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EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - Hypersolar, Inc.f10q0317ex32i_hypersolarinc.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - Hypersolar, Inc.f10q0317ex31i_hypersolarinc.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

☒   QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31, 2017

 

☐   TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM __________ TO __________

 

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER: 000-54437

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

(Name of registrant in its charter)

 

Nevada   26-4298300

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

510 Castillo St., Suite 320, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

Issuer’s telephone Number: (805) 966-6566

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒   No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  ☐ Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer (Do not check if smaller reporting company)  ☐

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐   No ☒

 

The number of shares of registrant’s common stock outstanding, as of May 11, 2017 was 678,342,322.

 

 

 

 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

INDEX

 

  Page
PART I: FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
ITEM 1: FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 3
  Condensed Balance Sheets at March 31, 2017 (unaudited) and June 30, 2016 3
  Condensed Statements of Operations for the Three months and Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (unaudited) 4
  Condensed Statement of Shareholders' Deficit for the Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 (unaudited) and June 30, 2016 5
  Condensed Statements of Cash Flows Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (unaudited) 6
  Notes to the Condensed Financial Statements 7
ITEM 2: MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 12
ITEM 3: QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 17
ITEM 4: CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 17
PART II: OTHER INFORMATION
ITEM 1 LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 18
ITEM 1A: RISK FACTORS 18
ITEM 2: UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS 18
ITEM 3: DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES 18
ITEM 4: MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 18
ITEM 5: OTHER INFORMATION 18
ITEM 6: EXHIBITS 19
SIGNATURES 20

 

 2 
 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   March 31,
2017
   June 30,
2016
 
   (Unaudited)     
         
ASSETS        
         
CURRENT ASSETS        
Cash  $51,955   $119,887 
Prepaid expense   6,717    - 
           
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS   58,672    119,887 
           
PROPERTY & EQUIPMENT          
Computers and peripherals   6,218    6,218 
Less: accumulated depreciation   (6,218)   (6,059)
           
NET PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT   -    159 
           
OTHER ASSETS          
Deposits   900    900 
Domain, net of amortization $3,071 and $2,805, respectively   2,244    2,510 
Patents   37,023    37,023 
           
TOTAL OTHER ASSETS   40,167    40,433 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $98,839   $160,479 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT          
           
CURRENT LIABILITIES          
Accounts payable  $117,102   $79,261 
Accrued expenses   378,848    362,301 
Derivative liability   2,675,450    6,230,102 
Convertible promissory notes, net of debt discount of $107,836 and $97,910, respectively   12,164    1,287,590 
           
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES   3,183,564    7,959,254 
           
LONG TERM LIABILITIES          
Convertible promissory notes, net of debt discount of $73,373 and $0, respectively   1,234,127    - 
           
TOTAL LONG TERM LIABILITIES   1,234,127    - 
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES   4,417,691    7,959,254 
           
SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT          
Preferred Stock, $0.001 par value;5,000,000 authorized preferred shares, no shares issued or outstanding   -    - 
Common Stock, $0.001 par value; 1,500,000,000 authorized common shares 678,342,322 and 589,552,961 shares issued and outstanding, respectively   678,342    589,553 
Additional Paid in Capital   6,009,994    5,655,520 
Accumulated deficit   (11,007,188)   (14,043,848)
           
TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT   (4,318,852)   (7,798,775)
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT  $98,839   $160,479 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed financial statements

 

 3 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

   Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended 
   March 31, 2017   March 31, 2016   March 31, 2017   March 31, 2016 
                 
REVENUE  $-   $-   $-   $- 
                     
OPERATING EXPENSES                    
General and administrative expenses   144,152    106,579    431,036    351,233 
Research and development cost   19,736    (30,004)   60,708    (1,024)
Depreciation and amortization   88    257    425    771 
                     
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES   163,976    76,832    492,169    350,980 
                     
