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EX-23 - CONSENT OF CROWE HORWATH LLP - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex23.htm
EX-31.2 - RULE 13(A)-14(A) CERTIFICATION (CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER) - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex312.htm
EX-10.9 - EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT WITH GAYLIN ANDERSON - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex109.htm
EX-99.2 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL OFFICER - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex992.htm
EX-10.8 - EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT WITH MATTHEW BONACCORSO - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex108.htm
EX-99.1 - CERTIFICATION OF PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICER - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex991.htm
EX-31.1 - RULE 13(A)-14(A) CERTIFICATION (CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER) - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex311.htm
EX-10.13 - NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS SALARY AND BONUS ARRANGEMENTS - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex1013.htm
EX-10.10 - EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT WITH CHANG LIU - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex1010.htm
EX-32 - SECTION 1350 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT CERTIFICATION - BANC OF CALIFORNIA, INC.dex32.htm
Table of Contents

 

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

FOR ANNUAL AND TRANSITION REPORTS

PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 13 OR 15(d) OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
     For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

     For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 000-49806

 

 

FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Maryland   04-3639825

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

610 Bay Boulevard, Chula Vista, California   91910
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (619) 691-1519

 

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

(Title of class)

Nasdaq Global Market

(Name of each exchange on which registered)

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    YES  ¨.    NO  x.

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    YES  ¨.    NO  x.

Check whether the issuer (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES  x.    NO  ¨.

Check whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this Chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    YES  ¨    NO  ¨.

Check if there is no disclosure of delinquent filers in response to Item 405 of Regulation S-K contained herein, and no disclosure will be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “accelerated filer,” “large accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check One):

Large accelerated filer  ¨    Accelerated filer  ¨    Non-accelerated filer   ¨    Smaller reporting company  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    ¨  YES.    x  NO.

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of such stock on the Nasdaq Global Market as of June 30, 2010, was $21.9 million. (The exclusion from such amount of the market value of the shares owned by any person shall not be deemed an admission by the registrant that such person is an affiliate of the registrant.) As of February 24, 2011, there were issued and outstanding 9,729,066 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

PART III of Form 10-K—Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held during May 2011.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

FIRST PACTRUST BANCORP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

FORM 10-K

December 31, 2010

INDEX

 

         Page  
  PART I   

Item 1

 

Business

     1   

Item 1A

 

Risk Factors

     29   

Item 1B

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

     36   

Item 2

 

Properties

     37   

Item 3

 

Legal Proceedings

     37   

Item 4

 

Reserved

     37   
  PART II   

Item 5

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     38   

Item 6

 

Selected Financial Data

     39   

Item 7

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     41   

Item 7A

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     54   

Item 8

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

     56   

Item 9

 

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

     95   

Item 9A

 

Controls and Procedures

     95   

Item 9B

 

Other Information

     95   
  PART III   

Item 10

 

Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

     96   

Item 11

 

Executive Compensation

     96   

Item 12

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     97   

Item 13

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

     97   

Item 14

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

     97   
  PART IV   

Item 15

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

     98   
 

Signatures

     101   

 


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1. Business

General

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. (“the Company”) is a unitary thrift holding company that is subject to regulation by the Office of Thrift Supervision. The Company was incorporated under Maryland law in March 2002 to hold all of the stock of Pacific Trust Bank (“the Bank”). As a thrift holding company, First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc., activities are limited to banking, securities, insurance and financial services-related activities. See “How We Are Regulated—First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.” First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. is not an operating company and has no significant assets other than all of the outstanding shares of common stock of Pacific Trust Bank, the net proceeds retained from its initial public offering completed in August 2002, its loan to the First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. 401(k) Employee Stock Ownership Plan, the proceeds for investments made and the net proceeds retained from the private placement completed in November 2010. First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. has no significant liabilities other than employee compensation. The management of the Company and the Bank is substantially the same. However, Gregory Mitchell currently serves as President and Chief Operating Officer of the Company and is currently not an employee of the Bank. The Company utilizes the support staff and offices of the Bank and pays the Bank for these services. If the Company expands or changes its business in the future, the Company may hire additional employees of its own. Unless the context otherwise requires, all references to the Company include the Bank and the Company on a consolidated basis.

The Bank is a community-oriented financial institution offering a variety of financial services to meet the banking and financial needs of the communities we serve. The Bank is headquartered in San Diego County, California, and as of December 31, 2010 operated nine banking offices primarily serving San Diego and Riverside Counties in California.

The principal business consists of attracting retail deposits from the general public and investing these funds primarily in loans secured by first mortgages on owner-occupied, one-to four- family residences, a variety of consumer loans, multi-family and commercial real estate and, to a limited extent, commercial business loans. The Company also invests in securities and other assets.

The Company offers a variety of deposit accounts for both individuals and businesses with varying rates and terms, which generally include savings accounts, money market deposits, certificate accounts and checking accounts. The Company solicits deposits in the Company’s market area and, to a lesser extent, from institutional depositors nationwide, and in the past has accepted brokered deposits.

The principal executive offices of First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. are located at 610 Bay Boulevard, Chula Vista, California, and its telephone number is (619) 691-1519. The Company’s common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol FPTB.

The Company’s reports, proxy statements and other information the Company files with the SEC, as well as news releases, are available free of charge through the Company’s Internet site at http://www.firstpactrustbancorp.com. This information can be found on the First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. “News” or “SEC Filings” pages of our Internet site. The annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed and furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act are available as soon as reasonably practicable after they have been filed with the SEC. Reference to the Company’s Internet address is not intended to incorporate any of the information contained on our Internet site into this document.

On November 1, 2010, the Company completed a private placement to select institutional and other accredited investors of 4,418,390 shares of common stock and 1,036,156 shares of newly designated Class B non-voting common stock at a price of $11.00 per share, providing the Company with aggregate gross proceeds

 

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of $60.0 million. In connection with the private placement, the Company issued warrants that are exercisable for a total of 1,635,000 shares of non-voting common stock at an exercise price of $11.00 per share. The primary purpose of the private placement was to enable the Company to repurchase the 19,300 shares of Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock Series A that was issued to the U.S. Department of Treasury on November 21, 2008 pursuant to the “TARP”, Troubled Asset Relief Program’s Capital Purchase Program. On December 15, 2010, the Company redeemed the $19.3 million of Series A Preferred Stock issued to the U.S. Treasury.

During much of 2008, 2009 and 2010, market and economic conditions in our industry and in California have declined resulting in increased delinquencies and foreclosures. A number of federal legislative and regulatory initiatives have been enacted to address these conditions. See “Asset Quality” and “How we are Regulated” in Item 1, “Risk Factors” in Item 1A and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7.

Forward-Looking Statements

This Form 10-K contains various forward-looking statements that are based on assumptions and describe our future plans and strategies and our expectations. These forward-looking statements are generally identified by words such as “believe,” “expect,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project,” or similar words. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is uncertain. Factors which could cause actual results to differ materially from those estimated include, but are not limited to, changes in interest rates, general economic conditions, legislative/regulatory changes, monetary and fiscal policies of the U.S. Government, including policies of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board, the quality and composition of our loan and investment portfolios, demand for our loan products, deposit flows, our operating expenses, competition, demand for financial services in our market areas and accounting principles and guidelines. These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward-looking statements, and you should not rely too much on these statements. We do not undertake, and specifically disclaim, any obligation to publicly revise any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events.

Lending Activities

General. The Company’s mortgage loans carry either a fixed or an adjustable rate of interest. Mortgage loans generally are long-term and amortize on a monthly basis with principal and/or interest due each month. At December 31, 2010, the Company’s net loan portfolio totaled $678.2 million, which constituted 78.7% of our total assets. The breakdown of loans in the portfolio was: 83.8% 1-4 residential (the “SFR Mortgage Portfolio”), 7.6% commercial real estate, 4.8% multi-family, 2.1% land, 1.7% Consumer and other.

The $578.8 million SFR mortgage portfolio was comprised of $568.9 million of first deed of trust loans and $9.9 million of loans secured by subordinated or junior liens. The Company’s SFR mortgage portfolio is comprised of a combination of traditional, fully-amortizing loans and non-traditional and/or interest only loans. For instance, in 2005 the Company introduced a fully-transactional flexible mortgage product called the “Green Account.” The Green Account is a first mortgage line of credit with an associated “clearing account” that allows all types of deposits and withdrawals to be performed, including direct deposit, check, debit card, ATM, ACH debits and credits, and internet banking and bill payment transactions. For further detailed information on the Green Account, visit the Company’s website at www.pacifictrustbank.com. At December 31, 2010, the balance of the Company’s Green Account loans totaled $245.5 million. Also, the Company had a total of $177.9 million in interest-only mortgage loans and $32.1 million in mortgage loans with potential for negative amortization.

As of December 31, 2010, the Executive Vice President of Lending may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $2.0 million. The President/CEO of the Bank may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $2.5 million. The Management Loan Committee may approve loans

 

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to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $8.0 million, with no single loan exceeding $4.0 million. The Board Loan Committee must approve loans over these amounts or outside our general loan policy. During January, 2011, the Board of Directors of the Bank approved increases to these loan authorizations. Currently, the Executive Vice President of Lending may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $2.5 million. The Chief Credit Officer may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $3.5 million. The President/CEO may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $2.5 million. The Management Loan Committee may approve loans to one borrower or group of related borrowers up to $10.0 million, with no single loan exceeding $5.0 million. The Board Loan Committee must approve loans over these amounts or outside our general loan policy.

At December 31, 2010, the maximum amount which the Company could have loaned to any one borrower and the borrower’s related entities was approximately $16.3 million. The largest lending relationship to a single borrower or a group of related borrowers was a combination of commercial real estate, multi-family and single family loans with an aggregate loan exposure amount of $12.0 million. The properties securing these loans are located in Anaheim and San Diego, California. All of these loans were performing in accordance with their terms as of December 31, 2010.

The following table presents information concerning the composition of the Company’s loan portfolio in dollar amounts and in percentages as of the dates indicated.

 

    December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  

Real Estate

                   

One- to four-family

  $ 355,007        51.38   $ 425,125        56.00   $ 460,316        56.92   $ 421,064        58.96   $ 515,891        69.46

Multi-family

    29,245        4.23        31,421        4.14        34,831        4.31        37,339        5.23        49,597        6.68   

Non-Residential

    39,035        5.65        39,900        5.26        41,498        5.13        35,500        4.97        36,605        4.93   

Land

    10,660        1.54        13,549        1.78        21,733        2.69        21,705        3.04        20,108        2.71   

Construction

    —          —          —          —          17,835        2.20        18,866        2.64        16,409        2.21   
                                                                               

Other Loans:

                   

Consumer

    11,031        1.60        11,370        1.50        12,313        1.52        14,293        2.00        16,195        2.18   

Green*

    245,481        35.53        237,188        31.25        219,091        27.09        163,962        22.96        87,294        11.75   

Commercial

    529        0.07        567        0.07        1,133        0.14        1,398        0.20        611        0.08   
                                                                               

Total loans

    690,988        100.00     759,120        100.00     808,750        100.00     714,127        100.00     742,710        100.00

Net deferred loan origination costs

    1,824          2,262          2,581          2,208          2,004     

Allowance for loan losses

    (14,637       (13,079       (18,286       (6,240       (4,670  
                                                 

Total loans receivable, net

  $ 678,175        $ 748,303        $ 793,045        $ 710,095        $ 740,044     
                                                 

 

* Under current OTS guidance, the Bank is required to classify Green loans as HELOCs on its quarterly Thrift Financial Report (“TFR”) due to the revolver feature of this product. Nonetheless, 87.4% of Green mortgages are first trust deed mortgages. The Company has requested the OTS reconsider the classification of these loans on TFRs to better reflect their terms and characteristics. Historically, these loans have outperformed the Bank’s traditional one-to four- unit first deed of trust mortgage portfolio. From 2008-2010, the Green Account loans experienced losses of 0.14% of the aggregate loan amount, while the traditional mortgage portfolio experienced a loss rate of 0.13%. As of December 31, 2010, none of the Company’s Green Accounts were nonperforming.

As of December 31, 2010, of this total $214.5 million was secured by one-to four–family properties, $13.7 million was secured by commercial properties, $9.3 million was secured by second trust deed lines of credit, $3.8 million was secured by multi-family properties and $4.2 million was secured by land. At 12/31/09, of this total $208.9 million was secured by one-to four–family properties, $14.3 million was secured by commercial properties, $8.7 million was secured by second trust deed lines of credit, $2.8 million was

 

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secured by multi-family properties and $2.5 million was secured by land. At 12/31/08, of this total $192.5 million was secured by one-to four-family loans, $14.9 million was secured by commercial properties, $8.3 million was secured by second trust deed line of credit, $2.5 million was secured by multi-family properties, and $798 thousand was secured by land. At 12/31/07, of this total $149.3 million was secured by one-to four- family properties, $6.2 million was secured by commercial properties, $5.7 million was secured by second trust deed lines of credit, $2.3 million was secured by multi-family properties and $429 thousand was secured by land. At 12/31/06, of this total $82.7 million was secured by one- to four- family properties, $2.0 million was secured by second trust deed lines of credit, $1.3 million was secured by multi-family properties and $1.7 million was secured by commercial properties.

The following table shows the composition of the Company’s loan portfolio by fixed- and adjustable-rate at the dates indicated.

 

    December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in Thousands)  

FIXED-RATE LOANS

                   

Real Estate

                   

One- to four-family

  $ 5,019        0.73   $ 6,396        0.84   $ 7,740        0.96   $ 10,440        1.46   $ 10,750        1.45

Multi-family

    22,532        3.26        21,992        2.90        22,693        2.81        23,035        3.23        29,458        3.97   

Non-Residential

    24,463        3.54        25,048        3.30        25,591        3.16        25,425        3.56        17,984        2.42   

Land

    9,823        1.42        12,691        1.67        21,631        2.67        21,601        3.02        20,002        2.69   

Other loans

                   

Consumer:

    143        0.02        249        0.03        366        0.05        868        0.12        927        0.12   

Green

    1,728        0.25        1,071        0.14        798        0.10        429        0.06        —          —     

Commercial

    500        0.07        511        0.07        525        0.06        500        0.07        —          —     
                                                                               

Total fixed-rate loans

    64,208        9.29        67,958        8.95        79,344        9.81        82,298        11.52        79,121        10.65   
                                                                               

ADJUSTABLE-RATE

                   

Real Estate

                   

One- to four-family

    349,988        50.65        418,730        55.16        452,576        55.96        410,624        57.50        505,141        68.01   

Multi-family

    6,713        0.97        9,429        1.24        12,138        1.50        14,304        2.00        20,139        2.71   

Non-Residential

    14,572        2.11        14,852        1.96        15,906        1.97        10,075        1.41        18,621        2.51   

Land

    837        0.12        857        0.11        103        0.01        104        0.02        106        0.02   

Construction

    —          —          —          —          17,835        2.20        18,866        2.64        16,409        2.21   

Other loans

                   

Consumer

    10,888        1.58        11,121        1.47        11,948        1.48        13,447        1.88        15,268        2.06   

Green

    243,753        35.28        236,117        31.10        218,292        26.99        163,533        22.90        87,294        11.75   

Commercial

    29        0.00        56        0.01        608        0.08        876        0.13        611        0.08   
                                                                               

Total adjustable-rate loans

    626,780        90.71        691,162        91.05        729,406        90.19        631,829        88.48        663,589        89.35   
                                                                               

Total loans

    690,988        100.00     759,120        100.00     808,750        100.00     714,127        100.00     742,710        100.00
                                                                               

Net deferred loan origination costs

    1,824          2,262          2,581          2,208          2,004     

Allowance for loan losses

    (14,637       (13,079       (18,286       (6,240       (4,670  
                                                 

Total loans receivable, net

  $ 678,175        $ 748,303        $ 793,045        $ 710,095        $ 740,044     
                                                 

 

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The following schedule illustrates the contractual maturity of the Company’s loan portfolio at December 31, 2010. (Dollars in thousands)

 

     Real Estate  
     One- to Four-Family     Multi-Family     Non-Residential     Land     Construction  

Due During Years Ending December 31,

   Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
 

2011(1)

   $ 813         4.86   $ 843         6.02   $ 180         5.25   $ 9,823         6.60   $ —           —  

2012

     11         5.50        579         5.07        —           —          —           —          —           —     

2013 and 2014

     2,230         6.27        3,090         5.00        6,215         5.00        —           —          —           —     

2015 to 2019

     3,418         5.06        98         4.25        197         4.25        —           —          —           —     

2020 to 2034

     122,850         3.62        4,365         5.17        31,049         6.87        738         3.62        —           —     

2035 and following

     225,685         5.32        20,270         6.19        1,394         3.50        99         3.50        —           —     
                                                                                     

Total

   $ 355,007         4.63   $ 29,245         5.78   $ 39,035         6.56   $ 10,660         5.92   $ —           —  
                                                                                     

 

     Consumer     Green     Commercial
Business
    TOTALS  

Due During Years Ending December 31,

   Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
 

2011(1)

   $ 3,713         5.84   $ 1,356         9.50   $ 499         12.65    $ 17,227         5.85

2012

     101         5.14        366         4.38        15         10.25        1,072         5.67   

2013 and 2014

     533         3.30        —           —          15         7.50        12,083         3.86   

2015 to 2019

     6,325         3.45        146         3.50        —           —          10,184         3.85   

2020 to 2034

     359         2.97        243,613         4.74        —           —          402,974         4.26   

2035 and following

     —           —          —           —          —           —          247,448         5.38   
                                                                    

Total

   $ 11,031         5.58   $ 245,481         4.75   $ 529         11.11   $ 690,988         5.32
                                                                    

 

(1) Includes demand loans, loans having no stated maturity and overdraft loans.

