
The Company’s insurance coverage may not be adequate.
 
If the Company was held liable for amounts exceeding the limits of its insurance coverage in place at any given time or for claims outside the scope of that coverage, its business, results of operations and financial conditions could be materially and adversely affected.
  
Our business is subject to extensive governmental regulation that could reduce our profitability, limit our growth, or increase competition.
 
Our planned businesses are subject to extensive federal, state and foreign governmental regulation and supervision, which could reduce our potential profitability or limit our potential growth by increasing the costs of regulatory compliance, limiting or restricting the products or services we plan to sell or the methods by which we plan to sell our products and services, or subjecting our businesses to the possibility of regulatory actions or proceedings.
 
In all jurisdictions the applicable laws and regulations are subject to amendment or interpretation by regulatory authorities. Generally, such authorities are vested with relatively broad discretion to grant, renew and revoke licenses and approvals and to implement regulations. Accordingly, we may be precluded or temporarily suspended from carrying on some or all of our planned activities or otherwise fined or penalized in a given jurisdiction. No assurances can be given that our business will be allowed to be, or continue to be, conducted in any given jurisdiction as we plan.

Competition resulting from these developments could cause the supply of, and demand for, our planned products and services to change, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
  
 
18

 
  
Our planned operations will expose us to various international risks that could adversely affect our business.
 
We are seeking to reach agreements for the provision of key aspects of our business with foreign operators, specifically in Mexico. Accordingly, we may become subject to legal, economic and market risks associated with operating in foreign countries, including:

 
the general economic and political conditions existing in those countries;
     
 
devaluations and fluctuations in currency exchange rates;
     
 
imposition of limitations on conversion of foreign currencies or remittance of dividends and other payments by foreign subsidiaries;
     
 
imposition or increase of withholding and other taxes on remittances and other payments by subsidiaries;
     
 
hyperinflation in certain foreign countries;
     
 
imposition or increase of investment and other restrictions by foreign governments;
     
 
longer payment cycles;
     
 
greater difficulties in accounts receivable collection; and
     
 
the requirement of complying with a wide variety of foreign laws.
   
Our ability to conduct business in foreign countries may be affected by legal, regulatory, political and economic risks.
 
Our ability to conduct business in foreign countries is subject to risks associated with international operations. These include:
  
 
the burdens of complying with a variety of foreign laws and regulations;
     
 
unexpected changes in regulatory requirements; and
     
 
new tariffs or other barriers in some international markets.
   
We are also subject to general political and economic risks in connection with our international operations, including:
  
 
political instability and terrorist attacks;
     
 
changes in diplomatic and trade relationships; and
     
 
general economic fluctuations in specific countries or markets.
    
We cannot predict whether quotas, duties, taxes, or other similar restrictions will be imposed by the U.S. or foreign countries upon our business in the future, or what effect any of these actions would have on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Changes in regulatory, geopolitical, social or economic policies and other factors may have a material adverse effect on our business in the future or may require us to significantly modify our current business practices.

The occurrence of natural or man-made disasters could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
 
We are exposed to various risks arising out of natural disasters, including earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, floods and tornadoes, and pandemic health events such as H1N1 influenza, as well as man-made disasters, including acts of terrorism and military actions. The continued threat of terrorism and ongoing military actions may cause significant volatility in global financial markets, and a natural or man-made disaster could trigger an economic downturn in the areas directly or indirectly affected by the disaster. These consequences could, among other things, result in a decline in business and increased claims from those areas. Disasters also could disrupt public and private infrastructure, including communications and financial services, which could disrupt our normal business operations.
  
 
19

 
Our inability to successfully recover should we experience a disaster or other business continuity problem could cause material financial loss, loss of human capital, regulatory actions, reputational harm or legal liability.
   
Should we experience a local or regional disaster or other business continuity problem, such as an earthquake, hurricane, terrorist attack, pandemic, security breach, power loss, telecommunications failure or other natural or man-made disaster, our continued success will depend, in part, on the availability of our personnel, our office facilities, and the proper functioning of our computer, telecommunication and other related systems and operations.
 
Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our technology infrastructure against damage from business continuity events that could have a significant disruptive effect on our operations. We could potentially lose operation of our projects or experience material adverse interruptions to our operations or delivery of services to our clients in a disaster recovery scenario.
 
We plan to regularly assess and take steps to improve upon our existing business continuity plans and key management succession. However, a disaster on a significant scale or affecting certain of our key operating areas within or across regions, or our inability to successfully recover should we experience a disaster or other business continuity problem, could materially interrupt our business operations and cause material financial loss, loss of human capital, regulatory actions, reputational harm, damaged client relationships or legal liability.
 
Assertions by a third party that the Company infringes its intellectual property could result in costly and time-consuming litigation, expensive licenses or the inability to operate as planned.
 
The energy and technology industries are characterized by the existence of a large number of patents, copyrights, trademarks and trade secrets and by frequent litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. There is a possibility of intellectual property rights claims against the Company. The Company’s technologies may not be able to withstand third-party claims or rights restricting their use. Companies, organizations or individuals, including the Company’s competitors, may hold or obtain patents or other proprietary rights that would prevent, limit or interfere with the Company’s ability to provide the Company’s services or develop new products or services, which could make it more difficult for the Company to operate the Company’s business. Any litigation or claims, whether or not valid, could be time-consuming, expensive to litigate or settle and could divert the Company’s managements’ attention and financial resources. If the Company is determined to have infringed upon a third party’s intellectual property rights, the Company may be required to pay substantial damages, stop using technology found to be in violation of a third party’s rights or seek to obtain a license from the holder of the infringed intellectual property right, which license may not be available on reasonable terms, or at all, and may significantly increase the Company’s operating expenses or may require the Company to restrict the Company’s business activities in one or more respects. The Company may also be required to develop alternative non-infringing technology that could require significant effort and expense or may not be feasible. In the event of a successful claim of infringement against the Company and the Company’s failure or inability to obtain a license to the infringed technology, the Company’s business and results of operations could be harmed.
 
The Company’s business will be adversely affected if the Company is unable to protect its intellectual property rights from unauthorized use or infringement by third-parties.
 
The Company intends to rely on a combination of trademark, patent, trade secret and copyright law, license agreements and contractual restrictions, including confidentiality agreements, invention assignment agreements and non-disclosure agreements with employees, contractors and suppliers, to protect the Company’s proprietary rights, all of which provide only limited protection.  The Company believes its intellectual property rights are valuable, and any inability to protect them could reduce the value of the Company’s products, services and brand. Various events outside of the Company’s control pose a threat to the Company’s intellectual property rights as well as to the Company’s products and services. The efforts the Company has taken to protect its proprietary rights may not be sufficient or effective, may not be enforceable or may be capable of being effectively circumvented. Any significant impairment of the Company’s intellectual property rights could harm the Company’s business or the Company’s ability to compete. Also, protecting the Company’s intellectual property rights is costly and time consuming.  The Company also seeks to maintain certain intellectual property as trade secrets. The secrecy could be compromised by outside parties, or by the Company’s employees, which would cause the Company to lose the competitive advantage resulting from these trade secrets.
  
 
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Risks Related to Our Securities
 
There is little current trading of our shares.  Our stock price is likely to be highly volatile.
 
Although prices for our shares of Common Stock are quoted on the OTCBB, there is little current trading and no assurance can be given that an active public trading market will develop or, if developed, that it will be sustained.  The OTCBB is generally regarded as a less efficient and less prestigious trading market than other national markets.  There is no assurance if or when our Common Stock will be quoted on another more prestigious exchange or market. The market price of our common stock is likely to be highly volatile and could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 
·
changes in the communications technology industry and markets;
 
·
volume and timing of subscriptions from major customers;
 
·
competitive pricing pressures;
 
·
our ability to obtain working capital financing;
 
·
technological innovations or new competitors in our market;
 
·
additions or departures of key personnel;
 
·
our ability to execute our business plan;
 
·
operating results that fall below expectations;
 
·
loss of any strategic relationship;
 
·
industry or regulatory developments;
 
·
economic and other external factors; and
 
·
period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.
  
In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock and for some time there will likely be a thin trading market for the stock, which causes trades of small blocks of stock to have a significant impact on the stock price.
 
Because our Common Stock is likely to be considered a “penny stock,” our trading will be subject to regulatory restrictions.  
 
Our Common Stock is currently, and in the near future will likely continue to be, considered a “penny stock.”  The SEC has adopted rules that regulate broker-dealer practices in connection with transactions in “penny stocks.”  Penny stocks generally are equity securities with a price of less than $5.00 (other than securities registered on certain national securities exchanges or quoted on the NASDAQ system, provided that current price and volume information with respect to transactions in such securities is provided by the exchange or system).  The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from those rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document prepared by the SEC, which specifies information about penny stocks and the nature and significance of risks of the penny stock market.  The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and any salesperson in the transaction, and monthly account statements indicating the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account.  In addition, the penny stock rules require that, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from those rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction.  These disclosure and other requirements may adversely affect the trading activity in the secondary market for our Common Stock.
   
 
21

 
  
Limited future sales of our Common Stock in the public market could make it difficult to generate significant liquidity in our stock. 
 
As noted above, we will be obligated to file a registration statement with the SEC to cover resales of shares issued to the pre-Merger Clean Wind Energy stockholders.  However, upon the effectiveness of this registration statement, most of the stock covered under the registration may not be immediately available for trading.  Due to a limitation in the number of shares traded on a regular basis, there may be significant swings in the bid and ask prices of our stock or there may not be any significant volume of the stock available to trade.
 
We have not paid dividends in the past and do not expect to pay dividends for the foreseeable future, and any return on investment may be limited to potential future appreciation on the value of our Common Stock. 
 
We currently intend to retain any future earnings to support the development and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future.  Our payment of any future dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors after taking into account various factors, including without limitation, our financial condition, operating results, cash needs, growth plans and the terms of any credit agreements that we may be a party to at the time.  To the extent we do not pay dividends, our stock may be less valuable because a return on investment will only occur if and to the extent our stock price appreciates, which may never occur.  In addition, shareholders must rely on sales of their Common Stock after price appreciation as the only way to realize their investment, and if the price of our stock does not appreciate, then there will be no return on investment.  Shareholders seeking cash dividends should not purchase our Common Stock.
 
Our officers, directors and principal stockholders can exert significant influence over us and may make decisions that are not in the best interests of all stockholders.  
 
Our officers, directors and principal stockholders (greater than 5% stockholders) collectively own a majority of our outstanding Common Stock.  As a result of such ownership, these stockholders will be able to affect the outcome of, or exert significant influence over, all matters requiring stockholder approval, including the election and removal of directors and any change in control.  In particular, this concentration of ownership of our Common Stock could have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control of us or otherwise discouraging or preventing a potential acquirer from attempting to obtain control of us.  This, in turn, could have a negative effect on the market price of our Common Stock.  It could also prevent our stockholders from realizing a premium over the market prices for their shares of Common Stock.  Moreover, the interests of this concentration of ownership may not always coincide with our interests or the interests of other stockholders, and accordingly, they could cause us to enter into transactions or agreements that we would not otherwise consider.
 