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS BEFORE OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES)   (163,976)   (76,832)   (492,169)   (350,980)
                     
OTHER INCOME/(EXPENSES)                    
Gain on debt conversion and change in derivative liability   2,679,773    3,565,307    3,803,154    7,917,161 
Interest expense   (99,915)   (181,311)   (274,325)   (566,274)
                     
TOTAL OTHER INCOME/(EXPENSES)   2,579,858    3,383,996    3,528,829    7,350,887 
                     
NET INCOME  $2,415,882   $3,307,164   $3,036,660   $6,999,907 
                     
BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE  $0.004   $0.006   $0.005   $0.014 
DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE  $0.004   $0.006   $0.005   $0.014 
                     
WEIGHTED-AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING                    
BASIC   652,153,322    537,004,223    620,783,642    507,494,231 
DILUTED   655,078,772    542,496,846    623,709,092    512,986,854 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed financial statements

 

 4 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' DEFICIT

FOR THE NINE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2017

 

                   Additional         
   Preferred stock   Common stock   Paid-in   Accumulated     
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Total 
Balance at June 30, 2016       -   $   -    589,552,961   $589,553   $5,655,520   $(14,043,848)  $(7,798,775)
                                    
Issuance of common stock for conversion of debt and accrued interest   -    -    88,789,361    88,789    351,786    -    440,575 
                                    
Stock based compensation expense   -    -    -    -    2,688    -    2,688 
                                    
Net income for the nine months ended March 31, 2017   -    -    -    -    -    3,036,660    3,036,660 
                                    
Balance at March 31, 2017 (unaudited)   -   $-    678,342,322   $678,342   $6,009,994   $(11,007,188)  $(4,318,852)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed financial statements

 

 5 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

   Nine Months Ended 
   March 31, 2017   March 31, 2016 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:        
Net income  $3,036,660   $6,999,907 
Adjustment to reconcile net income to net cash used in operating activities          
Depreciation & amortization expense   425    771 
Stock based compensation expense   2,688    - 
(Gain) on change in derivative liability   (3,803,154)   (7,917,161)
Amortization of debt discount recorded as interest expense   55,725    478,545 
(Increase) Decrease in change in assets:          
Prepaid expense   (6,717)   - 
Increase (Decrease) in change in liabilities :          
Accounts payable   37,841    (43,391)
Accrued expenses   218,600    87,660 
           
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES   (457,932)   (393,669)
           
NET CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES   -    - 
           
NET CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:          
Proceeds from convertible notes payable   390,000    410,000 
           
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES   390,000    410,000 
           
NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH   (67,932)   16,331 
           
CASH, BEGINNING OF PERIOD   119,887    39,491 
           
CASH, END OF PERIOD  $51,955   $55,822 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION          
Interest paid  $-   $70 
Taxes paid  $-   $- 
           
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURES OF NON CASH TRANSACTIONS          
Issuance of common stock upon conversion of convertible notes and accrued interest  $440,575   $123,447 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed financial statements

 

 6 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

MARCH 31, 2017

 

1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements of Hypersolar, Inc. ("Hypersolar" or the Company") have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Rule 10-01 of S-X Regulation Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all normal recurring adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending June 30, 2017. For further information refer to the financial statements and footnotes thereto included in the Company's Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2016.

 

Going Concern

 The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis of accounting, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets and liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. The accompanying financial statements do not reflect any adjustments that might result if the Company is unable to continue as a going concern. The Company does not generate revenue, and has negative cash flows from operations, which raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern and appropriateness of using the going concern basis is dependent upon, among other things, additional cash infusion. The Company has historically obtained funds through private placement offerings of equity and debt securities. Management believes that it will be able to continue to raise funds by sale of its securities to its existing shareholders and prospective new investors to provide the additional cash needed to meet the Company’s obligations as they become due, and allow the Company to develop its core business. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to continue to raise capital.