 

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The following schedule illustrates the Company’s loan portfolio at December 31, 2010 as the loans reprice. Loans which have adjustable or renegotiable interest rates are shown as maturing in the period during which the loan reprices. The schedule does not reflect the effects of possible prepayments or enforcement of due-on-sale clauses. (Dollars in thousands).

 

     One- to Four-Family     Multi-Family     Non-Residential     Land  

Due During Years Ending December 31,

   Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
 

2011(1)

   $ 195,875         4.25   $ 18,437         5.69   $ 30,979         6.42   $ 10,660         5.92

2012

     46,320         4.83        3,235         5.72        810         6.87        —           —     

2013 and 2014

     76,847         5.29        6,037         6.04        475         6.87        —           —     

2015 to 2019

     34,237         5.12        1,536         6.19        5,421         6.87        —           —     

2020 to 2034

     1,728         3.62        —           —          1,350         6.87        —           —     
                                                                    

Total

   $ 355,007         4.63   $ 29,245         5.78   $ 39,035         6.56   $ 10,660         5.92
                                                                    

 

     Consumer     Green     Commercial
Business
    TOTALS  

Due During Years Ending December 31,

   Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount      Weighted
Average
Rate
 

2011(1)

   $ 10,848         5.59   $ 178,725         4.76   $ 514         11.62   $ 446,038         5.36

2012

     144         4.80        34,483         4.73        —           —          84,992         4.91   

2013 and 2014

     39         3.30        32,273         4.74        15         7.50        115,686         5.18   

2015 to 2019

     —           —          —           —          —           —          41,194         5.23   

2020 to 2034

     —           —          —           —          —           —          3,078         3.91   
                                                                    

Total

   $ 11,031         5.58   $ 245,481         4.75   $ 529         11.11   $ 690,988         5.32
                                                                    

 

(1) Includes demand loans, loans having no stated maturity and overdraft loans.

The total amount of loans due after December 31, 2011 which have predetermined interest rates is $51.9 million, while the total amount of loans due after such date which have floating or adjustable interest rates is $621.9 million.

 

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One- to Four-Family Residential Real Estate Lending. The Company focuses lending efforts primarily on the origination of loans secured by first mortgages on owner-occupied, one- to four-family residences in San Diego and Riverside Counties, California. At December 31, 2010, one- to four-family residential mortgage loans totaled $569.5 million, or 82.4% of our gross loan portfolio including the portion of the Company’s Green Account home equity loan portfolio that are secured by first trust deeds.

The Company generally underwrites one- to four-family loans based on the applicant’s income and credit history and the appraised value of the subject property. Generally, the Company lends up to 80% of the lesser of the appraised value or purchase price for one- to four-family residential loans. For loans with a loan-to-value ratio in excess of 70%, the Company generally charges a higher interest rate. The Company currently has a very limited quantity of loans with a loan-to-value ratio (at time of closing) in excess of 80% at the date of loan origination. Properties securing our one- to four-family loans are appraised by independent fee appraisers approved by management. Generally, the Company requires borrowers to obtain title insurance, hazard insurance, and flood insurance, if necessary.

National and regional indicators of real estate values show continued depressed collateral values relative to peak levels, however, the Company believes that the current loan loss reserves are adequate to cover inherent losses. Further, the Company generally adjusts underwriting criteria by discounting the appraisal value by 5.0% when underwriting mortgages in declining market areas.

The Company currently originates one- to four-family mortgage loans on either a fixed- or an adjustable-rate basis, as consumer demand and Bank risk management dictates. The Company’s pricing strategy for mortgage loans includes setting interest rates that are competitive with other local financial institutions.

Adjustable-rate mortgages, or “ARM” loans are offered with flexible initial and periodic repricing dates, ranging from one year to seven years through the life of the loan. The Company uses a variety of indices to reprice ARM loans. During the year ended December 31, 2010, the Company originated $78.9 million of one- to four-family ARM loans with terms up to 30 years. Of these, $75.3 million were Green account loans. See further discussion under “Green Account Loans.”

One- to four-family loans may be assumable, subject to the Company’s approval, and may contain prepayment penalties. Most ARM loans are written using generally accepted underwriting guidelines. Mainly, due to the generally large loan size, these loans may not be readily saleable to Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, but are saleable to other private investors. The Company’s real estate loans generally contain a “due on sale” clause allowing us to declare the unpaid principal balance due and payable upon the sale of the security property.

The Company no longer offers ARM loans which may provide for negative amortization of the principal balance and has not offered these loans since March, 2006. At December 31, 2010, the existing negative amortizing loans in the one-to four- family portfolio totaling $30.1 million have monthly interest rate adjustments after the specified introductory rate term, and annual maximum payment adjustments of 7.5% during the first five years of the loan. The principal balance on these loans may increase up to 110% of the original loan amount as a result of the payments not being sufficient to cover the interest due during the first five years of the loan term. These loans adjust to fully amortize after five years through contractual maturity, or upon the outstanding loan balance reaching 110% of the original loan amount with up to a 30-year term. At December 31, 2010, $2.4 million of the Company’s negatively amortizing loan portfolio was non-performing loans.

In addition, the Bank currently offers interest-only loans and expects originations of these loans to continue. At December 31, 2010, the Company had a total of $148.4 million of interest-only mortgage loans secured by one-to four- family homes. These loans become fully amortized after the initial fixed rate period. At December 31, 2010, $10.1 million of the Company’s interest-only loan portfolio was nonperforming. The Company also offers its Green Account secured lines of credit which have interest only minimum payment requirements. See further discussion under “Consumer and Other Real Estate Lending.”

 

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In order to remain competitive in our market areas, the Company, at times, originates ARM loans at initial rates below the fully indexed rate. The Company’s ARM loans generally provide for specified minimum and maximum interest rates, with a lifetime cap, and a periodic adjustment on the interest rate over the rate in effect on the date of origination. As a consequence of using caps, the interest rates on these loans may not be as rate sensitive as is the Company’s cost of funds.

ARM loans generally pose different credit risks than fixed-rate loans, primarily because as interest rates rise, the borrower’s minimum monthly payment rises, increasing the potential for default.( See “Asset Quality—Non-performing Assets” and “Classified Assets.”) At December 31, 2010, the Company’s one- to four-family ARM loan portfolio totaled $350.0 million, or 50.7% of our gross loan portfolio. At that date, the fixed-rate one-to four-family mortgage loan portfolio totaled $5.0 million, or 0.7% of the Company’s gross loan portfolio. The composition of the Company’s loan portfolio did not significantly change during 2010. At December 31, 2010, $13.5 million of the Company’s ARM loan portfolio were non-performing loans.

Green Account Loans. The Company has $245.5 million of total Green account loans which represented 35.5% of the gross loan portfolio at December 31, 2010. The Company has SFR Green account loans secured by first trust deeds on one-to four- family properties of $214.5 million and other Green account loans that include second deeds of trust and loans secured against other property types of $31.0 million. Green account home equity loans generally have a fifteen year draw period with interest-only payment requirements, a balloon payment requirement a the end of the draw period and a maximum 80% loan to value ratio. Home equity lines of credit, other than Green account loans, may be originated in amounts, together with the amount of the existing first mortgage, up to 80% of the value of the property securing the loan.

Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Lending. The Company offers a variety of multi-family and commercial real estate loans. These loans are secured primarily by multi-family dwellings, and a limited amount of small retail establishments, hotels, motels, warehouses, and small office buildings primarily located in the Company’s market area. At December 31, 2010, multi-family and commercial real estate loans totaled $85.8 million or 12.4% of the Company’s gross loan portfolio.

The Company’s loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate are originated with either a fixed or adjustable interest rate. The interest rate on adjustable-rate loans is based on a variety of indices, generally determined through negotiation with the borrower. Loan-to-value ratios on multi-family real estate loans typically do not exceed 75% of the appraised value of the property securing the loan. These loans typically require monthly payments, may contain balloon payments and have maximum maturities of 30 years. Loan-to-value ratios on commercial real estate loans typically do not exceed 70% of the appraised value of the property securing the loan and have maximum maturities of 25 years.

Loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate are underwritten based on the income producing potential of the property and the financial strength of the borrower. The net operating income, which is the income derived from the operation of the property less all operating expenses, must be sufficient to cover the payments related to the outstanding debt. The Company generally requires an assignment of rents or leases in order to be assured that the cash flow from the project will be used to repay the debt. Appraisals on properties securing multi-family and commercial real estate loans are performed by independent state licensed fee appraisers approved by management. See “—Loan Originations, Purchases, Sales and Repayments.” The Company generally maintains a tax or insurance escrow account for loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate. In order to monitor the adequacy of cash flows on income-producing properties, the borrower may be required to provide periodic financial information.

Loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate properties generally involve a greater degree of credit risk than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. These loans typically involve large balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. The largest multi-family or commercial real estate loan at December 31, 2010 was secured by six one-to four- unit properties located in San Diego County with a principal

 

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balance of $8.7 million and a remaining line of credit limit of $2.0 million. At December 31, 2010, this loan was performing in accordance with the terms of the note.

Because payments on loans secured by multi-family and commercial real estate properties are often dependent on the successful operation or management of the properties, repayment of these loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy. If the cash flow from the project is reduced, or if leases are not obtained or renewed, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan may be impaired. See “—Asset Quality—Non-performing Loans” in Item 1.

Construction Lending and Land Loans. The Company has not historically originated a significant amount of construction loans. From time to time the Company has purchased participations in real estate construction loans, however, it has not done so since 2008. In addition, the Company may in the future originate or purchase loans or participations in construction. The Company had no construction loans at December 31, 2010.

The Company has $14.8 million in land loans. The Company has not historically originated a significant amount of land loans. From time to time the Company purchased participations in real estate construction loans, The Company may in the future originate or purchase loans or participations secured by land.

Consumer and Other Real Estate Lending. Consumer loans generally have shorter terms to maturity or variable interest rates, which reduce our exposure to changes in interest rates, and carry higher rates of interest than do conventional one- to four-family residential mortgage loans. In addition, management believes that offering consumer loan products helps to expand and create stronger ties to the Company’s existing customer base by increasing the number of customer relationships and providing cross-marketing opportunities. At December 31, 2010, the Company’s consumer and other loan portfolio totaled $11.6 million, or 1.7% of our gross loan portfolio1. The Company offers a variety of secured consumer loans, including second trust deed home equity loans and home equity lines of credit and loans secured by savings deposits. The Company also offers a limited amount of unsecured loans. The Company originates consumer and other real estate loans primarily in its market area.

The Company’s home equity lines of credit totaled $9.4 million, and comprised 1.4% of the gross loan portfolio at December 31, 2010. Additionally, the Company has $245.5 million of Green Account loans which represented 35.5% of the gross loan portfolio at December 31, 2010 which, for the purpose of this report, are included in the section titles Green Mortgage Loans above. Other home equity lines of credit have a seven or ten year draw period and require the payment of 1.0% or 1.5% of the outstanding loan balance per month (depending on the terms) during the draw period, which amount may be re-borrowed at any time during the draw period. Home equity lines of credit with a 10 year draw period have a balloon payment due at the end of the draw period. For loans with shorter term draw periods, once the draw period has lapsed, generally the payment is fixed based on the loan balance at that time. The Company actively monitors changes in the market value of all home loans contained in its portfolio. For instance, in 2010 the Company purchased independent, third party valuations of every property in its residential loan portfolio twice during the year. The most recent valuations were as of November 30, 2010. The Company has the right to adjust, and has adjusted, existing lines of credit to address current market conditions subject to the rules and regulations affecting home equity lines of credit. At December 31, 2010, unfunded commitments on Green Accounts totaled $35.9 million and $13.5 million on other consumer lines of credit. Other consumer loan terms vary according to the type of collateral, length of contract and creditworthiness of the borrower.

 

1 Pursuant to OTS guidance, the Company includes its Green Mortgages as HELOC loans in its quarterly call reports. This increases the HELOC exposure from $9.4 million to $254.9 million. Given that historically the first deed of trust residential Green Mortgages have performed similarly to other non-traditional SFR mortgages and are underwritten as first deed of trust mortgages, the bank considers these loans as 1-4 Unit SFR mortgages.

 

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Auto loans totaled $64 thousand at December 31, 2010, or 0.01% of the Company’s gross loan portfolio. Loan-to-value ratios were up to 100% of the sales price for new autos and 100% of retail value on used autos, based on valuations from official used car guides. The Company no longer originates auto loans.

Consumer and other real estate loans may entail greater risk than do one- to four-family residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans which are secured by rapidly depreciable assets, such as automobiles and recreational vehicles. In these cases, any repossessed collateral for a defaulted loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment of the outstanding loan balance. As a result, consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability and, thus, are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness, or personal bankruptcy. See “—Asset Quality—Non-performing Loans” in Item 1.

Commercial Business Lending. At December 31, 2010, commercial business loans totaled $529 thousand or 0.1% of the gross loan portfolio. The Company’s commercial business lending policy includes credit file documentation and analysis of the borrower’s background, capacity to repay the loan, the adequacy of the borrower’s capital and collateral as well as an evaluation of other conditions affecting the borrower. Analysis of the borrower’s past, present and future cash flows is also an important aspect of our credit analysis. The Company may obtain personal guarantees on our commercial business loans. Nonetheless, these loans are believed to carry higher credit risk than more traditional single-family home loans.

