Attached files

file filename
EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_321.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_311.htm
EX-23.1 - EXHIBIT 23.1 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_231.htm
EX-10.33 - EXHIBIT 10.33 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_1033.htm
EX-10.32 - EXHIBIT 10.32 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_1032.htm
EX-10.31 - EXHIBIT 10.31 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_1031.htm
EX-4.1 - EXHIBIT 4.1 - Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.exh_41.htm

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

 

(Mark One) FORM 10-K  

 

[ X ] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

or

 

[   ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______________________________ to ______________________________

Commission file number:

 

001-38298

 

ZOMEDICA PHARMACEUTICALS CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Alberta, Canada   N/A
(State or other jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or organization)   Identification No.)

 

100 Phoenix Drive, Suite 180, Ann Arbor, Michigan   48108
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (734) 369-2555

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Shares, without par value ZOM NYSE American

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

o Yes þ No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

o Yes þ No

 

 

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. þ Yes o No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). þ Yes o No

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer ¨

Accelerated filer ¨

Non-accelerated filer ¨

Smaller reporting company þ

Emerging growth company þ

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. þ

 

Indicate by a check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). o Yes þ No

 

As of June 30, 2019, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s common shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $11.5 million based on the last reported sale price of the common shares on the NYSE American on June 28, 2019.

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

The number of the registrant’s common shares outstanding as of February 26, 2020, was 128,871,732.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I  
Item 1. Business 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors 13
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 37
Item 2. Properties 37
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 37
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 37
PART II  
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 38
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 39
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 39
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 49
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 49
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 49
Item 9B. Other Information 50
PART III  
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 50
Item 11. Executive Compensation 54
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 59
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 61
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 62
PART IV  
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 63
Item 16. Form 10-K Summary 65

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 under Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as well as the safe harbor provisions of applicable Canadian securities legislation, that are based on management’s beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to management. Some of the statements under “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business” and elsewhere in this Form 10-Q contain forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements through our use of words such as “may,” “might,” “will,” “could,” “would,” “should,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “project,” “potential,” “continue,” “ongoing” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology, although not all forward-looking statements contain these words.

 

There are a number of important factors that could cause the actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statement made by us. These factors include, but are not limited to:

 

·the success, cost and timing of our research and development activities, validation studies and pivotal trials, including with respect to our TRUFORMA™ platform and our other diagnostic and therapeutic product candidates;

 

·our ability to find development and commercialization partners for our liquid biopsy platform and our therapeutic product candidates and the terms of any collaboration agreements we enter into with respect thereto;

 

·our ability to obtain regulatory approval from the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (FDA-CVM) and/or the USDA Center for Veterinary Biologics (USDA-CVB) for our pharmaceutical and diagnostic product candidates, as applicable;

 

 

·our ability to obtain funding for our operations;

 

·our obligation to pay a portion of our “net sales” to holders of our Series 1 Preferred Shares;

 

·our ability to raise additional capital, considering the significant obligations under our Series 1 Preferred Shares;

 

·the ability of our contract research organizations to appropriately conduct our safety studies and certain development activities;

 

·the ability of our contract manufacturing organizations to manufacture and supply our product candidates in accordance with current Good Manufacturing Practices and our clinical needs;

 

·the ability of our contract manufacturing organizations to manufacture and supply our product candidates in accordance with current Good Manufacturing Practices and our clinical needs;

 

·our plans to develop and commercialize our product candidates;

 

·our ability to develop and commercialize product candidates that can compete effectively against the product candidates developed and commercialized by our competitors or that can meet the current standards of care (including human generic drugs);

 

·the size and growth of the veterinary diagnostics and therapeutics markets;

 

·our ability to obtain and maintain intellectual property protection for our current and future product candidates;

 

·regulatory developments in the United States;

 

·the loss of key scientific or management personnel;

 

·our expectations regarding the period during which we will be an “emerging growth company” under the JOBS Act;

 

·the accuracy of our estimates regarding expenses, future revenues, capital requirements and needs for additional financing; and

 

·our status as a “passive foreign investment company” for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

 

The foregoing does not represent an exhaustive list of matters that may be covered by the forward-looking statements contained herein or risk factors that we are faced with that may cause our actual results to differ from those anticipate in our forward-looking statements. Please see “Risk Factors” below for additional risks which could adversely impact our business and financial performance.

 

All forward-looking statements are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report or the date of the document incorporated by reference into this report. We have no obligation, and expressly disclaim any obligation, to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. We have expressed our expectations, beliefs and projections in good faith, and we believe they have a reasonable basis. However, we cannot assure you that our expectations, beliefs or projections will result or be achieved or accomplished.

 

 

 

 

PART I

 

Item 1.Business.

 

BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

We are a development stage veterinary diagnostic company focused on creating point-of-care diagnostic platforms for use by veterinarians treating companion animals (canine, feline, and equine). We believe that our diagnostic platforms have the potential to significantly improve the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases affecting companion animals. We also believe that there are significant unmet medical needs for point-of-care diagnostic tools for use on pets, and that the pet diagnostic segment of the animal health industry is likely to grow substantially as new diagnostic tools and treatments are identified, developed, and marketed specifically for companion animals. 

 

Market Opportunity

 

U.S. consumers spent an estimated $75 billion on their pets in 2019, according to the American Pet Products Association, or APPA, an increase of approximately 4% from 2018. The veterinary care segment accounted for an estimated $19 billion in revenue in 2019, an increase of approximately 5% from 2018. According to dvm360 Magazine’s State of the Profession survey for 2015, diagnostics comprise 18%, and vaccinations, pharmaceuticals and biologicals comprise 25% of gross revenue at the veterinary practice level.

 

Veterinary diagnostics is a growing market. According to a 2016 pet owner survey conducted by The Human Animal Bond Research Institute Foundation in partnership with Cohen Research Group, 68% of U.S. households have at least one pet, 83% of dog-owning households visit the vet every year and it is estimated that there were 170 million clinical visits in the U.S in 2018.

 

The dvm360 Magazine survey also states that 61% of respondents indicated that they were providing more diagnostic services than the prior year. Similarly, a 2016 Credit Suisse survey of veterinarians found that 73% of respondents expected their diagnostic testing to increase over the next 12 months. According to MarketsandMarkets, the companion animal diagnostics market is projected to reach $2.8 billion by 2024 from $1.7 billion in 2019, at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate, or CAGR of 9.8%. The growth in this market is driven by the rising companion animal population, increasing demand for pet insurance, and the growth in the number of veterinary practitioners in developed countries. The growing demand for rapid tests and portable instruments for point-of-care services is expected to offer potential growth opportunities for market players in the coming years. Furthermore, in August of 2017, Accuracu Research, reported that the global veterinary immunodiagnostic market was expected to grow at a CAGR of 10.2% and reach $2.68 billion by 2025.

 

Packaged Facts’ Pet Medications, in its U.S. report for 2017, estimated the size of the U.S. pet medication market, the largest companion animal market worldwide, at $8.6 billion in 2017, up from $7 billion in 2015. Future Market Insights estimates that the global companion animal drug market is expected to grow at a compounded annual growth rate of 4.9% from 2015 - 2025.

 

We believe that several factors have contributed and will continue to contribute to an increase in spending on pet diagnostics and therapeutics. Companion animals are generally living longer, with the average lifespan for dogs increasing by half a year to 11 years between 2002 and 2012, according to a study by Banfield Pet Hospital. In 2015, the American Animal Hospital Association estimated that the average dog will account for approximately $3,600 in veterinary bills over its lifespan. According to Pet Supplies Plus, baby boomers are adopting pets in record numbers. In its December 2015 issue, Pet Business magazine predicted that the millennial generation would continue the trend of the baby boomers in their enthusiasm for and interest in their pets and pet products and services. This, we believe, along with the increasing awareness of, as the U.S. Public Health Service states, “the mental and emotional benefits of companion animals” and our use of companion animals to address or assist in a range of health and wellness issues including post-traumatic stress disorder and autism, will bolster the growth and development of the pet therapeutics and diagnostics market.

 

Pet owners in the United States generally pay for diagnostics and therapeutics for their companion animals out-of-pocket. According to statistics from the North American Pet Health Insurance Association, only about 2.0 million dogs and cats in the United States and Canada were covered by an insurance plan in 2018. This represents less than 1% of the nearly 184 million dogs and cats that the American Pet Products Association estimates are owned in the United States alone. We believe that this results in less pricing pressure than in human health care, although the limited adoption of insurance may also reduce the ability of pet owners to pay for diagnostics and therapeutics recommended by their veterinarians.

 

 1 

 

 

Development of Companion Animal Diagnostics

 

The development of companion animal diagnostics continues to evolve with the addition of new technologies to diagnostic portfolios. We believe that these new technologies may allow for the following:

 

·Enhanced capability to detect the frequency of occurrence and severity of diseases and conditions that impact companion animals;

 

·Increased accuracy and faster means to obtain test results;

 

·Wider availability of new diagnostic tools; and

 

·Enhanced economic benefits for veterinarians.

 

Compared to human diagnostic development, the development of companion animal diagnostics is generally faster and less expensive since it typically requires smaller clinical studies, with fewer subjects. We believe that the lower cost of developing companion animal diagnostics enables us to pursue multiple diagnostic candidates simultaneously and to spread the risk of failure across a number of candidates, rather than concentrating all of our resources on one diagnostic candidate that may ultimately fail to achieve regulatory approval or market acceptance.

 

Development of Companion Animal Therapeutics

 

Compared to human drug development, the development of companion animal therapeutics is generally faster and less expensive since it requires fewer clinical studies involving fewer subjects and can be conducted directly in the target species. Because our product candidates are based on drugs that have been successfully developed and approved for human use-as opposed to drugs based on new active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs)-we believe that we will be able to avoid or minimize the expenses associated with the human drug development process and more rapidly advance our development programs, while continuing to comply with current good manufacturing practices, or cGMP, for our product candidates. Since we are not pursuing entirely new chemical entities with our drug product candidates, we believe the risk of failure of a specific drug product candidate is significantly lower compared to developing a novel compound.

 

Unmet Medical Needs

 

Diagnostics

 

We believe that there is a significant unmet medical need for faster, more efficient and accurate disease/condition detection solutions for veterinarians. We believe that we have identified potential diagnostic assays that have the potential to satisfy unmet needs or improve upon existing diagnostic processes frequently used by companion animal veterinarians.

 

For example, cancer is a prevalent disease in canines that can be difficult and costly to diagnose using existing diagnostic testing. According to the Veterinary Cancer Society, 50% of all dogs over the age of 10 will develop cancer and one in four dogs will develop cancer at some stage in their life. Diagnosing certain cancers in canines is difficult because the location of the tumor may make it difficult or risky to obtain cell material through a biopsy. In addition, the overall health of a canine may increase the risk of performing a biopsy. Other diagnostic technologies, such as advanced imaging, are expensive while others, such as histopathologic examination, may take several days or more to provide a definitive diagnosis. Many more canine cancer cases may go undetected due to cost constraints and other factors. To address these shortcomings, we are developing a circulating tumor cell detection assay for use in the detection of certain cancers in companion animals.

 

 2 

 

 

Therapeutics

 

Despite the growing market for pet therapeutics, there are relatively few treatment options approved for use in companion animals, as compared to those approved for humans. As a result, veterinarians often must resort to prescribing products approved for use in humans, but not approved or formulated for use in companion animals and must rely upon trial and error or untested rules of thumb to assess the proper dosage needed to be effective in the particular species without undue risk of side effects. The veterinarian must also find a way to administer the human product to animals and determine the actual dosage amount, tasks which are important and potentially overlooked as practical considerations in the treatment of companion animals. To do this, veterinarians often rely on compounding pharmacies to formulate human drugs into species’ appropriate doses and formulations. As a result, veterinarians are forced to rely on therapeutics not proven safe and effective for their patients and on formulations for which no regulatory approval has been obtained. At the same time, the use of compounding pharmacies results in the veterinary clinic’s loss of much of the associated prescription revenue.

  

Product Pipeline

 

TRUFORMA™ Platform

 

Our strategic focus is on the final development and commercialization of our TRUFORMA™ diagnostic biosensor platform and the first five assays for the detection of adrenal and thyroid disorders in cats and dogs. The TRUFORMA™ platform uses Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) technology to provide a non-optical and fluorescence free detection system for use at the point-of-care. We believe that BAW technology will enable precise and repeatable test results at the point-of-care during a typical veterinary appointment. The TRUFORMATM platform is being developed together with Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC., or Qorvo Biotech.

 

Thyroid and adrenal disorders are some of the most common endocrine disorders in dogs and cats and diagnostics are a vital part of identifying these disorders in sick patients as well as geriatric wellness panels. Multiple assays must be performed to reach a definitive diagnosis but the ability to run all the necessary tests at the point-of- are does not currently exist and some tests must be sent to a reference lab. The initial three thyroid assays we are developing are: Total T4: Canine & Feline (thyroxine), Free T4: Canine, and TSH: Canine & Feline (thyroid stimulating hormone) and the two adrenal assays are Cortisol: canine, and Endogenous ACTH: canine (endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone, or eACTH). Feasibility results showed a correlation data range of 0.95 – 0.99 to standard of care reference lab instruments for all five assays, which should provide a definitive diagnosis during the patient’s visit.

 

Current methods for diagnosing the two most common canine adrenal diseases, Cushing’s and Addison’s, may require multiple visits, potential hospitalization of dogs for injections and multiple blood draws over time which is expensive, stresses patients, and requires significant veterinary staff time. The availability of canine eACTH at point-of-care has the potential to change the way veterinarians manage two chronic and potentially life-threatening diseases in dogs by providing accurate results more quickly and at a lower cost.

 

Hyperthyroidism is a common and chronic metabolic disorder in cats, requiring life-long treatment. It is estimated that over 10 percent of all senior cats will develop hyperthyroidism. (Feline hyperthyroidism - J Feline Med Surg. 2012 Nov;14(11):804-18. doi: 10.1177/1098612X12464462. Hyperthyroidism in cats: what's causing this epidemic of thyroid disease and can we prevent it? Peterson M.)

 

Verification of TRUFORMA’s™ initial assays is expected to be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2020. Assuming successful completion of verification, our goal is to complete validation by the end of the second quarter of 2020. We intend to commence a pilot program in parallel to the validation work to optimize the customer experience. Assuming successful completion of these phases of work, we expect to commence commercialization of all five initial assays in select strategic markets by the end of 2020. We believe our initial assays do not require premarket regulatory approval by U.S. regulators. Following commercial launch of TRUFORMA™, the Company intends to develop the platform’s next two assays for non-infectious gastrointestinal disease.

 

 3 

 

 

Pathogen Detection Program

 

Following the commercial launch of TRUFORMA™, we expect to continue the development of another point-of-care diagnostic platform, which is based on miniaturized laser-based Raman spectroscopy technology and is designed to detect pathogens in companion animals. We believe this platform will enable the identification of biological and biochemical signatures in complex biological samples and has the potential to achieve reference lab sensitivity/specificity to screen for a wide range of pathogens in companion animal feces, urine, respiratory, and dermatological samples in minutes without the need for extensive sample prep or the use of reagents. The diagnostic platform requires a small fecal sample preparation. Additionally, the platform has automated analysis and does not require specialized staff training. Assuming development work is successfully completed we expect the commercial launch of our fecal test to occur by 2022 and urine tests by 2023. We believe that this diagnostic platform does not require pre-market regulatory approval for use with companion animals in the United States. This platform is being developed together with Seraph Biosciences, Inc., or Seraph.

 

Veterinarians must use slow, unreliable manual processes to identify fecal parasitic infections at the point-of-care. Consequently, veterinarians frequently send samples out to reference labs to test for and identify parasitic infections, which is relatively expensive and takes several days, delaying diagnosis and treatment. We expect that our diagnostic platform will deliver multiple benefits over existing technology, including speed of results with minimal sample preparation time to achieve real-time analysis of a sample in a disposable cuvette. We believe that assay testing with our platform can result in a definitive, reliable identification of fecal and urine infections within minutes. In addition to faster results and treatment, an added benefit to pet owners is expected to be the small sample size requirements, which are expected to reduce the burden of collection by the owner prior to the visit.

 

We have filed a U.S. patent application covering compositions and methods for five fecal parasite detection assays for detecting parasitic infections in cats and dogs and submitted a U.S. provisional patent application covering compositions and methods for detecting urinary tract infections for use in our pathogen detection platform.

 

“Liquid Biopsy” Platform

 

We have performed initial development work on a circulating tumor cell (CTC) “liquid biopsy” platform for use in a reference lab setting as a canine cancer diagnostic. This platform is intended for use to detect canine cancers faster, more affordably and less invasively compared to existing methods, which can be expensive and cost prohibitive for pet owners. We have worked on the development of an assay for use with this platform that targets hard-to-diagnose canine cancers, such as hemangiosarcoma and osteosarcoma. This platform is being developed together with Celsee, Inc., or Celsee.

 

The liquid biopsy is a blood test that we believe has the potential to detect the presence of CTCs, which are cells that have shed from a primary tumor into neighboring blood vessels and are transported throughout the body’s circulatory system. Diagnosing certain cancers in canines is difficult because the location of the tumor may make it difficult or risky to obtain cell material through a biopsy. In addition, the overall health of a canine may increase the risk of performing a biopsy. Our initial development work focused on testing for difficult to biopsy cancers such as hemangiosarcoma and osteosarcoma in canines. Other diagnostic technologies, such as advanced imaging, are expensive while others, such as histopathologic examination, may take several days or more to provide a definitive diagnosis. We believe that the detection of CTCs in the blood could provide strong clinical support for a cancer diagnosis without the need for an invasive tissue biopsy or other expensive or time-consuming diagnostic test.

 

We have done development work on an assay for the detection of a blood-borne lymphoma cancer intended for use with this liquid biopsy platform. Lymphomas represent approximately 10-25% of all cancers diagnosed in dogs.

 

The lymphoma assay is designed to identify specific genetic abnormalities using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH tests are regularly used for cancers in human medicine, such as the HER2 breast cancer test.

 

In early 2020, we successfully completed the development and manufacturing milestones for our liquid biopsy platform.

 

 4 

 

 

Consistent with our focus on the development of point-of-care diagnostic platforms, we intend to seek one or more partners for the further development and commercialization of the liquid biopsy platform.

 

Therapeutic Candidates

 

We have identified a number of drugs which have proven safe and effective in humans that we have sought to develop for use in canines and felines. We believe this development approach enables us to reduce the risks associated with obtaining regulatory approval for unproven product candidates and shortens the development timeline necessary to bring our product candidates to market.

 

We have four drug product candidates. Our lead drug product candidate is ZM-007, an oral suspension formulation of metronidazole, targeting the treatment of acute diarrhea in small dog breeds and puppies under nine pounds or four kilograms. Metronidazole suspension is only available as a compounded drug and is not approved by the FDA-CVM. An Investigational New Animal Drug, or INAD, was opened for ZM-007 with the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, or FDA-CVM, in October 2016. The API in ZM-007 is metronidazole, which has been the subject of multiple studies in humans and has been approved for use in humans for decades.

 

Our second drug product candidate is ZM-012, a novel tablet formulation of metronidazole and a complementary formulation to ZM-007, targeting the treatment of acute diarrhea in dogs. Metronidazole tablets are currently only available as human generics, most commonly known as Flagyl®. An INAD was opened for ZM-012 with the FDA-CVM in April 2016. We have finalized the formulation and completed pilot testing of ZM-012 as a beef-flavored oral tablet intended for dogs greater than nine pounds or four kilograms and we completed pilot testing of ZM-012 in the fourth quarter of 2017. We intend to pursue regulatory approval of ZM-012 as a bioequivalent to ZM-007 following approval of ZM-007 by FDA-CVM. Drugs that are considered to be bioequivalent are, for regulatory purposes, essentially the same, meaning the absence of significant difference between the extent and rate of absorption over the course of a specific period of time at the same dose and under the same conditions. The implementation of this bioequivalent strategy is contingent on FDA-CVM approval of the new animal drug application (NADA) for ZM-007. If the FDA-CVM permits us to rely on the bioequivalence of ZM-012 to ZM-007, we anticipate that this regulatory pathway will conserve significant development costs because a bioequivalence study could replace the need for pivotal safety and efficacy studies for ZM-012.

 

Our third drug product candidate is ZM-006, a transdermal gel formulation of methimazole targeting the chronic treatment of hyperthyroidism in cats. Hyperthyroidism is one of the most commonly diagnosed endocrine disorders in middle-aged to older cats according to the American Association of Feline Practitioners. We are investigating ZM-006 pursuant to an INAD opened with the FDA-CVM in June 2016. The API in ZM-006, methimazole, most commonly known as Tapazole®, has been the subject of multiple studies in humans and has been approved for oral use in humans for decades. Our transdermal gel formulation is intended to provide an alternative to an oral tablet formulation already approved by the FDA-CVM for cats, known as Felimazole®. Felimazole® is a twice a day oral dose whereas the Zomedica ZM-006 formulation is a transdermal once daily dose. We do not believe that the API in ZM-006 is protected by any patents or other proprietary rights of third parties. ZM-006 is intended for application to the inside of the cat’s ear. We conducted a pilot efficacy study at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine and Quakertown Veterinary Clinic, an American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) accredited hospital, that concluded December 2019 and results are being evaluated.

 

We do not believe that the API in ZM-007 is protected by any patents or other proprietary rights of third parties in the U.S. We had a pre-submission meeting on December 13, 2017 with the FDA-CVM specific to the product development strategy for ZM-007 and ZM-012, a bioequivalent to ZM-007. Based on the feedback received from the FDA-CVM at that meeting and in light of additional market research demonstrating approved alternatives to compounded drugs, we have decided to prioritize development of ZM-007 over ZM-012.

 

Our fourth drug product candidate is ZM-011, a transdermal gel formulation of fluoxetine, most commonly known as Prozac®, its human pharmaceutical brand name. We believe that Fluoxetine in pill or compounded form is frequently prescribed by veterinarians to treat feline behavioral disorders such as inappropriate urination. We are investigating ZM-011 pursuant to an INAD opened with the FDA-CVM in January 2017. The API, fluoxetine, has been the subject of multiple studies in humans and has been approved for use in humans for decades. We do not believe that the API in ZM-011 is protected by any patents or other proprietary rights of third parties. ZM-011 is a transdermal gel formulation intended for application to the inside of the cat’s ear. The formulation of ZM-011 has been completed.

 

 5 

 

 

Consistent with our focus on the development of point-of-care diagnostic platforms, we intend to seek one or more partners for the further development of our therapeutic candidates.

 

License Agreements

 

In November 2018, we entered into a development and supply agreement with Qorvo focused on bringing Qorvo’s piezo-electric BAW sensor to the veterinary health sector. Under the terms of this agreement, we have exclusive, global rights to develop and market Qorvo's investigational point-of-care diagnostic platform for veterinary use. Under the agreement, Qorvo and we will collaborate on the development of veterinary diagnostic assays. The joint development work initially targets five assay cartridge candidates to detect the thyroid and adrenal disorders in dogs and cats. Qorvo is responsible for the development of the assay cartridges and the instrument. We have agreed to pay for the associated non-recurring engineering costs of up to $500,000 per assay cartridge and the instrument and are responsible for the validation of the assay cartridges and the instrument. Qorvo will supply us, on an exclusive basis, with the instruments and the related assay cartridges to be developed under the agreement pursuant to a rolling forecast, subject to specified minimum purchase requirements, at prices specified in the agreement. We will be responsible for the marketing and sale of the disposable assay cartridges and instruments.

 

The agreement, which is exclusive worldwide in the practice of veterinary medicine for the health and wellbeing of any non-human animal, has an initial term of ten years (subject to early termination and extension in certain circumstances).

 

We paid Qorvo $1.0 million and issued to Qorvo unregistered common shares having a value of $4.4 million, consisting of an aggregate of 2,565,789 common shares with an ascribed price of $1.52 per share. We paid an additional $5 million of milestone payments in the first quarter of 2019. We have agreed to pay Qorvo additional milestone payments in cash or, if elected by Qorvo, additional unregistered common shares having a value calculated as specified in the agreement. The total amount of additional milestone payments (if all milestones are met) will be $5 million (if paid entirely with cash) or up to $5.45 million (consisting of cash in the amount of $3.5 million and unregistered common shares having a value of $1.95 million, if Qorvo elects to receive compensation partially in equity). In connection with the agreement, we entered into a registration rights agreement providing Qorvo with certain registration rights with respect to the common shares to be issued by us under the agreement.

 

In May 2018, we entered into a development, commercialization and exclusive distribution agreement with Seraph, a human biomedical device company. Under the terms of this agreement, we have exclusive global veterinary industry rights to develop and market a novel pathogen detection system in the form of a point-of-care diagnostic instrument. The agreement covers development and validation of our fecal/urine pathogen detection assays. We are responsible for development and validation, and their associated costs. Seraph will supply us, on an exclusive basis, with the hardware platform, associated software and the consumables to be developed under the agreement, pursuant to a rolling forecast, at prices specified in the agreement. We will be responsible for the marketing and sale of the hardware platform, associated software and the consumables. The agreement, which is exclusive to the field of global veterinary diagnostic applications, has a term of seven years (subject to adjustment in certain circumstances) and automatically renews for additional one-year terms thereafter.

 

We paid Seraph up-front fees of $500,000 and issued to Seraph unregistered common shares having a value of $1,238,513, consisting of an aggregate of 641,717 common shares at an ascribed price of $1.9479 per share. Seraph is entitled to additional payments for development costs. Seraph will be entitled to receive up to an additional $7,000,000, payable 50 percent in cash and 50 percent in additional unregistered common shares, upon the achievement of a series of staged, specified milestones, including completion of laboratory studies and field studies, production and commercial shipment of products. Seraph is entitled to certain registration rights with respect to the common shares to be issued by us under the agreement. In addition, we have agreed to pay Seraph license fees based on a percentage of gross profit from commercial sales of the product.

 

 6 

 

 

In January 2017, we entered into a collaborative research agreement with Celsee, a developer of diagnostics for the detection and quantification of cells and other markers. Subsequent to this agreement, in December 2017, we entered into a license and supply agreement with Celsee for exclusive global rights to develop and market Celsee’s liquid biopsy platform. The agreement with Celsee covers the development and commercialization of liquid biopsy assays and related consumables for the detection of cancer in companion animals.

 

We paid Celsee up-front fees of $500,000 and issued to Celsee unregistered common shares having a value of $230,131, consisting of an aggregate of 112,314 common shares at an ascribed price of $2.2259 per share. We issued Celsee an additional 657,894 unregistered common shares having a value of $1 million at an ascribed price of $1.52. upon the achievement of specified milestones-namely, completion of product development and upon successful completion of manufacturing milestones. All milestone payments to Celsee were satisfied as of December 31, 2019.

 

In January 2020, we amended and restated the Celsee agreement to acknowledge the completion of the initial development work and to provide for definitive supply and pricing terms for the liquid biopsy instrument and related consumables.

 

Under the terms of the restated agreement, we continue to have veterinary oncology care exclusive global rights to develop and market Celsee’s liquid biopsy platform for use by veterinarians as a cancer diagnostic.