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

This summary of significant accounting policies of HyperSolar is presented to assist in understanding the Company’s financial statements. The financial statements and notes are representations of the Company’s management, which is responsible for their integrity and objectivity. These accounting policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalent

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the accompanying financial statements. Significant estimates made in preparing these financial statements include the estimate of useful lives of intangible assets, and the deferred tax valuation allowance. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consist of patents that are initially measured at the lower of cost or fair value. The patents are deemed to have an indefinite life and are not amortized. The patents are assessed annually for impairment, or whenever conditions indicate the asset may be impaired, and any such impairment will be recognized in the period identified.

 

Net Earnings (Loss) per Share Calculations

Net earnings (Loss) per share dictates the calculation of basic earnings (loss) per share and diluted earnings per share. Basic earnings (loss) per share are computed by dividing by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the year. Diluted net earnings (loss) per share is computed similar to basic earnings (loss) per share except that the denominator is increased to include the effect of stock options and stock based awards (Note 4), plus the assumed conversion of convertible debt (Note 5).

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company calculated the dilutive impact of the outstanding stock options of 250,000, and the convertible debt of $1,427,500, which is convertible into shares of common stock. The stock options and the convertible debt were included in the calculation of net earnings per share, because their impact was dilutive.

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2016, the Company calculated the dilutive impact of the outstanding stock options of 500,000, and the convertible debt of $1,275,000, which is convertible into shares of common stock. The stock options and the convertible debt were included, in the calculation of net earnings per share, because their impact was dilutive.

 

 

 7 
 

 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

MARCH 31, 2017

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Stock based Compensation

The Company periodically issues stock options and warrants to employees and non-employees in non-capital raising transactions for services and for financing costs. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the Financial Accounting Standards Board whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair value of financial instruments, requires disclosure of the fair value information, whether or not recognized in the balance sheet, where it is practicable to estimate that value. As of March 31, 2017, the amounts reported for cash, accrued interest and other expenses, notes payables, and derivative liability approximate the fair value because of their short maturities.

 

We adopted ASC Topic 820 for financial instruments measured as fair value on a recurring basis. ASC Topic 820 defines fair value, established a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. ASC Topic 820 established a three-tier fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). These tiers include:

 

Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and
Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one or more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

 

We measure certain financial instruments at fair value on a recurring basis. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are as follows at March 31, 2017 (See Note 6):

 

     Total   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3) 
                   
  Liabilities                
                       
  Derivative liability   2,675,450       -       -    2,675,450 
  Total liabilities measured at fair value  $2,675,450   $-   $-   $2,675,450 

 

The following is a reconciliation of the derivative liability for which Level 3 inputs were used in determining the approximate fair value:

 

  Balance as of July 1, 2016  $6,230,102 
  Fair value of derivative liabilities issued   248,502 
  (Gain) on change in derivative liability   (3,803,154)
  Balance as of March 31, 2017  $2,675,450 

 

Accounting for Derivatives

The Company evaluates all of its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, the Company uses a probability weighted average series Binomial lattice formula pricing models to value the derivative instruments at inception and on subsequent valuation dates.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

 8 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

MARCH 31, 2017

 

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Continued)

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In August 2016, FASB issued accounting standards update ASU-2016-15, “Statement of Cash Flows” (Topic 230) – Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments”, to address diversity in how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows. The amendments in this ASU are effective for public and nonpublic entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods with fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2016-15 on the Company’s financial statements.

 

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards if currently adopted would have a material effect on the accompanying condensed financial statements.

 

3.CAPITAL STOCK

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company issued 88,789,361 shares of common stock upon the conversion of $346,863 in principal, plus accrued interest of $93,712.

 

4.STOCK OPTIONS

 

Options

As of March 31, 2017, 250,000 non-qualified common stock options were outstanding. Each option expires on the date specified in the option agreement, which date is not later than the fifth (5th) anniversary from the grant date of the options. As of March 31, 2017, 250,000 options are fully vested with a maturity date of March 31, 2020, and are exercisable at an exercise price of $0.02245 per share.