Unlike residential mortgage loans, commercial business loans are typically made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flow of the borrower’s business. As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial business loans may be substantially dependent on the success of the business itself (which, in turn, is often dependent in part upon general economic conditions). The Company’s commercial business loans are usually, but not always, secured by business assets. However, the collateral securing the loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value based on the success of the business. See “—Asset Quality—Non-performing Loans” in Item 1.

Loan Originations, Purchases, Repayments, and Servicing

The Company originates real estate secured loans primarily through mortgage brokers and banking relationships. By originating most loans through brokers, the Company is better able to control overhead costs and efficiently utilize management resources. The Company is a portfolio lender of products not readily saleable to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, although they are saleable to private investors. The Company did not attempt to sell any of its loans during 2010.

The Company also originates consumer and real estate loans on a direct basis through our marketing efforts, and our existing and walk-in customers. The Company originates both adjustable and, to a much lesser extent, fixed-rate loans, however, the ability to originate loans is dependent upon customer demand for loans in our market areas. Demand is affected by competition and the interest rate environment. During the last few years, the Company has significantly increased origination of ARM loans. The Company has also purchased ARM loans secured by one-to four-family residences and participations in construction and commercial real estate loans in the past. During 2010, the Company re-purchased the outstanding portion of a participation loan previously sold totaling $182 thousand. Loans and participations purchased must conform to the Company’s underwriting guidelines or guidelines acceptable to the management loan committee. In periods of economic uncertainty, the ability of financial institutions to originate or purchase large dollar volumes of real estate loans may be substantially reduced or restricted, with a resultant decrease in interest income. During 2005, the Company introduced a new lending product called the “Green Account”, America’s first fully transactional flexible mortgage account. Originations of this product totaled $85.2 million and $87.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

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The following table shows loan origination, purchase, sale, and repayment activities for the periods indicated.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
     (In thousands)  

Originations by type:

      

Adjustable rate:

      

Real estate—one- to four-family

   $ 3,552      $ 16,293      $ 103,790   

—multi-family, commercial and land

     3,742        1,096        8,666   

—construction or development

     —          —          35   

Consumer and other

     89,389     92,311     129,195

—commercial business

     —          —          111   
                        

Total adjustable-rate

     96,683        109,700        241,797   

Fixed rate:

      

Real estate—one- to four-family

     —          260        1,252   

—multi-family, commercial and land

     —          19        3,561   

Non-real estate—consumer

     387        427        529   

—commercial business

     871        297        2,119   
                        

Total fixed-rate

     1,258        1,003        7,461   

Total loans originated

     97,941        110,703        249,258   

Purchases:

      

Real estate—one- to four-family

     182        —          —     

—multi-family, commercial and land

     —          —          —     

—construction or development

     —          —          —     

Consumer and other

     —          —          —     

—commercial business

     —          —          —     
                        

Total loans purchased

     182        —          —     

Repayments:

      

Principal repayments

     (158,573     (137,913     (154,635

Increase (decrease) in other items, net

     (9,424     (17,532     (11,673
                        

Net increase (decrease)

   $ (69,874   $ (44,742   $ 82,950   
                        

 

* Of this total, $85.2 million represents originations of the Company’s Green Account product, of which $75.3 million is secured by one-to four-family properties, $5.1 million is secured by land, $1.4 million is secured by multi-family properties and $3.4 million is secured by commercial properties. At 12/31/09, of this total, $87.7 million represents originations of the Company’s Green Account product, of which $81.4 million is secured by one-to four-family properties, $3.5 million is secured by land, $1.8 million is secured by multi-family properties and $978 thousand is secured by commercial properties. At 12/31/08, of this total, $122.6 million represents originations of the Company’s Green Account product, of which $117.3 million is secured by one-to-four family properties, $4.5 million is secured by commercial properties, $370 thousand is secured by land, and $359 thousand is secured by multi-family properties.

Asset Quality

Real estate loans are serviced in house in accordance with secondary market guidelines. When a borrower fails to make a payment on a mortgage loan on or before the default date, a late charge notice is mailed 16 days after the due date. All delinquent accounts are reviewed by a collector, who attempts to cure the delinquency by contacting the borrower prior to the loan becoming 30 days past due. If the loan becomes 60 days delinquent, the collector will generally contact the borrower by phone or send a personal letter to the borrower in order to identify the reason for the delinquency. Once the loan becomes 90 days delinquent, contact with the borrower is

 

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made requesting payment of the delinquent amount in full, or the establishment of an acceptable repayment plan to bring the loan current. When a loan becomes 90 days delinquent, a drive-by inspection is made. If the account becomes 120 days delinquent, and an acceptable repayment plan has not been agreed upon, a collection officer will generally initiate foreclosure or refer the account to the Company’s counsel to initiate foreclosure proceedings.

For consumer loans a similar process is followed, with the initial written contact being made once the loan is 10 days past due with a follow-up notice at 16 days past due. Follow-up contacts are generally on an accelerated basis compared to the mortgage loan procedure.

Accruing Loans in Past Due Status. The following table is a summary of our performing loans that were past due at least 30 days but less than 90 days past due as of December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009. The Company ceases accruing interest, and therefore classifies as nonperforming, any loan to which principal or interest has been in default for period of greater than 90 days, or if repayment in full of interest or principal is not expected (dollars in thousands):

 

     December 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
 

Performing loans past due 30 to 90 days:

    

One-to four-family

   $ 15,966      $ 17,455   

Commercial and multi-family

     540        189   

Home equity

     —          —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     9,927        5,608   

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —          —     

Construction

     —          —     

Commercial

     665        691   

Land

     738        —     

Consumer and other

     6        30   
                

Total performing loans past due 30 to 90 days

   $ 27,842      $ 23,973   
                

Ratios:

    

Performing loans past due 30 to 90 days as a percentage of total loans

     4.03     3.16

Performing loans past due 90 days or more as a percentage of total loans

     0.00     0.00

Total performing loans in past due status as a percentage of total loans

     4.03     3.16

Non-Performing Assets and Restructured Loans. At December 31, 2010, the Company had $26.5 million in net nonperforming assets compared to $29.0 million at December 31, 2009, a net decrease of $2.5 million.

 

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The following table is a summary of our nonperforming assets, net of specific valuation allowances, at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 (dollars in thousands):

 

     At December  31,
2009
    Increases
(2)
     Decreases
(3)
    At December 31,
2010
 

Nonperforming loans (1)

         

One-to four-family

   $ 16,752      $ 11,575       $ (15,997   $ 12,330   

Commercial and multi-family

     1,831        —           (1,831     —     

Home-Equity

     —          —           —          —     

Real estate secured-first trust deeds (Green acct)

     3,288        —           (3,288     —     

Real estate secured-second trust deeds (Green acct)

     —          —           —          —     

Commercial

     —          —           —          —     

Land

     1,400        7,581         (1,400     7,581   

Consumer

     —          2         —          2   
                                 

Total nonperforming loans

   $ 23,271      $ 19,158       $ (22,516   $ 19,913   

Other real estate owned

   $ 5,680      $ 13,962       $ (13,080   $ 6,562   
                                 

Total nonperforming assets

   $ 28,951      $ 33,120       $ (35,596   $ 26,475   
                                 

Ratios

         

Nonperforming loans to total loans

     3.37          2.88

Nonperforming assets to total loans plus other real estate owned

     3.79          3.80

 

(1) The Company ceases accruing interest, and therefore classifies as nonperforming, any loan as to which principal or interest has been in default for a period of greater than 90 days, or if repayment in full of interest or principal is not expected. Nonperforming loans exclude loans that have been restructured and remain on accruing status. These loans are not considered to be nonperforming because they were performing loans immediately prior to their restructuring and are currently performing in accordance with the restructured terms. At December 31, 2010, gross nonperforming loans totaled $21.1 million. At December 31, 2009, gross nonperforming loans totaled $25.6 million.
(2) Increases in nonperforming loans are attributable to loans where we have discontinued the accrual of interest at some point during the year ended December 31, 2010. Increases in other real estate owned represent the value of properties that have been foreclosed upon during December 2010.
(3) Decreases in nonperforming loans are primarily attributable to payments we have collected from borrowers, charge-offs of recorded balances and transfers of balances to other real estate owned during 2010. Decreases in other real estate owned represent either the sale, disposition or valuation adjustment on properties which had previously been foreclosed upon.

Nonperforming loans decreased $3.4 million to $19.9 million at December 31, 2010 compared to $23.3 million at December 31, 2009. Loan loss reserves totaling $1.2 million have been established for these loans. The Company utilizes estimated current market values when assessing loan loss provisions for collateral dependent loans.

Troubled Debt Restructured Loans (TDRs). As of December 31, 2010 the Company had 31 loans with an aggregate balance of $26.1 million classified as TDR. Specific valuation allowances totaling $3.1 million have been established for these loans. When a loan becomes a TDR the Company ceases accruing interest, recognizes principal and interest payments on a cash basis and classifies it as non-accrual until the borrower has made at least six consecutive payments and in certain instances twelve consecutive payments under the modified terms. Once the borrower has made at least twelve consecutive payments the Company performs a cash flow analysis to determine Of the 31 loans classified as TDR, 27 loans totaling $21.6 million are performing under their modified terms (defined as less than 90-days delinquent). Performing TDR include $10.8 million in loans secured by single family residence, $8.5 million reported as multifamily loans but secured by condo conversion projects, $2.1 million in loans secured by land, one home equity line of credit with a balance of $108 thousand, an unsecured commercial line of credit with a balance of $15 thousand and an unsecured consumer loan with a balance of $3 thousand. Of performing TDRs, $4.1 million have been paying as agreed for more than six months

 

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and are on accrual status while $17.5 million are performing and earning interest on a cash basis but are classified non-accrual because the borrower has yet to make six consecutive payments under the modified agreement. Four TDR loans with an aggregate balance of $4.6 million are “nonperforming” (defined as over 90 days delinquent). Nonperforming TDR loans consist of two loans with an aggregate balance of $2.9 million secured by land and two loans totaling $1.7 million secured by SFR. These loans will either return to a performing TDR status or move through the Company’s normal collection process for non-performing loans.

The following table presents the seasoning of the Bank’s performing restructured loans, their effective balance (principal balance minus SVA charged-off), and their weighted average interest rates (dollars in thousands):

 

Number of payments made  
One Payment     Two Payments     Three Payments     Four Payments     Five Payments     Six Payments  
Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
 
  $10,316        6.20   $ —               $ 547        5.20   $ —          —       $ 3,370        5.02   $ 1,329        3.42

 

Number of payments made  
Seven Payments     Eight Payments     Nine Payments     Ten Payments     Eleven Payments     12 Payments     TOTAL  
Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
    Amount     Weighted
Average
Rate
 
  $512        5.13   $ 1,478        5.56 %   $ 477        5.13   $ —               $ —               $ 3,526        5.31   $ 21,555        5.56

Real Estate Owned. At December 31, 2010, other real estate acquired in settlement of loans totaled $6.6 million, net of a valuation allowance of $3.4 million, based on the fair value of the collateral less estimated costs to sell (typically 9.0% of the newly appraised property value). The real estate owned balance consisted of one construction property and five single family properties currently held for sale.

Classified Assets. Federal regulations provide for the classification of loans and other assets, such as debt and equity securities considered by the Office of Thrift Supervision to be of lesser quality, as “substandard,” “doubtful” or “loss.” An asset is considered “substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that the insured institution will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected. Assets classified as “doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “substandard,” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.” Assets classified as “loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss reserve is not warranted.

When an insured institution classifies problem assets as either substandard or doubtful, it may establish general allowances for loan losses in an amount deemed prudent by management and approved by the Board of Directors. General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to recognize the inherent risk associated with lending activities, but, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets. When an insured institution classifies problem assets as “loss,” it is required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of that portion of the asset so classified or to charge off such amount. An institution’s determination as to the classification of its assets and the amount of its valuation allowances is subject to review by the Office of Thrift Supervision and the FDIC, which may order the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.

In connection with the filing of our periodic reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and in accordance with our classification of assets policy, we regularly review the problem assets in our portfolio to determine whether any assets require classification in accordance with applicable regulations. On the basis of

 

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management’s review of assets, at December 31, 2010, the Company had classified assets totaling $75.9 million, net of loan loss reserves of $4.4 million, of which $38.4 million was classified as special mention, $37.5 million was classified as substandard, $0 as doubtful and $0 as loss. The total amount classified represented 55.8% of our equity capital and 8.8% of our total assets at December 31, 2010.

Provision for Loan Losses. The past year proved to be a challenging operating environment, as witnessed by the continued deterioration of the national housing market. While the local market showed improvement over 2009 levels with a 2.6% increase in housing values between November, 2009 and November, 2010 as measured by the S&P Case Schiller Home Price Index for San Diego County, weaknesses still exist as evidenced by continued high levels of foreclosures and delinquencies which are exacerbated by persistently high unemployment in California and the United States. As a result of improvements in the local housing segments and declines in the level and composition of the Bank’s non-performing and classified assets between December 31, 2009 and December 31, 2010, the Company recorded a loan loss provision for the year ended December 31, 2010 of $9.0 million, compared to a loan loss provision of $17.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2009. The provision for loan losses is charged or credited to income to adjust our allowance for loan losses to reflect probable losses presently inherent in the loan portfolio based on the factors discussed below under “Allowance for Loan Losses.”

Allowance for Loan Losses. The Company maintains an allowance for loan losses to absorb probable incurred losses presently inherent in the loan portfolio. The allowance is based on ongoing assessments of the estimated probable losses presently inherent in the loan portfolio. In evaluating the level of the allowance for loan losses, management considers the types of loans and the amount of loans in the loan portfolio, peer group information, historical loss experience, adverse situations that may affect the borrower’s ability to repay, estimated value of any underlying collateral, and prevailing economic conditions. During the fourth quarter the Company changed the methodology used for calculating the allowance for loan losses on all residential first and second trust deed loans. The Company currently uses a rolling 12 month history of actual losses incurred, adjusted for numerous factors including those found in the Interagency Guidance on Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses, which include current economic conditions, loan seasoning and underwriting experience, among others. This analysis is combined with a comprehensive loan to value analysis (based upon recently obtained market values) to analyze the associated risks in the current loan portfolio. The Company evaluates all impaired loans individually using guidance from ASC 310 primarily through the evaluation of collateral values and cash flows.

At December 31, 2010, our allowance for loan losses was $14.6 million or 2.1% of the total loan portfolio. Assessing the allowance for loan losses is inherently subjective as it requires making material estimates, including the amount and timing of future cash flows expected to be received on impaired loans that may be susceptible to significant change. In the opinion of management, the allowance, when taken as a whole, reflects estimated probable losses presently inherent in our loan portfolios.

 

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The following table sets forth an analysis of our allowance for loan losses.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Balance at beginning of period

   $ 13,079      $ 18,286      $ 6,240      $ 4,670      $ 4,691   

Charge-offs

          

One- to four-family

     (4,227     (1,479     (658     —          —     

Multi-family

     —          —          —          —          —     

Construction

     —          (12,557     —          —          —     

Commercial

     —          —          (647     —          —     

Land

     (2,695     (6,266     —          —          —     

Consumer

     (609     (2,203     (246     (24     (15
                                        
     (7,531     (22,505     (1,551     (24     (15

Recoveries

          

One- to four-family

     91       —          —          —          —     

Multi-family

     —          —          —          —          —     

Construction

     —          —          —          —          —     

Commercial

     —          —          —          —          —     

Land

     6       —          —          —          —     

Consumer

     35        2        50        6        18   
                                        
     132        2        50        6        18   

Net (charge-offs) recoveries

     (7,399     (22,503     (1,501     (18     3   

Provision/(recovery) for loan losses

     8,957        17,296        13,547        1,588        (24
                                        

Balance at end of period

   $ 14,637      $ 13,079      $ 18,286      $ 6,240      $ 4,670   
                                        

Net charge-offs to average loans during this period

     1.04     2.89     0.20     —       —  

Allowance for loan losses to non-performing loans

     73.50     56.20     50.45     44.16     239.49

Allowance as a % of total loans (end of period)

     2.12     1.72     2.26     0.87     0.63

Investment Activities

Federally chartered savings institutions have the authority to invest in various types of liquid assets, including United States Treasury obligations, securities of various federal agencies, including callable agency securities, certain certificates of deposit of insured banks and savings institutions, certain bankers’ acceptances, repurchase agreements, and federal funds. Subject to various restrictions, federally chartered savings institutions may also invest their assets in investment grade commercial paper and corporate debt securities and mutual funds whose assets conform to the investments that a federally chartered savings institution is otherwise authorized to make directly. See “How We Are Regulated—Pacific Trust Bank” and “—Qualified Thrift Lender Test” for a discussion of additional restrictions on our investment activities.