Anti-takeover provisions may limit the ability of another party to acquire us, which could cause our stock price to decline. 
 
Our Articles of Incorporation, as amended, our Bylaws and Nevada law contain provisions that could discourage, delay or prevent a third party from acquiring us, even if doing so may be beneficial to our stockholders.  In addition, these provisions could limit the price investors would be willing to pay in the future for shares of our Common Stock.
 
ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.
 
ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

The Company leases a suite of offices and shared support services at 1997 Annapolis Exchange Parkway, Suite 300, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 pursuant to a lease that expires October 31, 2012 and leases approximately 8,435 square feet of commercial space in Warrenton, Virginia pursuant to a lease that expires November 30, 2013.On September 26, 2011 the Company  announced the closing of their internally staffed engineering office in Warrenton, Virginia transitioning to a Development Team that will oversee and coordinate the efforts of industry consultants and advisors to develop and construct their first Downdraft Energy Tower.

The Company maintains one unpatented lode mining claim, #IMC39643, claim name-Abbatoir, which is leased to U.S. Silver Corporation.
  
 
22

 
  
ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
  
Clean Wind Energy, Inc. v. John Hanback, et al
 
 
As of November 4, 2011, we were the plaintiff  in the matter captioned Clean Wind Energy, Inc. vs. John Hanback, et al, in the Federal District Court  of Alexandria, Virginia. On January 12, 2012, the Company and its subsidiary, Clean Wind Energy, Inc. (collectively “CWE”), entered into a Settlement and Release Agreement (the “Agreement”) with John W. Hanback (“Hanback”), Christopher W. Johnson (“Johnson”) and Itzhak Tepper (“Tepper”) (Hanback, Johnson and Tepper, the “Former Employees”), pursuant to which the Former Employees agreed to a mutual release and also agreed to the following:
   
 
CWE and the Former Employees will jointly file a Stipulation of Dismissal dismissing the lawsuit filed by CWE against the Former Employees in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, Civil Action No. 1:11cv1206 LMB/TRJ.
 
In consideration of $174,000 from an unaffiliated third party in February 2012, the Former Employees transferred the shares of common stock owned by them to an unaffiliated third party.
 
Hanback tendered to CWE assignments of certain patent applications in consideration of the Hanback Payment.
 
Hanback, Johnson and Tepper agreed to a 15 month non-competition period whereby they will not directly or indirectly attempt to procure a site for a large-scale tower using non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity.
 
Hanback, Johnson and Tepper agreed to a 15 month no-contact period, whereby they may not have any professional dealings with certain parties.
      
The Company has properly accounted for this settlement as accounts payable and accrued expenses in its December 31, 2011 consolidated financial statements.
   
Porter LeVay & Rose, Inc.
 
As of February 23, 2012, we were served with a Complaint in the matter of Porter, LeVay & Rose, Inc. filed in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, stipulating that Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. has yet to pay for certain services renedered on behalf of Porter LeVay & Rose for Financial Public Relations services. On March 21, 2012, Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc., executed a Stipulation Settling Action Agreement and agreed to pay a total of $39,219.30 in equal payments of $9,804.82, the first to be paid prior to March 30,2012 and monthly thereafter until paid in full.The first payment was made on March 27, 2012.  The Company has accounted for this $39,219.30 as accounts payable and accrued expenses in its December 31, 2011 consolidated financial statements.
   
From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings which arise in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm our business. We are currently not party to any such legal proceedings that we believe will have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse affect on our business, financial condition or operating results.
   
ITEM 4.  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE.
  
Not applicable.
   
PART II
 
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER   PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

Market information
 
The Company’s Common Stock is quoted on the OTC Bulletin Board under the symbol “CWET.OB”.  Historical high and low bid information for the Company’s Common Stock is not available to the Company.  The following table reflects the high and low sales prices for the Company’s Common Stock for each fiscal quarter during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.  The sales prices were obtained from the OTC Bulletin Board.
    
Quarterly period
 
Low
   
High
 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2011:
           
First Quarter
 
$
0.16
   
$
0.27
 
Second Quarter
 
$
0.22
   
$
0.32
 
Third Quarter
 
$
0.12
   
$
0.27
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.10
   
$
0.22
 
 
Fiscal year ended December 31, 2010:
               
First Quarter
 
$
0.05
   
$
0.20
 
Second Quarter
 
$
0.03
   
$
0.06
 
Third Quarter
 
$
0.03
   
$
0.06
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.03
   
$
0.20
 
   
Record Holders
 
As of March 30, 2012, there were approximately 1,357 registered holders of record of the Company’s Common Stock.
   
 
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Dividends
 
The Company has not paid any cash dividends to date, and has no intention of paying any cash dividends on the Common Stock in the foreseeable future.  The declaration and payment of dividends is subject to the discretion of the Company’s Board of Directors and to certain limitations imposed under Nevada law.  The timing, amount and form of dividends, if any, will depend upon, among other things, the Company’s results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, and other factors deemed relevant by the Board of Directors.  The Company intends to retain any future earnings for use in its business.  The Company has never paid dividends on its Common Stock.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans
 
The Company does not maintain any equity compensation plans.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
   
During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company issued 9,540,000 shares of Common Stock to private placement investors at $0.10 per share for aggregate gross proceeds of $954,000. In connection with the private placement subscription the Company has paid referral fees of $9,800 and also agreed to issue to the referring brokers, five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 98,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share. These shares were registered during the year ended December 31, 2011.

Also, during the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company received $60,000 from an investor in connection with the private placement subscription. The equivalent 600,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.10 were not yet issued at the end of the period ended December 31, 2011.
 
Issuance of the above securities are exempt from the registration requirements under Rule 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and/or Rule 506 as promulgated under Regulation D.

On July 27, 2011, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with Asher Enterprises, Inc. ("Asher"), for the sale of an 8% convertible note in the principal amount of $45,000 (the "Note"). The financing closed on August 8, 2011. The total net proceeds the Company received from this Offering on August 8, 2011 was $42,500.

The Note bears interest at the rate of 8% per annum. All interest and principal must be repaid on April 30, 2012. The Note is convertible into common stock, at Asher’s option, at a 42% discount (subsequently modified to 69% discount)  to the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock during the 10 trading day period prior to conversion. In the event the Company prepays the Note in full, the Company is required to pay off all principal, interest and any other amounts owing multiplied by (i) 135% if prepaid during the period commencing on the closing date through 90 days thereafter, (ii) 135% if prepaid 91 days following the closing through 120 days following the closing, (iii) 140% if prepaid 121 days following the closing through 151 days following the closing and (iv) 150% if prepaid 151 days following the closing through 180 days following the closing. After the expiration of 180 days following the date of the Note, the Company has no right of prepayment.

On August 31, 2011, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with Asher for the sale of an 8% convertible note in the principal amount of $32,500 (the "August 2011 Note"). The financing closed on August 31, 2011. The total net proceeds the Company received from this Offering was $30,000.
  
The August 2011 Note bears interest at the rate of 8% per annum. All interest and principal must be repaid on April 30, 2012. The Note is convertible into common stock, at Asher’s option, at a 52% discount to the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock during the 10 trading day period prior to conversion. In the event the Company prepays the August 2011 Note in full, the Company is required to pay off all principal, interest and any other amounts owing multiplied by (i) 135% if prepaid during the period commencing on the closing date through 90 days thereafter, (ii) 140% if prepaid 91 days following the closing through 120 days following the closing, (iii) 145% if prepaid 121 days following the closing through 150 days following the closing and (iv) 150% if prepaid 151 days following the closing through 180 days following the closing. After the expiration of 180 days following the date of the Note, the Company has no right of prepayment.
  
 
24

 
  
Asher has agreed to restrict its ability to convert the August 2011 Notes and receive shares of common stock such that the number of shares of common stock held by them in the aggregate and their affiliates after such conversion or exercise does not exceed 4.99% of the then issued and outstanding shares of common stock.
 
On October 6, 2011, the Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with Asher for the sale of an 8% convertible note in the principal amount of $32,500 (the "October 2011 Note").  The total net proceeds the Company received from this Offering was $30,000.

The October 2011 Note bears interest at the rate of 8% per annum. All interest and principal must be repaid on July 5, 2012. The Note is convertible into common stock, at Asher’s option, at a 69% discount to the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock during the 10 trading day period prior to conversion. In the event the Company prepays the October 2011 Note in full, the Company is required to pay off all principal, interest and any other amounts owing multiplied by (i) 135% if prepaid during the period commencing on the closing date through 90 days thereafter, (ii) 140% if prepaid 91 days following the closing through 120 days following the closing, (iii) 145% if prepaid 121 days following the closing through 150 days following the closing and (iv) 150% if prepaid 151 days following the closing through 180 days following the closing. After the expiration of 180 days following the date of the Note, the Company has no right of prepayment.
 
Asher has agreed to restrict its ability to convert the October 2011 Notes and receive shares of common stock such that the number of shares of common stock held by them in the aggregate and their affiliates after such conversion or exercise does not exceed 4.99% of the then issued and outstanding shares of common stock.

The Company claims an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Act") for the private placement of these securities pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Act and/or Regulation D promulgated there under since, among other things, the transaction did not involve a public offering, Asher is an accredited investor, Asher had access to information about the Company and their investment, Asher took the securities for investment and not resale, and the Company took appropriate measures to restrict the transfer of the securities.
 
On September 20, 2011, the Company received notice from an attorney representing John W. Hanback (Chief Technology Officer), Itzhak Tepper (PE Chief Structural Engineer) and one additional employee located at the Company’s research facility (collectively, the “Former Employees”) whereby the Former Employees have claimed that they have been constructively discharged from their employment and have terminated their employment agreements. The Company considers the notice from the Former Employees as a resignation by such Former Employees and has notified the Former Employees that such resignation has been accepted. As a result of such resignation, the Company has cancelled all stock certificates representing a total of 120,600,000 shares of common stock held by the Former Employees that would have been earned out on the first anniversary of their employment agreements.
  
On December 29, 2010, in connection with the Merger, the Company issued to the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy in exchange for their Clean Wind Energy Common Stock, the right to receive an aggregate of 300,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock.  These issuances of shares were made in reliance upon an exemption from registration under Section 4 (2) of the Securities Act, and Regulation D promulgated thereunder.
 
On December 29, 2010, the Company consummated the Merger pursuant to which the Company agreed to issue to Source Capital 6,000,000 shares for providing financial advisory services to Clean Wind Energy in the transaction. The Company also agreed to issue 100,000 shares to Terrence Dunne in connection with advisory services provided to the Company. These issuances of shares were made in reliance upon an exemption from registration under Section 4 (2) of the Securities Act, and Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

The 6,000,000 shares of common stock for consulting services provided during the merger of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. with Clean Wind Energy and for on-going financial services have not been issued as of December 31, 2011.
  