 

Celsee will supply us on an exclusive basis with the assays and the consumables for the products to be developed under the agreement pursuant to a rolling forecast to be provided by us at prices specified in the agreement. We will be responsible for the marketing and sale of the assays and the related consumables. The agreement, which is exclusive in the field of veterinary cancer diagnostic applications, has a term of five years (subject to termination in certain circumstances) and automatically renews for additional two-year terms thereafter (subject to either party determining not to renew).

 

Research and Development

 

We engage in development work on our diagnostic platforms in conjunction with our strategic partners. We also engage in research and development activities relating to our drug product candidates. We use various contract research organizations, or CROs, to assist in performing our research and development activities.

 

In connection with these activities, we have incurred and will continue to incur significant research and development expenses. Our research and development expenses were $10,345,291 for the year ended December 31, 2019 and $10,317,153 for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

We intend to commercialize our diagnostic products with a direct sales force and industry partners. We intend to market these products directly to veterinarians whom we believe are self-motivated to utilize advanced diagnostics in order to improve the health of companion animals, while also generating additional revenue.

 

We intend to seek partners to continue development and commercialization of our liquid biopsy platform and our therapeutic assets.

 

We believe our strategy of marketing directly to veterinarians is consistent with the current practice of veterinarians who perform some of their own diagnostic tests and send other diagnostic samples to reference labs for analysis. We also intend to selectively utilize distributors, which we believe will enable us to expand our commercial reach to a majority of all veterinarians in our chosen markets. We believe that we can compete effectively with a combination of our own direct sales force and complementary distributors.

 

To support our marketing efforts, we introduced a unique “Voice of the Vet” program in the fourth quarter of 2016 to gather insights and better understand the needs of veterinarians and their practices, and to gauge interest for potential future product offerings, while building brand awareness as a valued veterinary partner. Our Voice of the Vet program allows veterinarians, practice managers and veterinary technicians to participate in conversations where they can share ideas and experiences with each other, as well as with us through an interactive platform.

 

 7 

 

 

During 2019, we have increased our investment in building brand and product awareness as a valued veterinary partner with clinical practitioners.

 

Additionally, we are continuing to conduct comprehensive market research across the United States with private, corporate and institutional clinics along with key opinion leaders and academia to obtain feedback on our product development efforts and to build relationships with key market influencers.

 

Manufacturing

 

We have no internal manufacturing capabilities for our diagnostic and therapeutic product candidates.

 

Under our license and supply agreements, Qorvo, Seraph and Celsee are responsible for the manufacture and supply of the equipment and consumables to us. These strategic partners have primary responsibility for assuring that all products will be manufactured in accordance with applicable laws and meet all agreed upon specifications.

 

To ensure a dependable and high-quality supply of the APIs for our pilot studies and pivotal trials, we rely on cGMP-compliant contract manufacturers. Because the APIs in our drug product candidates are used in human drugs that are no longer subject to patent protection, we believe that there are multiple contract manufacturers for our drug product candidates that have demonstrated the ability to provide high-quality formulated products more cost effectively than we could on our own. We believe that the contract manufacturers of our trial supplies will be able to provide commercial supplies of any of our drug product candidates that are approved for marketing.

 

While we and our contract manufacturers have historically been able to obtain supplies of the APIs for development of our drug product candidates, neither we nor our contract manufacturers have long-term supply agreements with the API manufacturers. We also have no agreements for commercial-scale supply of the API or manufacture of any of our drug product candidates.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We intend to rely primarily upon a combination of in-licensing exclusive rights, regulatory exclusivity, proprietary know-how, and confidentiality agreements to protect our diagnostic assays, product formulations, processes, methods and other technologies and to preserve any trade secrets and operate without infringing on the proprietary rights of other parties, both in the United States and in other countries. We currently do not own any issued patents, although we intend to apply for patent protection where feasible

  

Our diagnostic technologies are dependent on intellectual property developed by our strategic partners and licensed to us. We do not own the intellectual property rights that underlie these technology licenses. Our rights to use the technology we license are subject to the negotiation of, continuation of and compliance with the terms of our licenses. However, we have filed four U.S. patent applications and two Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applications for U.S. and international protection of our diagnostic tests. Three of these applications cover tests developed for our liquid biopsy platforms, and one covers pathogen detection.

 

Because our drug product candidates are based on approved human drugs that no longer are subject to patent protection, there is little, if any, composition-of-matter patent protection available for the API in these product candidates. Where feasible, however, we intend to pursue the broadest intellectual property protection possible for our compounds and any proprietary technology through enhanced formulations of our drug product candidates. However, even intellectual property protection, if available, may not afford us with complete protection against competitors.

 

We depend upon the skills, knowledge and experience of our management personnel, as well as that of our other employees, advisors, consultants and contractors, none of which are patentable. To help protect our know-how, and any inventions for which patents may be difficult to obtain or enforce, we require all of our employees, consultants, advisors and other contractors to enter into customary confidentiality and inventions agreements that prohibit the disclosure of confidential information and, where applicable, require disclosure and assignment to us of the ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions important to our business.

 

 8 

 

 

Competition

 

Diagnostics

 

Our potential competitors include large human pharmaceutical and medical diagnostics companies, small businesses focused on animal health, and reference laboratory services provided by academic institutions and in-clinic product providers. These competitors include Idexx Laboratories, Inc., Antech Diagnostics, a unit of VCA Inc., Abaxis, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Zoetis Inc., Heska Corporation and Zoetis Inc.

  

Therapeutics

 

If our drug product candidate is the first one approved by the FDA-CVM for use in animals, it may be eligible for between three and seven years of regulatory exclusivity in the United States, depending on the type of product and its intended use. However, while there are fewer competitors in the pet therapeutics industry than in the human pharmaceutical industry, the development and commercialization of new animal health medicines is highly competitive, and we expect competition from major pharmaceutical, biotechnology and specialty animal health medicine companies.

 

Our potential competitors include large animal health companies, which currently derive a significant portion of their revenue from livestock medications. Large animal health companies include Merck Animal Health, the animal health division of Merck & Co., Inc.; Elanco; Bayer Animal Health, the animal health division of Bayer AG; Novartis Animal Health, the animal health division of Novartis AG; Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, the animal health division of Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH; and Zoetis, Inc., as well as European companies such as Virbac S.A., Vetoquinol S.A., and Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC. We are also aware of several smaller early stage companies that are developing products for use in the pet therapeutics market, including Kindred Biosciences, Inc., Aratana Therapeutics, Inc., Parnell Pharmaceuticals Holdings Ltd., and Jaguar Animal Health, Inc. Our drug product candidates will also face competition from medicines and products approved for use in humans that are used off-label for pets. Private organizations, academic institutions and government agencies conducting animal health product research are also considered potential competitors.

 

General

 

Many of our competitors and potential competitors have substantially more financial, technical, and human resources than we do. Many also have far more experience in the development, manufacture, regulation and worldwide commercialization of animal diagnostics and animal health medicines, including pet therapeutics. We also expect to compete with academic institutions, governmental agencies and private organizations that are conducting research in the fields of animal diagnostics and animal health medicines. If such competing products achieve regulatory approval and commercialization prior to our product candidates, or if our intellectual property protection and efforts to obtain regulatory exclusivity fail to provide us with exclusive marketing rights for some of our products, we may be unable to effectively compete in the markets in which we participate.

 

Government Regulation

 

Diagnostic Product Candidates

 

Our diagnostic product candidates may be subject to regulatory review by the USDA-CVB and/or post-marketing oversight by the USDA-CVB or FDA-CVM. Generally speaking, full diagnostic kits aimed at the detection or diagnosis of an infectious disease in animals, including the materials required for testing along with instructions for use and interpretation of results, used at the point-of-care, including in-office diagnostic tests, may be subject to pre-market regulatory review and approval by the USDA-CVB. The USDA-CVB’s review process for diagnostics is subject to some variability based on the type of diagnostic kit being reviewed, however, the USDA-CVB will generally review the results of specific tests that are required to be conducted in accordance with the USDA-CVB’s testing criteria. These include diagnostic sensitivity/specificity studies, conducted using a large number of samples of U.S. origin, reproducibility/repeatability/suitability studies used to evaluate test kits under field conditions in participating laboratories and ruggedness studies in which manufacturers measure the ruggedness or robustness of the diagnostic test kits based on the capacity of the assay to remain unaffected by small variations in or deviations from the instructions for use (for example, not allowing the samples to reach the designated temperature). Diagnostic products and testing kits that do not claim to detect or diagnose an infectious disease and that are not designed for use at the point-of-care are generally subject only to post-marketing oversight by the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB. While the sale of these products does not require premarket approval by the FDA-CVM and does not subject us to the FDA-CVM’s cGMP requirements, these products must not be adulterated, mislabeled or misbranded under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, or the FDC Act, and are subject to post-marketing review.

 

 9 

 

 

Drug Product Candidates

 

The FDA-CVM regulates animal pharmaceuticals under the FDC Act. In order to obtain regulatory approval to market a drug product candidate in the U.S., an applicant must demonstrate that the product candidate is safe, effective and produced by a consistent method of manufacture. Post-approval monitoring of products is required by law, with reports being provided to the FDA-CVM's Surveillance and Compliance group. Reports of product quality defects, adverse events or unexpected results are required in accordance with the law.

 

Prior to commencing testing of a drug product candidate, an applicant is required to open an INAD with the FDA-CVM. Formulation work and pilot testing occurs once the INAD is opened. This is followed by a pre-submission conference with the FDA-CVM to discuss and agree on a proposed development plan, including the design of pivotal safety and clinical trials that would support approval of a new animal drug application, or NADA.

 

Early pilot studies may be conducted in laboratory animals to establish clinical endpoints and the dose range for a new drug product candidate. Data on how well the drug is absorbed when dosed by different routes of administration and the relationship of the dose to the effectiveness are studied.

 

During development, the applicant will usually submit a proposed pivotal trial protocol to the FDA-CVM for review and concurrence prior to conducting the trial. The applicant must gather and submit data on manufacturing, safety and effectiveness to the FDA-CVM for review.

 

The pivotal clinical trial must be conducted with the formulation of the drug product candidate that is intended to be commercialized, and is a multi-site, randomized, controlled study, generally with a placebo control. To reduce bias in the study, individuals doing the assessment are not told whether the subject is in the group receiving the treatment being tested or the placebo group.

 

Once all data have been submitted and reviewed for each technical section - safety, effectiveness and chemistry, manufacturing and controls, or CMC - the FDA-CVM issues a “technical section complete letter” as each section review is completed, and when all three letters have been issued, the applicant prepares a draft of the Freedom of Information Summary, the proposed labeling, and all other relevant information, and submits these for FDA review. An administrative NADA is a NADA that is submitted after all of the technical sections that fulfill the requirements for the approval of the new drug product candidate have been reviewed by FDA-CVM and FDA-CVM has issued a technical section complete letter for each of those technical sections. Although this process is not required and submission of a non-administrative NADA is also acceptable, we plan to take advantage of the administrative NADA process to obtain a timelier phased review. Because FDA-CVM has already reviewed the individual technical sections before the administrative NADA is filed, FDA-CVM is committed under the Animal Drug User Fee Act (ADUFA) to reviewing and acting on 90% of administrative NADAs within 60 days after submission. The FDA-CVM user fee goal is to review and act on 90% of non-administrative NADAs within 180 days after submission. After approval, we will be required to collect reports of adverse events and submit them on a regular basis to the FDA.

 

Other Regulatory Considerations

 

Regulatory rules relating to human food safety, food additives, or drug residues in food will not apply to our product candidates because our product candidates are not intended for use in food animals or food production animals.

 

 10 

 

 

Advertising and promotion of animal health products is controlled by regulations in the United States. These rules generally restrict advertising and promotion to those claims and uses that have been reviewed and authorized by the FDA-CVM.

 

Any drug product candidate, if approved, may eventually face generic competition in the United States. In the United States, a generic animal drug may be approved pursuant to an Abbreviated New Animal Drug Application, or ANADA. Instead of demonstrating the drug’s safety and effectiveness in the target species as required in a NADA, a generic applicant must only show that the proposed generic product is the same as, and bioequivalent to, the approved brand name product. However, if any of our drug product candidates is the first one approved by the FDA-CVM for use in animals, it will be eligible for between three and seven years of regulatory exclusivity in the United States, depending on the type of product and its intended use.

 

We will be required to conduct post-approval monitoring of any approved product and to submit reports of product quality defects, adverse events or unexpected results, and be subject to regulatory inspection from time to time. Safety, quality, or efficacy concerns can lead to product recalls, withdrawals or suspended or declining sales, as well as product liability and other claims.

 

Employees

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had 28 employees. Of our employees, ten are engaged in research and development activities, seven are engaged in business development and marketing activities, and eleven are engaged in corporate and administrative activities. None of our employees are represented by labor unions or covered by collective bargaining agreements.

 

Properties

 

Our corporate headquarters and research and development laboratory are located in Ann Arbor, Michigan where we lease and occupy approximately 16,226 feet pursuant to a lease that expires January 31, 2025. In February 2020 we entered into an amended lease agreement whereby our original lease for approximately 26,540 square feet of space was bought out and a new lease was issued for 16, 226 square feet of office space

 

Legal Proceedings

 

On November 1, 2019, Heska Corporation (“Heska”) filed a complaint for damages and injunctive relief (the “Complaint”) in the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina, Case 1:19-cv-01108-LCB-JLW, against Qorvo US, Inc. (“Qorvo US”), Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC (“Qorvo Biotech” and, together with Qorvo US, “Qorvo”) and the Company (collectively with Qorvo, the “Defendants”). The Complaint alleges, among other things, that the Defendants improperly obtained Heska’s trade secrets and confidential information and/or conspired to use improper means to misappropriate Heska’s trade secrets related to an instrument and related consumable products for performing immunoassay analysis of biomarkers and other substances. The Complaint seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, as well as preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent the Defendants from commercializing the Company’s TRUFORMATM diagnostic instrument. On January 21, 2020, the Defendants filed a motion seeking dismissal of the Complaint. On February 11, 2020, Heska filed its response to the Defendants’ motion to dismiss to which the Defendants responded on February 25, 2020. The Company believes that the allegations in the Complaint have no merit and will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations or financial condition, and the Company reaffirms its intention to commence the commercialization of its TRUFORMATM platform by the end of 2020.

 

Under the terms of the Development and Supply Agreement, dated November 26, 2018, by and between Qorvo Biotech and the Company (the “Qorvo Agreement”), Qorvo Biotech agreed to indemnify the Company and certain related parties against claims alleging infringement or misappropriation of third-party intellectual property rights, subject to certain limitations and exceptions. Qorvo Biotech has notified the Company that Qorvo Biotech has assumed the defense of the Complaint and will indemnify the Company for losses arising from the Complaint in accordance with the terms of the Qorvo Agreement. Qorvo Biotech has further advised the Company that it intends to mount a vigorous defense to the claims in the Complaint, and that it believes the allegations contained in the Complaint are without merit.

 

 11 

 

 

Corporate Information

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (formerly, Wise Oakwood Ventures Inc.) was originally incorporated as Wise Oakwood Ventures Inc. on January 7, 2013 under the Business Corporations Act (Alberta). On October 28, 2013, we completed our initial public offering in Canada and became classified as a Capital Pool Company, as defined under the rules of the TSX Venture Exchange, or TSX-V. On April 21, 2016, we changed our name to Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and consolidated our common shares on a one-for-two and one-half (2½) basis. ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc., or ZoMedica Inc., was incorporated on May 14, 2015 under the Canada Business Corporations Act. On April 21, 2016, we completed a qualifying transaction, or the Qualifying Transaction, under TSX-V Policy 2.4 - Capital Pool Companies, consisting of a three-cornered amalgamation among our company, ZoMedica Inc. and our wholly-owned subsidiary. Under the Qualifying Transaction, ZoMedica Inc. and our subsidiary were amalgamated to form Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Ltd., or Zomedica Ltd. As consideration for the amalgamation, shareholders of ZoMedica Inc. became the owners of 97.6% (non-diluted) of our common shares, and ZoMedica Ltd. became our wholly-owned subsidiary. Subsequent to the Qualifying Transaction, Zomedica Ltd. was vertically amalgamated into our company. We have one wholly-owned subsidiary, Zomedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a Delaware company. ZoMedica Inc. entered into the Qualifying Transaction in order to accomplish the following: 

 

  · Enable its shareholders to own shares in a company that was publicly traded on the TSX-V;

 

  · Expand its shareholder base to include the public shareholders of Wise Oakwood; and

 

  · Obtain access to the cash resources raised by Wise Oakwood in its initial public offering.

  

On November 10, 2017, our shares were approved for listing on the NYSE American under the symbol “ZOM”. On November 20, 2017 the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission declared our registration statement on Form S-1 effective. Our common shares commenced trading on the NYSE American on November 21, 2017.

 

On February 10, 2020, we effected the voluntary withdrawal of our common shares from listing on the TSX-V.

 

Our principal executive offices are located at 100 Phoenix Drive, Suite 180, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, and our telephone number is (734) 369-2555. Our website address is www.zomedica.com. The information contained in, or accessible through, our website is not part of the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part.

 

 12 

 

 

Item 1A.Risk Factors.

 

Risks Factors

 

Risks Related to our Business

 

We have a limited operating history, are not profitable and may never become profitable.

 

We are a development stage veterinary diagnostic and pharmaceutical company creating products for companion animals (canine, feline and equine) by focusing on the unmet needs of clinical veterinarians. Since the commencement of our business in May 2015, our operations have been primarily limited to the identification of product candidates and research and development of our diagnostic and drug product candidates. As a result, we have limited historical operations upon which to evaluate our business and prospects and we have not yet demonstrated an ability to obtain approval for any of our product candidates or successfully overcome the risks and uncertainties frequently encountered by companies in emerging fields such as the companion animal pharmaceuticals and health care solutions industries.

 

We also have not generated any revenue to date, and we expect to continue to incur significant research and development costs and other expenses. Our net loss and comprehensive loss for the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 was $19,784,054 and $16,647,687, respectively. Our accumulated deficit as of December 31, 2019 was $52,057,841. As of December 31, 2019, we had total shareholders' equity of $2,095,459. We expect to continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future, which will increase significantly from historical levels as we expand our product development activities (including conducting required clinical studies and trials), seek necessary approvals for our product candidates, and begin commercialization activities. Even if we succeed in developing and broadly commercializing one or more of our product candidates, we expect to continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future, and we may never become profitable. If we fail to achieve or maintain profitability, then we may be unable to continue our operations at planned levels and be forced to reduce or cease operations.

 

We will need to raise additional capital to achieve our goals.

 

We do not have any products approved for sale. Although we believe that we do not require pre-market approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, or the FDA-CVM, to market and sell TRUMFORMATM , a Bulk Acoustic Wave sensor-based veterinary point-of-care diagnostic platform for performing immunodiagnostic testing, ZM-020, our Raman spectroscopy-based point-of-care diagnostic platform, nor ZM-017 and ZM-022, our circulating tumor cell, or CTC, diagnostic assay that we are developing, we do not expect to commence marketing of TRUMFORMATM the second half of 2020.

 

Until, and unless, we receive approval from the FDA-CVM for our drug product candidates, we cannot market or sell our drug products in the United States and will have no material drug product revenue. Our lead drug product candidates are in the formulation, optimization and/or pilot study stage, and we have not yet begun pivotal trials. We anticipate that each of our drug product candidates will require approximately five years of development at a cost of approximately $6 million per drug product candidate before we expect to be able to apply for marketing approval in the United States. In addition, certain assays that we may choose to pursue for use in our diagnostic platforms may require pre-market regulatory approval.

 

We are also seeking to identify potential complementary opportunities in the veterinary diagnostics and therapeutics sectors. We will continue to expend substantial resources for the foreseeable future to develop our existing product candidates and any other product candidates that we may develop or acquire. These expenditures will include: costs of developing and validating our diagnostic product candidates and related assays and consumables; costs associated with drug formulation; costs associated with conducting pilot and pivotal trials and clinical studies; costs associated with completing other research and development activities; costs of identifying additional potential product candidates; costs associated with payments to technology licensors and maintaining other intellectual property; costs of obtaining regulatory approvals; costs associated with securing contract manufacturers to meet our commercial manufacturing and supply capabilities; and costs associated with marketing and selling our products. In addition, under our existing development agreements, we are required make significant cash milestone payments to our development partners and to pay certain development costs. We do not control the timing of these payments. We also may incur unanticipated costs. Because the outcome of our development activities and commercialization efforts is inherently uncertain, the actual amounts necessary to successfully complete the development and commercialization of our existing or future product candidates may be greater or less than we anticipate.

  

 13 

 

 

As a result, we will need to obtain additional capital to fund the development of our business. Except for our $5,000,000 unsecured working capital loan we have no existing agreements or arrangements with respect to any financings, and any such financings may result in dilution to our shareholders, the imposition of debt covenants and repayment obligations or other restrictions that may adversely affect our business or the value of our common shares.

 

Our future capital requirements depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:

 

·the scope, progress, results and costs of researching and developing our existing or future diagnostics and product candidates;

 

·the extent to which any of our future diagnostic assays may be subject to USDA-CVB pre-market regulation;

 

·the timing of, and the costs involved in, obtaining regulatory approvals for any of our existing or future diagnostics or product candidates;

 

·the number and characteristics of the diagnostics and/or product candidates we pursue;

 

·the cost of contract manufacturers to manufacture our existing and future diagnostics and product candidates and any products we successfully commercialize;

 

·the cost of commercialization activities if any of our existing or future diagnostics and product candidates are approved for sale, including marketing, sales and distribution costs;

 

·the expenses needed to attract and retain skilled personnel;

 

·the costs associated with being a public company;

 

·our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements; and

 

·the costs involved in preparing and filing patent applications, maintaining any successfully obtained patents and protecting and enforcing any such patents.

 

Additional funds may not be available when we need them on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. If adequate funds are not available to us on a timely basis, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate one or more of our product development programs or any future commercialization efforts.

  

The audit opinion on our financial statements contains a going concern modification.

 

As a result of our recurring losses from operations and our accumulated deficit, the opinion of our independent registered public accountants on our financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2019 contains a going concern modification. If we are unable to continue as a going concern, we might have to liquidate our assets and the values we receive for our assets in liquidation or dissolution could be significantly lower than the values reflected in our financial statements. In addition, the inclusion of a going concern modification by our independent registered public accountants, our recurring losses, our accumulated deficit and our potential inability to continue as a going concern may materially adversely affect our share price and our ability to raise new capital or to enter into contractual relationships with third parties.

 

 14 

 

 

We are substantially dependent on the success of our lead product candidates and cannot be certain that any of them will be approved for marketing, to the extent applicable, or successfully commercialized.

 

We have no products approved for sale in any jurisdiction and are focused primarily on the development of our lead diagnostic candidates. Accordingly, our near-term prospects, including our ability to generate material product revenue, or enter into potential strategic transactions, will depend heavily on the successful development and commercialization of one or more of our lead candidates, which in turn will depend on a number of factors, including the following:

 

·the successful completion of clinical validation of our diagnostic product candidates, which may take significantly longer than we anticipate and will depend, in part, upon the satisfactory performance of our strategic partners and third-party contractors;

 

·the ability of our third-party contract manufacturers to manufacture supplies of any of our product candidates and to develop, validate and maintain viable commercial manufacturing processes that are compliant with Good Manufacturing Practices or GMP;

 

·our ability to successfully market any product candidate for which marketing approval is received, whether alone or in partnership with others;

 

·the availability, perceived advantages, relative cost, relative safety and relative efficacy of our product candidates compared to alternative and competing treatments;

 

·the acceptance of our product candidates as safe and effective by veterinarians, pet owners and the animal health community;

 

·our ability to achieve and maintain compliance with all regulatory requirements applicable to our business; and

 

·our ability to obtain and enforce our intellectual property rights and obtain marketing exclusivity for our product candidates, and avoid or prevail in any third-party patent interference, patent infringement claims or administrative patent proceedings initiated by third parties or the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”).

 

Many of these factors are beyond our control. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be successful in developing or commercializing any of our product candidates. If we are unsuccessful or are significantly delayed in developing and commercializing our product candidates, our business and prospects will be materially adversely affected, and you may lose all or a portion of your investment.

 

We face unproven markets for our products candidates.

 

The companion animal therapeutic and diagnostic markets are less developed than the human therapeutic and diagnostic markets and as a result no assurance can be given that our product candidates will be successful. Veterinarians, pet owners or other veterinary health providers in general may not accept or utilize any products that we may develop.

 

The companion animal care industry is subject to rapidly changing technology, which could make our product candidates obsolete.

 

The companion animal care industry is characterized by rapid technological changes, frequent new product introductions and enhancements, and evolving industry standards, all of which could make our product candidates obsolete. Our future success will depend on our ability to keep pace with the evolving needs of our customers on a timely and cost-effective basis and to pursue new market opportunities that develop as a result of technological and scientific advances. We must continuously enhance our product offerings to keep pace with evolving standards of care. If we do not update our product offerings to reflect new scientific knowledge or new standards of care, our product candidates could become obsolete, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

 15 

 

 

Our ability to successfully develop and commercialize our existing and any future product candidates will depend on several factors, including:

 

·our ability to convince the veterinary community of the clinical utility of our products and their potential advantages over existing tests and therapies;

 

·the willingness or ability by pet owners to pay for our products and the willingness of veterinarians to recommend our products;

 

·the willingness of veterinarians to utilize our diagnostic tests; and

 

·where applicable, the willingness of testing labs to buy our assay equipment.

 

Our dependence on suppliers could limit our ability to develop and commercialize certain products

 

We rely on third-party suppliers to provide components in our product candidates, manufacture products that we do not manufacture ourselves and perform services that we do not provide ourselves. Because these suppliers are independent third parties with their own financial objectives, actions taken by them could have a materially negative effect on our results of operations. The risks of relying on suppliers include our inability to enter into contracts with third-party suppliers on reasonable terms, inconsistent or inadequate quality control, relocation of supplier facilities, supplier work stoppages and suppliers’ failure to comply with applicable regulations or their contractual obligations. Problems with suppliers could materially negatively impact our ability to complete development, supply the market, lead to higher costs or damage our reputation with our customers.

 

In addition, we currently purchase many products and materials from sole or single sources. Some of the products that we purchase from these sources are proprietary and, therefore, cannot be readily or easily replaced by alternative sources. To mitigate risks associated with sole and single source suppliers, we will seek when possible to enter into long-term contracts that provide for an uninterrupted supply of products at predictable prices. However, some suppliers may decline to enter into long-term contracts, and we are required to purchase products with short term contracts or on a purchase order basis. There can be no assurance that suppliers with which we do not have contracts will continue to supply our requirements for products, that suppliers with which we do have contracts will always fulfill their obligations under these contracts, or that any of our suppliers will not experience disruptions in their ability to supply our requirements for products. In cases where we purchase sole and single source products or components under purchase orders, we are more susceptible to unanticipated cost increases or changes in other terms of supply. In addition, under some contracts with suppliers we have minimum purchase obligations, and our failure to satisfy those obligations may result in loss of some or all of our rights under these contracts or require us to compensate the supplier. If we are unable to obtain adequate quantities of products in the future from sole and single source suppliers, we may be unable to supply the market, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

The commercial potential of our product candidates is difficult to predict. The market for any product candidate, or for companion animal diagnostics and therapeutics overall, is uncertain and may be smaller than we anticipate, which could significantly and negatively impact our revenue, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We believe that the emerging nature of our industry and our unproven business plan make it difficult to estimate the commercial potential of any of our product candidates. The market for any product that we seek to commercialize will depend on important factors such as the cost, utility and ease of use of our diagnostic assays, the safety and efficacy of our drug candidates compared to other available treatments, including potentially less expensive human pharmaceutical alternatives with similar efficacy profiles, changing standards of care, preferences of veterinarians, the willingness of pet owners to pay for such products, and the availability of competitive alternatives that may emerge either during the product development process or after commercial introduction. If the market potential for our product candidates is less than we anticipate due to one or more of these factors, it could negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. Further, the willingness of pet owners to pay for our product candidates, if approved, may be less than we anticipate, and may be negatively affected by overall economic conditions. Because relatively few pet owners purchase insurance for their companion animals, pet owners are more likely to have to pay for our products directly and may be unwilling or unable to pay for any such products.