The general objectives of our investment portfolio are to provide liquidity when loan demand is high, to assist in maintaining earnings when loan demand is low and to maximize earnings while satisfactorily managing risk, including credit risk, reinvestment risk, liquidity risk and interest rate risk. See Item 7A “—Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.”

The Company currently invests in mortgage-backed securities (MBS) as part of our asset/liability management strategy. Management believes that MBS can represent attractive investment alternatives relative to other investments due to the wide variety of maturity and repayment options available through such investments. In particular, the Company has from time to time concluded that short and intermediate duration MBS (with an expected average life of less than ten years) represent a better combination of rate and duration than adjustable rate mortgage-backed securities. All of the Company’s negotiable securities, including MBS, are held as “available for sale.”

 

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The following table sets forth the composition of our securities portfolio and other investments at the dates indicated. Our securities portfolio at December 31, 2010, did not contain securities of any issuer with an aggregate book value in excess of 10% of our equity capital, excluding those issued by the United States Government or its agencies. Ten collateralized mortgage obligations totaling $29.1 million were purchased during 2010. These agency and private label mortgage-backed securities are collateralized with one-to four- family residential loans.

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
     Carrying
Value
     % of
Total
    Carrying
Value
     % of
Total
    Carrying
Value
     % of
Total
 
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Securities Available for Sale:

               

Agency securities FNMA/FHLB notes

   $ 5,055         7.80   $ 5,168         9.88   $ —           —     

Private label mortgage-backed securities

     54,247         83.73        47,131         90.11        17,560         99.97   

Federal National Mortgage Association

     5,488         8.47        4         0.01        4         0.02   

Government National Mortgage Association

     —           0.00        1         0.00        1         0.01   
                                                   

Total

   $ 64,790         100.00   $ 52,304         100.00   $ 17,565         100.00
                                                   

Estimated average remaining life of securities

     2.3 years           3.1 years           4.2 years      

Other interest earning assets:

               

Interest-earning deposits with banks

   $ 53,729         86.59   $ 3,884         10.55   $ 4,666         20.41

Federal funds sold

     —           0.00        23,580         64.03        8,835         38.64   

FHLB stock

     8,323         13.41        9,364         25.42        9,364         40.95   
                                                   
   $ 62,052         100.00   $ 36,828         100.00   $ 22,865         100.00
                                                   

The composition and maturities of the securities portfolio, excluding Federal Home Loan Bank stock, as of December 31, 2010 are indicated in the following table.

 

     December 31, 2010  
     One Year  or
Less
    One to  Five
Years
    Five to 10
Years
    Over 10
Years
    Total Securities  
     Amortized
Cost
    Amortized
Cost
    Amortized
Cost
    Amortized
Cost
    Amortized
Cost
     Fair
Value
 
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Available for Sale:

             

U.S. government-sponsored entities and agencies

   $ 5,036     $ —        $ —        $ —        $ 5,036       $ 5,055   

Private label mortgage-backed securities

     3,150       45,016        1,767        —          45,016         49,041   

Federal National Mortgage Association

     —          3        —          —          3         3   

Government National Mortgage Association

     —          —          5,402       —          5,402        5,485  
                                                 

Total investment securities

   $ 8,186     $ 45,019      $ 7,169      $ —        $ 60,374       $ 64,790   
                                                 

Weighted average yield

     2.61     7.49     4.31     0     

 

 

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Sources of Funds

General. The Company’s sources of funds are deposits, payments and maturities of outstanding loans and investment securities; and other short-term investments and funds provided from operations. While scheduled payments from the amortization of loans and mortgage-backed securities and maturing securities and short-term investments are relatively predictable sources of funds, deposit flows and loan prepayments are greatly influenced by general interest rates, economic conditions, and competition. In addition, the Company invests excess funds in short-term interest-earning assets, which provide liquidity to meet lending requirements. The Company also generates cash through borrowings. The Company utilizes Federal Home Loan Bank advances to leverage its capital base, to provide funds for its lending activities, as a source of liquidity, and to enhance its interest rate risk management.

Deposits. The Company offers a variety of deposit accounts to both consumers and businesses having a wide range of interest rates and terms. The Company’s deposits consist of savings accounts, money market deposit accounts, NOW and demand accounts, and certificates of deposit. The Company solicits deposits primarily in our market area and from institutional investors. The Company did not hold any brokered certificates of deposit at December 31, 2010. The Company primarily relies on competitive pricing policies, marketing and customer service to attract and retain deposits.

The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, changes in money market and prevailing interest rates and competition. The variety of deposit accounts the Company offers has allowed the Company to be competitive in obtaining funds and to respond with flexibility to changes in consumer demand. The Company has become more susceptible to short-term fluctuations in deposit flows, as customers have become more interest rate conscious. The Company tries to manage the pricing of our deposits in keeping with our asset/liability management, liquidity and profitability objectives, subject to competitive factors. Based on our experience, the Company believes that our deposits are relatively stable sources of funds. Despite this stability, the Company’s ability to attract and maintain these deposits and the rates paid on them has been and will continue to be significantly affected by market conditions.

The following table sets forth our deposit flows during the periods indicated.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2010             2009             2008      
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Opening balance

   $ 658,432      $ 598,177      $ 574,151   

Deposits net of withdrawals

     (20,057     47,456        6,514   

Interest credited

     7,933        12,799        17,512   
                        

Ending balance

   $ 646,308      $ 658,432      $ 598,177   
                        

Net increase/(decrease)

   $ (12,124   $ 60,255      $ 24,026   
                        

Percent increase/(decrease)

     (1.84 %)      10.07     4.18
                        

 

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The following table sets forth the dollar amount of savings deposits in the various types of deposit programs we offered at the dates indicated.

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
     Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
    Amount      Percent of
Total
 
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Noninterest-bearing demand

   $ 15,171         2.35   $ 14,021         2.13   $ 14,697         2.46

Savings

     124,620         19.28        121,503         18.45        96,864         16.19   

NOW

     44,860         6.94        43,942         6.67        39,448         6.60   

Money market

     89,707         13.88        81,771         12.42        81,837         13.68   
                                                   
     274,358         42.45        261,237         39.67        232,846         38.93   
                                                   

Certificates of deposit

               

0.00% - 2.99%

     354,829         54.90        349,241         53.04        80,992         13.54   

3.00% - 3.99%

     8,418         1.30        26,382         4.01        215,064         35.95   

4.00% - 4.99%

     7,286         1.13        19,755         3.00        66,629         11.14   

5.00% - 5.99%

     1,416         0.22        1,817         0.28        2,646         0.44   
                                                   

Total Certificates of deposit

     371,949         57.55        397,195         60.33        365,331         61.07   
                                                   
   $ 646,308         100.00   $ 658,432         100.00   $ 598,177         100.00
                                                   

The following table (in thousands) indicates the amount of the Company’s certificates of deposit by time remaining until maturity as of December 31, 2010.

 

     2011     2012     2013     2014     2015     Total  

0.00% - 2.99%

   $ 264,614      $ 51,939      $ 33,361      $ 1,528      $ 3,386      $ 354,829   

3.00% - 3.99%

     3,782        519        1,012        3,105        —          8,418   

4.00% - 4.99%

     1,864        2,300        3,123        —          —          7,287   

5.00% - 5.99%

     1,217        199        —          —          —          1,416   
                                                
   $ 271,477      $ 54,957      $ 37,496      $ 4,633      $ 3,386      $ 371,950   
                                                

$100,000 and over

   $ 145,673      $ 39,767      $ 26,056      $ 3,315      $ 1,959      $ 216,770   

Below $100,000

     125,805        15,190        11,440        1,318        1,427        155,180   
                                                

Total

   $ 271,477      $ 54,957      $ 37,496      $ 4,633      $ 3,386      $ 371,949   
                                                

Weighted Average Interest Rate

     1.15     1.49     1.83     2.81     2.50     1.30
                                                

Borrowings. Although deposits are our primary source of funds, the Company may utilize borrowings when they are a less costly source of funds and can be invested at a positive interest rate spread, when the Company desires additional capacity to fund loan demand or when they meet our asset/liability management goals. The Company’s borrowings historically have consisted of advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco (FHLB). However, the Company also has the ability to borrow from the Federal Reserve Bank as well as Pacific Coast Bankers Bank.

The Company may obtain advances from the FHLB by collateralizing the advances with certain of the Company’s mortgage loans and mortgage-backed and other securities. These advances may be made pursuant to several different credit programs, each of which has its own interest rate, range of maturities and call features. At December 31, 2010, the Company had $75.0 million in Federal Home Loan Bank advances outstanding and the ability to borrow an additional $97.4 million. The Company also had the ability to borrow $94.8 million from the Federal Reserve Bank as well as $8.0 million from Pacific Coast Bankers Bank. See also Note 8 of the Notes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements at Item 8 of this report for additional information regarding

 

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FHLB advances. Of the $75.0 million in FHLB borrowings outstanding as of December 31, 2010, $55.0 million are expected to mature in 2011. These maturing advances carry a weighted average rate of 3.5%.

The following table sets forth certain information as to our FHLB advances at the dates and for the years indicated. We had no other borrowings during the years indicated.

 

     At or for the Year Ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
     (Dollars in Thousands)  

Average balance outstanding

   $ 95,385      $ 155,548      $ 157,569   

Maximum month-end balance

   $ 120,000      $ 175,000      $ 229,000   

Balance at end of period

   $ 75,000      $ 135,000      $ 175,000   

Weighted average interest rate during the period

     3.05     3.24     3.52

Weighted average interest rate at end of period

     3.02     3.10     3.43

Subsidiary and Other Activities

As a federally chartered savings bank, Pacific Trust Bank is permitted by the Office of Thrift Supervision to invest 2% of our assets or $17.2 million at December 31, 2010, in the stock of, or unsecured loans to, service corporation subsidiaries. The Company may invest an additional 1% of our assets in secure corporations where such additional funds are used for inner city or community development purposes. At December 31, 2010, Pacific Trust Bank did not have any subsidiary service corporations.

Competition

The Company faces strong competition in originating real estate and other loans and in attracting deposits. Competition in originating real estate loans comes primarily from other savings institutions, commercial banks, credit unions and mortgage bankers. Other savings institutions, commercial banks, credit unions and finance companies provide vigorous competition in consumer lending.

The Company attracts deposits through the branch office system and through the internet. Competition for those deposits is principally from other savings institutions, commercial banks and credit unions located in the same community, as well as mutual funds and other alternative investments. The Company competes for these deposits by offering superior service and a variety of deposit accounts at competitive rates. Based on the most recent branch deposit data as of June 30, 2010 provided by the FDIC, Pacific Trust Bank’s share of deposits was 1.09% and 0.30% in San Diego and Riverside Counties, respectively.

Employees

At December 31, 2010, we had a total of 95 full-time employees and 12 part-time employees. Our employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group. Management considers its employee relations to be satisfactory.

HOW WE ARE REGULATED

Set forth below is a brief description of certain laws and regulations which are applicable to First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. and Pacific Trust Bank. The description of these laws and regulations, as well as descriptions of laws and regulations contained elsewhere herein, does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the applicable laws and regulations.

Legislation is introduced from time to time in the United States Congress that may affect the operations of the Company and the Bank. In addition, the regulations governing the Company and the Bank may be amended

 

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from time to time by the Office of Thrift Supervision, the FDIC, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System or the SEC, as appropriate. Legislation is introduced from time to time in the United States Congress that may affect our operations. In addition, the regulations governing the Company and the Bank may be amended from time to time by the OTS, the FDIC, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System or the SEC, as appropriate. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that was enacted on July 21, 2010 (“Dodd Frank Act”), provides, among other things, for new restrictions and an expanded framework of regulatory oversight for financial institutions and their holding companies, including the Company and the Bank. Under the new law, the Bank’s primary regulator, the OTS, will be eliminated, and the Bank will be subject to regulation and supervision by the OCC, which currently oversees national banks. In addition, beginning in 2011, all financial institution holding companies, including the Company, will be regulated by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, including imposing federal capital requirements on the Company and may result in additional restrictions on investments and other holding company activities. The law also creates a new consumer financial protection bureau that will have the authority to promulgate rules intended to protect consumers in the financial product and services market. The creation of this independent bureau could result in new regulatory requirements and raise the cost of regulatory compliance. In addition, new regulations mandated by the law could require changes in regulatory capital requirements, loan loss provisioning practices, and compensation practices and require holding companies to serve as a source of strength for their financial institution subsidiaries. Effective July 21, 2011, financial institutions may pay interest on demand deposits, which could increase our interest expense. We cannot determine the full impact of the new law on our business and operations at this time. Any legislative or regulatory changes in the future could adversely affect our operations and financial condition.

General

Pacific Trust Bank, as a federally chartered savings institution, is subject to federal regulation and oversight by the Office of Thrift Supervision extending to all aspects of its operations. The Bank is also subject to regulation and examination by the FDIC, which insures the deposits of the Bank to the maximum extent permitted by law, and requirements established by the Federal Reserve Board. Federally chartered savings institutions are required to file periodic reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and are subject to periodic examinations by the Office of Thrift Supervision. In 2011, this regulatory oversight will be transferred to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. The investment and lending authority of savings institutions are prescribed by federal laws and regulations, and such institutions are prohibited from engaging in any activities not permitted by such laws and regulations. Such regulation and supervision primarily is intended for the protection of depositors and not for the purpose of protecting shareholders. With the 2010 passage of the Dodd-Frank legislation, Congress mandated that the Office of Thrift Supervision be abolished with certain of its activities transferred to the Federal Reserve Board, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) and FDIC. In July, 2011, Pacific Trust bank will become regulated by the OCC and First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. will become regulated by the Federal Reserve.

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Pursuant to regulations of the Office of Thrift Supervision and the terms of the Company’s Maryland charter, the purpose and powers of the Company are to pursue any or all of the lawful objectives of a thrift holding company and to exercise any of the powers accorded to a thrift holding company.

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. is a unitary savings and loan holding company subject to regulatory oversight by the Office of Thrift Supervision. First PacTrust is required to register and file reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and is subject to regulation and examination by the Office of Thrift Supervision. In addition, the Office of Thrift Supervision has enforcement authority over us and our non-savings institution subsidiaries. In 2011, this regulatory oversight will be transferred to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

 

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First PacTrust generally is not subject to activity restrictions. If First PacTrust acquired control of another savings institution as a separate subsidiary, it would become a multiple savings and loan holding company, and its activities and any of its subsidiaries (other than Pacific Trust Bank or any other savings institution) would generally become subject to additional restrictions.