 

A summary of the Company’s stock option activity and related information follows:

 

     3/31/2017 
         Weighted 
     Number   average 
     of   exercise 
     Options   price 
  Outstanding, beginning of period   500,000   $0.03 
  Granted   -    - 
  Exercised   -    - 
  Forfeited/Expired   (250,000)  $0.04 
  Outstanding, end of period   250,000   $0.02 
  Exercisable at the end of period   250,000   $0.02 
  Weighted average fair value of options granted during the period       $- 

 

5. CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement on December 16, 2013 for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “December Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $100,000. The December Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.0048 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $26,000.The Company received additional tranches in the amount of $74,000 for an”) aggregate sum of $100,000. The December Note matured on May 16, 2015, and the maturity date was extended to February 16, 2016. Subsequently, a third extension was granted to November 16, 2016. During the year ended June 30, 2016, the Company issued 42,163,679 shares of common stock upon conversion of $59,500, plus accrued interest of $14,286. On October 1, 2016, the Company issued 11,515,068 shares of common stock upon conversion of $40,500, plus accrued interest of $11,318. As of March 31, 2017, the December Note and interest were fully converted.

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement on March 5, 2014, for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “March Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $100,000. The March Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.0048 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $30,000. On April 15, 2014, the lender and borrower agreed to amend the March Note to increase the principal sum to $150,000. The Company received additional tranches in the amount of $120,000 for an aggregate sum of $150,000. During the period ended December 31, 2016, the Company issued 37,843,288 shares of common stock upon conversion of $150,000 in principal, plus accrued interest of $40,459. The March Note matured on September 5, 2015 and was extended to June 5, 2016. Subsequently, a second extension was granted to March 5, 2017. As of March 31, 2017, the March Note was fully converted.

 

 9 
 

 

HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

MARCH 31, 2017

 

5. CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES (Continued)

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement on May 23, 2014, for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “May Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $500,000. The May Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.0048 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $50,000.The Company received additional tranches in the amount of $415,000 for an aggregate sum of $465,000. The May Note matured on May 23, 2015 and was extended to February 23, 2016. A second extension was granted to November 23, 2016. On January 19, 2017, the investor extended the May Note for additional sixty (60) months from the effective date of each tranche. The May Note matures on November 23, 2021. During the period ended March 31, 2017, the Company issued 39,431,005 shares of common stock upon conversion of $156,363 in principal, plus accrued interest of $41,934. Also, the principal was reduced by $1,137 for interest due from the investor. The remaining balance of the May Note as of March 31, 2017 was $307,500.

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement on April 9, 2015, for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $500,000. The April Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.01 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price since the original effective date of each respective advance or the lowest effective price per share granted to any person or entity after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $50,000. The Company received additional tranches in the amount of $450,000 for an aggregate sum of $500,000. The April Note matured nine (9) months from the effective dates of each respective tranche. A second extension was granted to October 9, 2016. On January 19, 2017, the investor extended the April Note for an additional (60) months from the effective date of each tranche. The April Note matures on October 31, 2021. The Company recorded amortization of debt discount, which was recognized as interest expense in the amount of $42,303 during the nine months ended March 31, 2017.

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement January 28, 2016, for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “January Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $500,000. The January Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.01 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price since the original effective date of each respective tranche or the lowest effective price per share granted to any person or entity after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $10,000. The Company received additional tranches in the amount of $490,000 for an aggregate sum of $500,000. The January Note matures twelve (12) months from the effective dates of each respective tranche. On January 19, 2017, the investor extended the January Note for an additional sixty (60) months from the effective date of each tranche. The January Note matures on January 27, 2022. The Company recorded amortization of debt discount, which was recognized as interest expense in the amount of $100,691 during the nine months ended March 31, 2017.