 
25

 
  
ITEM 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
  
This item is not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

Some of the statements contained in this Annual Report that are not historical facts are “forward-looking statements” which can be identified by the use of terminology such as “estimates,” “projects,” “plans,” “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” or the negative or other variations, or by discussions of strategy that involve risks and uncertainties. We urge you to be cautious of the forward-looking statements, that such statements, which are contained in this Annual Report, reflect our current beliefs with respect to future events and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors affecting our operations, market growth, services, products and licenses. No assurances can be given regarding the achievement of future results, as actual results may differ materially as a result of the risks we face, and actual events may differ from the assumptions underlying the statements that have been made regarding anticipated events. Factors that may cause actual results, our performance or achievements, or industry results, to differ materially from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements include without limitation:
  
 
our ability to raise capital when needed and on acceptable terms and conditions;
     
 
our ability to attract and retain management, and to integrate and maintain technical information and management information systems;
     
 
the intensity of competition;
     
 
general economic conditions; and
     
 
other factors discussed in “Risk Factors.”
    
All written and oral forward-looking statements made in connection with this Annual Report on Form 10-K that are attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements. Given the uncertainties that surround such statements, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements.
 
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the accompanying consolidated financial statements and related notes thereto.

Overview

Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. (the “Company” formerly known as Superior Silver Mines, Inc.) was incorporated in the State of Idaho on January 22, 1962 as Superior Mines Company and then changed its name to Superior Silver Mines, Inc.  The Company reincorporated as a Nevada corporation on December 27, 2010.  The Company has been dormant for a number of years, and has no known mineral reserves.
 
On December 29, 2010, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated December 29, 2010 (the “Merger Agreement”), the Company consummated a reverse merger (the “Merger”) with Clean Wind Energy, Inc., a corporation formed under the laws of the State of Delaware on July 26, 2010 (“Clean Wind Energy”).  In connection with the Merger, the Company issued to the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy in exchange for their Clean Wind Energy Common Stock, the right to receive an aggregate of 300,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock.  The Merger was accounted for as a “reverse merger”, since the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy owned a majority of the Company’s common stock immediately following the transaction and their management has assumed operational, management and governance control.
   
For accounting purposes, Clean Wind Energy was the surviving entity. The transaction was accounted for as a recapitalization of Clean Wind Energy pursuant to which Clean Wind Energy was treated as the surviving and continuing entity although the Company is the legal acquirer rather than a reverse acquisition.  The Company did not recognize goodwill or any intangible assets in connection with this transaction.  Accordingly, the Company’s historical financial statements are those of Clean Wind Energy immediately following the consummation of the reverse merger.
  
 
26

 
  
The Company plans to design, develop, and construct large downdraft towers that use benevolent, non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity and clean water economically (“Downdraft Towers”) by integrating and synthesizing numerous proven as well as emerging technologies. In addition to constructing Downdraft Towers in the United States and abroad, the Company intends to be prepared to establish partnerships at home and abroad to propagate these systems and meet increasing global demand for clean water and electricity
 
On January 21, 2011, the Company changed its name to Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc.  In addition, effective January 24, 2011, the Company’s quotation symbol on the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board was changed from “SSVM” to” CWET”.
 
Until the consummation of the Merger, the Company’s purpose was to seek, investigate and, if such investigation warranted, acquire an interest in business opportunities presented to it by persons or firms who, or which, desire to seek the perceived advantages of a publicly registered corporation.  Because the Company had no operations and only nominal assets until the Merger, it was considered a shell company under rules promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Plan of Operation
  
Our Company’s core objective and focus is to become a leading provider of clean efficient green energy to the world communities at a reasonable cost without the destructive residuals of fossil fuel, while continuing to generate innovative technological solutions for today and tomorrow’s electrical power needs.

As a development stage company, Clean Wind Energy has yet to earn revenues from its operations.  Clean Wind Energy is developing plans to design and construct large Downdraft Towers that use benevolent, non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity and clean water economically by integrating and synthesizing numerous proven as well as emerging technologies.  In addition to constructing Downdraft Towers in the United States and abroad, the Company intends to be prepared to establish partnerships at home and abroad to propagate these systems and meet increasing global demand for clean water and electricity. From our inception in July 2010, we have completed the following milestones, among others:
  
 
Filed numerous patent applications with the U.S. Patent Office in connection with the development of the wind technologies.
 
Received Notice of Allowance of its patent application titled Efficient Energy Conversion Devices & Methods (U.S. Pat. App. No. 13/091,124) by the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The patent covers specific aspects of deploying multiple turbines in a wind tunnel coupled to a novel hydraulic system capable of maintaining high efficiency hydraulic to electric conversion under a wide variance of wind speeds. The ultimate goal is to maximize the capture and utilization of all available wind energy in any given wind tunnel, as well as providing a consistency of power output during any deviations in wind speed. The Company considers this patent to be a “Core Patent” providing a significant barrier to entry for any potential competitor.
 
Executed agreements with three strategic world class companies with industry experience to assist in developing our Downdraft Tower.
 
Identified and executed agreements with key industry consultants.
 
Carbon Credit Assessment - Retained Green Giant Venture Fund to assessing the potential of CWET’s emission reduction project on the worldwide carbon markets and estimating the expected revenue generation, providing access to Carbon Finance. Green Giant Venture Fund initial estimates, developed under the appropriate United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)/CDM Methodology and the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), reflect that CWET’s project will reduce 5.7 Million tons of CO2 per year. These estimates are calculated 10 years forward resulting in a yearly value of $17.1 M USD, and total value over the 10-year crediting period of $170 Million USD for each individual Downdraft Tower.
 
The Company selected a site located in San Luis, Arizona to pursue the construction of their innovative green renewable energy Downdraft Tower Facility. The San Luis location incorporates plans for two (2) Downdraft Towers and a component parts Assembly Plant. As designed, the Company anticipates that each Downdraft Tower could generate enough electricity to power up to 1,600,000 homes using the guidelines set forth in the California Statewide Residential Appliance Saturation Study, 2004.
  
 
27

 
  
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Financial Reporting Release No. 60, published by the SEC, recommends that all companies include a discussion of critical accounting policies used in the preparation of their financial statements. While all these significant accounting policies impact our consolidated financial condition and results of operations, we view certain of these policies as critical. Policies determined to be critical are those policies that have the most significant impact on our consolidated financial statements and require management to use a greater degree of judgment and estimates. Actual results may differ from those estimates.

We believe that given current facts and circumstances, it is unlikely that applying any other reasonable judgments or estimate methodologies would cause a material effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or liquidity for the periods presented in this report.

General

The Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, which require management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, net revenue, if any, and expenses, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Senior management has discussed the development, selection and disclosure of these estimates with the Board of Directors. Management believes that the accounting estimates employed and the resulting balances are reasonable; however, actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. An accounting policy is deemed to be critical if it requires an accounting estimate to be made based on assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain at the time the estimate is made, if different estimates reasonably could have been used, or if changes in the estimate that are reasonably possible could materially impact the consolidated financial statements. Management believes the following critical accounting policies reflect the significant estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Development stage entity
 
The Company is considered to be a development stage entity, as defined by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 915.  For the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011, the Company has not generated any revenues to date, has no significant assets and has incurred losses since inception from developing its business and planned operations. Consequently, its operations are subject to all the risks inherent in the establishment of a new business enterprise.
 
Basic and diluted net loss per share
 
We utilize ASC 260, “Earnings Per Share” for calculating the basic and diluted loss per share. In accordance with ASC 260, the basic and diluted loss per share is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net loss per share is computed similar to basic net loss per share except that the denominator is adjusted for the potential dilution that could occur if stock options, warrants, and other convertible securities were exercised or converted into common stock. Potentially dilutive securities were not included in the calculation of the diluted net loss per share as their effect would be anti-dilutive.
 
Income taxes

The Company utilizes ASC 740 “Income Taxes” which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences in future years of differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their financial reporting amounts at each year-end based on enacted tax laws and statutory tax rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Temporary difference between taxable income reported for financial reporting purposes primarily relate to the recognition of debt costs and stock based compensation expenses. The adoption of ASC 740 “Income Taxes” did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.
   
 
28

 
  
Revenue Recognition

The Company has generated no revenues to date. It is the Company’s policy that revenue from product sales or services will be recognized in accordance with ASC 605 “Revenue Recognition”. Four basic criteria must be met before revenue can be recognized: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (2) delivery has occurred; (3) the selling price is fixed and determinable; and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. Determination of criteria (3) and (4) are based on management’s judgments regarding the fixed nature of the selling prices of the products delivered and the collectability of those amounts. Provisions for discounts and rebates to customers, estimated returns and allowances, and other adjustments are provided for in the same period the related sales are recorded. The Company will defer any revenue for which the product was not delivered or is subject to refund until such time that the Company and the customer jointly determine that the product has been delivered or no refund will be required. The Company did not have any revenue during the period ended December 31, 2011.
    
Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company adopted the provisions under FASB for Fair Value Measurements, which define fair value for accounting purposes, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure requirements regarding fair value measurements. The Company’s adoption of these provisions did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements. Fair value is defined as an exit price, which is the price that would be received upon sale of an asset or paid upon transfer of a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The degree of judgment utilized in measuring the fair value of assets and liabilities generally correlates to the level of pricing observability. Financial assets and liabilities with readily available, actively quoted prices or for which fair value can be measured from actively quoted prices in active markets generally have more pricing observability and require less judgment in measuring fair value. Conversely, financial assets and liabilities that are rarely traded or not quoted have less price observability and are generally measured at fair value using valuation models that require more judgment. These valuation techniques involve some level of management estimation and judgment, the degree of which is dependent on the price transparency of the asset, liability or market and the nature of the asset or liability. The Company has categorized its financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value into a three-level hierarchy in accordance with these provisions.

In January 2010 the FASB issued Update No. 2010-05 “Compensation—Stock Compensation—Escrowed Share Arrangements and Presumption of Compensation” (“2010-05”). 2010-05 re-asserts that the Staff of the Securities Exchange Commission (the “SEC Staff”) has stated the presumption that for certain shareholders escrowed share represent a compensatory arrangement. 2010-05 further clarifies the criteria required to be met to establish a position different from the SEC Staff’s position. The Company does not believe this pronouncement to have any material impact on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Accounting for Derivatives

In 2011, we issued convertible notes payable that contained certain conversion features which we identified as embedded derivatives. Therefore, in accordance with ASC 815-40, we reclassified the fair value of the conversion feature from equity to a liability at the date of issuance.  Subsequent to the initial issuance date, we are required to adjust to fair value the derivative as an adjustment to current period operations.

New Accounting Pronouncements

There are various updates recently issued, most of which represented technical corrections to the accounting literature or application to specific industries and are not expected to a have a material impact on the Company's consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
  
 
29

 
  
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
   
COMPARISON OF THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2011 TO THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010

Revenue

The Company has not generated revenue since inception.

Operating Expenses
   
Research and Development

During the year ended December 31, 2011, we incurred $362,850 as compared to $73,559 for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010; an increase of $289,291, or 393%.  The Company anticipates continued increase in research and development as products are developed.

Selling and Administrative
During the year ended December 31, 2011, we incurred $1,713,895 as compared to $764,598 for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010; an increase of $949,297, or 124%.  The Company added additional staff and costs associated to our increase Company development activities.