Pacific Trust Bank

The Office of Thrift Supervision has extensive authority over the operations of savings institutions. As part of this authority, we are required to file periodic reports with the Office of Thrift Supervision and we are subject to periodic examinations by the Office of Thrift Supervision and the FDIC, which insures the deposits of Pacific Trust Bank to the maximum extent permitted by law. This regulation and supervision primarily is intended for the protection of depositors and not for the purpose of protecting shareholders. As noted above, this regulatory authority will be transferred to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency in 2011.

The Office of Thrift Supervision and its successors also have extensive enforcement authority over all savings institutions and their holding companies, including the Bank and the Company. This enforcement authority includes, among other things, the ability to assess civil money penalties, to issue cease-and-desist or removal orders and to initiate injunctive actions. In general, these enforcement actions may be initiated for violations of laws and regulations and unsafe or unsound practices. Other actions or inactions may provide the basis for enforcement action, including misleading or untimely reports filed with the Office of Thrift Supervision. Except under certain circumstances, public disclosure of final enforcement actions by the Office of Thrift Supervision is required.

In addition, the investment, lending and branching authority of the Bank is prescribed by federal laws and it is prohibited from engaging in any activities not permitted by such laws. For instance, no savings institution may invest in non-investment grade corporate debt securities. In addition, the permissible level of investment by federal institutions in loans secured by non-residential real property may not exceed 400% of total capital, except with approval of the Office of Thrift Supervision. Federal savings institutions are also generally authorized to branch nationwide. The Bank is in compliance with the noted restrictions.

The Bank’s general permissible lending limit for loans-to-one-borrower is equal to the greater of $500 thousand or 15% of unimpaired capital and surplus including allowance for loan losses (except for loans fully secured by certain readily marketable collateral, in which case this limit is increased to 25% of unimpaired capital and surplus). At December 31, 2010, the Bank’s lending limit under this restriction was $16.3 million. The Bank is in compliance with the loans-to-one-borrower limitation.

The Office of Thrift Supervision’s oversight of Pacific Trust Bank includes reviewing its compliance with the customer privacy requirements imposed by the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 and the anti-money laundering provisions of the USA Patriot Act. The Gramm-Leach-Bliley privacy requirements place limitations on the sharing of consumer financial information with unaffiliated third parties. They also require each financial institution offering financial products or services to retail customers to provide such customers with its privacy policy and with the opportunity to “opt out” of the sharing of their personal information with unaffiliated third parties. The USA Patriot Act significantly expands the responsibilities of financial institutions in preventing the use of the United States financial system to fund terrorist activities. Its anti-money laundering provisions require financial institutions operating in the United States to develop anti-money laundering compliance programs and due diligence policies and controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering. These compliance programs are intended to supplement existing compliance requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act and the Office of Foreign Assets Control Regulations.

The Office of Thrift Supervision, as well as the other federal banking agencies, has adopted guidelines establishing safety and soundness standards on such matters as loan underwriting and documentation, asset quality, earnings standards, internal controls and audit systems, interest rate risk exposure and compensation and other employee benefits. Any institution which fails to comply with these standards must submit a compliance plan.

 

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FDIC Regulation and Insurance of Accounts.

The Bank’s deposits are insured up to the applicable limits by the FDIC, and such insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. As insurer, the FDIC imposes deposit insurance premiums and is authorized to conduct examinations of and to require reporting by FDIC-insured institutions. Our deposit insurance premiums for the year ended December 31, 2010 were $1.6 million. Those premiums have increased due to recent strains on the FDIC deposit insurance fund due to the cost of large bank failures and increase in the number of troubled banks.

The Bank is a member of the deposit insurance fund administered by the FDIC. Deposits are insured up to the applicable limits by the FDIC. Effective July 21, 2010, the basic deposit insurance is $250,000.

The FDIC assesses deposit insurance premiums quarterly on each FDIC-insured institution based on annualized rates for one of four risk categories applied to its deposits subject to certain adjustments. Each institution is assigned to one of four risk categories based on its capital, supervisory ratings and other factors. Its deposit insurance premiums are based on these risk categories, with higher risk institutions paying higher premiums.

The FDIC has issued proposed regulations setting insurance premium assessments based on an institution's total assets minus its Tier 1 capital instead of its deposits, as required by the Dodd-Frank Act. These regulations are proposed to be effective for assessments for the second quarter of 2011 and payable at the end of September 2011. The intent of the proposal at this time is not to substantially change the level of premiums paid notwithstanding the use of assets as the calculation base instead of deposits. Under this proposal, the Bank’s premiums would be based on its same assignment under one of four risk categories based on capital, supervisory ratings and other factors; however, the premium rates for those risk categories would be revised to maintain similar premium levels under the new calculation as currently exist.

As a result of a decline in the reserve ratio (the ratio of the net worth of the deposit insurance fund to estimated insured deposits) and concerns about expected failure costs and available liquid assets in the deposit insurance fund, the FDIC required most of the insured institutions to prepay on December 30, 2009, the estimated amount of its quarterly assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 and all quarters through the end of 2012 (in addition to the regular quarterly assessment for the third quarter which is due on December 30, 2009). The prepaid amount is recorded as an asset with a zero risk weight and the institution will continue to record quarterly expenses for deposit insurance. For purposes of calculating the prepaid amount, assessments are measured at the institution’s assessment rate as of September 30, 2009, with a uniform increase of 3 basis points effective January 1, 2011, and are based on the institution’s assessment base for the third quarter of 2009, with growth assumed quarterly at an annual rate of 5%. If events cause actual assessments during the prepayment period to vary from the prepaid amount, institutions will pay excess assessments in cash, or receive a rebate of prepaid amounts not exhausted after collection of assessments due on January 13, 2013, as applicable. Collection of the prepayment does not preclude the FDIC from changing assessment rates or revising the risk-based assessment system in the future. The rule includes a process for exemption from the prepayment for institutions whose safety and soundness would be affected adversely. The FDIC estimates that the reserve ratio will reach the designated reserve ratio of 1.15% by 2017 as required by statute.

Regulatory Capital Requirements

Federally insured savings institutions, such as the Bank, are required to maintain a minimum level of regulatory capital. The Office of Thrift Supervision has established capital standards, including a tangible capital requirement, a leverage ratio or core capital requirement and a risk-based capital requirement applicable to such savings institutions. These capital requirements must be generally as stringent as the comparable capital requirements for national banks. The Office of Thrift Supervision is also authorized to impose capital requirements in excess of these standards on a case-by-case basis.

 

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The capital regulations require core capital equal to at least 4.0% of adjusted total assets. Core capital consists of tangible capital plus certain intangible assets including a limited amount of credit card relationships. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had core capital equal to $95.6 million, or 11.1% of adjusted total assets, which was $61.3 million above the minimum requirement of 4.0% in effect on that date.

The Office of Thrift Supervision also requires savings institutions to have total capital of at least 8.0% of risk-weighted assets. Total capital consists of core capital, as defined above, and supplementary capital. Supplementary capital consists of certain permanent and maturing capital instruments that do not qualify as core capital and general valuation loan and lease loss allowances up to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets. Supplementary capital may be used to satisfy the risk-based requirement only to the extent of core capital. The Office of Thrift Supervision is also authorized to require a savings institution to maintain an additional amount of total capital to account for concentration of credit risk and the risk of non-traditional activities. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had $10.3 million of general loan loss reserves, which was 1.6% of risk-weighted assets. Since the Bank’s general loan loss reserve of 1.6% of risk-weighted assets exceeded the 1.25% limitation above, the Bank was unable to include $2.26 million of its general loss reserve when computing Total Risk-Based Capital.

In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets, all assets, including certain off-balance sheet items, will be multiplied by a risk weight, ranging from 0% to 100%, based on the risk inherent in the type of asset. For example, the Office of Thrift Supervision has assigned a risk weight of 50% for prudently underwritten permanent one- to four-family first lien mortgage loans not more than 90 days delinquent and having a loan-to-value ratio of not more than 80% at origination unless insured to such ratio by an insurer approved by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

On December 31, 2010, the Bank had total risk-based capital of $103.7 million and risk-weighted assets of $641.2 million; or total risk-based capital to risk-weighted assets of 16.2%. This amount was $44.3 million above the 8.0% requirement in effect on that date. The Office of Thrift Supervision and the FDIC are authorized and, under certain circumstances, required to take certain actions against savings institutions that fail to meet their capital requirements. The Office of Thrift Supervision is generally required to take action to restrict the activities of an “undercapitalized institution,” which is an institution with less than either a 4.0% core capital ratio, a 4.0% Tier 1 risked-based capital ratio or an 8.0% risk-based capital ratio. Any such institution must submit a capital restoration plan and until such plan is approved by the Office of Thrift Supervision may not increase its assets, acquire another institution, establish a branch or engage in any new activities, and generally may not make capital distributions.

Any savings institution that fails to comply with its capital plan or has Tier 1 risk-based or core capital ratios of less than 3.0% or a risk-based capital ratio of less than 6.0% and is considered “significantly undercapitalized” must be made subject to one or more additional specified actions and operating restrictions which may cover all aspects of its operations and may include a forced merger or acquisition of the institution. An institution that becomes “critically undercapitalized” because it has a tangible capital ratio of 2.0% or less is subject to further mandatory restrictions on its activities in addition to those applicable to significantly undercapitalized institutions. In addition, the Office of Thrift Supervision must appoint a receiver, or conservator with the concurrence of the FDIC, for a savings institution, with certain limited exceptions, within 90 days after it becomes critically undercapitalized. Any undercapitalized institution is also subject to the general enforcement authority of the OTS and the FDIC including the appointment of a conservator or receiver.

The Office of Thrift Supervision is also generally authorized to reclassify an institution into a lower capital category and impose the restrictions applicable to such category if the institution is engaged in unsafe or unsound practices or is in an unsafe or unsound condition.

The imposition by the Office of Thrift Supervision or the FDIC of any of these measures on the Bank may have a substantial adverse effect on its operations and profitability.

 

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Limitations on Dividends and Other Capital Distributions

Office of Thrift Supervision regulations impose various restrictions on savings institutions with respect to their ability to make distributions of capital, which include dividends, stock redemptions or repurchases, cash-out mergers and other transactions charged to the capital account.

Generally, savings institutions, that before and after the proposed distribution remain well-capitalized, such as Pacific Trust Bank, may make capital distributions during any calendar year equal to up to 100% of net income for the year-to-date plus retained net income for the two preceding years. However, an institution deemed to be in need of more than normal supervision by the Office of Thrift Supervision may have its dividend authority restricted by the Office of Thrift Supervision. The Bank may pay dividends in accordance with this general authority.

Savings institutions proposing to make any capital distribution need not submit written notice to the Office of Thrift Supervision prior to such distribution unless they are a subsidiary of a holding company or would not remain well-capitalized following the distribution. Pacific Trust Bank is a subsidiary of a holding company. Savings institutions that do not, or would not meet their current minimum capital requirements following a proposed capital distribution or propose to exceed these net income limitations must obtain Office of Thrift Supervision approval prior to making such distribution. The Office of Thrift Supervision may object to the distribution during that 30-day period based on safety and soundness concerns. See “—Regulatory Capital Requirements.”

Liquidity

All savings institutions, including Pacific Trust Bank, are required to maintain sufficient liquidity to ensure a safe and sound operation.

Qualified Thrift Lender Test

All savings institutions, including Pacific Trust Bank, are required to meet a qualified thrift lender test to avoid certain restrictions on their operations. This test requires a savings institution to have at least 65% of its portfolio assets, as defined by regulation, in qualified thrift investments on a monthly average for nine out of every 12 months on a rolling basis. As an alternative, the savings institution may maintain 60% of its assets in those assets specified in Section 7701(a)(19) of the Internal Revenue Code. Under either test, such assets primarily consist of residential housing related loans and investments. At December 31, 2010, the Bank met the test and has always met the test since the requirement was applicable.

Any savings institution that fails to meet the qualified thrift lender test must convert to a national bank charter, unless it requalifies as a qualified thrift lender and thereafter remains a qualified thrift lender. If an institution does not requalify and converts to a national bank charter, it must remain Savings Association Insurance Fund-insured until the FDIC permits it to transfer to the Bank Insurance Fund. If such an institution has not yet requalified or converted to a national bank, its new investments and activities are limited to those permissible for both a savings institution and a national bank, and it is limited to national bank branching rights in its home state. In addition, the institution is immediately ineligible to receive any new Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings and is subject to national bank limits for payment of dividends. If such an institution has not requalified or converted to a national bank within three years after the failure, it must divest of all investments and cease all activities not permissible for a national bank. In addition, it must repay promptly any outstanding Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings, which may result in prepayment penalties. If any institution that fails the qualified thrift lender test is controlled by a holding company, then within one year after the failure, the holding company must register as a bank holding company and become subject to all restrictions on bank holding companies.

 

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Federal Securities Law

The stock of First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. is registered with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The Company will be subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements of the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Company stock held by persons who are affiliates of the Company may not be resold without registration unless sold in accordance with certain resale restrictions. Affiliates are generally considered to be officers, directors and principal stockholders. If the Company meets specified current public information requirements, each affiliate of the Company will be able to sell in the public market, without registration, a limited number of shares in any three-month period.

Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve Board requires all depository institutions to maintain non-interest bearing reserves at specified levels against their transaction accounts, primarily checking, NOW and Super NOW checking accounts. At December 31, 2010, Pacific Trust Bank was in compliance with these reserve requirements. The balances maintained to meet the reserve requirements imposed by the Federal Reserve Board may be used to satisfy liquidity requirements that may be imposed by the Office of Thrift Supervision. See “—Liquidity.”

Federal Home Loan Bank System

Pacific Trust Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco, which is one of 12 regional Federal Home Loan Banks, that administers the home financing credit function of savings institutions. Each Federal Home Loan Bank serves as a reserve or central bank for its members within its assigned region. It is funded primarily from proceeds derived from the sale of consolidated obligations of the Federal Home Loan Bank System. It makes loans or advances to members in accordance with policies and procedures, established by the board of directors of the Federal Home Loan Bank, which are subject to the oversight of the Federal Housing Finance Board. All advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank are required to be fully secured by sufficient collateral as determined by the Federal Home Loan Bank. In addition, all long-term advances are required to provide funds for residential home financing.

As a member, the Bank is required to purchase and maintain stock in the FHLB of San Francisco. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had $8.3 million in FHLB stock, which was in compliance with this requirement. In past years, the Bank has received substantial dividends on its Federal Home Loan Bank stock. Over the past three fiscal years such dividends have averaged 2.1% and averaged 0.09% for 2010. For the year ended December 31, 2010, dividends paid by the FHLB to the Bank totaled $31 thousand as compared to $20 thousand for 2009. Future dividends received will be subject to economic conditions and the ability of the FHLB to pay them.

 

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TAXATION

Federal Taxation

General. First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. and Pacific Trust Bank are subject to federal income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below. The following discussion of federal taxation is intended only to summarize certain pertinent federal income tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to the Company or the Bank. The Bank’s federal income tax returns have never been audited. Prior to January 1, 2000, the Bank was a credit union, not generally subject to corporate income tax.

Method of Accounting. For federal income tax purposes, Pacific Trust Bank currently reports its income and expenses on the accrual method of accounting and uses a fiscal year ending on December 31, for filing its federal income tax return.

Minimum Tax. The Internal Revenue Code imposes an alternative minimum tax at a rate of 20% on a base of regular taxable income plus certain tax preferences, called alternative minimum taxable income. The alternative minimum tax is payable to the extent such alternative minimum taxable income is in excess of an exemption amount. Net operating losses can offset no more than 90% of alternative minimum taxable income. Certain payments of alternative minimum tax may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years. Pacific Trust Bank has not been subject to the alternative minimum tax, nor does the Company have any such amounts available as credits for carryover.