 

The Company entered into a securities purchase agreement February 3, 2017, for the sale of a 10% convertible promissory note (the “February Note”) in the aggregate principal amount of up to $500,000. The February Note is convertible into shares of common stock of the Company at a price equal to a variable conversion price of the lesser of $0.01 per share or fifty percent (50%) of the lowest trading price since the original effective date of each respective tranche or the lowest effective price per share granted to any person or entity after the effective date to acquire common stock. Upon execution of the securities purchase agreement, the Company received a tranche of $60,000. The Company received an additional tranche in the amount of $60,000 for an aggregate sum of $120,000. The February Note matures twelve (12) months from the effective dates of each respective tranche. The February Note matures on February 3, 2018, with an automatic extension of sixty (60) months from the effective date of each tranche. The Company recorded amortization of debt discount, which was recognized as interest expense in the amount of $12,164 during the nine months ended March 31, 2017.

 

ASC Topic 815 provides guidance applicable to convertible debt issued by the Company in instances where the number into which the debt can be converted is not fixed. For example, when a convertible debt converts at a discount to market based on the stock price on the date of conversion, ASC Topic 815 requires that the embedded conversion option of the convertible debt be bifurcated from the host contract and recorded at their fair value. In accounting for derivatives under accounting standards, the Company recorded a liability representing the estimated present value of the conversion feature considering the historic volatility of the Company’s stock, and a discount representing the imputed interest associated with the embedded derivative. The discount is amortized over the life of the convertible debt, and the derivative liability is adjusted periodically according to stock price fluctuations.

 

6. DERIVATIVE LIABILITIES

 

The convertible notes (the “Notes”) issued and described in Note 5 do not have fixed settlement provisions because their conversion prices are not fixed. The conversion features have been characterized as derivative liabilities to be re-measured at the end of every reporting period with the change in value reported in the statement of operations.

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, as a result of the Notes issued that were accounted for as derivative liabilities, we determined that the fair value of the conversion feature of the convertible notes at issuance was $248,502, based upon the Binomial lattice formula. We recorded the full value of the derivative as a liability at issuance with an offset to valuation discount, which will be amortized over the life of the Notes.

 

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HYPERSOLAR, INC.

CONDENSED NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

MARCH 31, 2017

 

6. DERIVATIVE LIABILITIES (Continued)

 

During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, the Company recorded a net gain in change in derivative of $3,803,154 in the statement of operations due to the change in fair value of the remaining Notes, for the nine months ended March 31, 2017. At March 31, 2017, the fair value of the derivative liability was $2,675,450.

 

For purpose of determining the fair market value of the derivative liability for the embedded conversion, the Company used the Binomial lattice formula. The significant assumptions used in the Binomial lattice formula of the derivatives are as follows:

 

  Risk free interest rate  0.29% - 1.95%
  Stock volatility factor  41.35% - 77.0%
  Weighted average expected option life  1 year - 5 year
  Expected dividend yield  None

 

7. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Management evaluated subsequent events as of the date of the financial statements pursuant to ASC TOPIC 855, and reported the following events:

 

On April 11, 2017, the Company received an additional tranche in the amount of $60,000 under the February note.

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

The information in this discussion may contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, including statements regarding our capital needs, business strategy and expectations. Any statements that are not of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements involve substantial risks and uncertainties. In some cases you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” or “continue”, the negative of the terms or other comparable terminology. Actual events or results may differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements. In evaluating these statements, you should consider various factors, including the risks included from time to time in other reports or registration statements filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. These factors may cause our actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements. We disclaim any obligation to publicly update these statements, or disclose any difference between actual results and those reflected in these statements.

 

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this Form 10-Q to “we,” “us,” “our,” or the “Company” refer to Hypersolar, Inc.