Depreciation

During the year ended December 31, 2011, we purchased office and other equipment.  Depreciation for the year ended December 31, 2011 was $2,197 as compared to $0 for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010.

Other Income/Expense

Interest expense

For year ended December 31, 2011, we incurred $182,929 as interest expense relating to our issued convertible notes payable.  In connection with the issuance, we incurred noncash charge to interest of $127,787 due to the excess of fair value of the conversion feature over the note proceeds.  In addition, we amortized a debt discount associated with the notes of $52,222.
 
Loss on modification of debt

In conjunction with the issuance of our October 2011 convertible note, we agreed to modify the conversion terms of our preexisting note issued in July 2011 from a 48% to a 69% discount formula.  As such, we incurred a noncash charge to operations of $88,849 as debt modification.

Gain on change in fair value of derivative liabilities

Each reporting period, we are required to adjust to fair value the conversion features of our convertible notes.  For the year ended December 31, 2011, we reported a gain on change in fair value of $89,241.

Net Loss

As a result of the activities described above, we incurred a net loss of $2,261,479 for the year ended December 31, 2011 as compared to a net loss of $838,157 for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010.
  
 
30

 
   
Liquidity and Capital Resources

We have financed our operations since inception primarily through private offerings of our equity securities and debt financing.

Working Capital

Our working capital deficit increased by ($1,151,464) during the year ended December 31, 2011 from a working capital deficit (current liabilities in excess of current assets) of $196,826 at December 31, 2010 to a working capital deficit of $1,348,290 at December 31, 2011. The increase in working capital deficit for the year ended December 31, 2011 is due to a combination of reasons, of which the significant factors include:
  
 
Cash had a net decrease from working capital by $142,852 for the year ended December 31, 2011. The most significant uses and proceeds of cash were:
    
  Approximately $1,243,600 of cash consumed in operating activities;
     
  A repayment of $42,000 for advances from shareholders/director;
     
  Proceeds of $1,004,200 from issuance of Private Placement Memorandum Subscription for the Company’s Common stock
     
 
Proceeds of $110,000 from issuance of Convertible Promissory Notes
  
Of the total current assets of $52,332 as of December 31, 2011, cash represented $52,332. Of the total current assets of $224,481 as of December 31, 2010, cash represented $195,184.

Proceeds from the issuance of common stock

During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company received $1,004,200 from the issuance of Private Placement Memorandum Subscriptions for the sale of its common stock. The Company paid $9,800 of finder’s fees to brokers for referrals who participated in the private placement subscription. Warrants to purchase 98,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.10 per share were also issued to these brokers for their referrals.

Proceeds from the issuance of convertible promissory note

During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company received a gross amount of $110,000 from the issuance of Convertible Promissory Notes and paid $7,500 in processing fees to the attorneys.
     
Cash flow analysis

Cash used in operations was $1,243,611 during the year ended December 31, 2011. During the year ended December 31, 2011, our primary capital needs were for operating expenses, including funds to support our business strategy, which primarily includes working capital necessary to fund operations and reducing our trade payables. The Company made $42,000 repayments on advance from shareholders/director from for operating expenses operating activities.

We utilized cash for investing activities from continuing operations of $13,441 to purchase equipment for research and development.

Cash provided from financing activities was $1,114,200 from private placement subscription of the Company common stock during the year ended December 31, 2011. The Company paid $9,800 of finder fees to brokers for referring investors who participated in the private placement subscription. Also, five year Warrants to purchase 98,000 shares of Common Stock at $0.10 per share will be issued to the brokers for these referrals. The Company recorded an expense of $29,400 for these warrants. The fair value of the warrants was determined using Black Scholes Option Pricing Model based on the following assumptions: (1) dividend yield of 0%, (2) expected volatility of 247%, (3) weighted average risk-free interest rate of 2.0 %, (4) expected life of 5.0 years, and (5) estimated fair value of the Company’s common stock of $0.30 per share
 
In addition, the Company received a gross amount of $110,000 from the issuance of Convertible Promissory notes and paid to the attorneys a total of $7,500 as processing fees.
  
 
31

 
   
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, which contemplate continuation of the Company as a going concern. The Company has reported a net loss from operations of $(2,261,479) for the year ended December 31, 2011, accumulated deficit of $(3,099,636) and total current liabilities in excess of current assets of $(1,348,290) as of December 31, 2011.

The Company is in a development stage and does not have any revenues from operations and will be dependent on funds raise to satisfy its ongoing capital requirements for at least the next 12 months. The Company will require additional financing in order to execute its operating plan and continue as a going concern. The Company cannot predict whether this additional financing will be in the form of equity or debt, or be in another form. The Company may not be able to obtain the necessary additional capital on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all. In any of these events, the Company may be unable to implement its current plans for expansion or respond to competitive pressures, any of these circumstances would have a material adverse effect on its business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Management expects that global economic conditions will continue to present a challenging operating environment through 2012. To the extent permitted by working capital resources, management intends to continue making targeted investments in strategic operating and growth initiatives. Working capital management will continue to be a high priority for 2012.

While we have been able to manage our working capital needs with the current credit facilities, additional financing is required in order to meet our current and projected cash flow requirements from operations. We cannot predict whether this new financing will be in the form of equity or debt. We may not be able to obtain the necessary additional capital on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all. Additional investments are being sought, but we cannot guarantee that we will be able to obtain such investments.
   
Financing transactions may include the issuance of equity or debt securities, obtaining credit facilities, or other financing mechanisms. However, the trading price of our common stock and the downturn in the U.S. stock and debt markets could make it more difficult to obtain financing through the issuance of equity or debt securities. Even if we are able to raise the funds required, it is possible that we could incur unexpected costs and expenses, fail to collect significant amounts owed to us, or experience unexpected cash requirements that would force us to seek alternative financing. Further, if we issue additional equity or debt securities, stockholders may experience additional dilution or the new equity securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing holders of our common stock. If additional financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we will have to curtail our operations.

Our independent registered public accounting firm’s report on our December 31, 2011 consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-K states that our difficulty in generating sufficient cash flow to meet our obligations and sustain operations raise substantial doubts about the our ability to continue as a going concern. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

Inflation

We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. If our costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
  
Off-Balance sheet Arrangements

We do not maintain off-balance sheet arrangements nor do we participate in any non-exchange traded contracts requiring fair value accounting treatment other than the operating leases as disclosed in Item 2, Properties and Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Note 9).
  
 
32

 
  
ITEM 7A.  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

This item is not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

ITEM 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

See the Financial Statements and Notes thereto commencing on Page F-1.

ITEM 9.  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
 
Previous independent registered public accounting firm
 
On December 30, 2010, the Company notified Decoria, Maichel & Teague P.S. (“DeCoria”) that it was dismissed as the Registrant’s independent registered public accounting firm, effective immediately. The decision to dismiss DeCoria as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm was approved by the Company’s Board of Directors on December 30, 2010. The reports of DeCoria on the Company’s financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 and for the period of exploration stage (January 1, 2007) through December 31, 2009 did not contain an adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion, and such reports were not qualified or modified as to uncertainty, audit scope, or accounting principles.
 
During the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 and for the period of exploration stage (January 1, 2007) through December 31, 2009, and through December 30, 2010, the Company has not had any disagreements with DeCoria on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure or auditing scope or procedure, which disagreements, if not resolved to DeCoria’s satisfaction, would have caused them to make reference thereto in their reports on the Company’s financial statements for such periods.
 
During the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 and for the period of exploration stage (January 1, 2007) through December 31, 2009, and through December 30, 2010, there were no reportable events, as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.
 
New independent registered public accounting firm
 
On December 30, 2010, the Company engaged RBSM LLP (“RBSM”) as its independent registered public accounting firm for the Company’s fiscal year ending December 31, 2010. The decision to engage RBSM as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm was approved by the Company’s Board of Directors on December 30, 2010.
 
During the two most recent fiscal years and through December 30, 2010, the Company has not consulted with RBSM regarding either:
  
 
1.
the application of accounting principles to any specified transaction, either completed or proposed; or the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company’s financial statements, and neither a written report was provided to the Company nor oral advice was provided that RBSM concluded was an important factor considered by the Company in reaching a decision as to the accounting, auditing or financial reporting issue; or
   
 
2.
any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement (as defined in paragraph (a)(1)(iv) of Item 304 of Regulation S-K and the related instructions thereto) or a reportable event (as described in paragraph (a)(1)(v) of Item 304 of Regulation S-K).
   
 
33

 
   
ITEM 9A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
The Company has carried out an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of management, including the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s “disclosure controls and procedures” as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) as of the end of the period covered by this report. The Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed so that information required to be disclosed in the Company’s reports filed under the Exchange Act, such as this Annual Report on Form 10-K, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Commission’s rules and forms. The Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are also intended to ensure that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. There are inherent limitations to the effectiveness of any system of disclosure controls and procedures, including the possibility of human error and the circumvention or overriding of the controls and procedures. Accordingly, even effective disclosure controls and procedures can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives, and management necessarily is required to use its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible disclosure controls and procedures. Based upon this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that, as of December 31, 2011, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in the reports that the Corporation files and submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported as and when required. This determination was due to the lack of segregation of duties and the Company’s failure to implement the necessary internal controls.

Notwithstanding  the existence of material weaknesses, management concluded that the financial statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K fairly present in all material respects the Company’s financial position, results of operations and statement of cash flows for the periods and dates presented.
 
Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, a company’s principal executive and principal financial officers and effected by a company’s board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

 
pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets;
     
 
provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorization of management and directors; and
     
 
provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
  
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011. This assessment was based on criteria established in the framework in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on our assessment, management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2011.
    
 
34

 
  
These control deficiencies could result in a misstatement of account balances that would result in a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement to our financial statements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Accordingly, we have determined that these control deficiencies as described above together constitute a material weakness.
In light of this material weakness, we performed additional analyses and procedures in order to conclude that our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K were fairly stated in accordance with GAAP. Accordingly, management believes that despite our material weaknesses, our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2011 are fairly stated, in all material respects, in accordance with GAAP.
  
This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission that permit us to provide only management’s report in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
   
Plan for Remediation of Material Weaknesses

To mitigate the current limited resources and limited employees, we rely heavily on direct management oversight of transactions, along with the use of legal and accounting professionals. As we grow, we expect to increase our number of employees and engage outsourced accounting professionals, which will enable us to implement adequate segregation of duties within the internal control framework.
   
Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls and Procedures

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all errors and all fraud.  A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met.  Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs.  Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Group have been detected.  These inherent limitations include, but are not limited to, the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake.  Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control.  The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.  Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.  Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with the evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Rule 13a-15 or 15d-15 under the Exchange Act that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2011 that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B.  OTHER INFORMATION
  
Warrant Agreement

On January 12, 2012 the Company entered into a Warrant Agreement providing the holder the right to purchase, at any time, up to July 12, 2012 and up to $1,000,000 worth of the Company's common stock valued at an exercise price calculated by taking the daily closing bid price of the Company's common stock reported on the OTCBB, at the date of exercise and discounting that closing bid price by 20%, provided, however, the exercise price shall in no event be lower than $0.10 per share nor greater than $0.40 per share.  The Warrant Agreement is non cancelable by the Company and is non callable.
     