Net Operating Loss Carryovers. A financial institution may carryback net operating losses to the preceding two taxable years and forward to the succeeding 20 taxable years. This provision applies to losses incurred in taxable years beginning after August 6, 1997. At December 31, 2010, First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc had no net operating loss carryforwards for federal income tax purposes. At December 31, 2010, First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. had a $300 thousand California state net operating loss carryforward.

Corporate Dividends-Received Deduction. First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. may eliminate from its income dividends received from the Bank as a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company if it elects to file a consolidated return with the Bank. The corporate dividends-received deduction is 100% or 80%, in the case of dividends received from corporations with which a corporate recipient does not file a consolidated tax return, depending on the level of stock ownership of the payor of the dividend. Corporations which own less than 20% of the stock of a corporation distributing a dividend may deduct 70% of dividends received or accrued on their behalf.

State Taxation

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. and Pacific Trust Bank are subject to the California corporate franchise (income) tax which is assessed at the rate of 10.8%. For this purpose, California taxable income generally means federal taxable income subject to certain modifications provided for in the California law.

Executive Officers Who are Not Directors

The business experience for at least the past five years for each of our executive officers who do not serve as directors is set forth below.

Gaylin Anderson. Age 44 years. Mr. Anderson became Executive Vice President and Chief Retail Banking Officer of the Bank effective January 3, 2011. Prior to joining the Bank, Mr. Anderson served as SVP, Consumer Branch Performance for U.S. Bank in Los Angeles, and as Director of Retail Banking for California National Bank, a $7.7 billion asset 68-branch community banking franchise serving Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura and San Bernardino counties. Mr. Anderson has held executive management positions for CitiBank, N.A., and California Federal Bank.

 

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Matthew Bonaccorso. Age 59 years. Mr. Bonaccorso became Executive Vice President and Chief Credit Officer of the Bank effective January 3, 2011. Prior to joining the Bank, Mr. Bonaccorso served at U.S. Bank where he managed its Special Assets Group-West operation with offices in Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, Newport Beach and Sacramento. Previously, he was EVP and Chief Credit Officer of California National Bank from 2001 to 2009. Prior to joining Cal National in 2001, Mr. Bonaccorso held executive positions at Knowledge First, Inc., and at Bank of America.

Richard Herrin. Age 42 years. Mr. Herrin became Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of the Bank effective December 6, 2010. Prior to joining the Bank, Mr. Herrin served at the FDIC as a member of the strategic operations group, which has overall responsibility for managing problem banks on behalf of the FDIC. As part of this group, Mr. Herrin acted as the Receiver-in-Charge of a number of the largest failed banks in the western region of the United States. Previously, he was the Manager of Asset Management Division within the FDIC where he served as a voting member of the Credit Review Committee for all receiverships in the western region of the United States. Prior to joining the FDIC in 2009, Mr. Herrin held executive positions at Vineyard Bank, Excel National Bank, Imperial Capital Bank and Bank of America.

Regan J. Lauer. Age 41 years. Ms. Lauer is currently serving as Senior Vice President-Controller of Pacific Trust Bank, and of First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. a position she has held since 2000 and 2002, respectively. Prior to her position with Pacific Trust, Ms. Lauer was an accountant with Deloitte & Touche LLP.

Chang Liu. Age 44 years. Mr. Liu became Executive Vice President and Chief Lending Officer of the Bank effective January 3, 2011. Prior to joining the Bank, Mr. Liu served at U.S. Bank as Senior Vice President where he managed the Los Angeles, Newport Beach and San Diego offices of its Special Assets Group. Previously, he was a Senior Vice President, Senior Loan Officer and Manager of California National Bank’s Los Angeles commercial real estate lending activity. Prior to joining Cal National in 1999, Mr. Liu held commercial real estate commercial lending and corporate finance positions at The Fuji Bank, Ltd., and Sumitomo Bank of California.

James P. Sheehy. Age 64 years. Mr. Sheehy serves as Executive Vice President, a position he has held since 1987, and Secretary and Treasurer for Pacific Trust Bank, and First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. positions he has held since 1999 and 2002, respectively. He has been employed by Pacific Trust Bank since 1987.

Melanie M. Yaptangco. Age 50 years. Ms. Yaptangco is Executive Vice President of Lending at Pacific Trust Bank. She has served in this position since 1998, and started with Pacific Trust Bank since 1987.

Internet Website

The Company maintains a website with the address of www.firstpactrustbancorp.com. The information contained on our website is not included as a part of, or incorporated by reference into, this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other reports, proxy statements and other information, including earnings press releases, filed with the SEC are available on that website through a link to the SEC’s website at “Resource Center—Investor Relations—SEC Filings.” For more information regarding access to these filings on our website, please contact our Corporate Secretary, First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc., 610 Bay Boulevard, Chula Vista California 91910; telephone number (619) 691-1519.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities is subject to certain risks. These risk factors should be considered by prospective and current investors in our securities when evaluating the disclosures in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (particularly the forward-looking statements.) The risks and uncertainties not presently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial also may impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, results of operations and financial condition could suffer. In that event, the value of our securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. The risks discussed below also include forward-looking statements, and our actual results may differ materially from those discussed in these forward-looking statements.

Risks Relating to First PacTrust

Our financial condition and results of operations are dependent on the economy, particularly in the Bank’s market area. The current economic recession in the market area we serve may continue to impact our earnings adversely and could increase the credit risk of our loan portfolio.

Our primary market area is concentrated in the greater San Diego market area. Adverse economic conditions in that market area can reduce our rate of growth, affect our customers’ ability to repay loans and adversely impact our financial condition and earnings. General economic conditions, including inflation, unemployment and money supply fluctuations, also may affect our profitability adversely. Our market area is undergoing a recession, which has resulted in higher levels of loan delinquencies, problem assets and foreclosures, decreased demand for our products and services and a decline in the value of our loan collateral. If this recession continues or becomes more severe, this negative impact on our business, financial condition and earnings may increase.

A continuation of recent turmoil in the financial markets could have an adverse effect on our financial position or results of operations.

Beginning in 2008, United States and global financial markets have experienced severe disruption and volatility, and general economic conditions have declined significantly. Adverse developments in credit quality, asset values and revenue opportunities throughout the financial services industry, as well as general uncertainty regarding the economic, industry and regulatory environment, have had a marked negative impact on the industry. Dramatic declines in the U.S. housing market over the past two years, with falling home prices, increasing foreclosures and increasing unemployment, have negatively affected the credit performance of mortgage loans and resulted in significant write-downs of asset values by many financial institutions. The United States and the governments of other countries have taken steps to try to stabilize the financial system, including investing in financial institutions, and have also been working to design and implement programs to improve general economic conditions. Notwithstanding the actions of the United States and other governments, these efforts may not succeed in restoring industry, economic or market conditions and may result in adverse unintended consequences. Factors that could continue to pressure financial services companies, including the Company, are numerous and include (i) worsening credit quality, leading among other things to increases in loan losses and reserves, (ii) continued or worsening disruption and volatility in financial markets, leading among other things to continuing reductions in asset values, (iii) capital and liquidity concerns regarding financial institutions generally, (iv) limitations resulting from or imposed in connection with governmental actions intended to stabilize or provide additional regulation of the financial system, or (v) recessionary conditions that are deeper or last longer than currently anticipated.

 

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Our allowance for loan losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb probable incurred losses in our loan portfolio.

Lending money is a substantial part of our business. Every loan carries a certain risk that it will not be repaid in accordance with its terms or that any underlying collateral will not be sufficient to assure repayment. This risk is affected by, among other things:

 

   

cash flow of the borrower and/or the project being financed;

 

   

in the case of a collateralized loan, the changes and uncertainties as to the future value of the collateral;

 

   

the credit history of a particular borrower;

 

   

changes in economic and industry conditions; and

 

   

the duration of the loan.

We maintain an allowance for loan losses which we believe is appropriate to provide for potential losses in our loan portfolio. The amount of this allowance is determined by our management through a periodic review and consideration of several factors, including, but not limited to:

 

   

an ongoing review of the quality, size and diversity of the loan portfolio;

 

   

evaluation of non-performing loans;

 

   

historical default and loss experience;

 

   

historical recovery experience;

 

   

existing economic conditions;

 

   

risk characteristics of the various classifications of loans; and

 

   

the amount and quality of collateral, including guarantees, securing the loans.

If our loan losses exceed our allowance for probable loan losses, our business, financial condition and profitability may suffer. The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for loan losses inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires us to make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans. In determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses, we review our loans and the loss and delinquency experience, and evaluate economic conditions and make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. If our estimates are incorrect, the allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover losses inherent in our loan portfolio, resulting in the need for additions to our allowance through an increase in the provision for loan losses. Continuing deterioration in economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding existing loans, identification of additional problem loans and other factors, both within and outside of our control, may require an increase in the allowance for loan losses. Our allowance for loan losses was 2.1% of gross loans held for investment and 73.5% of nonperforming loans, net of specific valuation allowances, at December 31, 2010. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require an increase in the provision for possible loan losses or the recognition of further loan charge-offs, based on judgments different than that of management. If charge-offs in future periods exceed the allowance for loan losses, we will need additional provisions to increase the allowance for loan losses. Any increases in the provision for loan losses will result in a decrease in net income and may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and our capital.

 

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Our provision for loan losses has decreased, however, additional increases in the provision and loan charge-offs may be required, adversely impacting operations.

For the year ended December 31, 2010, we recorded a provision for loan losses of $9.0 million compared to $17.3 million for the 2009 fiscal year. We also recorded net loan charge-offs of $7.4 million in 2010, compared to $22.5 million in 2009. During 2010, the Company’s loan delinquencies and credit losses began to stabilize. The Company’s nonperforming loans, net of specific valuation allowances, declined $3.2 million to $19.9 million at December 31, 2010. If trends in the housing, real estate and local business markets worsen, we would expect increased levels of delinquencies and credit losses which adversely impacts our condition and operations.

If our investments in real estate are not properly valued or sufficiently reserved to cover actual losses, or if we are required to increase our valuation reserves, our earnings could be reduced.

We obtain updated valuations in the form of appraisals and broker price opinions when a loan has been foreclosed and the property taken in as real estate owned (“REO”), and at certain other times during the assets holding period. Our net book value (“NBV”) in the loan at the time of foreclosure and thereafter is compared to the updated market value of the foreclosed property less estimated selling costs (fair value). A charge-off is recorded for any excess in the asset’s NBV over its fair value. If our valuation process is incorrect, the fair value of our investments in real estate may not be sufficient to recover our NBV in such assets, resulting in the need for additional charge-offs. Additional material charge-offs to our investments in real estate could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Our bank regulator periodically reviews our REO and may require us to recognize further charge-offs. Any increase in our charge-offs, as required by such regulator, may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Other-than-temporary impairment charges in our investment securities portfolio could result in losses and adversely affect our continuing operations.

As of December 31, 2010, the Company’s security portfolio consisted of twenty seven securities, four of which were in an unrealized loss position. The majority of unrealized losses are related to the Company’s private label mortgage-backed securities, as discussed below.

The Company’s private label mortgage-backed securities that are in a loss position had a market value of $11.5 million with unrealized losses of approximately $232 thousand at December 31, 2010. These non-agency private label mortgage-backed securities were rated AAA at purchase and are not within the scope of ASC 325. The Company monitors to insure it has adequate credit support and as of December 31, 2010, the Company believed there was no OTTI and did not have the intent to sell these securities and it is likely that it will not be required to sell the securities before their anticipated recovery. See further discussion in Note 2-Securities.

We closely monitor our investment securities for changes in credit risk. The valuation of our investment securities also is influenced by external market and other factors, including implementation of Securities and Exchange Commission and Financial Accounting Standards Board guidance on fair value accounting. Accordingly, if market conditions deteriorate further and we determine our holdings of other investment securities are OTTI, our future earnings, shareholders’ equity, regulatory capital and continuing operations could be materially adversely affected.

Our business may be adversely affected by credit risk associated with residential property.

At December 31, 2010, $588.2 million, or 85.1% of our total gross loan portfolio, was secured by one-to four- single-family mortgage loans and home equity lines of credit. This type of lending is generally sensitive to regional and local economic conditions that significantly impact the ability of borrowers to meet their loan payment obligations, making loss levels difficult to predict. The decline in residential real estate values as a result of the downturn in the California housing markets has reduced the value of the real estate collateral

 

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securing these types of loans and increased the risk that we would incur losses if borrowers default on their loans. Continued declines in both the volume of real estate sales and the sales prices coupled with the current recession and the associated increases in unemployment may result in higher than expected loan delinquencies or problem assets, a decline in demand for our products and services, or lack of growth or a decrease in deposits. These potential negative events may cause us to incur losses, adversely affect our capital and liquidity, and damage our financial condition and business operations.

Rising interest rates may hurt our profits.

To be profitable, we have to earn more money on loans and investments that we make than we pay to our depositors and lenders in interest. If interest rates rise, our net interest income and the value of our assets could be reduced if interest paid on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings, increases more quickly than interest received on interest-earning assets, such as loans, other mortgage-related investments and investment securities. This is most likely to occur if short-term interest rates increase at a faster rate than long-term interest rates. In addition, rising interest rates may hurt our income because it may reduce the demand for loans and the value of our securities. In a rapidly changing interest rate environment, we may not be able to manage our interest rate risk effectively, which would adversely impact our condition and operations. For a further discussion of how changes in interest rates could impact us, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7.

We face significant operational risks.

We operate many different financial service functions and rely on the ability of our employees and systems to process a significant number of transactions. Operational risk is the risk of loss from operations, including fraud by employees or outside persons, employees’ execution of incorrect or unauthorized transactions, data processing and technology errors or hacking and breaches of internal control systems.

Liquidity risk could impair our ability to fund operations and jeopardize our financial condition.

Liquidity is essential to our business. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance our activities or on terms that are acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry or economy in general. Factors that could detrimentally impact our access to liquidity sources include a decrease in the level of our business activity as a result of a downturn in the markets in which our loans are concentrated or adverse regulatory action against us. Our ability to borrow could also be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as a disruption in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry in light of the recent turmoil faced by banking organizations and the continued deterioration in credit markets.

We may elect or be compelled to seek additional capital in the future, but that capital may not be available when it is needed.

We are required by federal regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations. In addition, we may elect to raise additional capital to support our business or to finance acquisitions, if any, or we may otherwise elect or be required to raise additional capital. In that regard, a number of financial institutions have recently raised capital in response to deterioration in their results of operations and financial condition arising from the turmoil in the mortgage loan market, deteriorating economic conditions, declines in real estate values and other factors. Should we be required by regulatory authorities to raise additional capital, we may seek to do so through the issuance of, among other things, our common stock or preferred stock. The issuance of additional shares of common stock or convertible securities to new stockholders would be dilutive to our current stockholders.

 

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Our ability to raise additional capital, if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets, economic conditions and a number of other factors, many of which are outside our control, and on our financial performance. Accordingly, we cannot assure you of our ability to raise additional capital if needed or on terms acceptable to us. If we cannot raise additional capital when needed, it may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

There may be future sales of additional common stock or preferred stock or other dilution of our equity, which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

We are not restricted from issuing additional common stock or preferred stock, including securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or preferred stock or any substantially similar securities. The market value of our common stock could decline as a result of sales by us of a large number of shares of common stock or preferred stock or similar securities in the market or the perception that such sales could occur.

Anti-takeover provisions could negatively impact our shareholders.