 

Overview

 

Inspired by the photosynthetic process that plants use to harness the power of the sun to create energy molecules, we are developing a novel solar-powered particle system that mimics photosynthesis to separate hydrogen from water. On November 15, 2011, we filed a patent application to protect the intellectual property rights to our unique particles called “photoelectrosythetically active heterostructures” (PAH) for the production of hydrogen and other valuable chemicals. The patent was granted on March 14, 2017 as Patent No.: US 9,593,053 B1. On Friday, January 27, we filed an additional divisional application to pursue method claims for the PAH structures.

 

Our research is centered on developing a low-cost and submersible hydrogen production particle that can split water molecules under the sun, emulating the core functions of photosynthesis. Each particle is a complete hydrogen generator that contains a novel high voltage solar cell bonded to chemical catalysts by a proprietary encapsulation coating. On September 15, 2015, we announced that we had surpassed the critical voltage (1.5 Volts) threshold to split water molecules for renewable hydrogen fuel production. We believe this is an extremely important step towards commercialization, as 1.5 V is the minimum voltage needed to produce hydrogen in real world systems.

 

Currently, the strategy of partnering with both the University of Iowa and University of California, Santa Barbara, has advanced our technology significantly. We are currently contracted with the University of California, Santa Barbara through June 30, 2017. Our contract with the University of Iowa expired April 30, 2017 and we are still negotiating a new agreement expected to be finalized before May 15, 2017. We anticipate continuing this strategy of leveraging our existing relationships, as well as potentially exploring relationships with other leading universities, to continue developing our technology.

 

In addition to the university teams, in June of 2016, we hired Dr. Joun Lee to be our chief-technologist to work closely with the teams and drive progress. Dr. Lee is based in the lab at the University of Iowa. Also in August of 2016, we added Professor John Stickney as Scientific Advisor. Professor Stickney is currently at the University of Georgia within the Department of Chemistry.

 

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In order to achieve commercial scale production of hydrogen, we need to overcome the following challenges:

 

Low Cost

 

The overall cost depends on the cost of solar particles and catalysts for H2 production. Currently, platinum is the most desired catalyst for hydrogen production. Although used in very small amount, the use of platinum may pose a few roadblocks for wide scale adoption of this technology. To address this challenge, we are currently accelerating development of platinum metal free catalysts that can match or surpass the activity obtained from platinum metals. Recent results have shown great promise in reaching this goal.

 

High Performance

 

Our current efforts are focused on improving the H2 production efficiency to greater than 10%. In order to reach this goal, extensive research and development efforts on material synthesis and characterization are required. We are accelerating our efforts by working in parallel with the research teams at the University of Iowa and the University of California-Santa Barbara.

 

Commercialization

 

Manufacturing water splitting solar particles and integration of cost-effective silicon solar cells into prototype devices for hydrogen production will require strategic partnership with the photovoltaic industries. We are currently in process of forming partnership with solar cell companies for future prototype device development.

 

We have already overcome many of the challenges and steps necessary for successful realization of commercial solar H2 production systems through the following:

 

Discovery and development of a novel low-cost manufacturing technique to fabricate solar particles for hydrogen production with voltages greater than 1.3 Volts. The theoretical voltage for splitting water to produce hydrogen is 1.23 Volts. These particles are made of commercially viable solar cell materials and are stabilized using patent pending proprietary nano-encapsulation techniques for efficient and stable production of H2 in water, thus addressing the biggest challenge for wide scale adoption of solar H2 production units.

 

Utilizing cheap and non-toxic earth abundant materials, we have developed water splitting solar nanostructured thin films to achieve a voltage of 1.6 Volts, with currents for hydrogen production exceeding 10mA/cm2.

 

In order to protect the solar particles in corrosive waste water, we have developed a patent pending proprietary coating technology that stabilizes commercially available solar cells from corrosion under water environment allowing stable continuous production of hydrogen for more than hundreds of hours.