 

 16 

 

 

We face competition from the validated human drugs from which our drug candidates are developed which are not subject to patent protection and which are already used “off-label” in animals.

 

Our lead drug product candidates include APIs already demonstrated safe and effective in humans and we expect that our future drug product candidates will be similarly based on such APIs. We do not engage in research or discovery of novel therapeutics but focus on drug product candidates with APIs that have been successfully commercialized or demonstrated to be safe and effective in humans, which we sometimes refer to as validated. We expect that there will be little, if any, third-party patent protection of the APIs in our drug product candidates. As a result, our drug product candidates may face competition from their human equivalents in situations where such equivalents are available and used in unapproved animal indications, which is known as off-label use. There is no assurance that the eventual prices of our drug products will be lower than or competitive with the prices of the human equivalents used off-label, or that a palatable, easy-to-administer formulation will be sufficient to differentiate them from their human equivalents.

 

Our product candidates will face significant competition and may be unable to compete effectively.

 

The development and commercialization of veterinary diagnostics and pharmaceuticals is highly competitive, and our success depends on our ability to compete effectively with other products in the market and identify potential partners for continued development and commercialization.

 

There are a number of competitors in the diagnostic market that have substantially greater financial and operational resources and established marketing, sales and service organizations. We expect to compete primarily with commercial clinical laboratories, hospitals’ clinical laboratories and other veterinary diagnostic equipment manufacturers. Our principal competitors in the veterinary diagnostic market are IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., Antech Diagnostics, a unit of VCA Inc., Abaxis, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Zoetis Inc., Heska Corporation and Zoetis Inc. We must develop our distribution channels and build our direct sales force in order to compete effectively in these markets. If we are unable to effectively manage our distribution channels in our highly competitive industry, we may fail to retain customers or obtain new customers and our business will suffer.

  

If our drug product candidates are approved, we expect to compete with large animal health companies including Merck Animal Health, the animal health division of Merck &Co., Inc.; Elanco Animal Health Incorporated; Bayer Animal Health, the animal health division of Bayer AG; Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, the animal health business unit of Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH; and Zoetis Inc., as well as European companies such as Virbac S.A., Vetoquinol S.A. and Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC We are also aware of several smaller early stage companies that are developing products for use in the pet therapeutics market, including Kindred Biosciences, Inc., Aratana Therapeutics, Inc., . (a wholly owned subsidiary of Elanco Animal Health as of July 2019), Parnell Pharmaceuticals Holdings Ltd. and Jaguar Animal Health, Inc. We also expect to compete with academic institutions, governmental agencies and private organizations that are conducting research in the field of animal health medicines.

 

We target drug product candidates for which the API, while having been approved for use in human drugs, has not been previously approved for use in animals. If we are the first to gain approval for the use of such API in animals, our drug products will benefit from between three and seven years of marketing exclusivity in the United States for the approved indication. We also plan to differentiate our products, where possible, with alternative drug delivery systems that are more conducive to dosing for the target companion animal species, but we cannot assure you that we will be able to prevent our competitors from developing substantially similar products and bringing those products to market earlier than we are able to.

 

Our drug product candidates will face competition from various products approved for use in humans that are used off-label in animals, and all our products will face potential competition from new products in development. These and other potential competing products may benefit from greater brand recognition and brand loyalty than our drug product candidates may achieve. 

 

 17 

 

 

Many of our competitors and potential competitors have substantially more financial, technical and human resources than we do. Many also have far more experience than we have in the development, manufacture, regulation and worldwide commercialization of animal health medicines, including pet therapeutics. We also expect to compete with academic institutions, governmental agencies and private organizations that are conducting research in the fields of animal diagnostics and animal health. If such competing products are commercialized prior to our product candidates, or if our intellectual property protection and efforts to obtain regulatory exclusivity fail to provide us with exclusive marketing rights for some of our therapeutic products, we may be unable to compete effectively in the markets in which we participate. Contractual agreements between clinics and from competitors may limit practices’ ability to use other tests and technologies due to predetermined minimums in those agreements.

  

Our ability to develop, manufacture and commercialize our drug product candidates is dependent on our establishing and maintaining relationships with GMP-compliant third-party manufacturers.

 

We have no internal manufacturing capabilities and we do not plan to develop such capabilities. As a result, our ability to manufacture and commercialize our product candidates is substantially dependent on our ability to ensure a dependable and high-quality supply of the APIs required for our pilot studies and pivotal trials and for future commercial manufacturing. We currently believe that, because the APIs used in our drug product candidates have been used in human drugs, there are multiple GMP-compliant manufacturers available that will be able to supply these APIs and that the contract manufacturers we currently use for our trial supplies will be able to provide commercial supplies of any of our drug product candidates. While we have historically been able to obtain the necessary supplies of our APIs for our development work, we cannot be certain that either we or our contract manufacturers will continue to be able to provide the necessary API supply. Neither we nor our contract manufacturers have long-term supply contracts with API manufacturers, and we have no agreements in place for the commercial-scale supply of any API or the manufacture of any of our drug product candidates. If we are unable to procure the requisite apply of an API or to contract with a GMP-complaint third-party manufacturer, we may be unable to continue to develop, manufacture or commercialize any of our product candidates and our business may fail to grow or develop.

 

The results of earlier studies may not be predictive of the results of our pivotal trials, and we may be unable to obtain regulatory approval for our existing or future diagnostic or drug product candidates under applicable regulatory requirements or maintain any regulatory approval obtained. The denial, delay or loss of any regulatory approval would prevent or delay our commercialization efforts and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

The research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, approval, sale, marketing and distribution of our product candidates are subject to extensive regulation. We will not be permitted to market our drug product candidates in the United States until we receive approval of a New Animal Drug Application, or NADA, from the FDA-CVM and may not be able to market and sell any point-of-care diagnostic products without pre-marketing approval from the USDA-CVB. To gain approval to market a pet pharmaceutical or point-of-care diagnostic product kit for a particular species, we must provide the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB, as applicable, with efficacy data from pivotal trials that adequately demonstrate that our product candidates are safe and effective in the target species for the intended indications. In addition, we must provide manufacturing data. For the FDA-CVM, we must provide data from safety testing and clinical data, also called target animal safety studies. Similarly, for the USDA-CVB, we must provide the results of specific tests required to be conducted in accordance with the USDA-CVB’s guidelines demonstrating the sensitivity/specificity, reproducibility/repeatability/suitability and the ruggedness or robustness of the relevant diagnostic kit. Either of the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB may also require us to conduct costly post-approval testing and/or collect post-approval safety data to maintain our approval for any product candidate or diagnostic. The results of our pivotal studies and other initial development activities, and the results of any previous studies in humans or animals conducted by us or third parties, may not be predictive of future results of pivotal trials or other future studies, and failure can occur at any time during or after pivotal studies and other development activities by us or our contract research organizations or CROs. Our pivotal studies may fail to show the desired safety or efficacy of our product candidates despite promising initial data or the results in previous human or animal studies conducted by others, and the success of a product candidate in prior animal studies, or in the treatment of human beings, does not ensure success in subsequent studies. Clinical trials in humans and pivotal trials in animals sometimes fail to show a benefit even for drugs that are effective, because of statistical limitations in the design of the trials or other statistical anomalies. Therefore, even if our studies and other development activities are completed as planned, the results may not be sufficient to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates.

 

 18 

 

 

The FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB can delay, limit, deny or revoke approval of any of our product candidates for many reasons, including:

 

if the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB disagrees with our interpretation of data from our pivotal studies or other development efforts;

 

if we are unable to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB that the product candidate is safe and effective for the target indication;

 

if the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB requires additional studies or changes its approval policies or regulations;

 

if the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB does not approve of the formulation, labeling or the specifications of our existing and future product candidates;

 

if the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB fails to approve the manufacturing processes of our third-party contract manufacturers; and

 

if any approved product candidate subsequently fails post-approval testing required by the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB.

 

Further, even if we receive approval of our product candidates, such approval may be for a more limited indication than we originally requested, the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB may not approve the labeling that we believe is necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our product candidates and we may be required to conduct costly post-approval testing. Any delay or failure in obtaining applicable regulatory approval for the intended indications of our product candidates would delay or prevent commercialization of such product candidates and would materially adversely impact our business and prospects.

 

Development of product candidates for use in companion animal health is an inherently expensive, time-consuming and uncertain, and any delay or discontinuance of validation or pivotal studies for our current or future product candidates would significantly harm our business and prospects.

 

Development of product candidates for use in companion animals is an inherently lengthy, expensive and uncertain process, and there is no assurance that our development activities will be successful. We do not know whether the validation studies or the pivotal studies of our drug product candidates, will begin or conclude on time, and they may be delayed or discontinued for a variety of reasons, including if we are unable to:

 

address any safety concerns that arise during the course of the studies;

 

complete the studies due to deviations from the study protocols, the occurrence of adverse events or, in the case of our validation studies, sensitivity and selectivity results that vary from our expectations;

 

add new study sites;

 

address any conflicts with new or existing laws or regulations; or

 

reach agreement on acceptable terms with study sites, which can be subject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different sites.

 

Any delays in completing our development efforts will increase our costs, delay our product candidate development and any regulatory approval process and jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenue. Any of these occurrences may significantly harm our business, financial condition and prospects. In addition, factors that may cause a delay in the commencement or completion of our development efforts may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of our product candidates which, as described above, would materially, adversely impact our business and prospects.

  

 19 

 

 

Our strategic partnerships are important to our business. If we are unable to maintain any of these partnerships, or if these partnerships are not successful, our business could be adversely affected.

 

We have entered into a number of strategic partnerships that are important to our business and we expect to enter into similar partnerships as part of our growth strategy. These partnerships may pose a number of risks, including:

 

partners may have significant discretion in determining the efforts and resources that they will apply to these partnerships;

 

partners may not perform their obligations as expected;

 

partners may not pursue development of our product candidates or may elect not to continue or renew development based on development results, changes in the partners’ strategic focus or available funding, or external factors, such as an acquisition, that divert resources or create competing priorities;

 

partners could independently develop, or develop with third parties, products that compete directly or indirectly with our products or product candidates if the partners believe that competitive products are more likely to be successfully developed or can be commercialized under terms that are more economically attractive than ours, which may cause partners to cease to devote resources to the development of our product candidates;

 

disagreements with partners, including disagreements over proprietary rights, contract interpretation or the preferred course of development, might cause delays or termination of the research and development of product candidates, might lead to additional responsibilities for us with respect to product candidates, or might result in litigation or arbitration, any of which would be time-consuming and expensive;

 

partners may not properly maintain or defend their intellectual property rights or may use proprietary information in such a way as to invite litigation that could jeopardize or invalidate the intellectual property or proprietary information or expose us to potential litigation;

 

partners may infringe the intellectual property rights of third parties, which may expose us to litigation and potential liability;

 

partners may learn about our technology and use this knowledge to compete with us in the future;

 

there may be conflicts between different partners that could negatively affect those partnerships and potentially others; and

 

the number and type of our partnerships could adversely affect our attractiveness to future partners or acquirers.

 

If any partnerships we enter into do not result in the successful development of our product candidates or if one of our partners terminates its agreement with us, we may not be able to successfully develop our product candidates, our continued development of our product candidates could be delayed and we may need additional resources to develop additional product candidates. All of the risks relating to our product development, regulatory approval and commercialization also apply to the activities of our partners and there can be no assurance that our partnerships will produce positive results or successful products on a timely basis or at all.

 

 20 

 

 

Additionally, subject to its contractual obligations to us, if a partner of ours is involved in a business combination or otherwise changes its business priorities, the partner might deemphasize or terminate the development of any technology licensed to it by us. If one of our partners terminates its agreement with us, we may find it more difficult to attract new partners and our perception in the business and financial communities and our stock price could be adversely affected.

 

We may in the future determine to partner with additional pharmaceutical and technology companies for development of additional product candidates. We face significant competition in seeking appropriate partners. Our ability to reach a definitive agreement for partnership will depend, among other things, upon our assessment of the partner’s resources and expertise, the terms and conditions of the proposed partnership and the proposed partner’s evaluation of a number of factors. If we are unable to reach agreements with suitable partners on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all, we may not be able to access technologies that are important for the future development of our business. If we elect to fund and undertake development activities on our own, we may need to obtain additional expertise and additional capital, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. If we fail to enter into partnerships and do not have sufficient funds or expertise to undertake the necessary development activities, we may not be able to further develop our product candidates and our business may be materially and adversely affected.

  

Under the terms of our partnership arrangements, we are required to make significant milestone and other payments to our strategic partners. The timing of any such payments is uncertain and could adversely affect our cash flows and results of operations. If we are not able to make such payments when due, our business could be materially and adversely affected.

 

In November 2018, we entered into a development and supply agreement with Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC, or Qorvo, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Qorvo, Inc. Under this agreement, Qorvo is responsible for the development of certain assay cartridges and the related instrument. We agreed to pay the associated non-recurring engineering costs of up to $500,000 per assay cartridge and the instrument and are responsible for the validation of the assay cartridges and the instrument. Under the terms of this agreement, we are required to pay Qorvo additional milestone payments in cash or, if elected by Qorvo, additional unregistered common shares having a value calculated as specified in the agreement. The total amount of additional milestone payments (if all milestones are met) will be $10 million (if paid entirely with cash) or up to $10.9 million (consisting of cash in the amount of $7 million and unregistered common shares having a value of $3.9 million, if Qorvo elects to receive compensation partially in equity). At December 31, 2018, $5 million of milestone payment have been paid in cash. Total remaining milestone payments will be $5 million if paid entirely in cash, or $3.5 million in cash and $1.95 in unregistered common shares, if elected.

 

In May 2018, we entered into a development, commercialization and exclusive distribution agreement with Seraph Biosciences, Inc., or Seraph. Under this agreement, we are responsible for development and validation, and their associated costs. Seraph is entitled to additional payments for development costs. Seraph will be entitled to receive up to an additional $7,000,000, payable 50 percent in cash and 50 percent in additional unregistered common shares, upon the achievement of a series of staged, specified milestones, including completion of laboratory studies and field studies, production and commercial shipment of products. In addition, we have agreed to pay Seraph license fees based on a percentage of gross profit from commercial sales of ZM-020. At December 31, 2019, all milestone payments remain unpaid.

 

 21 

 

 

We will rely on third parties to conduct certain portions of our development activities. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or meet expected deadlines, we may be unable to obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize our product candidates.

 

We have used contract manufacturing organizations (“CMOs”) and contract research organizations (“CROs”) to conduct our manufacturing and research and development activities. We expect to continue to do so, including with respect to our manufacturing, clinical validation, pilot studies and pivotal trials of our diagnostic and therapeutic product candidates. These CMOs and CROs are not our employees, and except for contractual duties and obligations, we have limited ability to control the amount or timing of resources that they devote to our programs or manage the risks associated with their activities on our behalf. We are responsible to regulatory authorities for ensuring that each of our product candidates is manufactured using good manufacturing practices and studies are conducted in accordance with the development plans and trial protocols, and any failure by our CMOs and CROs to do so may adversely affect our ability to obtain regulatory approvals, subject us to penalties, or harm our credibility with regulators. The FDA-CVM also requires us and our CMOs and CROs to comply with regulations and standards, commonly referred to as good manufacturing practices, or GMPs, good clinical practices, or GCPs, and good laboratory practices, or GLPs, collectively called GXPs, for conducting, monitoring, recording and reporting the results of our manufacturing and studies to ensure that the data and results are scientifically credible and accurate.

 

Our agreements with our CMOs and CROs may allow termination by the CMOs and CROs in certain circumstances with little or no advance notice to us. These agreements generally will require our CMOs and CROs to reasonably cooperate with us at our expense for an orderly winding down of the CMOs’ and CROs’ services under the agreements. If the CMOs and CROs conducting our manufacturing and studies do not comply with their contractual duties or obligations to us, or if they experience work stoppages, do not meet expected deadlines, terminate their agreements with us or need to be replaced, or if the quality or accuracy of the data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our development protocols or GXPs or for any other reason, we may need to secure new arrangements with alternative CMOs and CROs, which could be difficult and costly. In such event, our studies also may need to be extended, delayed or terminated as a result, or may need to be repeated. If any of the foregoing were to occur, regulatory approval and commercialization of our product candidates may be delayed, and we may be required to expend substantial additional resources.

 

The failure of any CMO and CRO to perform adequately or the termination of any arrangements with any of them may adversely affect our business.

 

 22 

 

 

We rely on third-party manufacturers to produce our product candidates. If we experience problems with any of these suppliers, the manufacturing of our product candidates or products could be delayed.

 

We do not have the capability to manufacture our product candidates and do not intend to develop that capability. As a result, we rely on CMOs to produce our product candidates. We expect to enter into contracts with CMOs for the commercial scale production of the products we intend to commercialize. Reliance on CMOs involves risks, including:

 

the inability to meet our product specifications and quality requirements consistently;

 

inability to access production facilities on a timely basis;

 

inability or delay in increasing manufacturing capacity;

 

manufacturing and product quality issues related to the scale-up of manufacturing;

 

costs and validation of new equipment and facilities required for commercial level activity;

 

a failure to satisfy any applicable FDA-CVM cGMP requirements on a consistent basis;

 

the inability to negotiate manufacturing agreements with third parties under commercially reasonable terms;

 

termination or nonrenewal of manufacturing agreements with third parties in a manner or at a time that is costly or damaging to us;

 

the reliance on a single source of supply which, if unavailable, would delay our ability to complete the development and testing and commercialization of our products;

 

the lack of qualified backup suppliers for supplies that are currently purchased from a single source supplier;

 

operations of our CMOs or suppliers could be disrupted by conditions unrelated to our business or operations, including the bankruptcy of the CMO or supplier;

 

carrier disruptions or increased costs that are beyond our control; and

 

the failure to deliver products under specified storage conditions and in a timely manner.

 

Any of these risks could cause the delay of validation studies, clinical trials, regulatory submissions, the receipt of any required approvals or the commercialization of our products, cause us to incur higher costs and prevent us from commercializing our product candidates successfully. Manufacturing of our product candidates and any approved products subject to cGMP could be disrupted or halted if our CMOs do not comply with cGMP, even if the compliance failure does not relate to our product candidates or approved products. Furthermore, if our CMOs fail to deliver the required commercial quantities of finished product on a timely basis and at commercially reasonable prices and we are unable to find one or more replacement manufacturers capable of production at a substantially equivalent cost, in substantially equivalent volumes and quality and on a timely basis, we would likely be unable to meet demand for our products and could lose potential revenue. It may take several years to establish an alternative source of supply for our product candidates and to have any such new source approved by the FDA-CVM in the event that such approval is required.

 

 23 

 

 

Even if our product candidates obtain regulatory approval, they may never achieve market acceptance or commercial success.

 

Even if we obtain FDA-CVM, USDA-CVB or other regulatory approvals, our product candidates may not achieve market acceptance among veterinarians and pet owners and may not be commercially successful. Market acceptance of any of our product candidates for which we receive approval depends on a number of factors, including:

 

the safety of our products as demonstrated in our target animal studies;

 

the indications for which our products are approved;

 

the acceptance by veterinarians and pet owners of the product as a safe and effective treatment;

 

the proper training and administration or use of our products by veterinarians;

 

the potential and perceived advantages of our product candidates over alternative treatments or diagnostics, including products approved for use by humans that are used off label;

 

the cost of treatment in relation to alternative treatments and willingness to pay for our products, if approved, on the part of veterinarians and pet owners;

 

the willingness of pet owners to pay for our treatments, relative to other discretionary items, especially during economically challenging times;

 

the relative convenience and ease of administration;

 

the prevalence and severity of adverse side effects; and

 

the effectiveness of our sales and marketing efforts.

 

If our approved products fail to achieve market acceptance or commercial success, our business could fail and you could lose your entire investment.

 

Pharmaceuticals for companion animals, like human pharmaceuticals, are subject to unanticipated post-approval safety or efficacy concerns, which may harm our business and reputation.

 

The success of our commercialization efforts will depend upon the perceived safety and effectiveness of pharmaceuticals for companion animals, in general, and of our products, in particular. Unanticipated safety or efficacy concerns can arise with respect to approved therapeutics after they enter into commerce, which may result in product recalls or withdrawals or suspension of sales, as well as product liability and other claims. It is also possible that the occurrence of significant adverse side effects in approved human compounds upon which our drug product candidates are based could impact our products. Any safety or efficacy concerns, or recalls, withdrawals or suspensions of sales of our products or other pet therapeutics, or of their human equivalents, could harm our reputation, in particular, or pet therapeutics, generally, and materially, adversely affect our business and prospects or the potential growth of the pet therapeutics industry, regardless of whether such concerns or actions are justified.

 

Changes in the distribution channels for companion animal products could negatively impact our market share, margins and distribution of our products.

 

In most markets, pet owners typically purchase their animal health products directly from veterinarians. In recent years, pet owners have increasingly been afforded the option to purchase animal health products from sources other than veterinarians, such as Internet-based retailers, “big-box” retail stores or other over-the-counter distribution channels. Pet owners also could decrease their reliance on, and visits to, veterinarians as they rely more on Internet-based animal health information. Since we intend to market our products through the veterinarian distribution channel, any decrease in visits to veterinarians by pet owners could reduce our market share for such products and materially adversely affect our operating results and financial condition. In addition, pet owners may substitute human health products for animal health products if human health products are deemed to be lower-cost alternatives.

 

 24 

 

 

We do not currently carry liability insurance; however, as we continue our development and commercialization activities, future federal and state legislation may result in increased exposure to product liability claims, which could result in substantial losses to us.

 

We do not currently carry any product liability insurance. Under existing federal and state laws, companion animals are generally considered to be the personal property of their owners and, as such, pet owners’ recovery for product liability claims involving their companion animals may be limited to the replacement value of the animals. Pet owners and their advocates, however, have filed lawsuits from time to time seeking non-economic damages such as pain and suffering and emotional distress for harm to their companion animals based on theories applicable to personal injuries to humans. If new legislation is passed to allow recovery for such non-economic damages, or if precedents are set allowing for such recovery, we could be exposed to increased product liability claims that could result in substantial losses to us if successful. We do not currently have product liability insurance and we may not be able to obtain or maintain this type of insurance in the future.

 

If we are unable to establish sales capabilities on our own or through third parties, we may not be able to market and sell our existing or future product candidates, if approved, or generate product revenue.

 

We do not currently have a fully staffed sales organization. We intend to commercialize any product candidate for which we received regulatory approval in the United States with a direct sales force and through third-party distributors. To achieve this, we will be required to build a direct sales organization and to establish relationships with distributors of veterinary products. We also will have to build our marketing, sales, managerial and other non-technical capabilities and make arrangements with third parties for distribution and to perform certain of these other services, and we may not be successful in doing so. Building an internal sales organization is time consuming and expensive and will significantly increase our compensation expense. We may be unable to secure third-party distribution contracts with distributors on favorable terms or at all. We have no prior experience in the marketing, sale and distribution of pharmaceuticals or diagnostic products for companion animals and there are significant risks involved in building and managing a sales organization, including our ability to hire, retain and motivate qualified individuals, generate sufficient sales leads, provide adequate training to sales and marketing personnel, and effectively oversee a geographically dispersed sales and marketing team. If we are unable to build an effective sales organization and/or if we are unable to secure relationships with third-party distributors for our product candidates, we will not be able to successfully commercialize any product for which we receive marketing approval, our future product revenue will suffer and we would incur significant additional losses.

 

In jurisdictions outside of the United States we intend to utilize companies with an established commercial presence to market our products in those jurisdictions, but we may be unable to enter into such arrangements on acceptable terms, it at all.

 

If we fail to attract and keep senior management and key scientific personnel, we may be unable to successfully develop any of our existing or future product candidates, conduct our in-licensing and development efforts and commercialize any of our existing or future drug candidates.

 

Our success depends in part on our continued ability to attract, retain and motivate highly qualified management and scientific personnel. We are highly dependent upon our senior management, particularly Shameze Rampertab, CPA, CA, our interim Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, Stephanie Morley, DVM, our President and Chief Operations Officer, and Bruk Herbst, our Chief Commercial Officer. The loss of services of any of these individuals could delay or prevent the successful development of our existing or future product pipeline, completion of our planned development efforts or the commercialization of our product candidates. Although we have entered into employment agreements with Dr. Morley and Mr. Herbst for one-year terms (automatically extending for one-year terms thereafter) there can be no assurance that either of Dr. Morley or Mr. Herbst will extend their terms of service. We have also entered into an employment agreement Mr. Rampertab without a fixed term of service.

 

Consolidation of our customers could negatively affect the pricing of our products.

 

Veterinarians will be our primary customers for any approved products. In recent years, there has been a trend towards the consolidation of veterinary clinics and animal hospitals. If this trend continues, these large clinics and hospitals could attempt to leverage their buying power to obtain favorable pricing from us and other companion animal pharmaceutical and diagnostic products companies. Any resulting downward pressure on the prices of any of our approved products could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

 25 

 

 

We will need to increase the size of our organization and may not successfully manage our growth.

 

We will need to significantly expand our organization and systems to support our future expected growth. If we fail to manage our growth effectively, we will not be successful, and our business could fail.

 

Our research and development rely on testing in animals, which is controversial and may become subject to bans or additional regulations.

 

We must test our product candidates in target animals to obtain marketing approval. Although our animal testing will be subject to GLP and GCP requirements, as applicable, animal testing in the human pharmaceutical industry and in other industries has been the subject of controversy and adverse publicity. Some organizations and individuals have sought to ban animal testing or encourage the adoption of additional regulations applicable to animal testing. To the extent that such bans or regulations are imposed, our research and development activities, and by extension our operating results and financial condition, could be materially adversely affected. In addition, negative publicity about animal practices by us or in our industry could harm our reputation among potential customers for our products.

 

Because our directors may serve as directors or officers of other companies, they may have a conflict of interest in making decisions for our business.

 

Our directors may serve as directors or officers of other companies or have significant shareholdings in other veterinary pharmaceutical or diagnostic products companies and, to the extent that such other companies may participate in ventures in which we may participate, our directors may have a conflict of interest in negotiating and concluding terms respecting the extent of such participation. In the event that such a conflict of interest arises at a meeting of our directors, we expect that the director who has such a conflict will declare his conflict, abstain from voting for or against the approval of such participation or such terms and, if deemed necessary or advisable, recuse himself from any discussion concerning the matters in question. In some circumstances, a director may be unable to manage such conflicts and may therefore need to resign. Our directors are required to act honestly, in good faith and in our best interests. In determining whether or not we will participate in a particular business opportunity or enter into a particular business arrangement, we expect that the directors and officers will be guided by their fiduciary duties and take into account such matters as they deem relevant, including considering the degree of risk to which we may be exposed and our financial position at that time.