Provisions in our charter and bylaws, the corporate law of the State of Maryland and federal regulations could delay, defer or prevent a third party from acquiring us, despite the possible benefit to our stockholders, or otherwise adversely affect the market price of any class of our equity securities, including our common stock. These provisions include: a prohibition on voting shares of common stock beneficially owned in excess of 10% of total shares outstanding, supermajority voting requirements for certain business combinations with any person who beneficially owns more than 10% of our outstanding common stock; the election of directors to staggered terms of three years; advance notice requirements for nominations for election to our Board of Directors and for proposing matters that stockholders may act on at stockholder meetings, a requirement that only directors may fill a vacancy in our Board of Directors, supermajority voting requirements to remove any of our directors and the other provisions of our charter. Our charter also authorizes our Board of Directors to issue preferred stock, and preferred stock could be issued as a defensive measure in response to a takeover proposal. For further information, see “Description of Capital Stock—Preferred Stock.” In addition, pursuant to federal banking regulations, as a general matter, no person or company, acting individually or in concert with others, may acquire more than 10% of our common stock without prior approval from the our federal banking regulator.

These provisions may discourage potential takeover attempts, discourage bids for our common stock at a premium over market price or adversely affect the market price of, and the voting and other rights of the holders of, our common stock. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for holders of our common stock to elect directors other than the candidates nominated by our Board of Directors.

The voting limitation provision in our charter could limit your voting rights as a holder of our common stock.

Our charter provides that any person or group who acquires beneficial ownership of our common stock in excess of 10% of the outstanding shares may not vote the excess shares. Accordingly, if you acquire beneficial ownership of more than 10% of the outstanding shares of our common stock, your voting rights with respect to the common stock will not be commensurate with your economic interest in our company.

We currently hold a significant amount of bank-owned life insurance.

At December 31, 2010, we held $18.2 million of bank-owned life insurance or BOLI on certain key employees and executives, with a cash surrender value of $18.2 million. The eventual repayment of the cash surrender value is subject to the ability of the various insurance companies to pay death benefits or to return the cash surrender value to us if needed for liquidity purposes. We continually monitor the financial strength of the various companies with whom we carry these policies. However, any one of these companies could experience a

 

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decline in financial strength, which could impair its ability to pay benefits or return our cash surrender value. If we need to liquidate these policies for liquidity purposes, we would be subject to taxation on the increase in cash surrender value and penalties for early termination, both of which would adversely impact earnings.

If our investment in the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco (“FHLB”) becomes impaired, our earnings and stockholders’ equity could decrease.

At December 31, 2010, we owned $8.3 million in FHLB stock. We are required to own this stock to be a member of and to obtain advances from our FHLB. This stock is not marketable and can only be redeemed by our FHLB, which currently is not redeeming any excess member stock. Our FHLB’s financial condition is linked, in part, to the eleven other members of the FHLB System and to accounting rules and asset quality risks that could materially lower their capital, which would cause our FHLB stock to be deemed impaired, resulting in a decrease in our earnings and assets.

Changes in laws and regulations and the cost of regulatory compliance with new laws and regulations may adversely affect our operations and our income.

The Bank and the Company are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination by the OTS and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. These regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory and enforcement activities, including the ability to impose restrictions on a bank’s operations, reclassify assets, determine the adequacy of a bank’s allowance for loan losses and determine the level of deposit insurance premiums assessed. Because our business is highly regulated, the laws and applicable regulations are subject to frequent change. Any change in these regulations and oversight, whether in the form of regulatory policy, new regulations or legislation or additional deposit insurance premiums could have a material impact on our operations.

In response to the financial crisis of 2008 and early 2009, Congress has taken actions that are intended to strengthen confidence and encourage liquidity in financial institutions, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has taken actions to increase insurance coverage on deposit accounts. The recently enacted Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act provides for the creation of a consumer protection division at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System that will have broad authority to issue regulations governing the services and products we provide consumers. This additional regulation could increase our compliance costs and otherwise adversely impact our operations. That legislation also contains provisions that, over time, could result in higher regulatory capital requirements and loan loss provisions for the Company and the Bank and may increase interest expense due to the ability in July 2011 to pay interest on all demand deposits. In addition, there have been proposals made by members of Congress and others that would reduce the amount delinquent borrowers are otherwise contractually obligated to pay under their mortgage loans and limit an institution’s ability to foreclose on mortgage collateral. Recent regulatory changes impose limits on our ability to charge overdraft fees, which may decrease our non-interest income as compared to more recent prior periods. The potential exists for additional federal or state laws and regulations, or changes in policy, affecting lending and funding practices and liquidity standards. See “How We Are Regulated.”

In this recent economic downturn, federal banking regulators have been active in responding to concerns and trends identified in examinations and have issued many formal enforcement orders requiring capital ratios in excess of regulatory requirements. Bank regulatory agencies, such as the OTS, govern the activities in which the Bank may engage, primarily for the protection of depositors and not for the protection or benefit of potential investors. In addition, new laws and regulations may increase our costs of regulatory compliance and of doing business and otherwise affect our operations. New laws and regulations may significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the markets for and value of our loans and investments, the fees we can charge and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability.

 

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Our earnings are adversely impacted by increases in deposit insurance premiums and special FDIC assessments.

Beginning in late 2008, the economic environment caused higher levels of bank failures, which dramatically increased FDIC resolution costs and led to a significant reduction in the deposit insurance fund. As a result, the FDIC has significantly increased the initial base assessment rates paid by financial institutions for deposit insurance. In November 2009, the FDIC adopted a rule that requires financial institutions to prepay estimated quarterly risk-based assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for all of 2010, 2011 and 2012, which will be amortized for the period and adjusted for changes in premium levels or our financial condition. As a result, this prepayment will not immediately impact our earnings.

Strong competition within our market area may limit our growth and profitability.

Competition in the banking and financial services industry is intense. In our market area, we compete with commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, and brokerage and investment banking firms operating locally and elsewhere. Many of these competitors have substantially greater name recognition, resources and lending limits than we do and may offer certain services or prices for services that we do not or cannot provide. Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete in our market.

We rely on dividends from the Bank for substantially all of the Company’s revenue.

First PacTrust’s primary source of revenue is earnings of available cash and securities and dividends from the Bank. The OTS regulates and must approve the amount of Bank dividends to the Company. If the Bank is unable to pay dividends, First PacTrust may not be able to service its debt, pay its other obligations or pay dividends on the Company’s preferred and common stock which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition or the value of your investment in our common stock.

Our common stock trading volume may not provide adequate liquidity for investors.

Our common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Global Market. However, the average daily trading volume in our common stock is less than that of larger financial services companies. A public trading market having the desired depth, liquidity and orderliness depends on the presence of a sufficient number of willing buyers and sellers for our common stock at any given time. This presence is impacted by general economic and market conditions and investors’ views of our Company. Because our trading volume is limited, any significant sales of our shares could cause a decline in the price of our common stock.

First PacTrust Bancorp is an entity separate and distinct from its principal subsidiary, Pacific Trust Bank, and derives a portion of its revenue in the form of dividends from that subsidiary. Accordingly, First PacTrust Bancorp may be dependent upon dividends from the Bank to pay the principal of and interest on any indebtedness, to satisfy its other cash needs and to pay dividends on its common stock. The Bank’s ability to pay dividends is subject to its ability to earn net income and to meet certain regulatory requirements. In the event the Bank is unable to pay dividends to First PacTrust Bancorp, First PacTrust Bancorp may not be able to pay dividends on its common stock. See Note 11 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010. Also, First PacTrust Bancorp’s right to participate in a distribution of assets upon a subsidiary’s liquidation or reorganization is subject to the prior claims of the subsidiary’s creditors. This includes claims under the liquidation account maintained for the benefit of certain eligible deposit account holders of the Bank established in connection with the Bank’s conversion from the mutual to the stock form of ownership.

 

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The prices of the common stock may fluctuate significantly, and this may make it difficult for you to resell the Series A Preferred Stock and/or common stock when you want or at prices you find attractive.

We cannot predict how our common stock will trade in the future. The market value of our common stock will likely continue to fluctuate in response to a number of factors including the following, most of which are beyond our control, as well as the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section:

 

   

actual or anticipated quarterly fluctuations in our operating and financial results;

 

   

developments related to investigations, proceedings or litigation that involve us;

 

   

changes in financial estimates and recommendations by financial analysts;

 

   

dispositions, acquisitions and financings;

 

   

actions of our current stockholders, including sales of common stock by existing stockholders and our directors and executive officers;

 

   

fluctuations in the stock price and operating results of our competitors;

 

   

regulatory developments; and

 

   

developments related to the financial services industry.

The market value of our common stock may also be affected by conditions affecting the financial markets in general, including price and trading fluctuations. These conditions may result in (i) volatility in the level of, and fluctuations in, the market prices of stocks generally and, in turn, our common stock and (ii) sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the market, in each case that could be unrelated or disproportionate to changes in our operating performance. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market value of our common stock.

There may be future sales of additional common stock or other dilution of our equity, which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

We are not restricted from issuing additional common stock, including any securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common stock or any substantially similar securities. The market value of our common stock could decline as a result of sales by us of a large number of shares of common stock or similar securities in the market or the perception that such sales could occur.

The voting limitation provision in our charter could limit your voting rights as a holder of our common stock.

Our charter provides that any person or group who acquires beneficial ownership of our common stock in excess of 10% of the outstanding shares may not vote the excess shares. Accordingly, if you acquire beneficial ownership of more than 10% of the outstanding shares of our common stock, your voting rights with respect to the common stock will not be commensurate with your economic interest in our company.

In addition, the Maryland business corporation law, the state where First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. is incorporated, provides for certain restrictions on acquisition of First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc., and federal law contains restrictions on acquisitions of control of savings and loan holding companies such as First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

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Item 2. Properties

At December 31, 2010, the Bank had six full service offices and three limited service offices. The Bank owns the office building in which our home office and executive offices are located. At December 31, 2010, the Bank owned all but five of our other branch offices as well as yet to be opened branch property located in La Jolla, California. The net book value of the Bank’s investment in premises, equipment and leaseholds, excluding computer equipment, was approximately $6.2 million at December 31, 2010. See further discussion in Note 5—Premises and Equipment.

The following table provides a list of Pacific Trust Bank’s main and branch offices and indicates whether the properties are owned or leased:

 

Location

   Owned or
Leased
   Lease Expiration
Date
   Net Book Value at
December 31, 2010
               (Dollars in Thousands)

MAIN AND EXECUTIVE OFFICE

        

610 Bay Boulevard

Chula Vista, CA 91910

   Owned    N/A    $561

BRANCH OFFICES:

        

279 F Street

Chula Vista, CA 91912

   Owned    N/A    $401

850 Lagoon Drive

Chula Vista, CA 91910

   *    N/A    N/A

350 Fletcher Parkway

El Cajon, CA 91910

   Leased    December, 2014    N/A

5508 Balboa Avenue

San Diego, CA 92111

   Leased    October, 2011    N/A

27425 Ynez Road

Temecula, CA 92591

   Owned    N/A    $706

8200 Arlington Avenue

Riverside, CA 92503

   *    N/A    N/A

5030 Arlington Avenue

Riverside, CA 92503

   Owned    N/A    $219

16536 Bernardo Center Drive

San Diego, CA

   Leased    December, 2013    N/A

7877 Ivanhoe Street

La Jolla, CA (expected to open in 2011)

   Owned    N/A    $2,087

 

* These sites, which are on Goodrich Aerostructures facilities, are provided to the Company at no cost as an accommodation to Goodrich Aerostructures’ employees.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

From time to time we are involved as plaintiff or defendant in various legal actions arising in the normal course of business. We do not anticipate incurring any material liability as a result of such litigation.

Item 4. Reserved

 

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The Company’s common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “FPTB.” The approximate number of holders of record of the Company’s common stock as of December 31, 2010 was 267. Certain shares of the Company are held in “nominee” or “street” name and accordingly, the number of beneficial owners of such shares is not known or included in the foregoing number. At December 31, 2010 there were 9,729,384 shares of common stock (net of Treasury stock) issued and outstanding. The following table presents quarterly market information for the Company’s common stock for the two years ended December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009.

 

     Market Price Range         

2010

       High              Low          Dividends  

Quarter Ended

        

December 31, 2010

   $ 13.27       $ 10.45       $ 0.10   

September 30, 2010

   $ 10.70       $ 7.21       $ 0.05   

June 30, 2010

   $ 10.30       $ 7.12       $ 0.05   

March 31, 2010

   $ 8.40       $ 5.35       $ 0.05   
              
         $ 0.25   

 

     Market Price Range      Dividends  

2009

       High              Low         

Quarter Ended

        

December 31, 2009

   $ 7.00       $ 4.70       $ 0.05   

September 30, 2009

   $ 8.28       $ 5.54       $ 0.05   

June 30, 2009

   $ 8.60       $ 6.00       $ 0.05   

March 31, 2009

   $ 9.65       $ 5.67       $ 0.10   
              
         $ 0.25   

DIVIDEND POLICY

Dividends from First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc., will depend, in large part, upon receipt of dividends from Pacific Trust Bank, because First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. will have limited sources of income other than dividends from Pacific Trust Bank, earnings from the investment of proceeds from the sale of shares of common stock retained by First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc., and interest payments with respect to First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc.’s loan to the 401(k) Employee Stock Ownership Plan. There were no dividends paid from the Bank to First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. during the fiscal year of 2010.

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Period

   Total # of  shares
Purchased
     Average price paid
per share
     Total # of shares
purchased as part
of a publicly
announced program
     Maximum # of
shares that may

yet be purchased
 

10/1/10-10/31/10

     —           —           —           0   

11/1/10-11/30/10

     —           —           —           0   

12/1/10-12/31/10

     144         13.27         144         0   

The Company does not currently have a stock buyback plan, however, future purchases may be made by the Company if they are related to employee stock benefit plans, consistent with past practices. The purchases made during the period were tax liability sales related to employee stock benefit plans and are consistent with past practices.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

SELECTED FINANCIAL AND OTHER DATA

The following table sets forth certain consolidated financial and other data of the Company at the dates and for the periods indicated. The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation” included herein at Item 7 and the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included herein at Item 8.