 

In September of 2016, we announced and demonstrated our latest prototype device that safely and efficiently separates hydrogen and oxygen using an integrated solar cell-membrane system. This patent-pending technology not only enables safe operation but also substantially improves the hydrogen production efficiency by preventing mixing of the hydrogen and oxygen products. We are in the process of developing a 1ft2 patent-pending prototype device to achieve larger scale solar hydrogen production.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to impairment of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets, deferred tax assets and fair value computation using the Black Scholes option pricing model. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions, such as the trading value of our common stock and estimated future undiscounted cash flows, that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions; however, we believe that our estimates, including those for the above-described items, are reasonable.

 

Use of Estimates

 

In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, management utilizes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. These estimates and assumptions relate to recording net revenue, collectability of accounts receivable, useful lives and impairment of tangible and intangible assets, accruals, income taxes, inventory realization, stock-based compensation expense, Black Scholes valuation model inputs, derivative liabilities and other factors. Management believes it has exercised reasonable judgment in deriving these estimates. Consequently, a change in conditions could affect these estimates.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value of financial instruments, requires disclosure of the fair value information, whether or not recognized in the balance sheet, where it is practicable to estimate that value. As of March 31, 2017, the amounts reported for cash, accrued interest and other expenses, notes payables, and derivative liability approximate the fair value because of their short maturities.

 

We adopted ASC Topic 820 for financial instruments measured as fair value on a recurring basis. ASC Topic 820 defines fair value, established a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

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Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

Management reviewed currently issued pronouncements during the nine months ended March 31, 2017, and does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards if currently adopted would have a material effect on the accompanying condensed financial statements. Pronouncements disclosed in notes to the financials.

 

Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 compared to Three Months Ended March 31, 2016.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 were $163,976 and $76,832 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The net increase of $87,144 in operating expenses consisted primarily of an increase in investor relations expense in the amount of $18,158, an increase in professional fees in the amount of $10,322, an increase in research and development cost in the amount of $49,740, with an overall increase in general and administrative expenses of $8,924.

 

Other Income/(Expenses)

 

Other income and (expenses) for the three months ended March 31, 2017 were $2,579,858 and $3,383,996 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The decrease in income of $804,138 in other income and (expenses) was the result of a decrease in net gain on debt conversion and change in fair value of the derivative instruments of $885,534, with a decrease in interest expense of $81,396, which includes a net change of $92,785 of amortization of debt discount.

 

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Net Income/(Loss)

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017, our net income was $2,415,882 as compared to net income of $3,307,164 for the prior period March 31, 2016. The decrease in net income of $891,282 was related primarily to the decrease in other income and (expenses) associated with non-cash cost of the fair value of the convertible notes, with an overall increase in operating expenses. The Company has not generated any revenues.

 

Results of Operations for the Nine Months Ended March 31, 2017 compared to Nine Months Ended March 31, 2016.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 were $492,169 and $350,980 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The net increase of $141,189 in operating expenses consisted primarily of an increase in investor relations expense in the amount of $47,820, an increase in professional fees in the amount of $31,799, an increase in research and development of $61,732, with an overall decrease in general and administrative expenses of $162.

 

Other Income/(Expenses)

 

Other income and (expenses) for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 were $3,528,829 and $7,350,887 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The decrease in income of $3,822,058 in other income and (expenses) was the result of a decrease in net gain on debt conversion and change in fair value of the derivative instruments of $4,114,007, with a decrease in interest expense of $291,949, which includes a net change of $323,387 of amortization of debt discount.

 

Net Income/(Loss)

 

For the nine months ended March 31, 2017, our net income was $3,036,660 as compared to net income of $6,999,907 for the prior period March 31, 2016. The decrease in net income of $3,963,247 was related primarily to other income and (expenses) associated with the non-cash cost of the fair value of the convertible notes, and an overall increase in operating expenses. The Company has not generated any revenues.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

Liquidity is the ability of a company to generate funds to support its current and future operations, satisfy its obligations, and otherwise operate on an ongoing basis. Significant factors in the management of liquidity are funds generated by operations, levels of accounts receivable and accounts payable and capital expenditures.