 
35

 
  
Financing

On February 29, 2012, the Company entered into a Note Purchase Agreement pursuant to which the Company issued a secured convertible note in the amount of $335,000 due on June 23, 2012 with fixed interest of $12,563 per month beginning thirty days from issuance along with defined principal payments.  The Note is secured by certain assets of the Company
  
Subsequent issuances

On January 12, 2012, the Company entered into a Warrant Agreement with Paradigm Concepts, Inc. (the "Warrant Holder"), pursuant to which the Company issued to Warrant Holder one certificate (the “Warrant Certificate”) providing the Warrant Holder with the right to purchase, at any time until the earliest occurrence of either (a) after the underlying common stock issuable in the exercise of the warrants being declared registered and effective by the SEC on a registration statement filed by the Company, or, (b) 5:30 P.M. Pacific Daylight Savings Time on July 12, 2012. The Warrant Certificate is exercisable up to $1,000,000 worth of restricted shares of common stock of the Company (the “Warrant Shares”) valued at exercise price calculated by taking the daily closing bid price of the Company’s common stock as reported on the OTCBB, on the date of the exercise of the warrants, and discounting that closing bid price by 20%; provided, however, the exercise price may in no event be lower than $0.10 per share nor greater than $0.40 per share. The Warrant is non-cancelable by the Company and non-callable.
   
The Company claims an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Act") for the private placement of these securities pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Act and/or Regulation D promulgated there under since, among other things, the transaction did not involve a public offering, Paradigm is an accredited investor, had access to information about the Company and their investment, Paradigm took the securities for investment and not resale, and the Company took appropriate measures to restrict the transfer of the securities.
   
On January 12, 2012, the Company and its subsidiary, Clean Wind Energy, Inc. (collectively “CWE”), entered into a Settlement and Release Agreement (the “Agreement”) with John W. Hanback (“Hanback”), Christopher W. Johnson (“Johnson”) and Itzhak Tepper (“Tepper”) (Hanback, Johnson and Tepper, the “Former Employees”), pursuant to which the Former Employees agreed to a mutual release and also agreed to the following:
  
 
·
CWE and the Former Employees will jointly file a Stipulation of Dismissal dismissing the lawsuit filed by CWE against the Former Employees in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division, Civil Action No. 1:11cv1206 LMB/TRJ.
 
·
In consideration of $174,000 from an unaffiliated third party in February 2012, the Former Employees transferred the shares of common stock owned by them to an unaffiliated third party.
 
·
Hanback tendered to CWE assignments of certain patent applications in consideration of the Hanback Payment.
 
·
Hanback, Johnson and Tepper agreed to a 15 month non-competition period whereby they will not directly or indirectly attempt to procure a site for a large-scale tower using non-toxic natural elements to generate electricity.
 
·
Hanback, Johnson and Tepper agreed to a 15 month no-contact period, whereby they may not have any professional dealings with certain parties.
  
On February 7, 2012, the Company paid off the convertible promissory note in the amount of $45,000 dated July 27, 2011 held by Asher Enterprises Inc. The total amount paid is $69,304.92 which represents principal, interest and penalty for early payment before maturity.

On February 22, 2012, the Company  paid off the convertible promissory note in the amount of $32,500 dated August 23, 2011 held by Asher Enterprises Inc. The total amount paid is $49,918.22 which represents principal, interest and penalty for early payment before maturity.
     
 
36

 
  
On February 29, 2012, the Company entered into a Note Purchase Agreement and a Pledge and Security Agreement with Hanover Holdings I, LLC ("Hanover"), providing for the sale of an Original Issue Discount Secured Convertible Promissory Note in the principal amount of $335,000 (the "Note"). The financing closed on March 2, 2012. The Note contained an original issue discount of 10% representing $33,500. In the event of default, Hanover may convert balances owed under the Note into restricted shares of common stock, at Hanover’s option, at a conversion price equal to 45% of the lowest trading price for the common stock at any time during the prior 10 trading days immediately preceding the date of the notice of such conversion.

The Note bears interest at the rate of 15% per annum. Subject to the prepayment provisions in the Note, the principal plus interest amount of the Note is to be repaid subject to an amortization schedule which provides that the Company pay (i) $47,562.50 thirty days from the date of the Note, (ii) $62,562.50 sixty days from the date of the Note, (iii) $112,562.50 ninety days from the date of the Note and (iv) $162,562.50 one hundred twenty days from the date of the Note. The Company may prepay the Note in full at the Company’s sole option and discretion by providing to Hanover three prior trading days’ written notice, in full. The Company is required to pay off all principal, interest and any other amounts owing prior to any such prepayment. In order to facilitate the closing of this financing, a shareholder pledged 10,000,000 shares to Hanover.

The Company claims an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Act") for the private placement of these securities pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Act and/or Regulation D promulgated there under since, among other things, the transaction did not involve a public offering, Hanover is an accredited investor, Hanover had access to information about the Company and their investment, Hanover took the securities for investment and not resale, and the Company took appropriate measures to restrict the transfer of the securities.

On March 9, 2012, the Company paid off the convertible promissory note in the amount of $32,500 dated October 3, 2011 held by Asher Enterprises Inc. The total amount paid is $49,157.82 which represents principal, interest and penalty for early payment before maturity.
 
On February 29, 2012, the Company entered into a Note Purchase Agreement and a Pledge and Security Agreement with Hanover Holdings I, LLC ("Hanover"), providing for the sale of an Original Issue Discount Secured Convertible Promissory Note in the principal amount of $335,000 (the "Note"). The financing closed on March 2, 2012. The Note contained an original issue discount of 10% representing $33,500. In the event of default, Hanover may convert balances owed under the Note into restricted shares of common stock, at Hanover’s option, at a conversion price equal to 45% of the lowest trading price for the common stock at any time during the prior 10 trading days immediately preceding the date of the notice of such conversion. In order to facilitate the closing of this financing, a shareholder pledged 10,000,000 shares to Hanover (the “Pledged Shares”). On March 8, 2012, the Company received a notice of default from Hanover as a result of the Company’s common stock volume weighted average price falling below $0.08 per share. Hanover has requested that the escrow agent transfer the Pledged Shares to Hanover. Further, Hanover has demanded the repayment of $481,562.50 as a result of the claimed default.

During the month of January 2012, the Company issued an aggregate of 9,161,556 shares of common stock for services rendered of $1,329,118 and 1,450,000 common shares for common stock subscriptions for $145,000.

During the month ended February 2012, the Company issued an aggregate of 259,630 shares of common stock for services rendered of $26,283, 400,000 common shares for common stock subscriptions for $40,000 and 2,300,000 common shares for in connection with a warrant agreement entered into on January 12, 2012 for $230,000.

During the month of March 2012, the Company issued an aggregate of 1,525,545 shares of common stock for services rendered of $66,058.
   
 
37

 
   
PART III

ITEM 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.

The following table sets forth the names of the Company’s directors, executive officers, and key employees, and their positions with the Company, as of December 31, 2011:
 
Name
Age
Position(s)
Term of Office (Directors)
Ronald W. Pickett*
64
President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman
Annual meeting
Stephen Sadle*
66
Chief Operating Officer and Director
Annual Meeting
Robert P. Crabb*
64
Secretary, Chief Marketing Officer and Director
Annual meeting
Ownkar Persaud*
54
Chief Financial Officer
N/A
H. James Magnuson
58
Director
Annual meeting
Arthur P. Dammarell
67
Director
Annual meeting
  

 
*
Appointed pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement.
 
None of the events listed in Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K has occurred during the past ten years and that is material to the evaluation of the ability or integrity of any of the Company’s directors, director nominees or executive officers.
   
The following is a brief account of the business experience during the past five years (and, in some instances, for prior years) of each director and executive officer.

Ronald W. Pickett, President and Chief Executive Officer, Chairman
 
Mr. Pickett joined the Company on December 29, 2010 in connection with the Merger. Mr. Pickett brings over 40 years of construction, development and innovative technology skills and expertise to the team. He has founded numerous companies from startup and including three from inception through the public ownership process. Mr. Pickett also has an understanding of government, legislative, and permitting practices. Since December, 2007, Mr. Pickett has been an independent real estate development consultant. Until March, 2008, Mr. Pickett was a director of, and until December, 2007, Mr. Pickett was President and CEO of, Telkonet, Inc. (“Telkonet”) (OTCBB: TKOI.OB), a company that develops, manufactures and sells energy efficiency and smart grid networking technology. Until January, 2009, Mr. Pickett was President and a director of Microwave Systems Technology Inc. (“Microwave Systems”), a company that provided Internet/phone/video/wifi services in the New York City area. Until February, 2010, Mr. Pickett was Vice Chairman of Geeks on Call Holdings, Inc. (“Geeks on Call”) (PINK: GOCH.PK), a company that provided quick-response, on-site computer solutions and remote/telephone technical support. We took into account his prior experience in operating public and private enterprises in the development and construction of alternative energy projects and believe Mr. Pickett’s past experience in these fields gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a director.
 
Stephen Sadle, Chief Operating Officer, Director
 
Mr. Sadle joined the Company on December 29, 2010 in connection with the Merger. Mr. Sadle is an entrepreneur with over 40 years of diversified experience in management, contracting and heavy infrastructure development, interfacing with both the government and private sectors. He is experienced in Web-based vertical extranet applications and has developed operating extranets in the construction and transportation industries. Mr. Sadle served as co-founder, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Telkonet. He was also founder and president of a successful local construction company and was awarded the Small Businessman of the Year Award for the Washington Metropolitan Area. Since July, 2007, Mr. Sadle has been an independent real estate consultant. From 2000 until July, 2007, Mr. Sadle was Senior Vice President and a director of Telkonet. We took into account his prior work with infrastructure construction and development and believe Mr. Sadle’s past experience in these fields gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a Chief Operating Officer.
  
 
38

 
  
Robert P. Crabb, Secretary and Chief Marketing Officer, Director
 
Mr. Crabb joined the Company on December 29, 2010 in connection with the Merger. Mr. Crabb has over 40 years of public and private sector experience including 15 years in the insurance industry including, sales and sales management with MetLife and independent property and casualty brokerage. His entrepreneurial expertise includes marketing consulting, corporate management and commercial/residential real estate development. He has served in a corporate governance capacity as secretary to a number of start-up companies. Since September, 2007, Mr. Crabb has been an independent real estate development consultant. Until September, 2007, Mr. Crabb was Secretary of Telkonet, until February, 2009, Mr. Crabb was Secretary of Microwave Systems, and until October, 2009, Mr. Crabb was Secretary of Geeks on Call. The Company believes Mr. Crabb’s past experience in corporate compliance gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a director.
  