 

We may seek to raise additional funds in the future through debt financing which may impose operational restrictions on our business and may result in dilution to existing or future holders of our common shares.

 

We expect that we will need to raise additional capital in the future to help fund our business operations. Debt financing, if available, may require restrictive covenants, which may limit our operating flexibility and may restrict or prohibit us from:

 

paying dividends and/or making certain distributions, investments and other restricted payments;

 

incurring additional indebtedness or issuing certain preferred shares;

 

selling some or all of our assets;

 

entering into transactions with affiliates;

 

creating certain liens or encumbrances;

 

merging, consolidating, selling or otherwise disposing of all or substantially all of our assets; and

 

designating our subsidiaries as unrestricted subsidiaries.

 

Debt financing may also involve debt instruments that are convertible into or exercisable for our common shares. The conversion of the debt to equity financing may dilute the equity position of our existing shareholders.

 

 26 

 

 

We may not be able to obtain or maintain sufficient insurance on commercially reasonable terms or with adequate coverage against potential liabilities in order to protect ourselves against product liability claims.

 

Our business exposes us to potential product liability risks that are inherent in the testing, manufacturing and marketing of veterinary therapeutic and diagnostic products. We may become subject to product liability claims resulting from the use of our product candidates. We do not currently have product liability insurance and we may not be able to obtain or maintain this type of insurance for any future trials or product candidates. In addition, product liability insurance is becoming increasingly expensive. Being unable to obtain or maintain product liability insurance in the future on acceptable terms or with adequate coverage against potential liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We may acquire other businesses or form joint ventures that may be unsuccessful and could adversely dilute your ownership of our company.

 

As part of our business strategy, we may pursue in-licenses or acquisitions of other complementary assets and businesses and may also pursue strategic alliances. We have no experience in acquiring other assets or businesses and have limited experience in forming such alliances. We may not be able to successfully integrate any acquisitions into our existing business, and we could assume unknown or contingent liabilities or become subject to possible stockholder claims in connection with any related-party or third-party acquisitions or other transactions. We also could experience adverse effects on our reported results of operations from acquisition-related charges, amortization of acquired technology and other intangibles and impairment charges relating to write-offs of goodwill and other intangible assets from time to time following an acquisition. Integration of an acquired company requires management resources that otherwise would be available for ongoing development of our existing business. We may not realize the anticipated benefits of any acquisition, technology license or strategic alliance.

 

To finance future acquisitions, we may choose to issue shares of our common stock as consideration, which would dilute your ownership interest in us. Alternatively, it may be necessary for us to raise additional funds through public or private financings. Additional funds may not be available on terms that are favorable to us and, in the case of equity financings, may result in dilution to our stockholders. 

 

Risks Related to Government Regulation

 

Various government regulations could limit or delay our ability to develop and commercialize our products or otherwise negatively impact our business.

 

In the U.S., the manufacture and sale of certain diagnostic products are regulated by agencies such as the USDA, the FDA or the EPA. While our point-of-care Bulk Acoustic Wave sensor-based diagnostic platform and Raman spectroscopy-based diagnostic platform and our reference lab-based diagnostic test for canine cancer do not require approval by the USDA-CVB prior to sale in the U.S., these diagnostic solutions will be subject to post-marketing oversight by the FDA-CVM. In addition, delays in obtaining regulatory approvals for new products or product upgrades could have a negative impact on our growth and profitability.

 

The manufacture and sale of our products, as well as our research and development processes, are subject to similar and potentially more stringent laws in foreign countries.

 

We are also subject to a variety of federal, state, local and international laws and regulations that govern, among other things, the importation and exportation of products; our business practices in the U.S. and abroad, such as anti-corruption and anti-competition laws; and immigration and travel restrictions. These legal and regulatory requirements differ among jurisdictions around the world and are rapidly changing and increasingly complex. The costs associated with compliance with these legal and regulatory requirements are significant and likely to increase in the future.

 

Any failure to comply with applicable legal and regulatory requirements could result in fines, penalties and sanctions; product recalls; suspensions or discontinuations of, or limitations or restrictions on, our ability to design, manufacture, market, import, export or sell our products; and damage to our reputation.

 

 27 

 

 

Even if we receive regulatory approval for a product candidate, we will be subject to ongoing FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB obligations and continued regulatory oversight, which may result in significant additional expense. Additionally, any product candidates, if approved, will be subject to labeling and manufacturing requirements and could be subject to other restrictions. Failure to comply with these regulatory requirements or the occurrence of unanticipated problems with our products could result in significant penalties.

 

If the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB approves any of our existing or future therapeutic product candidates, the manufacturing processes, labeling, packaging, distribution, adverse event reporting, storage, advertising, promotion and recordkeeping for the product will be subject to extensive and ongoing regulatory requirements. These requirements include submissions of safety and other post-marketing information and reports, establishment registration, and product listing, as well as continued compliance with GMP, GLP and GCP for any studies that we conduct post-approval. Later discovery of previously unknown problems with a product, including adverse events of unanticipated severity or frequency, or with our third-party manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements, may result in, among other things:

 

restrictions on the marketing or manufacturing of the product, withdrawal of the product from the market, or voluntary product recalls;

 

fines, warning letters or holds on target animal studies;

 

refusal by the FDA-CVM or USDA-CVB to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications filed by us or our strategic collaborators, or suspension or revocation of product license approvals;

 

product seizure or detention, or refusal to permit the import or export of products; and

 

injunctions or the imposition of civil or criminal penalties.

 

The FDA-CVM’s or USDA-CVB’s policies may change and additional government regulations may be enacted that could prevent, limit or delay regulatory approval of our product candidates. We cannot predict the likelihood, nature or extent of government regulation that may arise from future legislation or administrative action in the United States or abroad. If we are slow or unable to adapt to changes in existing requirements or the adoption of new requirements or policies, or if we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, we may lose any marketing approval that we may have obtained and we may not achieve or sustain profitability, which would adversely affect our business.

 

Our ability to market our drug candidates in the United States, if approved, will be limited to use for the treatment of the indications for which they are approved, and if we want to expand the indications for which we may market our product candidates, we will need to obtain additional FDA-CVM approvals, which may not be granted.

 

We expect to seek FDA-CVM approval in the United States for our drug product candidates. If these drug product candidates are approved, the FDA-CVM will restrict our ability to market or advertise them for the treatment of indications other than the indications for which they are approved, which could limit their adoption by veterinarian and pet owners. We may attempt to develop, promote and commercialize new treatment indications and protocols for our drug product candidates in the future, but we cannot predict when or if we will receive the approvals required to do so. In addition, we would be required to conduct additional target animal studies to support our applications, which would utilize additional resources and may produce results that do not result in FDA-CVM approvals. If we do not obtain additional FDA-CVM approvals, our ability to expand our business in the United States will be limited.

 

If approved, any of our existing or future therapeutic products may cause or contribute to adverse medical events that we are required to report to regulatory authorities and, if we fail to do so, we could be subject to sanctions that would materially harm our business.

 

If we are successful in commercializing any of our existing or future therapeutic product candidates, we will be required to report adverse medical events if those products may have caused or contributed to those adverse events. The timing of our obligation to report would be triggered by the date we become aware of the adverse event as well as the nature of the event. We may fail to report adverse events we become aware of within the prescribed timeframe. We may also fail to appreciate that we have become aware of a reportable adverse event, especially if it is not reported to us as an adverse event or if it is an adverse event that is unexpected or removed in time from the use of our products. If we fail to comply with our reporting obligations, the regulatory authorities could take action including criminal prosecution, seizure of our products or delay in approval or clearance of future products.

 

 28 

 

 

Legislative or regulatory reforms with respect to veterinary pharmaceuticals or health care solutions may make it more difficult and costly for us to obtain regulatory clearance or approval of any of our existing or future product candidates and to produce, market, and distribute our products after clearance or approval is obtained.

 

From time to time, legislation is drafted and introduced in the U.S. Congress that could significantly change the statutory provisions governing the testing, regulatory clearance or approval, manufacture, and marketing of regulated products. In addition, FDA-CVM and USDA-CVB regulations and guidance are often revised or reinterpreted by the FDA-CVM and USDA-CVB in ways that may significantly affect our business and our products. Similar changes in laws or regulations can occur in other countries. Any new regulations or revisions or reinterpretations of existing regulations in the United States may impose additional costs or lengthen review times of any of our existing or future product candidates. We cannot determine what effect changes in regulations, statutes, legal interpretation or policies, when and if promulgated, enacted or adopted may have on our business in the future. Such changes could, among other things, require:

 

changes to manufacturing methods;

 

recall, replacement or discontinuance of certain products; and

 

additional record-keeping.

 

Each of these would likely entail substantial time and cost and could materially harm our financial results. In addition, delays in receipt of or failure to receive regulatory clearances or approvals for any future products would harm our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

 

Our ability to obtain intellectual property protection for our product candidates is limited.

 

Our diagnostic technologies are dependent on intellectual property developed by our strategic partners and licensed to us. We do not own the intellectual property rights that underlie these technology licenses. Our rights to use the technology we license are subject to the negotiation of, continuation of and compliance with the terms of our licenses. However, we have filed four U.S. patent applications and two Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applications for U.S. and international protection of our diagnostic tests. These applications cover tests developed for our ZM-017, ZM-022 and ZM-020 technology platforms. Even if such patents are issued, we do not expect that all of the patents will provide significant protection for our intellectual property. 

 

Some of our products may or may not be covered by a patent. Further if an application is filed, it is not certain that a patent will be granted or if granted whether it will be held to be valid. All of which may impact our market share and ability to prevent others (competitor third parties) from making, selling, or using our products.

 

We intend to rely upon a combination of regulatory exclusivity periods, patents, trade secret protection, confidentiality agreements, and license agreements to protect the intellectual property related to our current product candidates and our development programs. We may not be successful in protecting our intellectual property rights, including our unpatented proprietary know-how and trade secrets, or in avoiding claims that we infringed on the intellectual property rights of others. In addition to relying on patent and trademark rights, we rely on unpatented proprietary know-how and trade secrets, and employ various methods, including confidentiality agreements with employees and consultants, customers and suppliers to protect our know-how and trade secrets. However, these methods and our patents and trademarks may not afford complete protection and there can be no assurance that others will not independently develop the know-how and trade secrets or develop better production methods than us. Further, we may not be able to deter current and former employees, contractors and other parties from breaching confidentiality agreements and misappropriating proprietary information and it is possible that third parties may copy or otherwise obtain and use our information and proprietary technology without authorization or otherwise infringe on our intellectual property rights. In the future, we may also rely on litigation to enforce our intellectual property rights and contractual rights, and, if not successful, we may not be able to protect the value of our intellectual property. Any litigation could be protracted and costly and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations regardless of its outcome.

 

 29 

 

 

If we are unable to obtain trademark registrations for our products our business could be adversely affected.

 

We have pending trademark applications for our company name and composite marks comprised of our company name, logo and/or slogan in the U.S., Canada, European Union, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. In addition, we have approved pending trademark applications for our “Voice of the Vet” mark in the U.S. and Canada. We have secured two registrations in the European Union for our company name, company name and logo, and for the mark “Voice of the Vet powered by Zomedica” (and Design). We also have secured registrations in Brazil for our company name and logo. While we cannot make assurances that any pending trademark applications will mature to registration, most of these applications are now poised to mature to registration.

 

We have also filed for protection of several product names in the U.S., Canada and European Union. Currently, no significant hurdles have been encountered in the registration process. Moreover, any name we propose to use with our product candidates in the United States must be approved by the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB regardless of whether we have registered it, or applied to register it, as a trademark. The FDA-CVM typically conducts a review of proposed product names, including an evaluation of potential for confusion with other product names. If the FDA-CVM or the USDA-CVB object to any of our proposed proprietary product names, we may be required to expend significant additional resources in an effort to identify a suitable substitute name that would qualify under applicable trademark laws, not infringe the existing rights of third parties and be acceptable to the FDA-CVM and the USDA-CVB. 

 

Third parties may have intellectual property rights, which may require us to obtain a license or other applicable rights to make, sell or use our products. If such rights are not granted or obtained, I could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our success depends in part on our ability to obtain, or license from third parties, patents, trademarks, trade secrets and similar proprietary rights without infringing on the proprietary rights of third parties. Although we believe our intellectual property rights are sufficient to allow us to conduct our business without incurring liability to third parties, our products may infringe on the intellectual property rights of such persons. Furthermore, no assurance can be given that we will not be subject to claims asserting the infringement of the intellectual property rights of third parties seeking damages, the payment of royalties or licensing fees and/or injunctions against the sale of our products. Any such litigation could be protracted and costly and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our diagnostic technologies depend on certain technologies that are licensed to us. We do not control these technologies and any loss of our rights to them could prevent us from marketing our diagnostic product candidates.

 

Our diagnostic technologies are dependent on intellectual property developed by our strategic partners and licensed to us. We do not own the intellectual property rights that underlie these licenses. Our rights to use the technology we license are subject to the negotiation of, continuation of and compliance with the terms of our licenses. We do not control the prosecution, maintenance or filing of the patents and other intellectual property licensed to us, or the enforcement of these intellectual property rights against third parties. The patents and patent applications underlying our licenses were not written by us or our attorneys, and we do not have control over the drafting and prosecution of such rights. Our partners might not have given the same attention to the drafting and prosecution of patents and patent applications as we would have if we had been the owners of the intellectual property rights and had control over such drafting and prosecution. We cannot be certain that drafting and/or prosecution of the licensed patents and patent applications has been or will be conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations or will result in valid and enforceable patents and other intellectual property rights.

 

 30 

 

 

Our intellectual property agreements with third parties may be subject to disagreements over contract interpretation, which could narrow the scope of our rights to the relevant intellectual property or technology or increase our financial or other obligations to our licensors.

 

Certain provisions in our intellectual property agreements may be susceptible to multiple interpretations. The resolution of any contract interpretation disagreement that may arise could affect the scope of our rights to the relevant intellectual property or technology, or affect financial or other obligations under the relevant agreement, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

In addition, while it is our policy to require our employees and contractors who may be involved in the conception or development of intellectual property to execute agreements assigning such intellectual property to us, we may be unsuccessful in executing such an agreement with each party who in fact conceives or develops intellectual property that we regard as our own. Our assignment agreements may not be self-executing or may be breached, and we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defend claims they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property.

 

We may be subject to claims that our employees, consultants or independent contractors have wrongfully used or disclosed confidential information of third parties.

 

We have received confidential and proprietary information from third parties. In addition, we employ individuals who were previously employed at other pharmaceutical or animal health companies. We may be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants or independent contractors have inadvertently or otherwise improperly used or disclosed confidential information of these third parties or our employees’ former employers. Litigation may be necessary to defend against any such claims. Even if we are successful in defending against any such claims, such litigation could result in substantial cost and be a distraction to our management and employees.

 

Risks Related to Our Preferred Shares

 

We will be obligated to pay a significant portion of our net sales to the holders of our Series 1 Preferred Shares. This payment obligation will materially and adversely affect our liquidity and capital resources, may adversely impact our ability to raise additional capital, and could adversely affect the trading price of our common shares.

 

We are obligated to make annual payments to the holders of our Series 1 Preferred Shares in an amount equal to nine percent of the net sales (as defined in the Series 1 Preferred Shares), if any, of our company and our affiliates (the “Net Sales Payments”) until such time as the holders have received total Net Sales Payments equal to nine times the aggregate stated value of the outstanding Series 1 Preferred Shares. Such payments will materially and adversely affect our liquidity and capital resources which could result in a shortage of capital necessary to fund our operations or to take advantage of business opportunities as they arise. Our obligation to make these payments may make it more difficult for us to raise additional capital on terms acceptable to us, or at all. This payment obligation also may adversely affect investor perceptions of our company which could adversely affect the trading price of our common shares.

 

In the event of a sale of our company, holders of our Series 1 Preferred Shares will be entitled to a substantial premium on the purchase price they paid for their Series 1 Preferred Shares, which will reduce the sale proceeds to be received by holders of our common shares.

 

In the event that our company is the subject of a “fundamental transaction” (defined in the Series 1 Preferred Shares to include an amalgamation, merger or other business combination transaction involving our company in which our shareholders do not have the right to cast more than 50% of the votes that may be cast for the election of directors, or a sale, lease or other disposition of the properties and/or assets of our company as an entirety or substantially as an entirety to a third party) the holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will have the right, in preference to the holders of our common shares, to receive a portion of the aggregate consideration paid in the fundamental transaction that will represent a substantial premium on the purchase price they paid for their Series 1 Preferred Shares. Such premium will reduce the proceeds of any such fundamental transaction that would be received by holders of our common shares.

 

 31 

 

 

In the event of the liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our company, holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will have a liquidation preference over holders of our common shares and if the net assets of our company available for distribution to holders of our equity securities is not sufficient to pay this liquidation preference in full, holders of our common shares would receive no liquidating distribution in respect of their common shares.

 

In the event of the liquidation, dissolution or winding up of our company, holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will have a liquidation preference equal to the stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares less the Net Sales Returns (as defined in the Series 1 Preferred Shares) paid on the Series 1 Preferred Shares before holders of our common shares would be entitled to any proceeds of such liquidation, dissolution or winding up. If the net assets of our company available for distribution to holders of our equity securities is not sufficient to pay this liquidation preference in full, holders of our common shares would receive no liquidating distribution in respect of their common shares.

 

Our Series 1 Preferred Shares will be reclassified as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet once we begin to recognize revenues which may cause us to fail to meet the NYSE American’s continued listing requirements.

 

Because we are obligated to make annual payments to the holders of our Series 1 Preferred Shares in an amount equal to nine percent of the Net Sales (as defined in the Series 1 Preferred Shares), if any, of our company and our affiliates, once we begin to recognize revenues from our commercial activities, we will be required under United States general accounting principles to reclassify the Series 1 Preferred Shares as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. The reclassification will significantly increase our total liabilities and significantly reduce our shareholders’ equity. Under the NYSE American’s continued listing requirements, we are required to maintain shareholders’ equity of at least $4.0 million, which will increase to $6.0 million after December 31, 2020. As a result of the reclassification, we may fail to meet this continued listing requirement. If we are unable to satisfy the NYSE American’s continued listing requirements, our common shares could be delisted from the NYSE American which could adversely affect the liquidity and market price of our common shares.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Shares

 

We believe that we will be a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC for the current taxable year, which could subject certain U.S. shareholders to materially adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences.

 

We believe we were classified as a PFIC during our taxable year ended 2018, and based on current business plans and financial expectations, we expect to be a PFIC for the current and future taxable years. If we are a PFIC for any year in which you hold shares and you are a U.S. Holder (as defined below, in “Material United States Federal Income Tax Considerations”), unless you make a timely and effective Qualified Electing Fund election, or QEF Election or a mark-to-market election, or Mark-to-Market Election with respect to our common shares, you will not be eligible for the reduced tax rates associated with “qualified dividend income” with respect to distributions made to you or long-term capital gain upon a disposition of your common shares. Instead, all such distributions and gain will be taxable to you at the higher rates for ordinary income. In addition, a portion of any gain and distribution may be allocated to prior years during which you have owned our common shares and subjected to tax at the highest tax rate applicable to ordinary income in each such year. You would also be required to pay an interest charge on that portion of such gain or distribution.

 

If you are a U.S. Holder and make a timely and effective QEF Election, you generally must report on a current basis your share of our net capital gain and ordinary earnings for any year in which we are a PFIC, whether or not we distribute any amount to you, thus giving rise to so-called “phantom income” and to a potential tax liability. At this time, we intend to provide U.S. Holders with information required annually in order to allow such holders to make effective QEF Elections, but we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

 

If you are a U.S. Holder and make a timely and effective Mark-to-Market Election, you generally must include as ordinary income each year the excess of the fair market value of your common shares over your tax basis therein, thus also possibly giving rise to phantom income and a potential tax liability. Ordinary loss generally is recognized only to the extent of net mark-to-market gains previously included in income.

 

Each U.S. shareholder should consult its own tax advisors regarding the PFIC rules and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of our common shares

 

 32 

 

 

If the Internal Revenue Service determines that we are not a PFIC and you previously paid taxes pursuant to a QEF Election or a Mark-to-Market Election, you may pay more taxes than you legally owe.

 

If the Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, makes a determination that we are not a PFIC and you previously paid taxes pursuant to a QEF Election or Mark-to-Market Election, then you may have paid more taxes than you legally owed due to such election. If you do not, or are unable to, file a refund claim before the expiration of the applicable statute of limitations, you will not be able to claim a refund for those taxes.

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our company, or if they issue adverse or misleading opinions regarding us or our stock, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

 

Although we have research coverage by securities and industry analysts, if coverage is not maintained, the market price for our stock may be adversely affected. Our stock price also may decline if any analyst who covers us issues an adverse or erroneous opinion regarding us, our business model, our intellectual property or our stock performance, or if our target animal studies and operating results fail to meet analysts’ expectations. If one or more analysts cease coverage of us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline and possibly adversely affect our ability to engage in future financings.

 

We expect that the price of our common shares will fluctuate substantially.

 

You should consider an investment in our common shares risky and invest only if you can withstand a significant loss and wide fluctuations in the market value of your investment. The price of our common shares that will prevail in the market after the sale of our common shares by a selling shareholder may be higher or lower than the price you have paid. Numerous factors, including many over which we have no control, may have a significant impact on the market price of our common shares. These risks include those described or referred to in this “Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this report as well as, among other things:

 

any delays in, or suspension or failure of, our existing and future studies;
announcements of regulatory approval or disapproval of any of our existing or future product candidates or of regulatory actions affecting us or our industry;
delays in the commercialization of our existing or future product candidates;
manufacturing and supply issues related to our development programs and commercialization of our existing or future product candidates;
quarterly variations in our results of operations or those of our competitors;
changes in our earnings estimates or recommendations by securities analysts or adverse publicity about us or our product candidates;
announcements by us or our competitors of new product candidates, significant contracts, commercial relationships, acquisitions or capital commitments;
announcements relating to future development or license agreements including termination of such agreements;
adverse developments with respect to our intellectual property rights or those of our principal collaborators;
commencement of litigation involving us or our competitors;
any major changes in our board of directors or management;
new legislation in the United States relating to the prescription, sale, distribution or pricing of pet pharmaceuticals or diagnostic products;
product liability claims, other litigation or public concern about the safety of our product candidates or future products;
market conditions in the animal health industry, in general, or in the pet therapeutics sector, in particular, including performance of our competitors; and
general economic conditions in the United States and abroad.

 

In addition, the stock market, in general, or the market for stocks in our industry, in particular, may experience broad market fluctuations, which may adversely affect the market price or liquidity of our common shares. Any sudden decline in the market price of our common shares could trigger securities class-action lawsuits against us. If any of our shareholders were to bring such a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit and the time and attention of our management would be diverted from our business and operations. We also could be subject to damages claims if we are found to be at fault in connection with a decline in our stock price.

 

 33 

 

 

Our management owns a significant percentage of our common shares and will be able to exert significant control over matters subject to shareholder approval.

 

Based on shares outstanding as of February 26, 2019, our executive officers and directors and their respective affiliates beneficially own 19,135,956 or 14.84% of our voting shares. These shareholders will have the ability to influence us through this ownership position and may be able to determine all matters requiring shareholder approval. For example, these shareholders may be able to control elections of directors, amendments of our organizational documents, or approvals of any merger, sale of assets or other major corporate transaction. This may prevent or discourage unsolicited acquisition proposals or offers for our common shares that you may feel are in your best interest as one of our shareholders.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined under the JOBS Act and if we take advantage of reduced disclosure requirements applicable to “emerging growth companies,” our common shares could be less attractive to investors.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, as amended, or the JOBS Act, and, for as long as we continue to be an “emerging growth company,” we may choose to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies but not to “emerging growth companies,” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended, or SOX, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We could be an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, or until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our annual gross revenues exceed $1.07 billion, (ii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act, which would occur if the market value of our common shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, or (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three year period. We cannot predict if investors will find our common shares less attractive if we choose to continue to rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common shares less attractive as a result of any choices to reduce future disclosure, there may be a less active trading market for our common shares and our stock price may be more volatile.

 

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. An “emerging growth company” can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have chosen to “opt out” of such extended transition period, however, and, as a result, we are required to comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

 

Our Articles of Amalgamation (as amended) authorize us to issue an unlimited number of common shares and preferred shares without shareholder approval and we may issue additional equity securities, or engage in other transactions that could dilute your ownership interest, which may adversely affect the market price of our common shares

 

Our Articles of Amalgamation (as amended) authorize our Board of Directors, subject to the provisions of the ABCA, to issue an unlimited number of common shares and preferred shares without shareholder approval. Our Board of Directors may determine from time to time to raise additional capital by issuing common shares, preferred shares or other equity securities. We are not restricted from issuing additional securities, including securities that are convertible into or exchangeable for, or that represent the right to receive, common shares or preferred shares. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing, or nature of any future offerings, or the prices at which such offerings may be affected. Additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing shareholders or reduce the market price of our common shares, or both. Holders of our common shares are not entitled to pre-emptive rights or other protections against dilution. New investors also may have rights, preferences and privileges that are senior to, and that adversely affect, the then-current holders of our common shares. Additionally, if we raise additional capital by making offerings of debt or preference shares, upon our liquidation, holders of our debt securities and preferred shares, and lenders with respect to other borrowings, may receive distributions of our available assets before the holders of our common shares.

 

 34 

 

 

We have incurred significant costs as a result of operating as a U.S. public company, and our management will continue to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives.

 

As a U.S. publicly traded company, we will incur additional significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we have not incurred in the past, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined under the JOBS Act. In addition, new and changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the rules and regulations promulgated and to be promulgated thereunder, as well as under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the JOBS Act, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, have created uncertainty for U.S. public companies and increased our costs and time that our board of directors and management must devote to complying with these rules and regulations. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and lead to a diversion of management time and attention from revenue generating activities.

 

For as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act, we may choose to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other U.S. public companies that are not “emerging growth companies.” These exceptions provide for, but are not limited to, relief from the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, less extensive disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, exemptions from the requirements to hold a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved and an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. We may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” We may remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years. See “JOBS Act” in this report. To the extent we are no longer eligible to use exemptions from various reporting requirements under the JOBS Act, we may be unable to realize our anticipated cost savings from those exemptions.

 

Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and share price.

 

As a Canadian public company, we were not required to evaluate our internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of U.S. public companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404. We were required to meet these standards in the course of preparing our financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2019, and our management has reported on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for such year. Additionally, under the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” The rules governing the standards that must be met for our management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation.

 

In connection with the implementation of the necessary procedures and practices related to internal control over financial reporting, we may identify deficiencies that we may not be able to remediate in time to meet the deadline imposed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act for compliance with the requirements of Section 404. In addition, we may encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any requested improvements and receiving a favorable attestation in connection with the attestation provided by our independent registered public accounting firm. We will be unable to issue securities in the public markets through the use of a shelf registration statement if we are not in compliance with Section 404. Furthermore, failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could have a material adverse effect on our business and share price and could limit our ability to report our financial results accurately and timely.