 

As of March 31, 2017, we had a working capital deficit of $3,124,892 as compared to $7,839,367 as of June 30, 2016. This decrease in working capital deficit of $4,714,475 was due primarily to an increase in prepaid expense, accounts payable, and accrued expenses, offset by a decrease in cash, current portion of convertible notes and non-cash derivative liability.

 

Cash flow used in operating activities was $457,932 for the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and $393,669 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The increase in cash used in operating activities was due to an increase in investor relations expense and professional fees. The Company has had no revenues.

 

Cash provided by financing activities during the nine months ended March 31, 2017 was $390,000 and $410,000 for the prior period ended March 31, 2016. The decrease in financing activities was due to a decrease in financing with convertible notes through private placements during the current period.

 

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The condensed financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis of accounting, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets and liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. The accompanying condensed financial statements do not reflect any adjustments that might result if we are unable to continue as a going concern. During the nine months ended March 31, 2017, we did not generate any revenues, incurred net income of $3,036,660, which was primarily associated with the net change in derivative instruments, and cash used in operations of $457,932. As of March 31, 2017, we had a working capital deficiency of $3,124,892 and a shareholders’ deficit of $4,318,852. These factors, among others raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our independent auditors, in their report on our audited financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2016, expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our ability to continue as a going concern ultimately is dependent on our ability to generate revenue, which is dependent upon our ability to obtain additional equity or debt financing, attain further operating efficiencies and, ultimately, to achieve profitable operations. We have historically obtained funds from our shareholders through the sale of our securities. Management believes that we will be able to continue to raise funds through the sale of our securities to existing and new investors. Management believes that funding from existing and prospective new investors and future revenue will provide the additional cash needed to meet our obligations as they become due, and will allow the development of our core business operations.

 

PLAN OF OPERATION AND FINANCING NEEDS

 

Our plan of operation within the next twelve months is to further research, develop, and protect our technology.

 

We believe that our current cash and investment balances will be sufficient to support development activity, intellectual property protection, and all general and administrative expenses for the next six months. We estimate that we will require additional cash in 2017 based on our current operating plan and condition. We are investigating additional financing alternatives, including continued equity and/or debt financing. There can be no assurance that capital in any form would be available to us, and if available, on terms and conditions that are acceptable. If we are unable to obtain sufficient funds, we may be forced to reduce the size of our operations, which could have a material adverse impact on, or cause us to curtail and/or cease the development of our products.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, revenues or expenses, result of operations, liquidity or capital expenditures.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not required for Smaller Reporting Companies.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As of the end of the period covered by this report, we conducted an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) and Rule 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act). Based upon this evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is: (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Commission's rules and forms, and (ii) accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, or person performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There was no change to our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our last fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We are not currently a party to, nor is any of our property currently the subject of, any pending legal proceeding that will have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

There are no material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our annual report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on September 21, 2016.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

During the three months March 31, 2017, the Company issued 39,431,005 shares of common stock upon conversion of $156,363 in principal, plus accrued interest of $41,934 on outstanding note.

 

The Company relied on an exemption pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended in connection with the sale and issuances of its shares of common stock described above.

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

No disclosure required.

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None.

 

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ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit No.   Description
     
31.1*   Certification by Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Sarbanes-Oxley Section 302 (filed herewith).
     
32.2*   Certification by Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350 (filed herewith).
     
EX-101.INS**   XBRL Instance Document
     
EX-101.SCH**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
     
EX-101.CAL**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase
     
EX-101.DEF**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase
     
EX-101.LAB**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels Linkbase
     
EX-101.PRE**   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

 

* Filed herewith
** Furnished herewith

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

May 12, 2017 HYPERSOLAR, INC.
     
  By: /s/ Timothy Young
   

Timothy Young

Chief Executive Officer and
Acting Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Executive Officer and
Acting Principal Financial Officer and
Accounting Officer)

 

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