Ownkar Persaud, Chief Financial Officer
 
Mr. Persaud joined the Company on December 29, 2010 in connection with the Merger. Mr. Persaud is a Chartered Accountant with extensive public and private company experience. He has served as the Vice President of Finance and Principal Accounting Officer for MSTI Holdings, Inc. (PINK: MSHI.PK), a publicly traded cable, telephone and Internet service provider, in which capacity he managed the Company’s financial operations. He was also the Assistant Controller and SOX Compliance Officer for Telkonet, a publicly traded energy management solutions provider. Mr. Persaud served as Assistant Controller at SOTAS Inc., a provider of telecommunication network management services. Since May 2010, Mr. Persaud has been an independent consultant to public companies on SEC reporting and compliance matters. Until June, 2009, Mr. Persaud was the Vice President of Finance of Microwave Satellite. The Company believes Mr. Persaud’s past experience in corporate finance and compliance gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a Chief Financial Officer.
 
H. James Magnuson, Director
 
Mr. Magnuson has served as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors since 2007. Mr. Magnuson resigned as the Company’s Vice President effective December 29, 2010 pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement. Since 1979, Mr. Magnuson has been an attorney engaged in the private practice of law in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and received his BS degree from the University of Idaho and his Juris Doctorate from Boston College. The Company believes Mr. Magnuson’s background in providing legal services gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a director.
 
Arthur P. Dammarell, Director
 
Mr. Dammarell has served as a member of the Company’s Board of Directors since 2006. From 2000 through March 2006, Mr. Dammarell was the principal financial officer, treasurer and a director of Nova Oil, Inc. (now Nova Biosource Fuels, Inc.). He received his BA degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Eastern Washington University. The Company took into account his prior work in both public and private organizations providing consulting on development project financing and believe Mr. Dammarell’s past experience in these fields gives him the qualifications and skill to serve as a director.
 
Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting
 
Based solely upon a review of the copies of the forms furnished to the Company and written representations from officers and directors of the Company that no other reports were required, during the year ended December 31, 2010, all filing requirements under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act applicable to its officers, directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners were complied with on a timely basis.
 
Code of Ethics
 
The Company has adopted a Code of Conduct and Ethics that applies to all directors, officers and employees of the Company, including its principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer. The Company does not have a separately-designated standing audit committee or a committee performing similar functions.  Because the Company does not have an audit committee, the company has not yet determined whether any of its directors qualifies as an audit committee financial expert. Currently, the Company Board of Directors review the Company’s 10-K and financial statements.
  
 
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ITEM 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
The following table and related footnotes show the compensation paid during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, to all individuals serving as the Company’s principal executive officer or acting in a similar capacity during the last completed fiscal year.  No other executive officers received compensation in excess of $100,000 for such fiscal years.
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
Name and principal position
 
Year
 
Salary
($)
   
Bonus
($)
   
Stock awards
($)
   
Option awards
($)
   
Nonequity incentive plan
compensation
($)
   
Nonqualified
deferred
compensation
earnings
($)
   
All other
compensation
($)
   
Total
($)
 
Ronald W. Pickett, President,
 
2011
 
$
199,266
(6)  
$
0
   
$
0
(3)
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
199,266
 
  Chief Executive Officer and Chairman (1)  
2010
   
34,614
(2)
 
 
0
     
0
     
0
     
0
     
0
     
0
     
34,614
 
                                                                     
Thomas S. Smith, Director,
 
2011
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
  Former President (4)  
2010
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
 

 
(1)
Appointed as President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman effective December 29, 2010 pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement.
 
 
(2)
This amount represents accrued salary for Mr. Pickett for his services as an executive officer of Clean Wind for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010.
  
 
(3)
On September 22, 2010, Clean Wind Energy issued Mr. Pickett 20,000 shares of its common stock in exchange for cash and services rendered from Clean Wind Energy’s inception through September 22, 2010 at a price equal to $.001 per share (the par value of the shares).  Based upon the status of Clean Wind Energy as of September 22, 2010, such as its lack of assets, activities, commitments for funding and operations, the Company believes the fair value of Clean Wind Energy’s common stock was its par value at such time.  In addition, the Company believes there is no material value that can be attributed to the ministerial services rendered by Clean Wind Energy’s founders prior to the issuance of such shares.  Accordingly, the Company believes Clean Wind Energy did not pay any material equity-based compensation to officers and employees for services during the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010.
 
 
(4)
Resigned as President effective December 29, 2010 pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement.
 
 
(5)
Represents the aggregate grant date fair value computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718.
    
 
(6)
Included in the amount is $100,236 of accrued salaries for Mr. Pickett.
  
 
40

 
  
Director Compensation Table
 
The following table and related footnotes show the compensation paid during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 to the Company’s directors for their service as directors. 
 
Name
 
Fees earned
or paid in cash
($)
   
Stock awards
($)
   
Option awards
($)
   
Non-equity
incentive plan
compensation
($)
   
Nonqualified deferred
compensation earnings
($)
   
All other
compensation
($)
   
Total
($)
 
Robert P. Crabb (1)
 
$
10,386
(2)
 
$
0
(3)
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
10,386
 
H. James Magnuson
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
Arthur P. Dammarell
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
Dale B. Lavigne (4)
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
 
Terrence J. Dunne (5)
 
$
0
   
$
7,000
(6)
 
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
0
   
$
7,000
 
 

 
(1)
Appointed as director effective December 29, 2010 pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement.
 
 
(2)
Clean Wind has accrued salary for Mr. Crabb for his services as an executive officer of Clean Wind for the period of inception through December 31, 2010 in the amount of $10,386.
 
 
(3)
On September 22, 2010, Clean Wind Energy issued Mr. Crabb 4,000 shares of its common stock in exchange for cash and services rendered from Clean Wind Energy’s inception through September 22, 2010 at a price equal to $.001 per share (the par value of the shares).  Based upon the status of Clean Wind Energy as of September 22, 2010, such as its lack of assets, activities, commitments for funding and operations, the Company believes the fair value of Clean Wind Energy’s common stock was its par value at such time.  In addition, the Company believes there is no material value that can be attributed to the ministerial services rendered by Clean Wind Energy’s founders prior to the issuance of such shares.  Accordingly, the Company believes Clean Wind Energy did not pay any material equity-based compensation to officers and employees for services during the period from inception through December 31, 2010.
 
 
(4)
Resigned as a director effective December 29, 2010 pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement.
 
 
(5)
Resigned as a director effective October 29, 2010.
 
 
(6)
Represents the aggregate grant date fair value computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718.
 
Narrative to Summary Compensation Table and Director Compensation Table
 
During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company provided no stock options, warrants, or stock appreciation rights.  On December 29, 2010, pursuant to the Merger, Clean Wind Energy became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.  Clean Wind Energy has employment agreements with its officers as described below.  Clean Wind has accrued salaries for all its executives from inception through December 31, 2011 in the amount of $472,221.  On December 29, 2010, the Company issued 100,000 shares of Common Stock to former director Terrence J. Dunne in connection with services provided to the Company.  The Company did not otherwise compensate its directors of executive officers in 2010 or 2011.
 
During the year ended December 31, 2009, each director, and the one officer who was not a director, received 50,000 common shares, which were valued at $0.05 per share, amounting to $18,000. In addition, each individual was paid $500 cash. The Company provided no stock options, warrants, or stock appreciation rights, and during the year ended December 31, 2009 there were no employment contracts or incentive pay agreements, severance arrangements with any officer or director.
  
 
41

 
  
No officer or director has outstanding unexercised options, stock that has not vested, or equity incentive plan awards.  The Company maintains no employee benefits plans.
 
Employment Contracts and Termination of Employment and Change-In-Control Arrangements
 
On December 29, 2010, pursuant to the Merger, Clean Wind Energy became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company.  Clean Wind Energy has employment agreements with its executive officers.  Each of the employment agreements was entered into on September 22, 2010 and amended on November 22, 2010.
 
Name
 
Position(s)
 
Term
Salary
 
Bonus
 
Severance
Ronald W. Pickett
 
President, Chief Executive Officer
 
3 years; renewable for 1 year on mutual consent
$200,000
 
Board Discretionary
 
Twelve (12) months salary and benefits for termination without cause.
Stephen Sadle
 
Chief Operating Officer
 
3 years; renewable for 1 year on mutual consent
$175,000
 
Board Discretionary
 
Twelve (12) months salary and benefits for termination without cause.
Robert P. Crabb
 
Secretary, Chief Marketing Officer
 
3 years; renewable for 1 year on mutual consent
$60,000
 
Board Discretionary
 
Twelve (12) months salary and benefits for termination without cause.
Ownkar Persaud (1)
 
Chief Financial Officer
 
3 years; renewable for 1 year on mutual consent
$60,000
 
Board Discretionary
 
Three (3) months salary and benefits for termination due to a change of control
 
 
(1) 
Mr. Ownkar Persaud mutually agreed to reduce his original annual salary of $100,000 to $60,000 effective January 1, 2011.
 
The foregoing descriptions of the employment agreements do not purport to be complete and are qualified in their entirety by reference to such employment agreements which are included as exhibits to this Form 10-K, were filed with the SEC on Form 8-K on December 30, 2010.

ITEM 12.  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

Security ownership of certain beneficial owners

The following table sets forth, as of March 22, 2012, the beneficial ownership of our common stock by:

 
(1)
each person or entity who is known by us to beneficially own more than five percent (5%) of our common stock;

 
(2)
each of our directors;

 
(3)
each Named Executive Officer; and
 
 
(4)
all of our directors and executive officers as a group.
  
 
42

 
  
Set forth below is certain information, as of March 22, 2012, with respect to each person (including any group as that term is used in section 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act) who is known to the Company to be the beneficial owner of more than five percent of the Company’s Common Stock.  Unless otherwise indicated, the address of each beneficial owner is c/o Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc., 1997 Annapolis Exchange Parkway, Suite 300, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 and the nature of beneficial ownership is direct.
  
Name of
Beneficial Owner
 
Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership
   
Percent of Class (1)
 
Ronald W. Pickett
   
72,235,000
     
32.0%
 
Stephen Sadle
   
58,250,000
     
26.0%
 
Robert P. Crabb
   
12,400,000
     
5.0%
 
   

 
(1)
Based upon 225,547,250 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of March 22, 2012.
  
Security ownership of management
 
Set forth below is certain information, as of March 30, 2011, as to the Company’s Common Stock beneficially owned by all directors, each of the named executive officers, and directors and executive officers of the Company as a group.  Unless otherwise indicated, all beneficial ownership is direct.
 
Name of Beneficial Owner
 
Title of Beneficial Owner
 
Amount and Nature of Beneficial Ownership
   
Percent of Class (1)
 
Ronald W. Pickett
 
President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman
   
72,235,000
(3) 
   
32.0%
 
Stephen Sadle
 
Chief Operating Officer and Director
   
58,250,000
(3) 
   
26.0%
 
Robert P. Crabb
 
Secretary, Chief Marketing Officer and Director
   
12.400,000
(3) 
   
5.0%
 
Ownkar Persaud
 
Chief Financial Officer
   
10,000,000
(3) 
   
4.4%
 
                     
H. James Magnuson
 
Director
   
1,811,114
(2)
   
*
 
Arthur P. Dammarell
 
Director
   
525,500
     
*
 
Directors and executive officers as a group (6 persons)
 
---
   
155,221,614
     
67.4 %
 
   

* Less than 1%.