 

 35 

 

 

If we sell common shares in future financings, shareholders may experience immediate dilution and, as a result, our share price may decline.

 

We may from time to time issue additional common shares at a discount from the existing trading price of our common shares. As a result, our shareholders would experience immediate dilution upon the sale of any shares of our common shares at such discount. In addition, as opportunities present themselves, we may enter into financing or similar arrangements in the future, including the issuance of debt securities, preferred shares or common shares. If we issue common shares or securities convertible into common shares, our common shareholders would experience additional dilution and, as a result, our share price may decline.

 

Future sales of our common shares by our shareholders or the perception that these sales may occur could cause our stock price to decline.

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had 108,038,398 common shares outstanding, including a total of 3,977,714 common shares issued to our strategic partners. We are contractually obligated to register those common shares for resale or other disposition under the Securities Act. We filed a registration statement on Form S-3 to permit the sale or other disposition of these common shares along with additional common shares we have issued in two private placements during 2018. In addition, substantially all of our other outstanding common shares have been registered for resale or other disposition by the holders thereof or are otherwise freely tradable by the holders thereof.

 

Sales of a substantial number of our common shares by our shareholders or the perception that these sales may occur, could depress the market price of our common shares and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities, even if there is no relationship between such sales and the performance of our business.

 

We have never and do not, in the future, intend to pay dividends on our common shares, and your ability to achieve a return on your investment will depend on appreciation in the market price of our common shares.

 

We have never paid and do not expect to pay dividends on our common shares in the future. We intend to invest our future earnings, if any, to fund our growth and not to pay any cash dividends on our common shares. Since we do not intend to pay dividends, your ability to receive a return on your investment will depend on any future appreciation in the market price of our common shares. There is no assurance that our common shares will appreciate in price.

 

An active, liquid and orderly market for our common shares may not develop or be sustained, and you may not be able to sell your common shares.

 

Our common shares trade on the NYSE American exchange. We cannot assure you that an active trading market for our common shares will develop or be sustained. The lack of an active market may impair your ability to sell the common shares at the time you wish to sell them or at a price that you consider reasonable. An inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital by selling common shares and may impair our ability to acquire other businesses, applications or technologies using our common shares as consideration, which, in turn, could materially adversely affect our business.

 

We are subject to the continued listing requirements of the NYSE American. If we are unable to comply with such requirements, our common shares would be delisted from the NYSE American, which would limit investors’ ability to effect transactions in our common shares and subject us to additional trading restrictions.

 

Our common shares are currently listed on the NYSE American. In order to maintain our listing, we must maintain certain share prices, financial and share distribution targets, including maintaining a minimum amount of shareholders’ equity and a minimum number of public shareholders. In addition to these objective standards, the NYSE American may delist the securities of any issuer if, in its opinion, the issuer’s financial condition and/or operating results appear unsatisfactory; if it appears that the extent of public distribution or the aggregate market value of the security has become so reduced as to make continued listing on the NYSE American inadvisable; if the issuer sells or disposes of principal operating assets or ceases to be an operating company; if an issuer fails to comply with the NYSE American’s listing requirements; if an issuer’s common stock sells at what the NYSE American considers a “low selling price” (generally trading below $0.20 per share for an extended period of time); or if any other event occurs or any condition exists which makes continued listing on the NYSE American, in its opinion, inadvisable.

  

 36 

 

 

Item 1B.Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 2.Properties.

 

Our corporate headquarters are located in Ann Arbor, Michigan where we lease and occupy approximately 16,226 feet pursuant to a lease that expires January 31, 2025. In February 2020 we entered into an amended lease agreement whereby our original lease for approximately 26,540 square feet of space was bought out and a new lease was issued for 16, 226 square feet of office space.

 

Item 3.Legal Proceedings.

 

On November 1, 2019, Heska Corporation (“Heska”) filed a complaint for damages and injunctive relief (the “Complaint”) in the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina, Case 1:19-cv-01108-LCB-JLW, against Qorvo US, Inc. (“Qorvo US”), Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC (“Qorvo Biotech” and, together with Qorvo US, “Qorvo”) and the Company (collectively with Qorvo, the “Defendants”). The Complaint alleges, among other things, that the Defendants improperly obtained Heska’s trade secrets and confidential information and/or conspired to use improper means to misappropriate Heska’s trade secrets related to an instrument and related consumable products for performing immunoassay analysis of biomarkers and other substances. The Complaint seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, as well as preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent the Defendants from commercializing the Company’s TRUFORMATM diagnostic instrument. On January 21, 2020, the Defendants filed a motion seeking dismissal of the Complaint. On February 11, 2020, Heska filed its response to the Defendants’ motion to dismiss to which the Defendants responded on February 25, 2020. The Company believes that the allegations in the Complaint have no merit and will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations or financial condition, and the Company reaffirms its intention to commence the commercialization of its TRUFORMATM platform by the end of 2020.

 

Under the terms of the Development and Supply Agreement, dated November 26, 2018, by and between Qorvo Biotech and the Company (the “Qorvo Agreement”), Qorvo Biotech agreed to indemnify the Company and certain related parties against claims alleging infringement or misappropriation of third-party intellectual property rights, subject to certain limitations and exceptions. Qorvo Biotech has notified the Company that Qorvo Biotech has assumed the defense of the Complaint and will indemnify the Company for losses arising from the Complaint in accordance with the terms of the Qorvo Agreement. Qorvo Biotech has further advised the Company that it intends to mount a vigorous defense to the claims in the Complaint, and that it believes the allegations contained in the Complaint are without merit.

 

Item 4.Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

 37 

 

 

PART II

 

Item 5.Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Our common shares commenced trading on the NYSE American on November 21, 2017 under the symbol “ZOM”.

 

   High  Low
Year Ended December 31, 2019          
  Fourth Quarter  $0.40   $0.30 
  Third Quarter  $0.49   $0.21 
  Second Quarter  $0.45   $0.20 
  First Quarter  $1.27   $0.30 
Year Ended December 31, 2018          
  Fourth Quarter  $1.97   $1.04 
  Third Quarter  $2.40   $1.81 
  Second Quarter  $2.98   $1.75 
  First Quarter  $2.33   $1.79 

 

Common Stock Information

 

As of February 26, 2020, there were 128,871,732 common shares outstanding held of record by approximately 205 holders.

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

Plan Category    Number of Securities to be issued upon outstanding options rights      Weighted-average exercise price outstanding options and rights      Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))  
     (a)      (b)      (c)  
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders   7,040,265   $1.29    0 
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders   Nil    N/A    Nil 
Total   7,040,265   $1.29    0 

 

38

 

Item 6.Selected Financial Data.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 7.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is intended to help the reader understand the results of operations and financial condition of the Company. The Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2019. In addition to historical information, this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and forward-looking information under applicable Canadian securities law requirements (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. See “Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth under the “Part I – Item 1A Risk Factors” section and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as, in other reports and documents we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Overview

 

We are a development stage veterinary diagnostic company focused on creating point-of-care diagnostic platforms for use by veterinarians treating companion animals (canine, feline, and equine) by focusing on the unmet needs of clinical veterinarians. We believe that our diagnostic platforms have the potential to significantly improve the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases affecting companion animals. We believe that there are significant unmet medical needs for point-of-care diagnostic tools for use on pets, and that the pet diagnostic segment of the animal health industry is likely to grow substantially as new diagnostic tools and treatments are identified, developed, and marketed specifically for companion animals.

 

Our strategic focus is on the final development and commercialization of our TRUFORMA™ diagnostic biosensor platform and the first five assays for the detection of adrenal and thyroid disorders in cats and dogs. The TRUFORMA™ platform uses Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) technology to provide a non-optical and fluorescence free detection system for use at the point-of-care. We believe that BAW technology will enable precise and repeatable test results at the point-of-care during a typical veterinary appointment.

 

Following the commercial launch of TRUFORMA™, we expect to continue the development of our point- of-care diagnostic platform, which is based on miniaturized laser-based Raman spectroscopy technology and is designed to detect pathogens in companion animals. We believe this platform will enable the identification of biological and biochemical signatures in complex biological samples and has the potential to achieve reference lab sensitivity/specificity to screen for a wide range of pathogens in companion animal feces, urine, respiratory, and dermatological samples in minutes without the need for extensive sample prep or the use of reagents. The diagnostic platform requires a small fecal sample preparation. Additionally, the platform has automated analysis and does not require specialized staff training. Assuming development work is successfully completed we expect the commercial launch of our fecal test to occur by 2022 and urine tests by 2023. We believe that this diagnostic platform does not require pre-market regulatory approval for use with companion animals in the United States.

 

We have performed initial development work on a circulating tumor cell (CTC) “liquid biopsy” platform for use in a reference lab setting as a canine cancer diagnostic. This platform is intended for use to detect canine cancers faster, more affordably and less invasively compared to existing methods, which can be expensive and cost prohibitive for pet owners. We have worked on the development of an assay for use with this platform that targets hard-to-diagnose canine cancers, such as hemangiosarcoma and osteosarcoma.

 

39

We are a development-stage company with no products approved for marketing and sale, and we have not generated any revenue. We have incurred significant net losses since our inception. We incurred net losses of $19,784,054 and $16,647,687 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. These losses have resulted principally from costs incurred in connection with investigating and developing our product candidates, research and development activities and general and administrative costs associated with our operations. As of December 31, 2019, we had an accumulated deficit of $52,057,841 and cash and cash equivalents of $510,586.

 

For the foreseeable future, we expect to continue to incur losses, which will increase significantly from historical levels as we expand our product development activities, commercialize them if they do not require U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, or FDA-CVM, pre-market approval, seek regulatory approvals for our product candidates where required from the FDA-CVM or the United States Department of Agriculture Center for Veterinary Biologics, or the USDA-CVB.

 

For further information on the regulatory, business and product pipeline, please see the “Business” section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. For further information on the risk factors, please see the “Risk Factors” section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Revenue

 

We do not have any products approved for sale, have not generated any revenue from product sales since our inception and do not expect to generate any revenue from the sale of products in the near future. If our development efforts result in clinical success and regulatory approval or collaboration agreements with third parties for any of our product candidates, we may generate revenue from those product candidates.

 

Operating Expenses

 

The majority of our operating expenses to date have been for the general and administrative activities related to general business activities, capital market activities and stock-based compensation, and research and development activities related to our lead product candidates.

 

Research and Development Expense

 

All costs of research and development are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. Research and development costs primarily consist of salaries and related expenses for personnel, stock-based compensation expense, fees paid to consultants, outside service providers, professional services, travel costs and materials used in clinical trials and research and development.

 

General and Administrative Expense

 

General and administrative expense consists primarily of personnel costs, including salaries, related benefits and stock-based compensation for employees, consultants and directors. General and administrative expenses also include rent and other facilities costs and professional and consulting fees for legal, accounting, tax services and other general business services.

 

Professional Fees

 

Professional fees include attorney’s fees, accounting fees and consulting fees incurred in connection with product investigation and analysis, regulatory analysis, government relations, audit, securities offerings, investor relations, and general corporate and intellectual property advice.

 

Income Taxes

 

As of December 31, 2019, we had net operating loss carryforwards for federal and state income tax purposes of $16,140,344 and non-capital loss carryforwards for Canada of approximately $20,366,610, which will begin to expire in fiscal year 2035. We have evaluated the factors bearing upon the realizability of our deferred tax assets, which are comprised principally of net operating loss carryforwards and non-capital loss carryforwards. We concluded that, due to the uncertainty of realizing any tax benefits as of December 31, 2019, a valuation allowance was necessary to fully offset our deferred tax assets.

 

40

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

 

Our management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or U.S. GAAP. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and revenue, costs and expenses and related disclosures during the reporting periods. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and judgments, including those described below. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

While our significant accounting policies are more fully described in Note 3 of the notes to our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this document, we believe that the estimates and assumptions involved in the following accounting policies may have the greatest potential impact on our financial statements.

 

JOBS Act

 

The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act, contains provisions that, among other things, reduce certain reporting requirements for an “emerging growth company.” We have irrevocably elected not to avail ourselves of the JOBS Act provision that an emerging growth company may delay adopting new or revised accounting standards until such times as those standards apply to private companies.

 

In addition, we are in the process of evaluating the benefits of relying on the other exemptions and reduced reporting requirements provided by the JOBS Act. Subject to certain conditions set forth in the JOBS Act, if as an “emerging growth company” we choose to rely on such exemptions, we may not be required to, among other things, (i) provide an auditor’s attestation report on our system of internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404, and (ii) comply with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements (auditor discussion and analysis). These exemptions will apply until December 31, 2022 or until we no longer meet the requirements of being an “emerging growth company,” whichever is earlier.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the year. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Areas where significant judgment is involved in making estimates are the determination of fair value of stock-based compensation; the useful lives and recoverability of property and equipment and intangible assets; deferred income taxes and forecasting future cash flows for assessing the going concern assumption.

 

Research and Development Costs

 

Research and development expenses comprise costs incurred in performing research and development activities, including salaries and benefits, safety and efficacy studies and contract manufacturing costs, contract research costs, patent procurement costs, materials and supplies and occupancy costs. Research and development activities include internal and external activities associated with research and development studies of current product candidates and advancing product candidates towards a goal of obtaining regulatory approval to manufacture and market the product candidate.

 

Research and development costs related to continued research and development programs are expensed as incurred in accordance with ASC topic 730.

 

41

Translation of Foreign Currencies

 

The functional currency, as determined by management, is U.S. dollars, which is also our reporting currency. Transactions denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars and the monetary value of assets and liabilities are translated at the period end exchange rates. Revenue and expenses are translated at rates of exchange prevailing on the transaction dates. All of the exchange gains or losses resulting from these other transactions are recognized in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

We measure the cost of equity-settled transactions by reference to the fair value of the equity instruments at the date at which they are granted if the fair value of the goods or services received by us cannot be reliably estimated.

 

We calculate stock-based compensation using the fair value method, under which the fair value of the options at the grant date is calculated using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model, and subsequently expensed over the vesting period of the option using the graded vesting method. The provisions of our stock-based compensation plans do not require us to settle any options by transferring cash or other assets, and therefore we classify the awards as equity. Stock-based compensation expense recognized during the period is based on the value of stock-based payment awards that are ultimately expected to vest. We estimate forfeitures at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. Volatility is determined based on volatilities of comparable companies when the Company does not have its own trading history. The expected term, which represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding, is estimated based on an average of the term of the options. The risk-free rate assumed in valuing the options is based on the Canadian treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for the expected term of the option. The expected dividend yield percentage at the date of grant is Nil as we are not expected to pay dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

Loss Per Share

 

Basic loss per share, or EPS, is computed by dividing the loss attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through the exercise or conversion of stock options, restricted stock awards, warrants and convertible securities. In certain circumstances, the conversion of options, warrants and convertible securities are excluded from diluted EPS if the effect of such inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

 

The dilutive effect of stock options is determined using the treasury stock method. Stock options and warrants to purchase our common shares issued during the period were not included in the computation of diluted EPS, as the effect would be anti-dilutive.

 

Comprehensive Loss

 

We follow ASC topic 220. This statement establishes standards for reporting and display of comprehensive (loss) income and its components. Comprehensive loss is net loss plus certain items that are recorded directly to shareholders' equity. We currently have no other comprehensive loss items. 

 

42

Results of Operations

 

Year ended December 31, 2019 compared to year ended December 31, 2018

 

Our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 are as follows:

 

    Year ended    Year Ended           
    December 31, 2019    December 31, 2018    Change      
     $      $      $      %  
Expenses                    
Research and development   10,345,291    10,317,153    28,138    0%
General and administrative   7,114,777    4,521,349    2,593,428    57%
Professional fees   1,536,646    1,534,977    1,669    0%
Amortization - right-of-use asset   509,381        509,381    N/A 
Amortization - intangible   1,082    2,083    (1,001)   -48%
Depreciation   277,150    203,684    73,466    36%
Loss from operations   19,784,327    16,579,246    3,204,081    19%
Interest Expense   18,338        18,338    N/A 
Gain on settlement of liabilities   (19,737)       (19,737)   N/A 
Loss on sale of fixed assets   1,308    69,382    (68,074)   -98%
Foreign exchange gain   (182)   (941)   759    -81%
Loss before income taxes   19,784,054    16,647,687    3,135,367    19%
                     
Income tax expense               N/A 
                     
Net loss and comprehensive loss   19,784,054    16,647,687    3,135,367    19%
                     

 

Revenue

 

We did not generate any revenue during the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $10,345,291 compared to $10,317,153 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $28,138 or less than 1%. The increase was primarily due to an increase in third-party expenses relating to the development of our product candidate and the addition of full-time employees. Contracted expenditures increased $1,098,987 and salaries increased $96,934. These costs were partially offset by a reduction in licensing fees. In 2019, we paid licensing fees of $5,000,000 related to the development of our TRUFORMATM platform, and licensing fees of $736,841 related to the development of our liquid biopsy platform. In 2018, we paid licensing fees of $5,413,158 related to the development of our TRUFORMATM platform and $1,738,513 related to the development of our pathogen detection platform.

 

General and Administrative

 

General and administrative expense for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $7,114,777, compared to $4,521,349 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $2,593,428 or 57%. The increase was due to an increase in salaries, bonus and benefits of $2,853,769, which included share-based compensation expense of $2,539,092 resulting from the granting of options to purchase an aggregate of 7,495,000 common shares, all of which vested upon the dates of grant. Other increases in salaries, bonus and benefits were due to increases in sales, marketing and other administrative salaries and benefits. Marketing and investor relations expense increased by $245,997, and travel and accommodation expense increased by $169,383, which were partially offset by a reduction in regulatory costs of $329,666 and a decrease in rent of $263,279 which was reclassified to amortization of right-of-use asset.

 

Professional Fees

 

Professional fees for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $1,536,646 compared to $1,534,977 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $1,669 or less than 1%. The increase was primarily due to increased expenses resulting from an increase in our SEC reporting and registration activities.

 

43

Net Loss

 

Our net loss for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $19,784,054, or $0.19 per share, compared with a net loss of $16,647,687, or $0.18 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $3,135,167 or 19%. The net loss in each period was attributed to the matters described above. We expect to continue to record net losses in future periods until such time as we have sufficient revenue from our product candidates to offset our operating expenses.

 

Cash Flows

 

Year ended December 31, 2019 compared to year ended December 31, 2018

 

The following table shows a summary of our cash flows for the periods set forth below:

 

    Year ended    Year ended           
    December 31, 2019    December 31, 2018    Change      
    $    $    $    % 
Cash flows used in operating activities   (15,634,064)   (11,147,528)   (4,486,536)   40%
Cash flows provided by financing activities   14,891,317    10,258,643    4,632,674    45%
Cash flows used in investing activities   (686,932)   (618,997)   (67,935)   11%
Decrease in cash   (1,429,679)   (1,507,882)   78,203    -5%
                     
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year   1,940,265    3,448,147    (1,507,882)   -44%
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year   510,586    1,940,265    (1,429,679)   -74%

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $15,634,064, compared to $11,147,528 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $4,486,536 or 40%. The increase in net cash used in operating activities resulted primarily from the increase in our net loss, as well as a decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $288,994, partially offset by an increase in non-cash expenses including stock-based compensation of $2,539,092, amortization of right-of-use asset of $509,381, utilization of deposits and prepaid expenses of $332,826 and depreciation of $277,150.

 

Financing Activities 

 

Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $14,891,317, compared to net cash provided by financing activities of $10,258,643 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $4,632,674 or 45%. The increase in cash from financing activities resulted from $12,000,000 in proceeds from the private sale of preferred shares, $3,000,000 in proceeds from our underwritten public offering of common stock, net of financing costs, and $600,000 in proceeds from the exercise of stock options, partially offset by $4,002,496 from the private sale of our common shares, proceeds of $2,034,307 from the exercise of stock options and common stock subscriptions of $4,280,000, partially offset by stock issuance costs of $58 in 2018.

 

Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $686,932, compared to $618,997 for the year ended December 31, 2018, an increase of $67,935 or 11%. The increase in net cash used in investing activities resulted primarily from costs associated with the digital data platform, the construction of marketing assets, and the capitalization of integration costs associated with the implementation of an ERP system, partially offset by investments in additional leasehold improvements, equipment and furniture for additional office and lab space in Ann Arbor during 2018.

 

44

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We have incurred losses and negative cash flows from operations and have not generated any revenue since our inception in May 2015. As of December 31, 2019, we had an accumulated deficit of $52,057,841. We have funded our working capital requirements primarily through the sale of our capital shares and the exercise of stock options. At December 31, 2019, we had cash and cash equivalents of $510,586.

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company had cash and cash equivalents of $510,586, prepaid expenses and deposits of $1,228,585, and tax credits receivable of $67,618. Current assets amounted to $1,806,789 with current liabilities of $2,087,525, resulting in a working capital deficit (defined as current assets minus current liabilities) of $280,736.

 

In the second quarter of 2019, we sold $12,000,000 of our Series 1 Preferred Shares to an accredited investor in a private placement at a purchase price of $1,000,000 per Series 1 Preferred Share. Each Series 1 Preferred Share has a stated value of $1,000,000. The Series 1 Preferred Shares do not have voting rights except to the extent required by applicable law and are not convertible into the Company’s common shares. Holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will not be entitled to dividends but, in lieu thereof, will receive Net Sales Payments until such time as the holders have received total Net Sales Returns equal to 9 times the aggregate stated value of the outstanding Series 1 Preferred Shares. We will have the right to redeem the outstanding Series 1 Preferred Shares at any time at a redemption price equal to 9 times the aggregate stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares outstanding less the aggregate amount of the Net Sales Returns paid (the “Redemption Amount”). Upon any dissolution, liquidation or winding up, whether voluntary or involuntary, holders of Series 1 Preferred Shares will be entitled to a liquidation preference equal to the stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares less the Net Sales Returns paid on the Series 1 Preferred Shares. In the event of a fundamental transaction (defined in the Series 1 Preferred Shares to include an amalgamation, merger or other business combination transaction involving our company in which our shareholders do not have the right to cast more than 50% of the votes that may be cast for the election of directors, or a sale, lease or other disposition of the properties and/or assets of our company as an entirety or substantially as an entirety to a third party), the holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will be entitled to receive consideration for their Series 1 Preferred Shares equal to a multiple of the stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares ranging from 5.0 to 9.0 depending on the timing of the fundamental transaction, subject to a cap equal to the Redemption Amount.

 

In December 2018, we entered into an at-the-market equity offering sales agreement with Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. under which we may sell pursuant to the universal shelf registration statement common shares in the United States only, from time to time, for up to $50.0 million and was amended on March 25, 2019 to $10.0 million in aggregate sales proceeds in "at the market" transactions. No sales of common shares were made under the sales agreement in the second and third quarters, and the program was inactive at December 31, 2019.

 

On October 17, 2017 we entered into a five-year $5,000,000 unsecured working capital facility with Equidebt LLC, one of our shareholders (the “Equidebt Facility”). Amounts borrowed under the Equidebt Facility bear interest at a rate of 14% per annum payable at maturity. All amounts borrowed under the Equidebt Facility become due and payable on October 17, 2022. We can make two borrowings per month under the Equidebt Facility, each of which must be for a minimum of $250,000. No amounts were outstanding under the Equidebt Facility at December 31, 2019.

 

If we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our existing security holders will likely experience dilution, and the incurring of indebtedness would result in increased debt service obligations and could require us to agree to operating and financial covenants that could restrict operations. In the event that we are unable to obtain sufficient capital to meet our working capital requirements, we may be required to change or curtail current or planned operations in order to conserve cash until such time, if ever, that sufficient proceeds from operations are generated. In such an event, we may not be able to take advantage of business opportunities and may have to terminate or delay safety and efficacy studies, curtail our product development programs, or sell or assign rights to our product candidates, products and technologies.

 

45

Our future capital requirements depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:

 

the scope, progress, results and costs of researching and developing our current or future product candidates;

 

the timing of, and the costs involved in, obtaining regulatory approvals for any of our current or future product candidates;

 

the number and characteristics of the product candidates we pursue;

 

the cost of manufacturing our current and future product candidates and any products we successfully commercialize;

 

the cost of commercialization activities if any of our current or future product candidates are approved for sale, including marketing, sales, service, customer support and distribution costs;

 

the expenses needed to attract and retain skilled personnel;

 

the costs associated with being a public company;

 

our ability to establish and maintain strategic collaborations, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements; and

 

the costs involved in preparing, filing, prosecuting, maintaining, defending and enforcing possible patent claims, including litigation costs and the outcome of any such litigation.

 

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Since inception, we have not engaged in the use of any off-balance sheet arrangements, such as structured finance entities, special purpose entities or variable interest entities.

 

Contingencies and Legal Proceedings

 

On November 1, 2019, Heska Corporation (“Heska”) filed a complaint for damages and injunctive relief (the “Complaint”) in the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina, Case 1:19-cv-01108-LCB-JLW, against Qorvo US, Inc. (“Qorvo US”), Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC (“Qorvo Biotech” and, together with Qorvo US, “Qorvo”) and the Company (collectively with Qorvo, the “Defendants”). The Complaint alleges, among other things, that the Defendants improperly obtained Heska’s trade secrets and confidential information and/or conspired to use improper means to misappropriate Heska’s trade secrets related to an instrument and related consumable products for performing immunoassay analysis of biomarkers and other substances. The Complaint seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, as well as preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent the Defendants from commercializing the Company’s TRUFORMATM diagnostic instrument. On January 21, 2020, the Defendants filed a motion seeking dismissal of the Complaint. On February 11, 2020, Heska filed its response to the Defendants’ motion to dismiss to which the Defendants responded on February 25, 2020.The Company believes that the allegations in the Complaint have no merit and will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations or financial condition, and the Company reaffirms its intention to commence the commercialization of its TRUFORMATM platform by the end of 2020.

 

Under the terms of the Development and Supply Agreement, dated November 26, 2018, by and between Qorvo Biotech and the Company (the “Qorvo Agreement”), Qorvo Biotech agreed to indemnify the Company and certain related parties against claims alleging infringement or misappropriation of third-party intellectual property rights, subject to certain limitations and exceptions. Qorvo Biotech has notified the Company that Qorvo Biotech has assumed the defense of the Complaint and will indemnify the Company for losses arising from the Complaint in accordance with the terms of the Qorvo Agreement. Qorvo Biotech has further advised the Company that it intends to mount a vigorous defense to the claims in the Complaint, and that it believes the allegations contained in the Complaint are without merit.

 

46

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Liquidity and Market Risk

 

Liquidity risk is the risk that we will encounter difficulty raising liquid funds to meet our commitments as they fall due. In meeting our liquidity requirements, we closely monitor our forecasted cash requirements with expected cash drawdown.

 

We are exposed to interest rate risk, which is affected by changes in the general level of interest rates. Due to the fact that our cash is deposited with major financial institutions in an interest-bearing savings account, we do not believe that the results of operations or cash flows would be affected to any significant degree by a sudden change in market interest rates given their relative short-term nature.

 

We are also exposed to credit risk at period end from the carrying value of our cash. We manage this risk by maintaining bank accounts with a Canadian Chartered Bank and a U.S. bank that is a member of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Our cash is not subject to any external restrictions.

 

We are exposed to changes in foreign exchange rates between the Canadian and United States dollar which could affect the value of our cash. We had no foreign currency hedges or other derivative financial instruments as of December 31, 2019. We do not enter into financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes and do not currently utilize derivative financial instruments.

 

We have balances denominated in Canadian dollars that give rise to exposure to foreign exchange (“FX”) risk relating to the impact of translating certain non-U.S. dollar balance sheet accounts as these statements are presented in U.S. dollars. A strengthening U.S. dollar will lead to a FX loss, while a weakening U.S. dollar will lead to a FX gain. For each Canadian dollar balance of $1.0 million, a +/- 10% movement in the Canadian currency held by us versus the U.S. dollar would affect our loss and other comprehensive loss by $100,000.

 

Recently adopted accounting pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued new guidance, ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The new standard establishes a right-of-use model (“ROU”) that requires a lessee to recognize a ROU asset and lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with a term longer than 12 months. Leases will be classified as finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern and classification of expense recognition in the income statement. Additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures are also required by the new guidance.

 

A modified retrospective transition approach is required, applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. The Company adopted the new standard with an initial application date of January 1, 2019 and used the effective date as its date of initial application. Consequently, financial information was not updated, and the disclosures required under the new standard were not provided for dates and periods before January 1, 2019.

 

The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company has elected the ‘package of practical expedients’, which permits the Company not to reassess under the new standard prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification and initial direct costs. The Company has not elected the use-of-hindsight or the practical expedient pertaining to land easements; the latter not being applicable to the Company.

 

On August 29, 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, which amends ASC 350-40 to address a customer’s accounting for implementation costs incurred in a cloud computing arrangement (CCA) that is a service contract. ASU 2018-15 aligns the accounting for costs incurred to implement a CCA that is a service arrangement with the guidance on capitalizing costs associated with developing or obtaining internal-use software. Specifically, the ASU amends ASC 350 to include in its scope implementation costs of a CCA that is a service contract and clarifies that a customer should apply ASC 350-40 to determine which implementation costs should be capitalized in a CCA that is considered a service contract. The amendments in this update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted.

 

The Company chose to adopt this guidance on July 1, 2019 using the prospective transition method.

 

47

Outstanding Share Data

 

The only class of outstanding voting or equity securities of the Company are the common shares. As of February 26,

2020:

 

there are 128,871,732 common shares issued and outstanding;

 

there are stock options outstanding under our Stock Option Plan to acquire an aggregate of 7,040,265 common shares; and

 

there are common share purchase warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) outstanding to acquire an aggregate of 21,875,001 common shares, which Warrants were issued in connection with offering complete by the Company on February 14, 2020 (which has been described in a Form 8-K filed by the Company on February 13, 2020). Of these Warrants, 20,833,334 are exercisable for a cash price of $0.20, and 1,041,667 are exercisable for cash price of $0.15. The Warrants also have a “cashless exercise” feature which is applicable in certain circumstances. The cashless exercise feature could result in the potential issuance of common shares based upon the “in-the-money” value of the Warrants at the time of exercise of the applicable Warrants. The number of the common shares that may be issued is not determinable. However, the number of common shares that are issuable is based upon a formula contained in the Warrants, which determines the number of common shares issuable by dividing the “in-the-money” value (based upon the then current market price, as provided in the Warrant) by the then current market price, and multiplying this result by the number of common shares that are issuable under the Warrant pursuant to cash exercise.

 

48

 

Item 8.Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

Our financial statements, together with the independent registered public accounting firm report thereon, are incorporated by reference from the applicable information set forth in Part IV Item 15, “Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Item 9.Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

 

None.

 

Item 9A.Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Our Disclosure Controls

 

 We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that material information required to be disclosed in our periodic reports filed under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and to provide reasonable assurance that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, our interim chief executive officer and chief financial officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rule 13(a)-15(e) under the Exchange Act. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.  

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Interim Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on criteria established in the framework in “Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013)” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2019.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risks that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K does not include an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm because we are an “emerging growth company,” and may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

 

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal controls over financial reporting. From time to time, we make changes to our internal control over financial reporting that are intended to enhance its effectiveness, and which do not have a material effect on our overall internal control over financial reporting.

 

49

 

Item 9B.Other Information.

 

None.

 

 

PART III

 

Item 10.Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

 

MANAGEMENT

 

Executive Officers and Directors

 

The following table sets forth the name, age, position and tenure of each of our directors and executive officers as of December 31, 2019:

 

Name Age Position
Shameze Rampertab 53 Interim Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Secretary and Director
Stephanie Morley 44 President and Chief Operations Officer
Bruk Herbst 50 Chief Commercial Officer
James LeBar (1)(2)(3) 67 Director
Rodney Williams (1)(2)(3) 58 Director
Jeffrey Rowe (1)(2)(3) 64 Chairman 
Johnny D. Powers (2)(3) 58 Director

 

_________________________________________________________________

(1)   Member of the Audit Committee
(2)   Member of the Compensation Committee
(3)   Member of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

        

Management 

 

Shameze Rampertab, CPA, CA has been our Interim Chief Executive Officer since December 2019 and our Chief Financial Officer since March 2016. In April 2016, he took on the roles of Corporate Secretary and Director. Mr. Rampertab acted as an independent consultant for a number of companies, including us, in respect of which he provided general financial advisory and accounting services prior to his appointment as Chief Financial Officer, from November 2015 to March 2016. He was the Chief Financial Officer of multiple publicly-traded health care companies including Profound Medical Corp. from October 2014 to November 2015 and Intellipharmaceutics International Inc. from October 2010 to October 2014. Mr. Rampertab is a chartered professional accountant and chartered accountant with twenty years of experience in capital markets, strategic planning and analysis. He holds an MBA from McMaster University and a Bachelor’s degree in molecular genetics and molecular biology from the University of Toronto. We selected Mr. Rampertab to serve on our board of directors due to his strong experience in the financial, medical and scientific arenas.

 

Stephanie Morley, DVM has been our President and Chief Operations Officer since September of 2019. From October 2015 until September of 2019, she served as our Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of Product Development. Prior thereto, from July 2015 until October 2015, Dr. Morley was a consultant for us providing strategic and tactical support. From December 2013 to August 2015 Dr. Morley served as Associate Director of Business Development with the University of Michigan Medical School. From April 2006 to August 2013 Dr. Morley held several positions of increasing responsibility with MPI Research, a contract research organization, including Vice President of Operations. Dr. Morley is a trained veterinarian, having earned her DVM degree from Michigan State University. After earning her DVM degree, Dr. Morley was a practicing veterinarian with Oakwood Animal Hospital in Kalamazoo, MI and Adobe Animal Medical Center in Albuquerque, NM where she assumed dual roles of both clinical practitioner and operations management   

 

50

 

Bruk Herbst has been our Chief Commercial Officer since July 2017. From October 2015 to December 2016 Mr. Herbst was the Executive Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing at i4C Innovations Inc. d/b/a Voyce, an animal health and wellness company. From October 2007 to September 2015, he served as Executive Senior Director and Head of U.S. Sales at IDEXX Laboratories, Inc, a developer, manufacturer and distributor of products and services for the companion animal veterinary and other markets, where he was responsible for in-clinic and reference lab diagnostics, point of care, information technologies and digital radiology. From January 1999 to October 2007 Mr. Herbst also held commercial leadership roles in patient monitoring, pharmacy and diagnostics with Omnicare Specialty Care Group and Life Systems. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in business from the University of Arizona.

 

Non-Management Directors

 

James LeBar has been a Director and the Chairman of our Compensation Committee since April 2016. Mr. LeBar also served as a director on the board of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc. from May 2015 until the completion of our Qualifying Transaction in April 2016. From March 2011 until his retirement in January 2016, Mr. LeBar served as a turnaround consultant for Nationwide Placement Inc., a specialized health training company. We selected Mr. LeBar to serve on our board of directors due to his experience as an entrepreneur and executive leader, an expert in building and operating start-up companies and establishing corporate structures for profitability and success.

 

Rodney Williams, MBA has served as a Director and the Chair of our Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee since April 2016. He is currently employed as Corporate Global Vice President Portfolio and Services for publicly-traded Align Technologies (ALGN) as of February 1, 2017. Previously, Mr. Williams was an entrepreneur-in-residence with PTV Healthcare Capital, a private equity investment firm and he has been with PTV since October 2015. Prior to PTV, he was President and CEO of Heart Rhythm Society Consulting Services from January 2013 through August 2015. From January 2008 through January 2013, Mr. Williams served as Senior Vice President of Global Product Planning and Marketing at St. Jude Medical Inc. Mr. Williams also served in commercial leadership roles in sales and marketing at GE Healthcare, Johnson and Johnson, and Bausch & Lomb. Mr. Williams earned both his MBA and Bachelor of Science degrees from the University of Southern California and attended the General Management Executive Leadership Program at The Wharton School of Business. We selected Mr. Williams to serve on our board of directors due to his experience with both large and small-cap medical technology and related health care companies and his global commercialization expertise.

 

Jeffrey Rowe has served as Chairman of the Board since December 2019 and the Chairman of our Audit Committee since April 2016. Until his retirement in October 2015, Mr. Rowe served as Executive Vice President and a Director of Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc., the largest independent specialty pharmacy company in the U.S. During his tenure with Diplomat, the company grew from a single location with less than $5 million in revenue, to sixteen locations and $3 billion in sales, and became publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Prior to his career with Diplomat, Mr. Rowe owned two successful community pharmacies in Genesee County, Michigan. He holds a Bachelor of Pharmacy degree from Ferris State University. We selected Mr. Rowe to serve on our board of directors due to his financial expertise and his extensive experience in pharmaceutical operations, the specialty pharmacy industry and fundamental business strategies involving accreditation, contracting, cybersecurity and regulation, combined with an expertise in compounding and integrative medicine.

 

Johnny D. Powers has been a Director since August 2019 and a strategic advisor since December 2019. Dr. Powers has over 30 years of experience in the medical diagnostics industry, including over seven years of experience in veterinary healthcare as a senior executive at IDEXX Laboratories. Dr. Powers was Executive Vice President of IDEXX from 2012 until 2016, overseeing multiple business units, including IDEXX Reference Labs, Telemedicine Services, Rapid Assay Point-of-Care Products, Bioresearch and Worldwide Operations. He joined IDEXX as Corporate Vice President in February 2009, where he led IDEXX Reference Labs to a global leadership position. Prior to joining IDEXX, Dr. Powers was Vice President responsible for the Cancer Diagnostics business of Becton, Dickinson and Company, a medical technology company, from 2007 to 2008. Dr. Powers joined Becton, Dickinson and Company as a result of its acquisition in 2006 of TriPath Imaging Inc., a molecular diagnostics-based cancer diagnostics company, where he held various senior management positions from 2001 to 2007, including Vice President of Worldwide Operations, and President of the TriPath Oncology business unit. From 1996 to 2001, Dr. Powers was employed by Ventana Medical Systems, Inc., a tissue-based cancer diagnostics company, where he held various positions, including Vice President and General Manager of the Anatomical Pathology business and Vice President and General Manager of Worldwide Operations. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Powers was employed by Organon Teknika Corporation, a medical diagnostics company, in various technical management roles. Dr. Powers holds a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Wake Forest University, an M.S. in chemical engineering from Clemson University, an M.B.A. from the Duke University Fuqua School of Business and a Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from North Carolina State University. Dr. Powers has an extensive and proven track record of product innovation, commercial execution and operational excellence in the medical diagnostics industry. He has led the development and commercialization of hundreds of innovative diagnostic platforms, products and services in early-stage businesses as well as global, multi-billion-dollar companies. We selected Mr. Powers to serve on our board due to his background and experience in the veterinary healthcare field and his proven capabilities in commercial operations.

  

51

 

Board Composition

 

At our 2019 annual shareholders’ meeting, the size of the board was fixed at six directors and six directors were elected. Subsequently, one of the directors resigned, and therefore our board of directors currently consists of five members with one vacancy. Our bylaws provide that our directors will hold office until the close of the first annual meeting of shareholders following his or her election unless the director is elected for a stated term. Our board of directors is responsible for the business and affairs of our company and considers various matters that require its approval.

 

Our board of directors is comprised of a majority of directors who are “independent” (as discussed below), and the Board has established an Audit Committee, a Compensation Committee and a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. We have adopted charters for our each of these committees and a code of ethics and business conduct, or Code of Ethics. Our Code of Ethics is available on our website at www.zomedica.com. The committee charters are also available for review on our website.

 

Under the Alberta Business Corporations Act, (“ABCA”), at least 25% of our directors must be “resident Canadians” as defined in the ABCA. At present, Messrs Rampertab and LeBar meet this requirement.

 

Director Independence

 

Our board of directors has determined that all of our directors, other than Mr.Rampertab and Dr. Powers are “independent,” as defined under the NYSE American. For purposes of the NYSE American rules, an independent director means a person other than an executive officer or employee of our company or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of our board of directors, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a director, subject to certain additional limitations.  Such directors are also deemed to be “independent” under applicable Canadian securities laws.

 

Code of Ethics

 

Our board of directors has adopted the Code of Ethics, which applies to all officers, directors and employees. Our Code of Ethics is available on our website at www.zomedica.com. Information contained in, or accessible through, our website does not constitute part of this Form 10-K. We intend to disclose any amendments to our Code of Ethics, or waivers of its requirements, on our website or in our filings under the Exchange Act.

  

Board Committees

 

Our board of directors has three standing committees: The Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee and the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Except for Dr. Powers, all of our committee members are “independent,” as defined under the NYSE American rules and for purposes of Canadian securities laws. Dr. Powers was an “independent” director until December 2, 2019, when he was named as a Strategic Advisor to provide day-to-day strategic oversight and management guidance to Mr. Rampertab, as the Interim Chief Executive Officer.

 

Each of our committee charters is available on our website at www.zomedica.com.

 

52

 

Audit Committee

 

Our audit committee is currently comprised of three members, Mr. Rowe (Chairman), Mr. Williams and Mr. LeBar. Each member of our audit committee is a non-employee member of our board of directors. We have designated Mr. Rowe as our “audit committee financial expert,” as defined under Item 407 of Regulation S-K. All of the members of our audit committee are “independent” members of our board of directors, as required by the NYSE American rules and Canadian securities laws.

 

The purpose of our audit committee of our board of directors is to oversee (i) the integrity of our company’s financial statements, our company’s accounting and financial reporting processes and financial statement audits; (ii) our company’s compliance with applicable legal and regulatory requirements; (iii) our company’s systems of internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures; (iv) the independent auditor’s engagement, qualifications, performance, compensation and independence; (v) review of related party transactions; and (vi) compliance with the company’s corporate policies. The audit committee’s function is one of oversight, whereas the planning and conduct of the audit is the responsibility of the independent auditor, and the financial statements are the responsibility of the company’s management.

 

Each member of the audit committee has experience reviewing financial statements and dealing with related accounting and auditing issues and is “financially literate” within the meaning of Canadian securities laws.

 

The audit committee has the sole authority to pre-approve all audit and permitted non-audit services provided by the independent auditor.

 

Compensation Committee

 

Our compensation committee is currently comprised of four members, Mr. Rowe, Mr. LeBar, Mr. Williams and Dr. Powers. All of the members of our compensation committee are “independent”, as defined under the NYSE American rules and for purposes of Canadian securities laws, except Dr. Powers who was independent until December 2, 2019 when he was named as a Strategic Advisor.

 

The purpose of our compensation committee is to (i) make recommendations to our board of directors relating to evaluation and compensation of our executives, (ii) oversee incentive, equity-based and other compensatory plans in which executive officers and key employees of our company participate, (iii) review and participate in determining director compensation and (iv) prepare any report on executive compensation required by the rules and regulations of the Commission and the listing standards of NYSE American.

 

We chose to retain Dr. Powers as a member of the Compensation Committee as the board believes his expertise continues to be valuable in these areas even though he is no longer an independent director.

 

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee

 

Our nominating and corporate governance committee is currently comprised of four members, Mr. Williams (Chairman), Mr. LeBar Mr. Rowe and Dr. Powers. All of the members of our nominating and corporate governance committee are “independent” as defined under the NYSE American rules and for the purposes of Canadian securities laws, except Dr. Powers who was independent until December 2, 2019 when he was named as a Strategic Advisor.

 

The purpose of our nominating and corporate governance committee of our board of directors is to carry out the responsibilities delegated by the board of directors relating to our director nominations process, developing and maintaining our company’s corporate governance policies, and any related matters required by the federal securities laws or by the applicable listing rules of the NYSE American.

 

We chose to retain Dr. Powers as a member of Nominating and Corporate Governance Committees as the board believes his expertise continues to be valuable in these areas even though he is no longer an independent director.

 

53

 

Board Leadership Structure and Role in Risk Oversight

 

Although we have not adopted a formal policy on whether the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer positions should be separate or combined, we have determined that it is in our best interests and the best interests of our shareholders to separate these roles at this time. Mr. Rampertab currently serves as our Interim Chief Executive Officer and Mr. Rowe serves as Chairman of our board of directors.

 

Our board of directors is primarily responsible for overseeing our risk management processes. The board of directors receives and reviews periodic reports from management, auditors, legal counsel, and others, as considered appropriate regarding our assessment of risks. The board of directors focuses on the most significant risks facing our general risk management strategy, and us and also ensures that risks undertaken by us are consistent with the board’s appetite for risk. While the board oversees our risk management, management is responsible for day-to-day risk management processes. We believe that this division of responsibilities is the most effective approach for addressing the risks facing us and that our board leadership structure supports this approach.

 

 

Item 11.Executive Compensation

 

EXECUTIVE AND DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

 

The following table shows the compensation for each of the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 awarded to or earned by our principal executive officer and our two other most highly compensated executive officers who were serving as executive officers as of December 31, 2019. The persons listed in the following table are referred to herein as the “named executive officers.”

 

Name and Principal Position      Salary  Bonus  Option  All Other  Total
            Awards(4)  Compensation(5)   
      ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)  ($)
Gerald Solensky, Jr.(1)                            
(Former) Chairman of the Board  2018   309,737    70,000        24,000    403,737 
(Former) Chief Exectuive Officer  2019   334,610    30,000    812,490    336,730    1,513,830 
Shameze Rampertab(2)                            
Interim Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial  2018   242,128    72,625        7,390    322,143 
Officer, Corporate Secretary and Director  2019   226,261    31,289    367,555    8,013    633,118 
Stephanie Morley(3)                            
President and Chief Operations Officer  2018   202,596    70,000        24,000    296,596 
   2019   207,292    30,000    448,212    26,082    711,586 

 

__________________

 

(1) Mr. Solensky received no compensation for his services as our President and Chief Executive Officer prior to December 31, 2015, other than a payment in the amount of $4,238, which he subsequently gifted back to ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. Mr. Solensky entered into an employment agreement in December 2016 and amended in January 2017 pursuant to which he receives an annual salary of $285,000 and a monthly car allowance of $2,000. 

 

(2) Dr. Morley began serving as a consultant in July 2015 and received consulting fees of cash of $16,822 and 329,636 of common shares having a value of $22,600 at the times of issuance. She was appointed Chief Operating Officer of ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. in October 2015.  In connection with her appointment, she received a signing bonus consisting of 485,944 common shares having a value of $87,400 at the time of issuance.  Dr. Morley entered into an employment agreement with ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in October 2015 pursuant to which she receives an annual salary of $150,000 per annum, which was increased to $200,000 effective July 2017. Dr. Morley also received a monthly allowance of $2,000 effective July 2017 for vehicle and tax preparation.

 

 (3) Mr. DiMarzo began serving as a consultant in October 2016 and received consulting fees of cash of $50,958 and options to purchase 100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $1.13. He was appointed Executive Vice President of Global Strategy of ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in February 2017 pursuant ot which he receives an annual salary of $215,000 and a monthly allowance of $4,000 for vehicle, insurance and tax preparation.

 

 (4) All Other Compensation represents consulting fees and monthly allowances.

 

54

 

Employment and Consulting Agreements

 

Gerald Solensky Jr.

 

In December 2016, we entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Solensky, which was amended in August 2017 and July 2018 pursuant to which Mr. Solensky served as our President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Solensky’s amended employment agreement had an unspecified term and provided him with an annual base salary of $325,000 plus quarterly bonuses and participation in our employee benefit plan. In addition, we agreed to pay Mr. Solensky a $2,000 monthly car allowance and four weeks of paid vacation. Pursuant to Mr. Solensky’s amended employment agreement, any options granted to him were subject to accelerated vesting upon a change of control, a resolution of our board in anticipation of a change of control, our termination of his employment without cause or his resignation for good reason. Mr. Solensky’s employment agreement also included customary non-solicitation, confidentiality and assignment of inventions provisions. In the event that we terminated Mr. Solensky’s employment without cause or he resigns for good reason, we were required to pay him twelve months base salary and any quarterly bonus allocable or payable prior to termination.

 

In connection with his resignation as an officer and director of our company, we entered into a separation agreement with Mr. Solensky which provided for severance payments to Mr. Solensky of $338,286, in two tranches all of which have been paid. We also entered into a cooperation agreement, or the cooperation agreement, with Mr. Solensky which includes the following provisions:

 

  •  A restriction on the ability of Mr. Solensky to sell his common shares, subject to permitted exceptions. Exceptions include certain transfers to Equidebt LLC, which has a credit facility with us, and a transfer process whereby we are permitted to designate a proposed purchaser of any shares that Mr. Solensky intends to sell. 
     
   • A commitment to vote his common shares in support of matters proposed by the Board of Directors at shareholder meetings, including directors proposed for election by the Board.
     
   • Certain restrictions in relation to actions as shareholder, including supporting any person who intends to contest the election of our directors or making any proposal in respect of a merger transaction.

 

The cooperation agreement has a term that expires on our second annual shareholder meeting, subject to early termination if Mr. Solensky ceases to own 10% of our outstanding common shares. We also entered into a consulting agreement with Mr. Solensky under which he agreed to provide certain consulting services to us upon our request for a period specified in the consulting agreement.

 

Shameze Rampertab

 

In July 2016, we entered into a written employment agreement with Mr. Rampertab pursuant to which Mr. Rampertab serves as our Chief Financial Officer. Mr. Rampertab’s employment agreement was amended in November 2016 with an unspecified term and provides him with an annual base salary of $225,563 plus quarterly bonuses and other plans provided to senior executives. In addition, we agreed to pay Mr. Rampertab a $602 monthly car allowance, premiums covering medical, dental and disability insurance and reimbursements to travel expenses along with four weeks of paid vacation. Pursuant to Mr. Rampertab's employment agreement, any options granted to him will be subject to accelerated vesting upon a change of control, a resolution of the Board of Directors in anticipation of a change of control or the Corporation's termination without cause or constructive termination of Mr. Rampertab's employment. Mr. Rampertab's employment agreement also includes customary non-solicitation, confidentiality and assignment of inventions provisions. If we constructively terminate Mr. Rampertab or terminate Mr. Rampertab's employment for any reason other than death or just cause, we are required to pay Mr. Rampertab for his accrued vacation along with the product of multiplying 10.35 by the sum of Mr. Rampertab's then current salary, monthly car allowance and a monthly average of the bonus amounts payable in the previous twelve months. In the event of a change of control, the board must consider additional bonus payments to Mr. Rampertab. In December of 2019, Mr. Rampertab was named Interim Chief Financial Officer. No changes were made to his employment agreement.

 

55

 

Stephanie Morley

 

In connection with her appointment as President Dr. Morley entered into a new employment agreement with us, which has an initial term of three years and and automatically extends for one-year terms unless either party elects to terminate it. Under the agreement, Dr Morley will receive an annual base salary of $225,000, subject to annual review and will be entitled to quarterly cash bonuses upon the achievement of certain specified objectives established by the Board. Pursuant to the agreement, Dr. Morley will receive a $2,000 monthly allowance in respect of the following items: (i) vehicle and (ii) tax preparation. Dr. Morley is entitled to four weeks paid vacation time. Pursuant to the agreement, any options granted to Dr. Morley will be subject to accelerated vesting in the event that Dr. Morley’s employment is terminated by us without cause. The agreement also includes customary non-solicitation, confidentiality and assignment of inventions provisions. In the event that Dr. Morley has a “separation from service” within the meaning of Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, Dr. Morley would have the right to exercise all of her options, and we would be required to pay her a lump sum equal to 12 months of her base salary and any quarterly bonus allocable or payable prior to the date of termination.

 

Bruk Herbst

 

In July 2017, we entered into a written employment agreement with Mr. Herbst pursuant to which Mr. Herbst serves as our Chief Commercial Officer. Under the agreement, Mr. Herbst receives an annual base salary of $150,000, subject to annual review and will be entitled to quarterly cash bonuses upon the achievement of certain specified objectives established by the Board. Mr. Herbst also receives a $4,000 monthly allowance in respect of the following items: (i) vehicle and (ii) tax preparation. Mr. Herbst is entitled to three weeks paid vacation time. Pursuant to the agreement, any options granted to Mr. Herbst will be subject to accelerated vesting in the event that Mr. Herbst’s employment is terminated by us without cause. The agreement also includes customary non-solicitation, confidentiality and assignment of inventions provisions. In the event that Mr. Herbst has a “separation from service” within the meaning of Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, Mr. Herbst would have the right to exercise all of his options, and we would be required to pay him a lump sum equal to 12 months of his base salary and any quarterly bonus allocable or payable prior to the date of termination.

 

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

 

The following table sets forth certain information, on an award-by-award basis, concerning outstanding equity awards for each named executive officer as of December 31, 2019.

 

   Option awards  Stock awards
Name  Number of securities underlying unexercised options (#) exercisable  Number of securities underlying options (#) unexercisable  Equity incentive plan awards: number of securities underlying unexercised unearned options (#)  Option exercise price ($)  Option expiration date  Number of shares or units of stock that have not vested (#)  Market value of shares of units of stock that have not vested ($)  Equity incentive plan awards: number of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested (#)  Equity incentive plan awards: market or payout value of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested ($)
Gerald Solensky, Jr.(1)   1,705,265            1.52   1/10/2021                
Shameze Rampertab (1)   950,000            1.52   1/10/2021                
Stephanie Morley (1)   900,000            1.52   1/10/2021                
Bruk Herbst (1)   300,000            1.52   1/10/2021                
Stephanie Morley (2)   500,000            0.43   9/16/2021                

__________________

 

(1)Stock options vest immediately upon issue, with an issue date of January 10, 2019, and expire on January 10, 2021.
(2)Stock options vest immediately upon issue, with an issue date of September 16, 2019 and expire on September 16, 2021.

 

56

 

Equity Compensation Plan Information

 

The following table provides information, as of December 31, 2019, with respect to all compensation arrangements maintained by us, including individual compensation arrangements, under which shares are authorized for issuance.

 

Plan Category    Number of Securities to be issued upon outstanding options rights      Weighted-average exercise price outstanding options and rights      Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in columns (a))  
     (a)      (b)      (c)  
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders   7,040,265   $1.29    0 
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders   Nil    N/A    Nil 
Total   7,040,265   $1.29    0 

 

Stock Option Plans

 

As of December 31, 2015, Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp (formerly, Wise Oakwood Ventures Inc.), had a shareholder-approved option plan, or the WOW Plan, pursuant to which options to purchase 200,000 common shares were outstanding. The terms of the WOW Plan were substantially similar to those of our current Stock Option Plan. In connection with the Qualifying Transaction, these options were consolidated into options to purchase 80,000 common shares of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and fully exercised and the WOW Plan was terminated.

 

In April 2016, concurrent with the completion of the Qualifying Transaction, we adopted a new equity stock option plan, the Stock Option Plan. The Stock Option Plan was approved by our shareholders. The purpose of the Stock Option Plan is to attract and retain employees, consultants, officers and directors to our company and to motivate them to advance the interests of our company by affording them with the opportunity, through share options, to acquire an equity interest in our company and benefit from its growth.

 

Administration. The Stock Option Plan is administered by our board of directors. Our board of directors may grant options to purchase shares of our common shares or such other shares as may substitute therefore in the capital of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. Our board of directors also has authority to determine the terms and conditions of each award, prescribe, amend and rescind rules and regulations relating to the Stock Option Plan, and amend the terms of awards (provided that no amendment may materially prejudice the rights of a participant without consent such participant’s consent). Our board of directors may delegate authority to a committee of our directors or to an officer. Our board or directors may terminate the Stock Option Plan.

 

Eligibility. Persons eligible to receive awards under the Stock Option Plan include any person who is an employee, officer, director or consultant provided that any consultant has performed and/or continues to perform services for our company under a written agreement and on an ongoing basis or is expected to provide a service to our company.

 

Shares Subject to the Stock Option Plan. The aggregate number of shares of common shares available for issuance in connection with options and awards granted under the Stock Option Plan is ten percent of the total number of issued and outstanding common shares calculated on a non-diluted basis. If any award of options granted under the Stock Option Plan expires or terminates without having been fully exercised, that number of common shares shall become available for the purpose of future grants under the Stock Option Plan.

 

Terms and Conditions of Options. Our board of directors will determine the exercise price of options granted under the Stock Option Plan. The exercise price of stock options may not be less than that from time to time permitted under the rules of any stock exchange on which the common shares are then listed. In addition, the exercise price of an option must be paid in cash.

 

The number of common shares subject to each option shall be determined by our board of directors with the following limitations. The number of common shares reserved for issuance to any one individual, consultant, person conducting investor relations or insider (as defined in the Securities Act (Alberta)) in a 12-month period may not exceed 5%, 2%, 2% and 10%, respectively, of the issued and outstanding common shares at the time of the grant.

 

57

 

No option may be exercisable for more than ten years from the date of grant. Options granted under the Stock Option Plan will be exercisable at such time or times as our board of directors prescribes at the time of grant. Options shall only be exercised by the participant as long as the optionee remains or was within the last ninety days an employee, officer, director or consultant, if the optionee dies, within one year of the optionee's death or if an optionee is engaged in investor relations activities, within 30 days of being so engaged by our company.

 

All benefits, rights and options accruing under the Stock Option Plan are non-transferrable and non-assignable unless specifically provided in the grant. During the lifetime of a participant, any options granted under the Stock Option Plan may only be exercised by the participant and in the event of the death of a participant, by the person or persons to whom the participant's rights under the option pass by the participant's will or applicable law.

 

Effect of Certain Corporate Transactions. In the event of a sale by our company of all or substantially all of its assets or in the event of a change of control (as defined in the Stock Option Plan) of our company, each participant shall be entitled to exercise, in whole or in part, the options granted to such participant under the Stock Option Plan, either during the term of the option or within ninety days after the date of the sale or change of control, whichever first occurs.

 

Director Compensation

 

We have not established a formal compensation policy for our outside directors. Set forth below is information concerning the compensation of directors, other than directors who are our employees, paid during the year ended December 31, 2019:

 

On January 10, 2019, we granted the following options to our non-employee directors:

 

·Mr. LeBar - options to acquire 400,000 common shares,
·Mr. Williams - options to acquire 400,000 common shares,
·Mr. Rowe - options to acquire 350,000 common shares.

 

Each of these options had an exercise price $1.52 per common share, were immediately exercisable and expire two years from the date of grant.

 

On August 16, 2019, we granted the following options to Dr. Powers in connection with his appointment as a director of our company: - options to acquire 500,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.26 per common share; options to acquire 100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.35 per common share; options to acquire 100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.45 per common share; options to acquire 100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.55 per common share; options to acquire100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.65 per common share; and options to acquire 100,000 common shares at an exercise price of $0.75 per common share. Each of these options were immediately exercisable and expire two years from the date of grant.

 

The table below summarizes the compensation we paid to our non-employee directors in 2019.

 

Name  Fees earned or
paid in cash ($)
  Stock Awards
($)
  Option Awards
($)
  Total ($)
Jim Lebar          $156,204   $156,204 
Rod Williams          $156,204   $156,204 
Jeff Rowe          $136,678   $136,678 
Johnny D. Powers          $97,986   $97,986 

 

58

 

On December 3, 2019, we named Dr. Powers as a Strategic Advisor to provide day-to-day strategic oversight and management guidance to Mr. Rampertab as Interim Chief Executive Officer. In connection therewith, we entered into a strategic advisory agreement with Dr. Powers pursuant to which we agreed to pay him the following compensation:

 

·The sum of $190 per hour, billable in increments of one-quarter of an hour;
·An option grant of 250,000 options to acquire common shares, with an exercise price at fair market value, a two-year term and full vesting on date of grant, subject to establishment and approval by the Board of Directors accordance with the stock option plan;
·Reimbursement for travel expenses, food, lodging, any per diem allowance, equipment, supplies, or similar items

 

As of December 31, 2019, Dr. Powers had not received any compensation under this agreement.

 

 

Item 12.Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters. 

 

The table below sets forth certain information with respect to beneficial ownership of our securities as of February 26, 2020 by:

 

  · each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our issued and outstanding common shares;
  · each of our executive officers and directors; and
  · all executive officers and directors as a group.

 

The number of shares beneficially owned by each shareholder is determined in accordance with SEC rules. Under these rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which a person has sole or shared voting power or investment power. Percentage ownership is based on 128,871,732 common shares outstanding on February 26, 2020. In computing the number of shares beneficially owned by a person and the percentage ownership of that person, common shares subject to stock options, warrants or other rights held by such person that are currently convertible or exercisable or will become convertible or exercisable within 60 days of February 26, 2020 are considered outstanding, although these shares are not considered outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of any other person.

 

Unless otherwise stated, the address of each 5% or greater beneficial holder is c/o Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp., 100 Phoenix Drive, Suite 180, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108. We believe, based on information provided to us that each of the shareholders listed below has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares beneficially owned by the shareholder unless noted otherwise, subject to community property laws where applicable.

 

59

 

   Beneficial Ownership
Name of Selling Shareholder    Number of Shares Beneficially Owned      Percentage of Total Outstanding Common Shares  
Gerald Solensky Jr. (1)   40,250,936    30.94%
Sabby Volatility Warrant Master Fund, Ltd.   8,333,334    6.49%
Jeffrey S. Starman (8)   9,287,869    7.24%
Bradly J. Hayosh (8)   9,134,655    7.12%
Armistice Capital Master Fund Ltd.   6,768,444    5.27%
           
Jeffrey Rowe (2)    12,590,480    9.78%
Stephanie Laine Morley (3)   2,864,580    2.21%
Shameze Rampertab (4)   1,293,000    1.00%
Johnny D. Powers (5)   1,000,000    * 
Bruk Herbst (6)   365,996    * 
James LeBar (7)   420,000    * 
Rodney Williams (8)   601,900    * 
           
All executive officers and directors as a group (seven persons)   19,135,956    14.84%

 

*Less than one percent.

 

(1) Includes options to purchase 1,705,265 common shares.

 

(2) Includes 11,120,000 common shares held in the Rowe Family GST Trust, 664,480 common shares held by the Jeffrey M. Rowe U/T/A dated November 5, 2004 (the “Jeffrey M. Rowe Living Trust”) and 181,000 common shares held by Mr. Rowe through his IRA. Mr. Rowe’s sister, Michele Ramo, serves as trustee to the Rowe Family GST Trust with Mr. Rowe’s oversight. Mr. Rowe has disclaimed all beneficial ownership of the common shares held in the Rowe Family GST Trust except to the extent of his pecuniary interest therein. Mr. Rowe serves as trustee to the Jeffrey M. Rowe Living Trust and exclusively makes all investment decisions on behalf of this trust. Mr. Rowe also has options to purchase 350,000 common shares.

 

(3) Includes options to purchase 1,400,000 common shares, 641,685 common shares held by The Dr. Stephanie Morley Revocable Living Trust and 5,000 common shares held by Dr. Morley’s children

 

(4) Includes options to purchase 950,000 common shares and 3,000 common shares held by Mr. Rampertab’s children.

 

(5) Includes options to purchase 1,000,000 common shares.

 

(6) Includes options to purchase 300,000 common shares and 3,000 common shares held by Mr. Herbst’s children.

 

(7) Includes options to purchase 400,000 common shares.

 

(8) Includes 40,000 common shares held by Entrust Group Inc. FBO Rodney James Williams IRA and options to purchase 400,000 common shares

 

(9) Includes (i) 8,952,493 common shares held by Equidebt LLC (“Equidebt”), (ii) 25,874 common shares held by Wickfield Properties, LLC (“Wickfield”), and (iii) 37,195 common shares held by Lakeview Asset Management LLC (“Lakeview”). Messrs. Hayosh and Starman are Managers of Equidebt and Wickfield and share voting and dispositive power over the common shares held by Equidebt and Wickfield. Mr. Hayosh and JH5 Family LLC (“JH5”) each own a 50% membership interest in Lakeview. Mr. Hayosh has sole dispositive power over the common shares held by Lakeview, and Mr. Starman owns a 39.5% interest in JH5. Mr. Hayosh and Mr. Starman may be deemed to own beneficially the shares held by Lakeview. Also includes 167,845 common shares owned by Mr. Hayosh.

 

60

 

Item 13.Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

 

Other than compensation arrangements for our named executive officers and directors, we describe below each transaction or series of transactions, since January 1, 2019, to which we were a party or will be a party, in which:

 

·the amounts involved exceeded or will exceed $120,000; and

 

·any of our directors, executive officers or holders of more than 5% of our common shares, or any member of the immediate family of the foregoing persons, had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

Compensation arrangements for our named executive officers and directors are described in Item 11 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Equidebt Working Capital Facility 

 

On September 1, 2017, Equidebt LLC, or Equidebt, one of our shareholders, which is controlled by Bradley J. Hayosh and Jeffrey S. Starman, entered into a Loan Agreement, or the Loan Agreement, with Mr. Solensky pursuant to which Equidebt agreed to provide Mr. Solensky with an unsecured line of credit in the amount of $5,000,000 for the purpose of enabling Mr. Solensky to exercise options to purchase up to 950,000 common shares expiring on December 21, 2018 and to purchase additional common shares from us from time to time, or the line of credit. Amounts borrowed under the line of credit were to bear interest at a rate of 14% per annum payable at maturity. In addition, Mr. Solensky was required to pay Equidebt a monthly maintenance fee of $6,250 per month payable at maturity. All amounts borrowed under the line of credit were to become due and payable on September 1, 2022. Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default (defined in the Loan Agreement to include Mr. Solensky’s failure to make payments under the line of credit or his other indebtedness when due, the occurrence of certain insolvency events relating to Mr. Solensky or the occurrence of a substantial change in the existing or prospective financial condition or net worth of Mr. Solensky which Equidebt determines to be materially adverse), Equidebt had the right to declare all amounts outstanding under the line of credit immediately due and payable. We were not a party to the line of credit, which was full recourse against Mr. Solensky.

 

As a result of discussions with the NYSE American in connection with our application to list our common shares, we restructured and replaced the line of credit. Accordingly, on October 17, 2017, we entered into a Loan Agreement, or the Working Capital Loan Agreement, with Equidebt pursuant to which Equidebt agreed to provide us with a five-year $5,000,000 unsecured working capital line of credit, or the working capital line of credit. Amounts borrowed under the working capital line of credit bear interest at a rate of 14% per annum payable at maturity. All amounts borrowed under the line of credit become due and payable on October 17, 2022. Upon the occurrence of an Event of Default (defined in the Working Capital Loan Agreement to include our failure to make payments under the working capital line of credit or our other indebtedness when due, the occurrence of certain insolvency events relating to us, Equidebt has the right to declare all amounts outstanding under the working capital line of credit immediately due and payable. No amounts were outstanding under the Equidebt Facility at December 31, 2019.

 

In May 2018, we announced that we had commenced a private offering to accredited investors in the United States of up to 4,651,162 common shares at a price of $2.15 per share for aggregate gross proceeds of up to $10.0 million (the “May 2018 Private Placement”). We sold an aggregate of 1,861,627 common shares in the May 2018 Private Placement for gross proceeds of approximately $4.0 million. The 1,861,627 common shares are covered by the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-3 filed with the Commission on February 7, 2019 (File No. 333-229014). In connection with our May 2018 private placement, Equidebt LLC acquired 1,209,302 of our common shares at a price of $2.15 per share for total proceeds of approximately $2.6 million.

 

61

 

Wickfield Phoenix LLC Lease Agreement 

 

Wickfield Phoenix LLC is an affiliate of Wickfield Properties, LLC, which is controlled by Bradley J. Hayosh and Jeffrey S. Starman, who beneficially own over 5% of the common shares. On February 1, 2020 we entered into a new lease with Wickfield Phoenix LLC for 16,226 square feet of office space and cancelled our existing lease with Wickfield Phoenix LLC. The new lease period is for 60 months, commencing on February 1, 2020 and ending on January 31, 2025 with a monthly rent payment of $32,452. Upon cancellation of our existing lease, we received a refund of prepaid rent in the amount of $1,002,113.

 

Item 14.Principal Accounting Fees and Services.

 

The following table represents aggregate fees billed to the Company for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 by MNP LLP, the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm.

 

   Year Ended December 31,
   2019  2018
Audit Fees  $78,241   $81,224 
Audit Related Fees   68,207    58,837 
Tax Fees   7,469    7,553 
All Other Fees   35,692    8,546 
Total Fees  $189,609   $156,160 

 

Audit Fees consist of fees for professional services and expenses relating to the audit of our annual financial statements, the audit of our internal control over financial reporting and the review of our quarterly financial information.

 

Audit Related Fees consist of fees for professional services and expenses reasonably relating to the audit of our annual financial statements or the review of our quarterly financial information and are not reported as Audit Fees.

 

Tax Fees are for tax-related services related primarily to tax consulting and tax planning.

 

All Other Fees consist of fees for products and services which are not included in the previous three categories. These services include review of financial data included in our registrations filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and review of certain information in connection with our 2018 private placements.

 

The Audit Committee pre-approves all auditing services and any non-audit services that the independent registered public accounting firm is permitted to render under Section 10A(h) of the Exchange Act.

 

The Audit Committee has considered whether the provision of non-audit services is compatible with maintaining the independence of MNP LLP and has concluded that the provision of such services is compatible with maintaining the independence of our auditors. All such services were approved by the Audit Committee pursuant to Rule 2-01 of Regulation S-X under the Exchange Act to the extent that rule was applicable.

 

62

 

PART IV

 

Item 15.Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.

 

 

(a) The following documents are included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K

 

(1)-(2) Financial Statements

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-5
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 F-6
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018   F-7
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements F-8

 

Exhibit   Description
Number    
1.1   Sales Agreement, dated December 7, 2018, by and between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 1.1 to the Company’s Registrations Statement on Form S-3 filed with the Commission on December 20, 2018 (File No. 333-228926))
3.1   Articles of Amalgamation of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
3.2   Amended and Restated By-Law No. 1 of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
3.3   Certificate of Amendment and Registration of Restated Articles of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
3.4   Certificate of Amalgamation of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.4 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
3.5   Articles of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.5 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on May 10, 2019 (File No. 001-38298))
4.1*   Description of Securities
10.1+   Executive Employment Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Shameze Rampertab (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.2+   Amendment No. 1 to Executive Employment Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Shameze Rampertab (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.3+   Employment Agreement between ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Stephanie Morley (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409)) 

 

63

 

10.4+   Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.5+   Executive Employment Agreement between ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Bruk Herbst (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.16 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.6   Loan Agreement, dated October 17, 2017, by and between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Equidebt LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.20 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.7   Line of Credit Promissory Note, dated October 17, 2017, from Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. in favor of Equidebt LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.21 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on November 20, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
10.8#   Development, Commercialization and Exclusive Distribution Agreement, dated May 10, 2018, by and between Seraph Biosciences, Inc. and Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.24 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on August 19, 2018 (File No. 001-38298))
10.9#   Development and supply agreement with Qorvo Biotechnologies, LLC
10.10   Form of Preferred Share Subscription Agreement for May 2019 Offering (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.29 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on May 10, 2019 (File No. 001-38298))
10.11+   Executive Employment Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Stephanie Morley (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.30 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on September 17, 2019).
10.12+   Separation Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Gerald L. Solensky (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Filing Statement on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on December 3, 2019 (File No 001-38298))
10.13+   Cooperation Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp and Gerald L. Solensky (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Filing Statement on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on December 3, 2019 (File No 001-38298))
10.14+   Consulting Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp and Gerald L. Solensky (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Filing Statement on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on December 3, 2019 (File No 001-38298))
10.15*^   Amended and Restated Exclusive License and Supply Agreement, dated January 17, 2020, by and between Celsee, Inc. and Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. 
10.16*   Lease Agreement for 100 Phoenix Drive, Ann Arbor, 48108
10.17*   Consulting Agreement between Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and Johnny D. Powers
21.1   List of Subsidiaries (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 21.1 to the Company's Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed with the Commission on April 21, 2017 (File No. 333-217409))
23.1**   Consent of MNP LLP
31.1**   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1**   Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, 18 U.S.C. Section 1350

 

101.INS   XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

The registrant has received confidential treatment for certain portions of this exhibit.
+ Indicates management contract or compensatory plan.
* Filed herewith.
** Furnished herewith.
^ Certain identified information has been excluded from this exhibit because it is both (i) not material and (ii) would be competitively harmful if publicly disclosed.

 

 

Item 16.Form 10-K Summary.

 

None.

 

64

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  ZOMEDICA PHARMACEUTICALS CORP.
       
  By:   /s/ Shameze Rampertab  
    Name:  Shameze Rampertab  
    Title:  Chief Financial Officer and Interim Chief Executive Officer  

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
         
/s/ Shameze Rampertab        
Shameze Rampertab    Interim Chief Executive Officer   February 26, 2020
    (principal executive officer)    
/s/ Shameze Rampertab        
Shameze Rampertab   Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Secretary and Director   February 26, 2020
    (principal financial and accounting officer)    
         
/s/ James LeBar        
James LeBar   Director   February 26, 2020
         
/s/ Rodney Williams         
Rodney Williams   Director   February 26, 2020 
         
/s/ Jeffrey Rowe        
Jeffrey Rowe   Director   February 26, 2020
         
/s/ Johnny D. Powers        
Johnny D. Powers   Director   February 26, 2020
         

 

 

 

65

 

 

 

 

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.

 

 

Consolidated financial statements

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

(Expressed in United States Dollars, except as otherwise noted)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.:

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”), which comprise the consolidated balance sheets as at December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as at December 31, 2019 and 2018, and its consolidated results of operations and its consolidated cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (US GAAP).

 

Material Uncertainty Related to Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company’s recurring losses from operations raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans concerning these matters are also discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ MNP LLP
 

Chartered Professional Accountants

Licensed Professional Accountants

 

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2015.

 

Toronto, Canada

February 26, 2020

 

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Consolidated balance sheets
As at December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

 

        December 31,      December 31,  
   Note    2019      2018  
          
Assets               
                
Current assets:               
Cash and cash equivalents       $510,586   $1,940,265 
Prepaid expenses, deposits and deferred financing costs   5    1,228,585    1,867,034 
Tax credits receivable        67,618    53,659 
         1,806,789    3,860,958 
                
Prepaid expenses, deposits and deferred financing costs   5    -    1,442,415 
Property and equipment   6    729,142    717,088 
Right-of-use asset   8    1,103,658    - 
Intangible assets   7    543,395    13,058 
        $4,182,984   $6,033,519 
                
Liabilities and shareholders' equity               
                
Current liabilities:               
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities       $2,087,525   $2,376,519 
         2,087,525    2,376,519 
                
Shareholders' equity:               
Capital stock               
Series 1 preferred shares, without par value; 20 shares authorized (2018 - nil) Issued and outstanding 12 series 1 preferred shares (2018 - nil)   10   $11,961,397   $- 
Unlimited common shares without par value; Issued and outstanding 108,038,398  common shares (2018 - 97,598,898)   11    38,566,820    30,410,648 
Common stock subscribed        -    4,280,000 
Additional paid-in capital   12    3,625,083    1,240,139 
Accumulated deficit        (52,057,841)   (32,273,787)
         2,095,459    3,657,000 
                
        $4,182,984   $6,033,519 

 

Signed on behalf of the Board:

 

“Jeff Rowe” “ Rod Williams”
Chairman of the Board Director

 

Nature of operations and going concern (Note 1)

Commitments and contingencies (Note 15)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-2 

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

        December 31,      December 31,  
   Note    2019      2018  
          
Expenses:               
Research and development   18   $10,345,291   $10,317,153 
General and administrative   18    7,114,777    4,521,349 
Professional fees   18    1,536,646    1,534,977 
Amortization - right-of-use asset   7    509,381    - 
Amortization - intangible asset   7    1,082    2,083 
Depreciation   6    277,150    203,684 
Loss from operations        19,784,327    16,579,246 
Loss on fixed assets   6    1,308    69,382 
Interest expense        18,338    - 
Gain on settlement of liabilities        (19,737)   - 
Foreign exchange gain        (182)   (941)
Loss before income taxes        19,784,054    16,647,687 
Income tax expense   14    -    - 
Net loss and comprehensive loss       $19,784,054   $16,647,687 
                
Weighted average number of common shares - basic and diluted        106,297,975    93,440,341 
                
Loss per share - basic and diluted       $(0.19)  $(0.18)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-3 

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Consolidated statements of shareholders’ equity
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

      Series 1 preferred stock  Common stock            
   Note    Shares      Amount      Shares      Amount      Common stock subscribed      Additional paid-in capital      Accumulated deficit      Total  
Balance at December 31, 2017        -   $-    90,225,869   $18,244,659   $-   $1,768,526   $(15,626,100)  $4,387,085 
Stock issuance for services        -    -    3,207,506    5,651,671    -    -    -    5,651,671 
Stock issuance for financing, net of cost        -    -    1,861,627    3,944,336    -    -    -    3,944,336 
Stock-based compensation   13    -    -    -    -    -    7,288    -    7,288 
Stock issuance due to exercise of options   11,13    -    -    2,303,896    2,569,982    -    (535,675)   -    2,034,307 
Common stock subscribed                            4,280,000              4,280,000 
Net loss        -    -    -    -    -    -    (16,647,687)   (16,647,687)
Balance at December 31, 2018        -   $-   97,598,898   $30,410,648   $4,280,000   $1,240,139   $(32,273,787)  $3,657,000 
Stock issuance for services   11    -    -    707,236    792,104    -    -    -    792,104 
Stock issuance for financing, net of cost   10,11    12    11,961,397    9,337,529    6,609,920    (4,280,000)   -    -    14,291,317 
Stock-based compensation   13    -    -    -    -    -    2,539,092    -    2,539,092 
Stock issuance due to exercise of options   11,13    -    -    394,735    754,148    -    (154,148)   -    600,000 
Net loss        -    -    -    -    -    -    (19,784,054)   (19,784,054)
Balance at December 31, 2019        12   $11,961,397    108,038,398   $38,566,820   $-   $3,625,083   $(52,057,841)  $2,095,459 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-4 

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Consolidated statements of cash flows
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

   Note    2019      2018  
          
Cash flows used in operating activities:               
Net loss       $(19,784,054)  $(16,647,687)
Adjustments for               
Depreciation   6    277,150    203,684 
Amortization - intangible assets   7    1,082    2,083 
Amortization - right-of-use asset        509,381    - 
Loss on fixed asets        1,308    69,382 
Stock issued for services   11    792,104    5,651,671 
Stock-based compensation   13    2,539,092    7,288 
Change in non-cash operating working capital               
Trade and other receivable        (13,959)   (25,387)
Prepaid expenses        239,953    (124,230)
Deposits        92,873    (1,832,114)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities        (288,994)   1,547,782 
         (15,634,064)   (11,147,528)
                
Cash flows from financing activities:               
Cash proceeds from issuance of preferred shares   10    12,000,000    - 
Cash proceeds from issuance of common shares   11    3,000,000    8,282,496 
Cash received from stock option exercises        600,000    2,034,307 
Cash paid on stock issuance costs        (708,683)   (58,160)
         14,891,317    10,258,643 
                
Cash flows used in investing activities:               
Cash received from sale of fixed assets   6    -    9,000 
Investment in intangibles   7    (531,419)   - 
Investment in property and equipment   6    (155,513)   (627,997)
         (686,932)   (618,997)
                
Decrease in cash and cash equivalents        (1,429,679)   (1,507,882)
                
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year        1,940,265    3,448,147 
                
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year       $510,586   $1,940,265 
                
Supplemental cash flow information:               
                
Interest Paid       $18,338   $- 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

F-5

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

1.Nature of operations and going concern

 

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. ("Zomedica" or the “Company”) was incorporated on January 7, 2013 under the Business Corporations Act (Alberta) as Wise Oakwood Ventures Inc. (“WOW”) and was classified as a capital pool company, as defined in Policy 2.4 of the TSX Venture Exchange. ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. was incorporated on May 14, 2015 under the Canada Business Corporations Act.

 

On April 21, 2016, the Company closed its qualifying transaction (“Transaction”), consisting of the acquisition of ZoMedica Pharmaceuticals Inc. (“ZoMedica”) pursuant to a three-cornered amalgamation, whereby ZoMedica was amalgamated with 9674128 Canada Inc. (which was wholly-owned by WOW) and common shares and options of the Company were issued to former holders of ZoMedica securities as consideration. The amalgamated company changed its name to Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Ltd. and WOW subsequently changed its name to Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. Prior to completion of the Transaction, WOW consolidated its common shares on the basis of the one post-consolidation common share for every 2.5 pre-consolidation common shares. The Transaction constituted WOW’s qualifying transaction under TSX Venture Exchange Policy 2.4 – Capital Pool Companies. The shares of Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. began trading on the TSX Venture Exchange under the new symbol “ZOM” on Monday, May 2, 2016. On June 21, 2016, the Company filed Articles of Amalgamation and vertically amalgamated with its wholly-owned subsidiary, Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Ltd.

 

Zomedica has one corporate subsidiary, Zomedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a Delaware company whose results and operations are included in these consolidated financial statements. The Company is a biopharmaceutical company targeting health and wellness solutions for the companion pet through a ground-breaking approach that focuses on the needs of the veterinarians themselves. Zomedica's head office is located at 100 Phoenix Drive, Suite 180, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 and its registered office is located at 3400, 350-7th Ave SW, Calgary, AB, T2P 3N9.

 

On November 20, 2017, Zomedica announced that its registration statement on Form S-1 was declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and on November 21, 2017, the Company’s common shares began trading on the NYSE under the symbol “ZOM”.

 

Going concern

 

The consolidated financial statements are prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that the Company will be able to realize its assets and meet its obligations in the normal course of operations for the foreseeable future. The Company has incurred losses from operations since inception and has an accumulated deficit of $52,057,841 as at December 31, 2019 (December 31, 2018 - $32,273,787). The Company has funded its research and development (“R&D”) activities principally through the issuance of securities and loans from related parties. There is no certainty that such funding will be available going forward. These conditions raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern and realize its assets and pay its liabilities as they become due.

 

In order for the Company to continue as a going concern and fund any significant expansion of its operations or R&D activities, the Company will require significant additional capital. The Company’s ultimate success will depend on whether its future product candidates receive the necessary regulatory approval and it is able to successfully market approved products. The Company cannot be certain that it will be able to receive regulatory approval for any of its future product candidates, or that it will reach the level of sales and revenues necessary to achieve and sustain profitability.

 

The availability of equity or debt financing will be affected by, among other things, the results of the Company’s research and development, its ability to obtain regulatory approvals, the market acceptance of its products, the state of the capital markets generally, strategic alliance agreements, and other relevant commercial considerations. In addition, if the Company raises additional funds by issuing equity securities,

F-6

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

1.Nature of operations and going concern (continued)

 

Going concern (continued)

 

its then existing security holders will likely experience dilution, and the incurring of indebtedness would result in increased debt service obligations and could require the Company to agree to operating and financial covenants that would restrict its operations. Any failure on its part to raise additional funds on terms favorable to the Company or at all, may require the Company to significantly change or curtail its current or planned operations in order to conserve cash until such time, if ever, that sufficient proceeds from operations are generated, and could result in the Company not taking advantage of business opportunities. There is no certainty the Company will be able to raise the necessary funds to continue operations as a going concern. These financial statements do not reflect adjustments, if any, which would be required to the carrying amounts or classification of assets and liabilities, or the amounts of reported expenses, should the use of the going concern assumption be determined not be appropriate. Such adjustments, if any, could be material.

 

2.Basis of preparation

 

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently in the consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”).

 

Basis of consolidation

 

These consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned operating subsidiary, Zomedica Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

All inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated on consolidation.

 

3.Significant accounting policies

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Areas where significant judgment is involved in making estimates are: the determination of fair value of stock-based compensation; the useful lives and recoverability of property and equipment; and forecasting future cash flows for assessing the going concern assumption.

 

Basis of measurement

 

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except as otherwise noted.

 

Functional and reporting currencies

 

The Company’s and subsidiary’s functional currency, as determined by management, is US dollars, which is also the Company’s reporting currency.

 

F-7

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

3.Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid securities with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of cash on hand and cash held in trust related to share issuances. The cash held in trust is readily available to the Company and is classified as current.

 

The financial risks associated with these instruments are minimal and the Company has not experienced any losses from investments in these securities.

 

Property and equipment

 

Property and equipment are carried at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Maintenance and repair expenditures that do not improve or extend the life are expensed in the period incurred.

 

Depreciation is recognized so as to write off the cost less their residual values over their useful lives, using the straight-line method. The estimated useful lives, residual values and depreciation methods are reviewed at the end of each year, with the effect of any changes in estimate accounted for on a prospective basis.

 

An item of property and equipment is derecognized upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on the disposal or retirement of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between the sales proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and is recognized in profit or loss.

 

Estimated useful lives for the principal asset categories are as follows:

 

Computer equipment (years)    3  
Furniture and equipment (years)  5 - 7
Laboratory equipment (years)  5 - 7
Leasehold improvements  Over shorter of estimated useful life and lease term

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. For assets that are to be held and used, impairment is recognized when the sum of estimated undiscounted future cash flows associated with the asset or group of assets is less than its carrying value. If impairment exists, an adjustment is made to write the asset down to its fair value, and a loss is recorded as the difference between the carrying value and fair value.

 

Research and development

 

Research and development costs related to continued research and development programs are expensed as incurred in accordance with ASC topic 730.

 

F-8

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

3.Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

Share issue costs

 

Share issue costs are recorded as a reduction of the proceeds from the issuance of capital stock.

 

Foreign currency

 

In respect of transactions denominated in currencies other than the Company and its wholly owned operating subsidiaries’ functional currencies, the monetary assets and liabilities are remeasured at the period end rates. Revenue and expenses are remeasured at rates of exchange prevailing on the transaction dates. All of the exchange gains or losses resulting from these transactions are recognized in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company measures the cost of equity-settled transactions by reference to the fair value of the equity instruments at the date at which they are granted if the fair value of the goods or services received by the Company cannot be reliably estimated.

 

The Company calculates stock-based compensation using the fair value method, under which the fair value of the options at the grant date is calculated using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model, and subsequently expensed over the vesting period of the option using the graded vesting method. The provisions of the Company's stock-based compensation plans do not require the Company to settle any options by transferring cash or other assets, and therefore the Company classifies the awards as equity. Stock-based compensation expense recognized during the period is based on the value of stock-based payment awards that are ultimately expected to vest.

 

The Company estimates forfeitures at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates.

 

Loss per share

 

Basic loss per share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing the loss attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through the exercise or conversion of stock options, restricted stock awards, warrants and convertible securities. In certain circumstances, the conversion of options is excluded from diluted EPS if the effect of such inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

 

The dilutive effect of stock options is determined using the treasury stock method. Stock options to purchase common shares of the Company during fiscal 2019 and 2018 were not included in the computation of diluted EPS because the Company has incurred a loss for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 and the effect would be anti-dilutive.

 

Comprehensive loss

 

The Company follows ASC topic 220. This statement establishes standards for reporting and display of comprehensive (loss) income and its components. Comprehensive loss is net loss plus certain items that are recorded directly to shareholders' equity. The Company has no other comprehensive loss items.

 

F-9

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

3.Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

Intangible assets

 

Intangible assets with finite useful lives that are acquired separately are carried at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses. Amortization is recognized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives. The estimated useful lives and amortization methods are reviewed at the end of each year, with the effect of any changes in estimate being accounted for on a prospective basis. Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives that are acquired separately are carried at cost less accumulated impairment losses.

 

Computer software and website (years)  3
Trademarks (years)  15

 

The Company has not yet commenced the amortization of the website as it is still in development.

 

Fair value measurement

 

Under ASC topic 820, fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date (i.e., an exit price). ASC topic 820 establishes a hierarchy for inputs to valuation techniques used in measuring fair value that maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the most observable inputs be used when available. Observable inputs are inputs that reflect assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability developed based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the Company's own assumptions about the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability developed based on the best information available in the circumstances. There are three levels to the hierarchy based on the reliability of inputs, as follows:

 

lLevel 1 - Observable inputs that reflect quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.
   
lLevel 2 - Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, or quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active.
   
lLevel 3 - Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

 

The degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for instruments categorized in Level 3.

 

Income taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with Accounting Standard Codification 740, Income Taxes ("ASC 740"), on a tax jurisdictional basis. The Company files income tax returns in Canada and the province of Alberta and its subsidiary files income tax returns in the United States and various states, including the headquarters in Michigan.

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their financial statement reported amounts using enacted tax rates and laws in effect in the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. A valuation allowance is provided against deferred tax assets when it is determined to be more likely than not that the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

F-10

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

3.Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

Income taxes (continued)

 

The Company assesses the likelihood of the financial statement effect of an uncertain tax position that should be recognized when it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination by a taxing authority based on the technical merits of the tax position, circumstances, and information available as of the reporting date. The Company is subject to examination by taxing authorities in jurisdictions such as the United States and Canada. Management does not believe that there are any uncertain tax positions that would result in an asset or liability for taxes being recognized in the accompanying consolidated financial statements. The Company recognizes tax-related interest and penalties, if any, as a component of income tax expense.

 

ASC 740 prescribes recognition threshold and measurement attributes for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. ASC 740 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in periods, disclosure and transition. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company has not taken any tax positions that would require disclosure under ASC 740.

 

Segmented reporting

 

The Company currently operates as a single segment. Its principal business relates to the discovery, development and commercialization of innovative pharmaceuticals for the companion pet.

 

Recently adopted accounting pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued new guidance, ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The new standard establishes a right-of-use model (“ROU”) that requires a lessee to recognize a ROU asset and lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with a term longer than 12 months. Leases will be classified as finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern and classification of expense recognition in the income statement. Additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures are also required by the new guidance.

 

A modified retrospective transition approach is required, applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. The Company adopted the new standard with an initial application date of January 1, 2019 and used the effective date as its date of initial application. Consequently, financial information was not updated, and the disclosures required under the new standard were not provided for dates and periods before January 1, 2019.

 

The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition. The Company has elected the ‘package of practical expedients’, which permits the Company not to reassess under the new standard prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification and initial direct costs. The Company has not elected the use-of-hindsight or the practical expedient pertaining to land easements; the latter not being applicable to the Company.

 

F-11

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

3.Significant accounting policies (continued)

 

Recently adopted accounting pronouncements (continued)

 

On August 29, 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, which amends ASC 350-40 to address a customer’s accounting for implementation costs incurred in a cloud computing arrangement (CCA) that is a service contract. ASU 2018-15 aligns the accounting for costs incurred to implement a CCA that is a service arrangement with the guidance on capitalizing costs associated with developing or obtaining internal-use software. Specifically, the ASU amends ASC 350 to include in its scope implementation costs of a CCA that is a service contract and clarifies that a customer should apply ASC 350-40 to determine which implementation costs should be capitalized in a CCA that is considered a service contract. The amendments in this update are effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company chose to early adopt this guidance on July 1, 2019 using the prospective transition method.

 

4.Critical accounting judgments and key sources of estimation uncertainty

 

The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and revenue and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and further periods if the review affects both current and future periods.

 

Critical areas of estimation and judgements in applying accounting policies include the following:

 

Going concern

 

These consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S GAAP on a going concern basis, which assumes the realization of assets and discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business within the foreseeable future. Management uses judgment in determining assumptions for cash flow projections, such as anticipated financing, anticipated sales and future commitments to assess the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. A critical judgment is that the Company continues to raise funds going forward and satisfy their obligations as they become due.

 

Useful lives and recoverability of property and equipment

 

As described in Note 3 above, the Company reviews the estimated useful lives of property and equipment with definite useful lives at the end of each year and assesses whether the useful lives of certain items should be shortened or extended, due to various factors including technology, competition and revised service offerings. During the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company was not required to adjust the useful lives of any assets based on the factors described above. Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. During the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, The Company did not identify any events or circumstances to indicate that the carrying value of property and equipment was not recoverable.

 

F-12

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

4.Critical accounting judgments and key sources of estimation uncertainty (continued)

 

Stock-based payments

 

The Company estimates the fair value of convertible securities such as options using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model which requires significant estimation around assumptions and inputs such as expected life, expected volatility, estimated forfeiture rates and expected dividends.

 

5.Prepaid expenses, deposits and deferred financing costs

 

     2019      2018  
Prepaid rent (i)  $-   $1,613,038 
Deposits (ii)   1,033,231    1,596,104 
Prepaid marketing (iii)   19,829    37,465 
Prepaid insurance (iii)   110,636    33,372 
Other (iv)   64,889    29,470 
Total  $1,228,585   $3,309,449 

 

(i)On July 31, 2018 the Company entered into an amended lease agreement with Wickfield Phoenix, LLC for an additional 18,640 square feet of office space. The Company prepaid the full outstanding balance of $1,269,073. As of January 1, 2019, the balance of the prepaid rent, inclusive of the original and amended lease amounts was $1,613,038. In accordance with the Company’s adoption of ASC 842 on January 1, 2019, this amount was reclassified as a right-of-use asset in the consolidated balance sheet. As of December 31, 2018, the Company classified $509,380 as a current asset in the consolidated balance sheet.;

(ii)Deposits include payments made to vendors in advance and are primarily associated with research activity, design fees for additional office space and equipment purchases. As of December 31, 2019, the Company classified all amounts as a current asset. As of December 31, 2018, $1,257,347 was classified as a current asset in the consolidated balance sheet;

(iii)As of December 31, 2019, and 2018, all amounts were classified as a current asset in the consolidated balance sheet;

(iv)Other is comprised of deferred financing costs, subscription payments and software licensing. As of December 31, 2019, and 2018, the Company classified all amounts as a current asset in the consolidated balance sheet.

 

F-13

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

6.Property and equipment

 

     Computer equipment      Furniture and equipment      Laboratory equipment      Leasehold improvements      Total  
Cost               
Balance at December 31, 2017  $151,155   $76,058   $245,729   $36,957   $509,899 
Additions   18,847    105,821    246,375    256,954    627,997 
Disposals   -    -    (139,467)   (10,936)   (150,403)
Balance at December 31, 2018   170,002    181,879    352,637    282,975    987,493 
Additions   218,076    3,415    3,350    65,672    290,513 
Disposals   (2,210)   -    -    -    (2,210)
Balance at December 31, 2019   385,868    185,294    355,987    348,647    1,275,796 
                          
Accumulated depreciation                         
Balance at December 31, 2017   42,802    11,845    74,875    9,220    138,742 
Depreciation   62,116    17,740    86,368    37,460    203,684 
Disposals   -    -    (61,547)   (10,474)   (72,021)
Balance at December 31, 2018   104,918    29,585    99,696    36,206    270,405 
Depreciation   88,417    26,617    68,519    93,597    277,150 
Disposals   (901)   -    -    -    (901)
Balance at December 31, 2018   192,434    56,202    168,215    129,803    546,653 
                          
Net book value as at:                         
December 31, 2018  $65,084   $152,294   $252,941   $246,769   $717,088 
December 31, 2019  $193,434   $129,092   $187,772   $218,844   $729,142 

 

In August 2018, the Company relocated part of its operations to a new building. Due to the relocation, leasehold improvements with a net book value of $462 were written off and equipment with a net book value of $77,920 was sold for $9,000. The net loss on disposal recorded was $69,382.

 

In February 2019, the Company reclassified $135,000 out of prepaid assets into property and equipment.

 

In May 2019, the Company disposed of assets with a net book value of $1,308. A net loss on disposal was recorded in the consolidated statement of loss and comprehensive loss.

 

F-14

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

7.Intangible assets

 

    Computer software    Trademarks    Website    Total intangible assets 
Cost                    
Balance at December 31, 2017  $5,143   $16,236   $-   $21,379 
Additions   -    -    -    - 
Balance at December 31, 2018   5,143    16,236    -    21,379 
Additions   -    -    531,419    531,419 
Balance at December 31, 2019   5,143    16,236    531,419    552,798 
                     
Accumulated amortization                    
Balance at December 31, 2017   4,143    2,095    -    6,238 
Amortization   1,000    1,083    -    2,083 
Balance at December 31, 2018   5,143    3,178    -    8,321 
Amortization   -    1,082    -    1,082 
Balance at December 31, 2019   5,143    4,260    -    9,403 
                     
Net book value as at:                    
December 31, 2018  $-   $13,058   $-   $13,058 
December 31, 2019  $-   $11,975   $531,419   $543,395 

 

The estimated future amortization of intangible is as follows:

 

2020 $178,229
2021  178,229
2022  178,229
2023  1,089
2024  1,089
Total $536,865

 

8.Leases

 

As discussed in Note 3, the Company adopted ASC 842 with an initial application date of January 1, 2019. The Company is party to two lease agreements under which it rents office and laboratory space. The rent for both of these leases was prepaid upon inception and therefore at adoption the Company reclassified its prepaid lease balances of $1,613,039 to a right-of-use asset.

 

The Company amortizes the asset on a straight-line basis over the remaining life of the lease and records the expense in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss. During the year ended 2019 and 2018, the Company recognized $509,381 and nil, respectively, in amortization expense in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

 

9.Loan Arrangements

 

On October 18, 2017, the Company entered into a loan arrangement with a shareholder of the Company, pursuant to which such shareholder has agreed to provide a loan facility to the Company, whereby the Company may borrow up to $5,000,000, with the proceeds to be used for working capital and general corporate purposes. The term of the loan facility is five (5) years, with principal and interest payments being due only at the time of maturity. Under the loan agreement, the Company may borrow in one or more advances, provided however that a minimum amount of $250,000 must be borrowed at any one time and not more than two advances may occur per month. Interest shall accrue at a rate of fourteen percent (14%) per annum, payable upon maturity. As of December 31, 2019, no amounts have been borrowed.

 

F-15

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

10.Preferred stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue up to 20 shares of our Series 1 Preferred Shares, all without par value, and each having a stated value of $1,000,000. The Series 1 Preferred Shares do not have voting rights except to the extent required by applicable law and are not convertible into the Company’s common shares. Holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will not be entitled to dividends but, in lieu thereof, will receive Net Sales Returns (“Net Sales Returns” is defined as annual payments equal to 9 percent of Net Sales) until such time as the holders have received total Net Sales Returns equal to 9 times the aggregate stated value of the outstanding Series 1 Preferred Shares. The Company will have the right to redeem the outstanding Series 1 Preferred Shares at any time at a redemption price equal to 9 times the aggregate stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares outstanding less the aggregate amount of the Net Sales Returns paid (the “Redemption Amount”).

 

Upon any dissolution, liquidation or winding up, whether voluntary or involuntary, holders of Series 1 Preferred Shares will be entitled to a liquidation preference equal to the stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares less the Net Sales Returns paid on the Series 1 Preferred Shares.

 

In the event of a fundamental transaction (defined to include an amalgamation, merger or other business combination transaction involving our company in which our shareholders do not have the right to cast more than 50% of the votes that may be cast for the election of directors, or a sale, lease or other disposition of the properties and/or assets of our company as an entirety or substantially as an entirety to a third party), the holders of the Series 1 Preferred Shares will be entitled to receive consideration for their Series 1 Preferred Shares equal to a multiple of the stated value of the Series 1 Preferred Shares ranging from 5.0 to 9.0 depending on the timing of the fundamental transaction, subject to a cap equal to the redemption amount. The Company has assessed the likelihood of any Net Sales Payments to the Series 1 Preferred shareholders to be remote.

 

Issued and outstanding preferred stock:

 

      Number of preferred stock    
Preferred stock amount  
Balance at December 31, 2018   -   $- 
Stock issued from financing (i)   12    11,961,397 
Balance at December 31, 2019   12   $11,961,397 

 

(i)On May 9, 2019, the Company entered into subscription agreements to sell $12,000,000 of its Series 1 Preferred Shares to an accredited investor in a private placement at a purchase price of $1,000,000 per Series 1 Preferred Share; $5,000,000 of the purchase price was paid on May 9, 2019 and the remaining $7,000,000 was paid on June 7, 2019. The Company recorded $38,603 of share issuance costs as an offset to preferred stock in the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

F-16

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

11.Common stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue an unlimited number of common shares, all without par value.

 

Issued and outstanding common stock:

 

     Number of common stock      Common stock amount  
Balance at December 31, 2017   90,225,869   $18,244,659 
Stock issuance for services (i and iii)   3,207,506    5,651,671 
Stock issued from financing, net of costs (ii)   1,861,627    3,944,336 
Stock issuance due to exercise of options   2,303,896    2,569,982 
Balance at December 31, 2018   97,598,898   $30,410,648 
Stock issuance for services (iv and v)   707,236    792,104 
Stock issuance from financing (vi and vii)   9,337,529    6,609,920 
Stock issuance due to exercise of options   394,735    754,148 
Balance at December 31, 2019   108,038,398   $38,566,820 

 

i)On May 10, 2018, the Company issued 641,717 common shares in accordance with a Development, Commercialization and Exclusive Distribution Agreement with a third party and recognized $1,238,513 as a research and development expense in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.
ii)On May 15, 2018, the Company issued 255,815 common shares for gross proceeds of $550,000. On June 28, 2018, the Company issued 1,605,812 common shares for gross proceeds of $3,452,496. The Company recorded $56,160 of share issuance costs as an offset to capital stock.
iii)On November 26, 2018, the Company issued 2,565,789 common shares in accordance with a Development and Supply Agreement with a third party and recognized $4,413,158 as a research and development expense in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.
iv)On January 14, 2019, the Company settled $75,000 of amounts due to a vendor by issuing 49,342 common shares valued at $55,263 at the date of issuance. The Company recorded a $19,737 gain on the settlement of liabilities in the consolidated statement of loss and comprehensive loss;

v)On January 14, 2019, the Company issued 657,894 common shares in satisfaction of $1,000,000 of all remaining milestones under a License and Supply Agreement with a third party. The Company recognized $736,841 as research and development expense, based on the value of the common stock on the date of issuance;

vi)On January 14, 2019, the Company completed a non-brokered private placement, and issued 2,815,789 common shares. Gross proceeds of $4,280,000 were received prior to December 31, 2018.The Company recorded $465 of share issuance costs as an offset to common stock;
vii)On March 28, 2019, the Company completed an underwritten public offering of its common stock pursuant to which the Company sold an aggregate 6,521,740 common shares for gross proceeds of $3,000,000. The Company recorded $669,615 of share issuance costs as an offset to common stock in the year ended December 31, 2019.

F-17

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

12.Common stock subscribed

 

During December 2018, the Company offered its common shares in a private offering of 6,578,947 common shares at a price of $1.52 per share, for aggregate gross proceeds of up to $10,000,000.  The Company received subscription funds in the aggregate amount of $4,280,000 from investors. These common shares were not issued until after December 31, 2018.

 

13.Stock-based compensation

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company issued 7,495,000 stock options, each option entitling the holder to purchase on common share of the Company. During the year ended December 31, 2019, 394,735 options were exercised.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company issued nil stock options. During the year ended December 31, 2018, an aggregate of 2,303,896 options were exercised.

 

The continuity of stock options are as follows:

 

    

Number of

Options

    Weighted Avg Exercise Price 
Balance at December 31, 2017   8,080,000   $1.21 
Stock options exercised January 8, 2018   (124,000)   0.20 
Stock options exercised January 26, 2018   (100,000)   0.20 
Stock options exercised March 8, 2018   (50,000)   0.19 
Stock options exercised March 13, 2018   (176,000)   0.19 
Stock options exercised March 22, 2018   (50,000)   0.19 
Stock options exercised March 26, 2018   (240,000)   0.19 
Stock options exercised March 28, 2018   (325,000)   0.19 
Stock options exercised March 29, 2018   (562,996)   2.13 
Stock options exercised April 20, 2018   (154,000)   0.20 
Stock options expired April 21, 2018   (1,946,000)   0.20 
Stock options expired June 9, 2018   (100,000)   1.16 
Stock options expired June 21, 2018   (400,000)   1.13 
Stock options expired August 14, 2018   (75,000)   2.10 
Stock options exercised September 27, 2018   (85,000)   1.45 
Stock options expired September 28, 2018   (5,000)   2.12 
Stock options exercised on October 11, 2018   (200,000)   1.15 
Stock options expired November 12, 2018   (250,000)   2.08 
Stock options expired November 12, 2018   (600,000)   1.14 
Stock options exercised on November 29, 2018   (175,000)   1.13 
Stock options exercised on December 20, 2018   (26,900)   1.11 
Stock options expired December 21, 2018   (1,978,100)   1.11 
Stock options exercised on December 21, 2018   (35,000)   1.11 
Balance at December 31, 2018   422,004   $1.95 
Stock options granted January 10, 2019   5,995,000    1.52 
Stock options expired February 24, 2019   (35,000)   1.15 
Stock options exercised March 8, 2019   (164,473)   1.52 
Stock options exercised March 15, 2019   (164,473)   1.52 
Stock options exercised March 29, 2019   (65,789)   1.52 
Stock options expired May 23, 2019   (10,000)   1.52 
Stock options expired June 16, 2019   (40,000)   1.52 
Stock options cancelled July 14, 2019   (5,000)   1.52 
Stock options cancelled August 13, 2019   (5,000)   1.52 
Stock options expired August 14, 2019   (387,004)   2.11 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   500,000    0.26 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   100,000    0.35 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   100,000    0.45 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   100,000    0.55 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   100,000    0.65 
Stock options granted August 19, 2019   100,000    0.75 
Stock options granted September 16, 2019   500,000    0.43 
Balance at December 31, 2019   7,040,265   $1.28 

 

F-18

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

13.Stock-based compensation (continued)

 

As at December 31, 2018, details of the issued and outstanding stock options are as follows:

 

Grant date    Exercise price (CDN$)     Number of options issued and outstanding     Number of vested options outstanding      Weighted Avg Remaining Life (years)  
February 24, 2017  $1.50    35,000    35,000    0.15 
August 14, 2017  $2.75    387,004    387,004    0.62 
Balance at December 31, 2018        422,004    422,004      

 

As at December 31, 2019, details of the issued and outstanding stock options are as follows:

 

Grant date   

Exercise price

(USD$)

    

Number of

options

    

Number of

vested options

    

Weighted Avg

Remaining Life

(years)

 
January 10, 2019  $1.52    5,540,265    5,540,265    1.03 
August 19, 2019   0.26    500,000    500,000    1.64 
August 19, 2019   0.35    100,000    100,000    1.64 
August 19, 2019   0.45    100,000    100,000    1.64 
August 19, 2019   0.55    100,000    100,000    1.64 
August 19, 2019   0.65    100,000    100,000    1.64 
August 19, 2019   0.75    100,000    100,000    1.64 
September 16, 2019   0.43    500,000    500,000    1.71 
Balance at December 31, 2019        7,040,265    7,040,265      

 

The Company granted 7,495,000 stock options during the year ended December 2019 (December 31, 2018 - $nil).. The fair value of options granted during the year ended December 31, 2019 was estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of options granted using the following assumptions:

 

   January 10, 2019  August 19, 2019  September 16, 2019
Volatility   68%     87%     89%
Risk-free interest rate   2.56%     1.48%     1.74%
Expected life (years)   2       2      2 
Dividend yield   0      0      0 
Common share price  $1.23   $  0.26     $0.42 
Strike price  $1.52    $ 0.26 - $ 0.75   $0.43 
Forfeiture rate   nil      nil      nil 

 

The Company recorded $2,539,092 stock-based compensation for the year ended December 31, 2019 and $7,288 of stock-based compensation for the year ended December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recorded the cash receipt of $600,000 as common stock and reclassified $154,148 of stock-based compensation to common stock due to the exercise of 394,735 options disclosed above. During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company recorded the cash receipt of $2,034,307 as common stock and reclassified $535,675 of stock-based compensation to common stock due to the exercise of 2,303,896 options disclosed above.

 

 

 

 

 

F-19

  

Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp.
Notes to the consolidated financial statements
For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018
(Stated in United States dollars)

 

14.Income taxes

 

The reconciliation of the combined Canadian federal and provincial statutory income tax rate of 27% (2018- 27%) to the effective tax rate is as follows:

 

     For the year ended December 31, 2019      For the year ended December 31, 2018  
Loss before income taxes  $(19,784,054)  $(16,647,687)
Expected income tax expense (recovery)   (5,341,690)   (4,494,880)
Difference in foreign tax rates   54,660    53,280 
Tax rate changes and other adjustments   -    (850,310)
Stock based compensation and non-deductible expenses   771,640    (312,810)
Prior Period Adjustments   261,160    - 
Share issuance costs recorded in equity   (198,930)   - 
Change in valuation allowance   4,453,160