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
     (In thousands, except per share data)  

Selected Financial Condition Data:

          

Total assets

   $ 861,621      $ 893,921      $ 876,520      $ 774,720      $ 808,343   

Cash and cash equivalents

     59,100        34,596        19,237        21,796        13,995   

Loans receivable, net

     678,175        748,303        793,045        710,095        740,044   

Real estate owned, net

     6,562        5,680        158        —          —     

Securities available-for-sale

     64,790        52,304        17,565        4,367        13,989   

Bank owned life insurance

     18,151        17,932        17,565        17,042        16,349   

Other investments (interest-bearing term deposit)

     —          —          893        992        992   

FHLB stock

     8,323        9,364        9,364        6,842        9,794   

Deposits

     646,308        658,432        598,177        574,151        570,543   

Total borrowings

     75,000        135,000        175,000        111,700        151,200   

Total equity

     136,009        97,485        98,723        84,075        81,741   

Selected Operations Data:

          

Total interest income

     40,944        46,666        45,896        45,711        45,514   

Total interest expense

     10,788        17,976        23,021        28,847        26,945   

Net interest income

     30,156        28,690        22,875        16,864        18,569   

Provision for loan losses

     8,957        17,296        13,547        1,588        (24

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

     21,199        11,394        9,328        15,276        18,593   

Customer service fees

     1,336        1,383        1,579        1,573        1,397   

Net gain on sales of securities available-for-sale

     3,274        —          —          —          —     

Income from bank owned life insurance

     219        369        540        711        628   

Other non-interest income

     50        61        83        107        192   

Total non-interest income

     4,879        1,813        2,202        2,391        2,217   

Total non-interest expense

     22,217        15,901        13,522        14,082        13,565   

Income/(loss) before taxes

     3,861        (2,694     (1,992     3,585        7,245   

Income tax expense/(benefit)

     1,036        (1,695     (1,463     624        2,531   

Net income/(loss)

     2,825        (999     (529     2,961        4,714   

Dividends paid on preferred stock

     960        1,003        109        —          —     

Net income (loss) available to common shareholders

     1,865        (2,002     (638     2,961        4,714   

Basic earnings/(loss) per share

     0.37        (0.48     (0.15     0.71        1.15   

Diluted earnings/(loss) per share

     0.37        (0.48     (0.15     0.70        1.12   

Selected Financial Ratios and Other Data:

          

Performance Ratios:

          

Return on assets (ratio of net income to average total assets)

     0.32     (0.11 )%      (0.06 )%      0.38     0.59

Return on equity (ratio of net income to average equity)

     2.68     (1.03 )%      (0.62 )%      3.54     5.91

Dividend payout ratio

     56.9     n/a     n/a     109.3     58.9

Interest Rate Spread Information:

          

Average during period

     3.60     3.25     2.64     1.89     2.11

End of period

     3.56     3.34     2.75     2.18     1.78

Net interest margin(1)

     3.68     3.39     2.92     2.27     2.44

Ratio of operating expense to average total assets

     2.52     1.78     1.64     1.81     1.70

Efficiency ratio(2)

     63.41     52.13     53.92     73.13     65.26

Ratio of average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities

     106.31     107.03     109.36     109.84     109.15

 

* Not applicable due to the net loss reported for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008.

 

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     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
     (In thousands)  

Quality Ratios:

          

Non-performing assets to total assets

     3.07     3.24     4.15     1.82     0.24

Allowance for loan losses to non-performing loans(3)

     73.50     56.20     50.45     44.16     239.49

Allowance for loans losses to gross loans(3)

     2.12     1.72     2.26     0.87     0.63

Capital Ratios:

          

Equity to total assets at end of period

     15.79     10.91     11.26     10.85     10.11

Average equity to average assets

     11.97     10.87     10.45     10.71     10.00

Other Data:

          

Number of full-service offices

     6        6        6        6        6   

 

(1) Net interest income divided by average interest-earning assets.
(2) Efficiency ratio represents noninterest expense as a percentage of net interest income plus noninterest income, exclusive of securities gains and losses.
(3) The allowance for loan losses at December 31, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, and 2006 was $14.6 million, $18.3 million, $6.2 million, $4.7 million, respectively.

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Executive Management Overview

This overview of management’s discussion and analysis highlights selected information in the financial results of the Company and may not contain all of the information that is important to you. For a more complete understanding of trends, commitments, uncertainties, liquidity, capital resources and critical accounting policies and estimates, you should carefully read this entire document. Each of these items could have an impact on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. is a savings and loan holding company that owns one thrift institution, Pacific Trust Bank. As a unitary thrift holding company, First PacTrust Bancorp, Inc. activities are limited to banking, securities, insurance and financial services-related activities. Pacific Trust Bank is a federally chartered stock savings bank, in continuous operation since 1941 as a successful financial institution. The Company is headquartered in Chula Vista, California, a suburb of San Diego, California, and has six full service and three limited service banking offices primarily serving residents of San Diego and Riverside Counties in California. The Company’s geographic market for loans and deposits is principally San Diego and Riverside counties.

On November 1, 2010, the Company completed a private placement to select institutional and other accredited investors providing the Company with aggregate gross proceeds of $60.0 million. In connection with the private placement the Company issued warrants that are exercisable for a total of 1,635,000 shares of Non-Voting Common Stock at an exercise price of $11.00 per share. The Company has also filed a registration statement with the SEC for the ability to sell an additional $250 million of securities in the future, if desired and the market is receptive. The primary purpose of the private placement was to enable the Company to repurchase the 19,300 shares of Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock Series A that was issued to the U.S. Department of Treasury on November 21, 2008 pursuant to the “TARP”, Troubled Asset Relief Program’s Capital Purchase Program. The Company redeemed the $19.3 million of Series A Preferred Stock that had been issued to the U.S. Treasury on December 15, 2010. In January 2011, the Company repurchased 280,795 warrants with a strike price of $10.31 which were issued to the United States Department of the Treasury in connection with TARP. These warrants were purchased for $1.0 million, or $3.58 per warrant.

The Company’s principal business consists of attracting retail deposits from the general public and investing these funds and other borrowings in loans primarily secured by first mortgages on owner-occupied, one-to four-family residences in San Diego and Riverside counties, California. During 2005, the Company introduced a new lending product called the “Green Account”, America’s first fully transactional flexible mortgage account. The Company originated $85.2 million in Green Account loans in 2010. The Company anticipates continued origination of this product. At December 31, 2010, one- to four-family residential mortgage loans totaled $569.5 million, or 82.4% of our gross loan portfolio including the portion of the Company’s Green account home equity loan portfolio that are first trust deeds. If the home equity Green account loans in first position are excluded, total one- to four-family residential mortgage loans totaled $355.0 million, or 51.4% of our gross loan portfolio.

The Company continues to develop strong deposit relationships with customers by providing quality service while offering a variety of competitive deposit products. During 2007, the Company introduced commercial deposit accounts and had a total of $95.3 million of commercial deposit accounts at December 31, 2010. Net core deposits including checking, savings and MMDA accounts increased by $13.1 million, while total net deposits declined $12.1 million during 2010 due primarily to a decrease in certificate of deposit accounts as the Bank continued to lower rates on CD products.

The Company’s results of operations are dependent primarily on net interest income, which is the difference between interest income on earning assets such as loans and securities, and interest expense paid on liabilities such as deposits and borrowings. The Company’s net interest income, which is primarily driven by interest income on residential first mortgage loans, increased by $1.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2010. The decline in interest rate levels experienced throughout the year negatively impacted loan interest income, but,

 

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positively contributed to a significant reduction in the Company’s cost of funds while increasing the Company’s net interest margin by 29 basis points or 8.6% from 3.39% to 3.68% between December 31, 2009 and 2010, respectively.

The past year represented to be a challenging operating environment, as witnessed by the continued instability and high levels of foreclosures in the housing market coupled with continued high levels of unemployment. Reduced availability of commercial and consumer credit have negatively affected the performance of consumer and commercial credit and resulted in write-downs of assets by financial institutions. As a result, the Company continues to have elevated levels of provisions for loan losses and non-performing loans, however some improvement was seen 2010. The Company experienced a decrease of $2.5 million (8.6%) in non-performing assets over the prior year while the provision for loan losses decreased $8.3 million over the prior year. Other real estate owned increased during the year, as the Company has attempted to work out its problem loans. The Company expects that the economic pressures on consumers and businesses and a lack of confidence in the financial markets may continue to adversely affect the Company’s results of operations in the coming year. Future earnings of the Company are inherently tied to changes in interest rate levels, the relationship between short and long term interest rates, credit quality, and economic trends. If short term interest rates continue to decrease, the Company’s interest expense on deposits will likely decrease at a faster pace than the interest income received on earning assets due to the relatively shorter term repricing characteristics of the Company’s deposits than the maturity or repricing characteristics of its loan portfolio. Conversely, if short term interest rates rise in the future interest expense paid on the Company’s deposits would increase at a faster pace than the interest income received on interest-earning assets which could negatively impact the Company’s results of operations over the short term. The Company currently intends to continue to focus on the origination of adjustable rate loan products while securing longer term deposits and borrowings.

In addition to striving for retail deposit growth, the primary on-going business focus will be continued improvement in customer service and origination of Green account loans secured by one to-four- family properties. Future growth will be managed to ensure sound capital ratios are maintained while talking advantage of income enhancement opportunities. Given the current economic environment and resulting high non-performing loan balances, the Company will continue to focus on the timely resolution of non-performing assets. This will be coupled with efforts to further improve our efficiency ratio through controlling operating expenses, as well as exploring potential new sources of noninterest income.

The following is a discussion and analysis of the Company’s financial position and results of operations and should be read in conjunction with the information set forth under “General” in Item 7A, Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk, and the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto appearing under Item 8 of this report.

Comparison of Financial Condition at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009

The Company’s total assets decreased by $32.3 million, or 3.6%, to $861.6 million at December 31, 2010 from $893.9 million at December 31, 2009 primarily as a result of a decline in the loans receivable balance of $70.1 million. The decrease in total assets was partially reduced by an increase in interest-bearing deposits of $49.8 million, an increase in the balance of the available-for-sale securities portfolio in the amount of $12.5 million and an increase in premises and equipment of $2.1 million.

Loans receivable, net of valuation allowances, decreased by $70.1 million, or 9.4%, to $678.2 million at December 31, 2010 from $748.3 million at December 31, 2009. This decrease was the result of net loan principal repayments, charge-offs and foreclosures exceeding loan production during the year. For the year ended December 31, 2010, loan production including advances drawn during the year was $97.9 million compared to $110.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2009. The loan production was primarily attributable to growth in the Company’s transactional flexible Green account loan product which totaled $85.2 million. The Company’s ability to originate loans has been largely unaffected by the turmoil in the secondary mortgage markets given that

 

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all loans originated are kept in portfolio, however, loan demand in general was down due to current economic circumstances and the slowdown of sales of higher-end properties, which is the market focus of the Company. At December 31, 2010, the Company had a total of $423.4 million in interest-only mortgage loans and $32.1 million in loans with potential for negative amortization. At December 31, 2009, the Company had a total of $506.3 million in interest-only mortgage loans, and $33.8 million in loans with potential for negative amortization. Negatively amortizing and interest-only loans could pose a higher credit risk because of the lack of principal amortization and potential for negative amortization. However, management believes these risks are mitigated through the Company’s loan terms and underwriting standards, including its policies on loan-to-value ratios. The Company has not originated negatively amortizing loans since March, 2006.

Interest bearing deposits increased $49.8 million to $53.7 million at December 31, 2010 from $3.9 million at December 31, 2009 primarily due to the net proceeds from the private placement in November 2010, after the repurchase of the Series A Preferred Stock.

Securities classified as available-for-sale of $64.8 million at December 31, 2010 increased $12.5 million from December 31, 2009 due to the purchase of agency and private label mortgage-backed securities during the period.

Premises and equipment of $6.3 million at December 31, 2010 increased $2.1 million from December 31, 2009 as a direct result of a newly acquired building in La Jolla, California to serve as an additional branch for the Company in 2011.

Total deposits decreased by $12.1 million, or 1.8%, to $646.3 million at December 31, 2010 from $658.4 million at December 31, 2009. Certificate of deposits decreased $25.2 million primarily due to the maturity of institutional certificate of deposits as well as an overall decrease in the rates offered by the bank. In addition, money market accounts increased $7.9 million, savings accounts increased $3.1 million and checking accounts increased $918 thousand. During 2010, the Company had $60.0 million of long term FHLB advances mature resulting in a 44.4% decrease to $75.0 million at December 31, 2010 from $135.0 million at December 31, 2009.

Equity increased $38.5 million to $136.0 million at December 31, 2010 from $97.5 million at December 31, 2009 as a result of the Company’s completion of the private placement in November, 2010. This was supplemented by the issuance of warrants totaling $3.2 million, net income of $2.8 million, a $932 thousand increase in unrealized gain in securities available-for-sale and an increase of ESOP shares earned of $455 thousand. Equity decreased due to the following: the redemption of the preferred stock issued to the U.S. Treasury under the “TARP” Troubled Asset Relief Program’s Capital Purchase Program totaling $19.3 million, the payment of common stock dividends of $1.5 million and the payment of preferred stock dividends in the amount $925 thousand.

 

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Average Balances, Net Interest Income, Yields Earned and Rates Paid

The following table presents for the periods indicated the total dollar amount of interest income from average interest-earning assets and the resultant yields, as well as the interest expense on average interest-bearing liabilities, expressed both in dollars and rates. Also presented is the weighted average yield on interest-earning assets, rates paid on interest-bearing liabilities and the resultant spread at December 31, 2010. No tax equivalent adjustments were made. All average balances are monthly average balances. Non-accruing loans have been included in the table as loans carrying a zero yield.

 

    At December  31,
2010
    2010     2009     2008  
    Average
Yield/
Cost
    Average
Balance
    Interest     Average
Yield/
Cost
    Average
Balance
    Interest     Average
Yield/
Cost
    Average
Balance
    Interest     Average
Yield/
Cost
 
    (Dollars in thousands)  

INTEREST-EARNING ASSETS

                   

Loans receivable(1)

    4.76   $ 710,017      $ 35,439        4.99   $ 779,079      $ 42,312        5.43   $ 763,331      $ 45,234        5.93

Securities(2)

    8.22     62,463        5,289        8.47     40,324        4,266        10.58     2,219        141        6.35

Other interest-earning assets(3)

    0.61     46,451        216        0.47     26,579        88        0.33     18,832        521        2.77
                                                       

Total interest-earning assets

    4.70     818,931        40,944        5.00     845,982        46,666        5.52     784,382        45,896        5.85
                                                       

BOLI and non-interest earning assets(4)

      63,030            49,512            38,132       
                                     

Total assets

    $ 881,961          $ 895,494          $ 822,514       
                                     

INTEREST-BEARING LIABILITIES

                   

NOW

    0.12   $ 57,522        108        0.19   $ 53,767        202        0.38   $ 53,297        471        0.88

Money market

    0.35     87,897        573        0.65     77,290        815        1.05     106,719        2,351        2.20

Savings

    0.32     125,156        783        0.63     116,606        1,429        1.23     95,781        2,225        2.32

Certificates of deposit

    1.36     404,382        6,469        1.60     384,253        10,353        2.69     315,469        12,465        3.95

FHLB advances

    3.07     95,385        2,855        2.99     158,500        5,177        3.27     157,569        5,509        3.50
                                                       

Total interest-bearing liabilities

    1.13     770,342        10,788        1.40     790,416        17,976        2.27     728,835        23,021        3.16
                                                       

Non-interest-bearing liabilities

      6,012            7,760            7,703       

Total liabilities

      776,354            798,176            736,538       

Equity

      105,607            97,318            85,976       
                                     

Total liabilities and equity

    $ 881,961          $ 895,494          $ 822,514       
                                     

Net interest/spread

    3.56     $ 30,156        3.60     $ 28,690        3.25     $ 22,875        2.69
                                     

Margin(5)

          3.68         3.39         2.92

Ratio of interest-earning assets to interest-bearing liabilities

      106.31         107.03         107.62    

 

(1) Calculated net of deferred fees and loss reserves.
(2) Calculated based on amortized cost.
(3) Includes FHLB stock at cost and term deposits with other financial institutions.
(4) Includes BOLI investment of $18.2 million.
(5) Net interest income divided by interest-earning assets.

 

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Rate/Volume Analysis

The following table presents the dollar amount of changes in interest income and interest expense for major components of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. For each category of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, information is provided on changes attributable to (1) changes in volume, which are changes in volume multiplied by the old rate, and (2) changes in rate, which are changes in rate multiplied by the old volume. Changes attributable to both rate and volume which cannot be segregated have been allocated proportionately to the change due to volume and the change due to rate.

 

     2010 Compared to 2009     2009 Compared to 2008  
     Total
Change
    Change
Due
To Volume
    Change
Due
To Rate
    Total
Change
    Change
Due
To Volume
    Change
Due
To Rate
 
     (In Thousands)  

INTEREST-EARNING ASSETS

            

Loans receivable

   $ (6,873   $ (3,592   $ (3,281   $ (2,922   $ 918      $ (3,840

Securities

     1,023