 
(1)
Based upon 225,547,250 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of March 30, 2012.
 
 
(2)
Includes 1,368,891 shares held in trust for the benefit of Mr. Magnuson’s relatives. As trustee, Mr. Magnuson has the power to vote such shares, but disclaims any beneficial ownership in the shares.
 
 
(3)
Includes certain shares noted in the executive employment agreement which states that during the first twelve months, after 90 days of employment if there is voluntarily termination by the executive, 90% of the shares will be forfeited to the Company. If the executive dies during the first twelvemonths, the shares distributed to the beneficiary will be 50% of the shares plus 1/24th of the remaining 50% for each month he was employed during the period of the 13th to the 24th month of the agreement. If termination is due to disability, the shares distributed will be 25% of the shares plus for each month of employment an additional amount of shares prorated at 1/36th of the remaining 75%, any undistributed shares will be forfeited to the Company.
  
 
43

 
   
ITEM 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.
  
Transactions with Related Persons
 
Except as set forth below, since January 1, 2010, there has not been, nor is there currently proposed, any transaction or series of similar transactions to which the Company was or will be a party in which the amount involved exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of the Company’s total assets at year end for the last two completed fiscal years; and in which any director, executive officer, other stockholders of more than 5% of the Company’s Common Stock or any member of their immediate family had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.
 
The Company pays H.F. Magnuson and Co., where its former Secretary and Principal Accounting Officer, Dennis O’Brien, is employed, for general administrative and accounting services. The amount paid in 2010 was $3,800 and the amount paid to date in 2011 is $0.  Mr. O’Brien has no ownership interest in H. F. Magnuson & Company.  Prior to the effect of the Merger, the Estate of H.F. Magnuson owned 10.31% of the Company’s Common Stock.  Prior to the effect of the Merger, H. James Magnuson, the son on H. F. Magnuson, owned 8.64% of the outstanding Common Stock of the Company (1,368,891 shares of which he holds in trust for H.F. Magnuson’s relatives).
 
During the periods of November and December, 2010, Ronald W. Pickett, a director and executive officer of the Company, advanced Clean Wind Energy $71,333 (cash received and deposited of $22,000 and the balance of $49,333 is reimbursable expenses). During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company had repaid $66,333 and owed Mr. Pickett a sum of $5,000. These amounts are interest free advances.  Clean Wind Energy also owes reimbursable expenses of approximately $15,000 to Stephen Sadle at December 31, 2010, this amount was paid in full during the year ended December 31, 2011.
 
On December 29, 2010, the Company agreed to issue 100,000 shares of Common Stock to former director Terrence J. Dunne in connection with services provided to the Company. These shares of Common Stock were issued during the year ended December 31, 2011.

Indemnification Agreements
 
On March 30, 2011, the Company entered into Indemnification Agreements with directors Thomas Smith, H. James Magnuson and Arthur P. Dammarell, and executives Ronald Pickett, President and Chief Executive Officer and Ownkar Persaud, Chief Financial Officer.

The Indemnification Agreements provide that the Company will indemnify the Company's officers and directors, to the fullest extent permitted by law, relating to, resulting from or arising out of any threatened, pending or completed action, suit or proceeding, or any inquiry or investigation by reason of the fact that such officer or director (i) is or was a director, officer, employee or agent of the Company or (ii) is or was serving at the request of the Company as a director, officer, employee or agent of another corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise if he acted in good faith and in a manner he reasonably believed to be in or not opposed to the best interests of the Company, and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe his or her conduct was unlawful.. In addition, the Indemnification Agreements provide that the Company will make an advance payment of expenses to any officer or director who has entered into an Indemnification Agreement, in order to cover a claim relating to any fact or occurrence arising from or relating to events or occurrences specified in this paragraph, subject to receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of such officer or director to repay such amount if it shall ultimately be determined that he is not entitled to be indemnified by the Company as authorized under this Agreement.
 
Director Independence
 
We believe that director Arthur P. Dammarell is “independent” as that term is defined in Rule 303A.02 of the NYSE Listed Company Manual.  For such director there were no transactions, relationships or arrangements not disclosed in Item 13 above, that were considered by the Board of Directors under the applicable independence definitions in determining that the director is independent.
  
 
44

 
  
ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES.

RBSM LLP (“RBSM”) has served as our independent registered public accounting firm since December 30, 2010. RBSM was also Clean Wind Energy’s independent registered public accounting firm prior to the Merger on December 29, 2010.  Prior to December 30, 2010, DeCoria, Maichel & Teague P.S. (“DM&T”) served as the Company’s independent registered accounting firm. We have not been billed by DM&T upon consummation of the December 2010 Reverse Merger.
    
(1) Audit Fees
 
RBSM has billed us audit fees of $45,600 and $-0- during 2011 and 2010, respectively. These fees would relate to the audit of our annual consolidated financial statements and the review of the interim consolidated financial statements and services in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.
 
(2) Audit-Related Fees

RBSM billed us audit-related fees in the aggregate amount of 13,300 and $10,000 during 2011 and 2010, respectively. These fees relate to the audit of our subsidiary, Clean Wind Energy’s September 30, 2010 financial statements and review of the Form 8-K and review of the Company’s registration statements filed with the SEC.

(3) Tax Fees

No fees of this sort were billed by RBSM during 2011 or 2010.

(4) All Other Fees

No fees of this sort were billed by RBSM during 2011 and 2010 or by DM&T during 2011 and 2010.
  
 
45

 
 
PART IV

ITEM 15.  EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.
  
(a)
Documents filed as part of this report.
     
 
(1)
Financial Statements. The following consolidated financial statements are included in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K:
     
   
Report of RBSM on Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for the periods ended December 31, 2011 and 2010
     
   
Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 2011 and 2010
     
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Year ended December 31, 2011, for the Period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010 and for the Period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011
     
   
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through ended December 31, 2011
     
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for Year ended December 31, 2011, for the Period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010 and for the Period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011
     
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
     
 
(2)
Financial Statement Schedules.
     
   
Additional Schedules are omitted as the required information is inapplicable or the information is presented in the financial statements or related notes.
     
 
(3)
Exhibits required to be filed by Item 601 of Regulation S-K.
  
 
46

 
 
Exhibits Index

Exhibit
 
Description
     
2.1 
 
Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of December 29, 2010, by and among Superior Silver Mines, Inc., Superior Silver Mines Acquisition Corp., and Clean Wind Energy, Inc. (1)
2.2
 
Plan of Domestication of Superior Silver Mines, Inc., dated December 21, 2010 (1)
2.3
 
Nevada Articles of Domestication of Superior Silver Mines, Inc., dated December 27, 2010 (1)
2.4
 
Idaho Statement of Domestication of Superior Silver Mines, Inc., dated December 22, 2010 (1)
2.5
 
Articles of Merger by and between Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. and Superior Silver Mines, Inc. (2)
3.1
 
Articles of Incorporation of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. (1)
3.2
 
Amended Bylaws of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. (3)
4.1
 
Form of Common Stock Certificate (4)
10.1
 
Letter Agreement between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Source Capital Group, Inc., dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.2
 
Deed of Lease, dated December 1, 2010, by and between CKP One, LLC and Clean Wind Energy, Inc. (1)
10.3
 
Lease Agreement, dated October 20, 2010, and effective November 1, 2010, by and between Office Suites PLUS at Annapolis and Clean Wind Energy, Inc. (1)
10.4 
 
Director and Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Ronald Pickett, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.5 
 
Director and Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Stephen Sadle, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.6 
 
Director and Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Robert Crabb, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.7 
 
Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and John W. Hanback, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.8 
 
Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Itzhak Tepper, PE, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.9 
 
Executive Employment Agreement, dated September 22, 2010, by and between Clean Wind Energy, Inc. and Ownkar Persaud, and Amendment dated November 22, 2010 (1)
10.10
 
Form of Director and Officer Indemnification Agreement (4)
14.1
 
Code of Business Conduct and Ethics
21.1
 
Subsidiaries of the Registrant (4)
31.1
 
Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of Ronald W. Pickett
31.2
 
Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of Ownkar Persaud
32.1
 
Certification of Ronald W. Pickett pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.2
 
Certification of Ownkar Persaud pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
101.INS
 
XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH
 
XBRL Schema Document
101.CAL
 
XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document
101.LAB
 
XBRL Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE
 
XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document
101.DEF
 
XBRL Definition Linkbase Document
 

 
(1)
Filed with the registrant's Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 30, 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
(2)
Filed with the registrant's Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 21, 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
(3)
Filed with the registrant's Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 28, 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
(4)
Filed with the registrant's Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 12, 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
        
 
47

 

The following exhibits are included herein or incorporated by reference:
    
Exhibit
 
Description
     
14.1   Code of Business Conduct and Ethics
     
31.1
 
Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of Ronald W. Pickett
     
31.2
 
Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of Ownkar Persaud
     
32.1
 
Certification of Ronald W. Pickett pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
     
32.2
 
Certification of Ownkar Persaud pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
 
 
 
 
48

 
  
SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
  
 
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
 
       
Dated: March30, 2012
By:
/s/ Ronald W. Pickett
 
   
Name: Ronald W. Pickett
 
   
President, Chief Executive Officer
 
  
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
  
Dated: March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ Ronald W. Pickett
 
   
Name: Ronald W. Pickett
 
   
President, Chief Executive Officer (PEO), Director
 
 
Dated: March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ Ownkar Persaud
 
   
Name: Ownkar Persaud
 
   
Chief Financial Officer (PFO and PAO)
 
 
Dated : March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ Robert P. Crabb
 
   
Name: Robert P. Crabb
 
   
Director
 
 
Dated : March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ Stephen L. Sadle
 
   
Name: Stephen L. Sadle
 
   
Director
 
 
Dated : March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ H. James Magnuson
 
   
Name: H. James Magnuson
 
   
Director
 
 
Dated : March 30, 2012
By:
/s/ Arthur P. Dammarell
 
   
Name: Arthur P. Dammarell
 
   
Director
 
    
 
49

 
  
Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc.
(A Development Stage Company)
Index to Consolidated Financial Statements
  
 
   
Page
     
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
F-2
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2011 and 2010
 
F-3
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2011, for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010 and for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011
 
F-4
     
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011
 
F-5
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the year ended December 31, 2011, for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2010 and for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011
 
F-7
     
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
F-8 to F-21
 




 
F-1

 
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


To the Board of Directors and Shareholders
Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc.


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. (the “Company”), a development stage company as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ deficit and cash flows for each of the two years ended December 31, 2011 and for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States of America). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to the above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the consolidated results of operations, and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2011 and for the period from July 26, 2010 (date of inception) through December 31, 2011 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 3 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company is a development stage company and is incapable of generating sufficient cash flow to sustain its operations without securing additional financing, which raises substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to this matter are described in Note 3. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
   
 
 
 
/s/ RBSM LLP
 

New York, New York
March 30, 2012
  
 
F-2

 
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(a development stage company)
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
      
   
2011
   
2010
 
ASSETS
           
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 52,332     $ 195,184  
Prepaid expenses
    -       29,697  
Total current assets
    52,332       224,881  
                 
Property and equipment, net
    11,244       -  
                 
Other assets:
               
Deposits
    9,330       9,330  
                 
Total assets
  $ 72,906     $ 234,211  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 478,355     $ 191,581  
Accrued liabilities and expenses
    627,650       183,126  
Advances from stockholders/officers
    5,000       47,000  
Convertible notes payable, net of unamortized debt discount of $57,778
    52,222       -  
Derivative liabilities
    237,395       -  
Total current liabilities
    1,400,622       421,707  
                 
Commitments and contingencies
    -       -  
                 
Stockholders' deficit:
               
Preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share; 10,000,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2011 and 2010
    -       -  
Common stock, par value $0.0001 per share; 500,000,000 shares authorized; 210,850,519 and 20,955,199 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively
    21,085       2,096  
Common stock to be issued
    480,000       457,000  
Additional paid in capital
    1,270,835       191,565  
Accumulated deficit during development stage
    (3,099,636 )     (838,157 )
Total stockholders' deficit
    (1,327,716 )     (187,496 )
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit
  $ 72,906     $ 234,211  
 
   
See the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 
F-3

 
    
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(a development stage company)
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
     
   
For the
year ended
December 31, 2011
   
For the period
From July 26, 2010
(date of inception)
through
December 31, 2010
   
For the period
From July 26, 2010
(date of inception)
through
December 31, 2011
 
REVENUE:
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES:
                       
Research and development
    362,850       73,559       436,409  
Selling, general and administrative
    1,713,895       764,598       2,478,493  
Depreciation
    2,197       -       2,197  
Total operating expenses
    2,078,942       838,157       2,917,099  
                         
Loss from operations
    (2,078,942 )     (838,157 )     (2,917,099 )
                         
Other income (expense):
                       
Interest expense
    (182,929 )     -       (182,929 )
Loss on modification of debt
    (88,849 )     -       (88,849 )
Gain on change in fair value of derivative liabilities
    89,241       -       89,241  
                         
Loss before provision for income taxes
    (2,261,479 )     (838,157 )     (3,099,636 )
                         
Provision for income taxes (benefit)
    -       -       -  
                         
NET LOSS
  $ (2,261,479 )   $ (838,157 )   $ (3,099,636 )
                         
Net loss per common share, basic and fully diluted
  $ (0.01 )   $ (0.04 )        
                         
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, basic and fully diluted
    226,844,313       20,955,199          
  
See the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
  
 
F-4

 

CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(a development stage company)
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
For the Period From July 26, 2010 (date of inception) Through December 31, 2011
 
   
Preferred stock
   
Common stock
   
Common to be Issued
   
Additional
Paid In
   
Deficit
Accumulated
During
Development
       
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Capital
   
Stage
   
Total
 
Balance, date of inception (July 26, 2010) adjusted for recapitalization
    -     $ -       20,955,199     $ 2,096       -     $ -     $ 191,565     $ -     $ 193,661  
Recapitalization and direct costs resulting in reverse merger:
                                                                       
Shares to be issued to Clean Wind Energy's stockholders
    -       -       -       -       300,000,000       30,000       -       -       30,000  
Shares to be issued for consulting services rendered in connection with reverse merger
    -       -       -       -       6,100,000       427,000       -       -       427,000  
Net loss
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (838,157 )     (838,157 )
Balance, December 31, 2010
    -       -       20,955,199       2,096       306,100,000       457,000       191,565       (838,157 )     (187,496 )
Recapitalization and direct costs resulting in reverse merger:
                                                                       
Shares issued to Clean Wind Energy's stockholders
    -       -       300,000,000       30,000       (300,000,000 )     (30,000 )     -       -       -  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered in connection with reverse merger
    -       -       100,000       10       (100,000 )     (7,000 )     6,990       -       -  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.20 per share
    -       -       100,000       10       -       -       19,990       -       20,000  
Shares to be issued in connection with PPM Subscription at $0.10 per share
    -       -       -       -       1,200,000       120,000       -       -       120,000  
Shares issued in connection with PPM Subscription at $0.10 per share
    -       -       1,200,000       120       (1,200,000 )     (120,000 )     119,880       -       -  
Shares issued in connection with PPM Subscription at $0.10 per share
    -       -       7,290,000       729       -       -       728,271       -       729,000  
Accrued warrants to be issued referring brokers in connection with PPM Subscription at $0.10 per share
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (29,400 )     -       (29,400 )
Subtotal
    -     $ -       329,645,199     $ 32,965       6,000,000     $ 420,000     $ 1,037,296     $ (838,157 )   $ 652,104  
 
   
See the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
 
 
F-5

 

CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(a development stage company)
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
For the Period From July 26, 2010 (date of inception) Through December 31, 2011
 
   
Preferred stock
   
Common stock
   
Common to be Issued
   
Additional
Paid In
   
Deficit
Accumulated
During
Development
       
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Capital
   
Stage
   
Total
 
Balance forward
    -     $ -       329,645,199     $ 32,965       6,000,000     $ 420,000     $ 1,037,296     $ (838,157 )   $ 652,104  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.27 per share
    -       -       24,422       2       -       -       6,591       -       6,593  
Broker's finders fees paid in connection with PPM Subscription
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (9,800 )     -       (9,800 )
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.20 per share
    -       -       13,787       1       -       -       2,756       -       2,757  
Shares to be issued in connection with PPM Subscription at $0.10 per share
    -       -       1,050,000       105       600,000       60,000       104,895       -       165,000  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.12 per share
    -       -       150,000       15       -       -       17,985       -       18,000  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.12 per share
    -       -       50,000       5       -       -       5,995       -       6,000  
Shares forfeited and cancelled by some Clean Wind Energy's stockholders acquired in connection with the merger upon resignation
    -       -       (120,600,000 )     (12,060 )     -       -       12,060       -       -  
Shares issued for consulting services rendered at $0.18 per share
    -       -       517,111       52       -       -       93,057       -       93,109  
Net loss
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (2,261,479 )     (2,261,479 )
Balance, December 31, 2011
    -     $ -       210,850,519     $ 21,085       6,600,000     $ 480,000     $ 1,270,835     $ (3,099,636 )   $ (1,327,716 )
    
See the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements
  
 
F-6

 
 
CLEAN WIND ENERGY TOWER, INC.
(a development stage company)
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
   
   
For the
year ended
December 31, 2011
   
For the period
From July 26, 2010
(date of inception)
through
December 31, 2010
   
For the period
From July 26, 2010
(date of inception)
through
December 31, 2011
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
                 
Net loss
  $ (2,261,479 )   $ (838,157 )   $ (3,099,636 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
                       
Depreciation
    2,197       -       2,197  
Amortization of debt discounts
    52,222       -       52,222  
Non cash interest
    127,787       -       127,787  
Common stock issued for services rendered
    146,459       427,000       573,459  
Loss on debt modification
    88,849       -       88,849  
Gain from change in fair value of derivative liabilities
    (89,241 )     -       (89,241 )
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
                       
Prepaid expenses
    29,697       (29,697 )     -  
Advances from stockholders/officers
    (42,000 )     47,000       5,000  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
    701,898       374,707       1,076,605  
Net cash used in operating activates
    (1,243,611 )     (19,147 )     (1,262,758 )
                         
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Net cash acquired from reverse merger
    -       223,586       223,586  
Purchase of property and equipment
    (13,441 )     -       (13,441 )
Payment of long term deposit
    -       (9,330 )     (9,330 )
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
    (13,441 )     214,256       200,815  
                         
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
                       
Proceeds from issuance of subsidiary's common stock
    -       75       75  
Proceeds from shares issued in connection with PPM Subscription
    1,004,200       -       1,004,200  
Proceeds from issuance of convertible notes payable
    110,000       -       110,000  
Net cash provided by financing activities
    1,114,200       75       1,114,275  
                         
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
    (142,852 )     195,184       52,332  
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
    195,184       -       -  
                         
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
  $ 52,332     $ 195,184     $ 52,332  
                         
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION
                 
                         
Interest paid
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
Income taxes paid
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
                         
Non cash investing and financing activities:
                       
Accrued warrants to be issued referring brokers in connection with PPM subscription at $0.10 per share
  $ 29,400     $ -     $ 29,400  
Shares forfeited and cancelled by some Clean Wind Energy's stockholders acquired in connection with the merger upon resignation
  $ 12,060     $ -     $ 12,060  
  
See the accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

 
F-7

 
  
CLEAN WIND ENERGY, INC.
(a development stage company)
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS

Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. (the “Company”, “we”, “us”, “our”) (formerly known as Superior Silver Mines, Inc.) was incorporated in the State of Idaho on January 22, 1962 as Superior Mines Company and then changed its name to Superior Silver Mines, Inc. The Company reincorporated as a Nevada corporation on December 27, 2010. The Company has been dormant for a number of years, and has no known mineral reserves.

On December 29, 2010, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated December 29, 2010 (the “Merger Agreement”), the Company consummated a reverse merger (the “Merger”) with Clean Wind Energy, Inc., a corporation formed under the laws of the State of Delaware on July 26, 2010 (“Clean Wind Energy”). In connection with the Merger, the Company issued to the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy in exchange for their Clean Wind Energy Common Stock, the right to receive an aggregate of 300,000,000 shares of the Company’s Common Stock. The Merger was accounted for as a “reverse merger”, since the stockholders of Clean Wind Energy owned a majority of the Company’s common stock immediately following the transaction and their management has assumed operational, management and governance control.
  
For accounting purposes, Clean Wind Energy was the surviving entity. The transaction was accounted for as a recapitalization of Clean Wind Energy pursuant to which Clean Wind Energy was treated as the surviving and continuing entity although the Company is the legal acquirer rather than a reverse acquisition. The Company did not recognize goodwill or any intangible assets in connection with this transaction. Accordingly, the Company’s historical financial statements are those of Clean Wind Energy immediately following the consummation of the reverse merger.
  
On January 21, 2011, the Company changed its name to Clean Wind Energy Tower, Inc. In addition, effective January 24, 2011, the Company’s quotation symbol on the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board was changed from SSVM.OB to CWET.OB.
  
Until the consummation of the Merger, the Company’s purpose was to seek, investigate and, if such investigation warranted, acquire an interest in business opportunities presented to it by persons or firms who, or which, desire to seek the perceived advantages of a publicly registered corporation. Because the Company had no operations and only nominal assets until the Merger, it was considered a shell company under rules promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Fair Value of Financial Instruments
  
Our short-term financial instruments, including cash, other assets and accounts payable and accrued expenses consist primarily of instruments without extended maturities, the fair value of which, based on management’s estimates, reasonably approximate their book value. The fair value of our notes and advances payable is based on management estimates and reasonably approximates their book value based on their current maturity.
    
Long-Lived Assets

We review long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable in accordance with ASC 360-10 (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets). Recoverability is measured by comparison of the carrying amount to the future net cash flows which the assets are expected to generate. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the assets exceeds the projected discounted future cash flows arising from the asset using a discount rate determined by management to be commensurate with the risk inherent to our current business model.
   
 
F-8

 
   
CLEAN WIND ENERGY, INC.
(a development stage company)
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS