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EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - W. P. Carey Inc.wpc2017q110-qexh32.htm
EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - W. P. Carey Inc.wpc2017q110-qexh312.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - W. P. Carey Inc.wpc2017q110-qexh311.htm


 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q

þ QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2017
or 

o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from__________ to __________
 
Commission File Number: 001-13779
wpchighreslogo.jpg
W. P. CAREY INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Maryland
45-4549771
(State of incorporation)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
 
50 Rockefeller Plaza
 
New York, New York
10020
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
Investor Relations (212) 492-8920
(212) 492-1100
(Registrant’s telephone numbers, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes þ No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
 
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
 
Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No þ
 
Registrant has 106,511,735 shares of common stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding at May 4, 2017.
 




INDEX
 
 
 
Page No.

Forward-Looking Statements

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, or this Report, including Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Item 2 of Part I of this Report, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believe,” “project,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “intend,” “strategy,” “plan,” “may,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding: capital markets; tenant credit quality; the general economic outlook; our expected range of Adjusted funds from operations, or AFFO; our corporate strategy; our capital structure; our portfolio lease terms; our international exposure and acquisition volume, including the effects of the United Kingdom’s referendum to approve an exit from the European Union; our expectations about tenant bankruptcies and interest coverage; statements regarding estimated or future economic performance and results, including our underlying assumptions, occupancy rate, credit ratings, and possible new acquisitions and dispositions by us and our investment management programs; the Managed Programs discussed herein, including their earnings; statements that we make regarding our ability to remain qualified for taxation as a real estate investment trust, or REIT; the impact of a recently issued pronouncement regarding accounting for leases; the amount and timing of any future dividends; our existing or future leverage and debt service obligations; our ability to sell shares under our “at the market” program and the use of proceeds from that program; our future prospects for growth; our projected assets under management; our future capital expenditure levels; our future financing transactions; our estimates of growth; and our plans to fund our future liquidity needs. These statements are based on the current expectations of our management. It is important to note that our actual results could be materially different from those projected in such forward-looking statements. There are a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Other unknown or unpredictable factors could also have material adverse effects on our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations, AFFO, and prospects. You should exercise caution in relying on forward-looking statements as they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may materially affect our future results, performance, achievements or transactions. Information on factors that could impact actual results and cause them to differ from what is anticipated in the forward-looking statements contained herein is included in this Report as well as in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, including but not limited to those described in Item 1A. Risk Factors in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016, as filed with the SEC on February 24, 2017, or the 2016 Annual Report. Moreover, because we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment, new risks are likely to emerge from time to time. Given these risks and uncertainties, potential investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements as a prediction of future results, which speak only as of the date of this Report, unless noted otherwise. Except as required by federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the SEC, we do not undertake to revise or update any forward-looking statements.

All references to “Notes” throughout the document refer to the footnotes to the consolidated financial statements of the registrant in Part I, Item 1. Financial Statements (Unaudited).


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 1
                    



PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements.

W. P. CAREY INC. 
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Assets
 
 
 
Investments in real estate:
 
 
 
Real estate, at cost
$
5,209,837

 
$
5,204,126

Operating real estate
81,783

 
81,711

Accumulated depreciation
(521,835
)
 
(484,437
)
Net investments in properties
4,769,785

 
4,801,400

Net investments in direct financing leases
688,234

 
684,059

Assets held for sale
14,764

 
26,247

Net investments in real estate
5,472,783

 
5,511,706

Equity investments in the Managed Programs and real estate
312,140

 
298,893

Cash and cash equivalents
152,834

 
155,482

Due from affiliates
106,113

 
299,610

In-place lease and tenant relationship intangible assets, net
805,100

 
826,113

Goodwill
636,871

 
635,920

Above-market rent intangible assets, net
407,480

 
421,456

Other assets, net
304,507

 
304,774

Total assets
$
8,197,828

 
$
8,453,954

Liabilities and Equity
 
 
 
Liabilities:
 
 
 
Senior Unsecured Notes, net
$
2,343,062

 
$
1,807,200

Non-recourse debt, net
1,386,542

 
1,706,921

Senior Unsecured Credit Facility - Term Loans, net
250,944

 
249,978

Senior Unsecured Credit Facility - Revolver
192,804

 
676,715

Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities
255,754

 
266,917

Below-market rent and other intangible liabilities, net
119,914

 
122,203

Deferred income taxes
83,375

 
90,825

Distributions payable
107,816

 
107,090

Total liabilities
4,740,211

 
5,027,849

Redeemable noncontrolling interest
965

 
965

Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)


 


Equity:
 
 
 
W. P. Carey stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 50,000,000 shares authorized; none issued

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value, 450,000,000 shares authorized; 106,511,052 and 106,294,162 shares, respectively, issued and outstanding
107

 
106

Additional paid-in capital
4,400,389

 
4,399,961

Distributions in excess of accumulated earnings
(945,515
)
 
(894,137
)
Deferred compensation obligation
47,266

 
50,222

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(246,234
)
 
(254,485
)
Total W. P. Carey stockholders’ equity
3,256,013

 
3,301,667

Noncontrolling interests
200,639

 
123,473

Total equity
3,456,652

 
3,425,140

Total liabilities and equity
$
8,197,828

 
$
8,453,954


 See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 2
                    



W. P. CAREY INC. 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues
 
 
 
Owned Real Estate:
 
 
 
Lease revenues
$
155,781

 
$
175,244

Operating property revenues
6,980

 
6,902

Reimbursable tenant costs
5,221

 
6,309

Lease termination income and other
760

 
32,541

 
168,742

 
220,996

Investment Management:
 
 
 
Reimbursable costs from affiliates
25,700

 
19,738

Asset management revenue
17,367

 
14,613

Structuring revenue
3,834

 
12,721

Dealer manager fees
3,325

 
2,172

Other advisory revenue
91

 

 
50,317

 
49,244

 
219,059

 
270,240

Operating Expenses
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
62,430

 
84,452

Reimbursable tenant and affiliate costs
30,921

 
26,047

General and administrative
18,424

 
21,438

Property expenses, excluding reimbursable tenant costs
10,110

 
17,772

Stock-based compensation expense
6,910

 
6,607

Dealer manager fees and expenses
3,294

 
3,352

Subadvisor fees
2,720

 
3,293

Property acquisition and other expenses
73

 
5,566

Restructuring and other compensation

 
11,473

 
134,882

 
180,000

Other Income and Expenses
 
 
 
Interest expense
(41,957
)
 
(48,395
)
Equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs and real estate
15,774

 
15,011

Other income and (expenses)
516

 
3,871

 
(25,667
)
 
(29,513
)
Income before income taxes and gain on sale of real estate
58,510

 
60,727

Benefit from (provision for) income taxes
1,305

 
(525
)
Income before gain on sale of real estate
59,815

 
60,202

Gain on sale of real estate, net of tax
10

 
662

Net Income
59,825

 
60,864

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
(2,341
)
 
(3,425
)
Net Income Attributable to W. P. Carey
$
57,484

 
$
57,439

 
 
 
 
Basic Earnings Per Share
$
0.53

 
$
0.54

Diluted Earnings Per Share
$
0.53

 
$
0.54

Weighted-Average Shares Outstanding
 
 
 
Basic
107,562,484

 
105,939,161

Diluted
107,764,279

 
106,405,453


 
 
 
Distributions Declared Per Share
$
0.9950

 
$
0.9742

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 3
                    



W. P. CAREY INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (UNAUDITED)
(in thousands) 
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Net Income
$
59,825

 
$
60,864

Other Comprehensive Income
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
14,750

 
14,033

Realized and unrealized loss on derivative instruments
(5,673
)
 
(11,775
)
Change in unrealized loss on marketable securities
(253
)
 

 
8,824

 
2,258

Comprehensive Income
68,649

 
63,122

 
 
 
 
Amounts Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests
 
 
 
Net income
(2,341
)
 
(3,425
)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(570
)
 
(1,870
)
Realized and unrealized gain on derivative instruments
(3
)
 

Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests
(2,914
)
 
(5,295
)
Comprehensive Income Attributable to W. P. Carey
$
65,735

 
$
57,827

 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 4
                    



W. P. CAREY INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
 
W. P. Carey Stockholders
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Distributions
 
 
 
Accumulated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
 
in Excess of
 
Deferred
 
Other
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
$0.001 Par Value
 
Paid-in
 
Accumulated
 
Compensation
 
Comprehensive
 
W. P. Carey
 
Noncontrolling
 
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Capital
 
Earnings
 
Obligation
 
Loss
 
Stockholders
 
Interests
 
Total
Balance at January 1, 2017
106,294,162

 
$
106

 
$
4,399,961

 
$
(894,137
)
 
$
50,222

 
$
(254,485
)
 
$
3,301,667

 
$
123,473

 
$
3,425,140

Contributions from noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
80,513

 
80,513

Shares issued upon delivery of vested restricted share awards
187,922

 
1

 
(9,435
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(9,434
)
 
 
 
(9,434
)
Shares issued upon exercise of stock options and purchases under employee share purchase plan
28,968

 

 
(1,384
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,384
)
 
 
 
(1,384
)
Delivery of deferred vested shares, net
 
 
 
 
3,179

 
 
 
(3,179
)
 
 
 

 
 
 

Amortization of stock-based compensation expense
 
 
 
 
6,910

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6,910

 
 
 
6,910

Distributions to noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
(6,261
)
 
(6,261
)
Distributions declared ($0.9950 per share)
 
 
 
 
1,158

 
(108,862
)
 
223

 
 
 
(107,481
)
 
 
 
(107,481
)
Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
57,484

 
 
 
 
 
57,484

 
2,341

 
59,825

Other comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
 


Foreign currency translation adjustments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14,180

 
14,180

 
570

 
14,750

Realized and unrealized loss on derivative instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(5,676
)
 
(5,676
)
 
3

 
(5,673
)
Change in unrealized loss on marketable securities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(253
)
 
(253
)
 
 
 
(253
)
Balance at March 31, 2017
106,511,052

 
$
107

 
$
4,400,389

 
$
(945,515
)
 
$
47,266

 
$
(246,234
)
 
$
3,256,013

 
$
200,639

 
$
3,456,652






 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 5
                    




W. P. CAREY INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
(Continued)
Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
 
W. P. Carey Stockholders
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Distributions
 
 
 
Accumulated
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common Stock
 
Additional
 
in Excess of
 
Deferred
 
Other
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
$0.001 Par Value
 
Paid-in
 
Accumulated
 
Compensation
 
Comprehensive
 
W. P. Carey
 
Noncontrolling
 
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Capital
 
Earnings
 
Obligation
 
Loss
 
Stockholders
 
Interests
 
Total
Balance at January 1, 2016
104,448,777

 
$
104

 
$
4,282,042

 
$
(738,652
)
 
$
56,040

 
$
(172,291
)
 
$
3,427,243

 
$
134,185

 
$
3,561,428

Shares issued to a third party in connection with the redemption of a redeemable noncontrolling interest
217,011

 
1

 
13,418

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13,419

 
 
 
13,419

Contributions from noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
90

 
90

Shares issued upon delivery of vested restricted share awards
190,083

 

 
(6,662
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(6,662
)
 
 
 
(6,662
)
Shares issued upon exercise of stock options and purchases under employee share purchase plan
10,480

 

 
(684
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(684
)
 
 
 
(684
)
Deferral of vested shares, net
 
 
 
 
(4,262
)
 
 
 
4,262

 
 
 

 
 
 

Amortization of stock-based compensation expense
 
 
 
 
9,814

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9,814

 
 
 
9,814

Redemption value adjustment
 
 
 
 
561

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
561

 
 
 
561

Distributions to noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
(6,084
)
 
(6,084
)
Distributions declared ($0.9742 per share)
 
 
 
 
1,242

 
(105,004
)
 
248

 
 
 
(103,514
)
 
 
 
(103,514
)
Net income
 
 
 
 
 
 
57,439

 
 
 
 
 
57,439

 
3,425

 
60,864

Other comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12,163

 
12,163

 
1,870

 
14,033

Realized and unrealized loss on derivative instruments
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(11,775
)
 
(11,775
)
 
 
 
(11,775
)
Balance at March 31, 2016
104,866,351

 
$
105

 
$
4,295,469

 
$
(786,217
)
 
$
60,550

 
$
(171,903
)
 
$
3,398,004

 
$
133,486

 
$
3,531,490


See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 6
                    



W. P. CAREY INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
(in thousands)
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017

2016
Cash Flows — Operating Activities
 
 
 
Net income
$
59,825

 
$
60,864

Adjustments to net income:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization, including intangible assets and deferred financing costs
63,853

 
84,956

Distributions of earnings from equity investments
16,848

 
15,475

Equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs and real estate
(15,774
)
 
(15,011
)
Management income received in shares of Managed REITs and other
(15,602
)
 
(6,939
)
Amortization of rent-related intangibles and deferred rental revenue
12,503

 
(34,009
)
Stock-based compensation expense
6,910

 
9,814

Deferred income taxes
(5,550
)
 
(3,027
)
Straight-line rent
(4,729
)
 
(2,300
)
Realized and unrealized loss (gain) on foreign currency transactions, derivatives, extinguishment of debt, and other
3,120

 
(3,914
)
Gain on sale of real estate
(10
)
 
(662
)
Allowance for credit losses

 
7,064

Changes in assets and liabilities:
 
 
 
Deferred structuring revenue received
6,672

 
7,560

Increase in deferred structuring revenue receivable
(1,400
)
 
(2,266
)
Net changes in other operating assets and liabilities
(14,599
)
 
2,819

Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
112,067

 
120,424

Cash Flows — Investing Activities
 
 
 
Proceeds from repayment of short-term loans to affiliates
210,000

 
20,000

Proceeds from sale of real estate
24,184

 
103,689

Funding of short-term loans to affiliates
(22,835
)
 
(20,000
)
Funding for real estate construction and expansion
(13,039
)
 
(2,562
)
Return of capital from equity investments
1,512

 
1,935

Capital expenditures on owned real estate
(1,320
)
 
(4,092
)
Change in investing restricted cash
569

 
(3,074
)
Other investing activities, net
391

 
(1,130
)
Proceeds from repayments of note receivable
223

 
195

Capital expenditures on corporate assets
(99
)
 
(761
)
Capital contributions to equity investments in real estate

 
(5
)
Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities
199,586

 
94,195

Cash Flows — Financing Activities
 
 
 
Repayments of Senior Unsecured Credit Facility
(1,267,814
)
 
(130,000
)
Proceeds from Senior Unsecured Credit Facility
778,827

 
190,568

Proceeds from issuance of Senior Unsecured Notes
530,456

 

Scheduled payments of mortgage principal
(257,449
)
 
(17,941
)
Distributions paid
(106,751
)
 
(102,239
)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests
80,513

 
90

Prepayments of mortgage principal
(42,392
)
 
(36,894
)
Payment of financing costs
(12,464
)
 
(250
)
Payments for withholding taxes upon delivery of equity-based awards and exercises of stock options
(10,819
)
 
(7,352
)
Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests
(6,261
)
 
(6,084
)
Change in financing restricted cash
(259
)
 
633

Proceeds from exercise of stock options and purchases under the employee share purchase plan

 
6

Net Cash Used in Financing Activities
(314,413
)
 
(109,463
)
Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents During the Period
 
 
 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash
112

 
4,681

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
(2,648
)
 
109,837

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
155,482

 
157,227

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
$
152,834

 
$
267,064

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 7
                    



W. P. CAREY INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

Note 1. Business and Organization
 
W. P. Carey Inc., or W. P. Carey, is, together with its consolidated subsidiaries, a REIT that provides long-term financing via sale-leaseback and build-to-suit transactions for companies worldwide and manages a global investment portfolio. We invest primarily in commercial properties domestically and internationally. We earn revenue principally by leasing the properties we own to single corporate tenants, primarily on a triple-net lease basis, which generally requires each tenant to pay substantially all of the costs associated with operating and maintaining the property.

Originally founded in 1973, we reorganized as a REIT in September 2012 in connection with our merger with Corporate Property Associates 15 Incorporated. We refer to that merger as the CPA®:15 Merger. On January 31, 2014, Corporate Property Associates 16 – Global Incorporated, or CPA®:16 – Global, merged with and into us, which we refer to as the CPA®:16 Merger. Our shares of common stock are listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “WPC.”

We have elected to be taxed as a REIT under Section 856 through 860 of the Internal Revenue Code. As a REIT, we are not generally subject to United States federal income taxation other than from our taxable REIT subsidiaries, or TRSs, as long as we satisfy certain requirements, principally relating to the nature of our income and the level of our distributions, as well as other factors. We hold all of our real estate assets attributable to our Owned Real Estate segment under the REIT structure, while the activities conducted by our Investment Management segment subsidiaries have been organized under TRSs.

Through our TRSs, we also earn revenue as the advisor to publicly owned, non-listed REITs, which are sponsored by us under the Corporate Property Associates, or CPA®, brand name and invest in similar properties. At March 31, 2017, we were the advisor to Corporate Property Associates 17 – Global Incorporated, or CPA®:17 – Global, and Corporate Property Associates 18 – Global Incorporated, or CPA®:18 – Global. We refer to CPA®:17 – Global and CPA®:18 – Global together as the CPA® REITs.

At March 31, 2017, we were also the advisor to Carey Watermark Investors Incorporated, or CWI 1, and Carey Watermark Investors 2 Incorporated, or CWI 2, two publicly owned, non-listed REITs that invest in lodging and lodging-related properties. We refer to CWI 1 and CWI 2 together as the CWI REITs and, together with the CPA® REITs, as the Managed REITs (Note 3).

At March 31, 2017, we also served as the advisor to Carey Credit Income Fund, or CCIF, a business development company, or BDC, and feeder funds of CCIF, or the CCIF Feeder Funds, which are also BDCs (Note 3). We refer to CCIF and the CCIF Feeder Funds collectively as the Managed BDCs.

At March 31, 2017, we were also the advisor to Carey European Student Housing Fund I, L.P., or CESH I, a limited partnership formed for the purpose of developing, owning, and operating student housing properties and similar investments in Europe. We refer to the Managed REITs, Managed BDCs, and CESH I collectively as the Managed Programs.

Reportable Segments
 
Owned Real Estate — We own and invest in commercial properties principally in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia that are then leased to companies, primarily on a triple-net lease basis. We also own two hotels, which are considered operating properties. We earn lease revenues from our wholly-owned and co-owned real estate investments that we control. In addition, we generate equity income through co-owned real estate investments that we do not control and through our ownership of shares and limited partnership units of the Managed Programs (Note 6). Through our special member interests in the operating partnerships of the Managed REITs, we also participate in their cash flows (Note 3). At March 31, 2017, our owned portfolio was comprised of our full or partial ownership interests in 900 properties, totaling approximately 86.6 million square feet, substantially all of which were net leased to 214 tenants, with an occupancy rate of 99.1%.

Investment Management — Through our TRSs, we structure and negotiate investments and debt placement transactions for the Managed REITs and CESH I, for which we earn structuring revenue, and manage their portfolios of real estate investments, for which we earn asset management revenue. We also earn asset management revenue from CCIF based on the average of its gross assets at fair value. We may earn disposition revenue when we negotiate and structure the sale of properties on behalf of the Managed REITs, and we may also earn incentive revenue and receive other compensation through our advisory agreements with certain of the Managed Programs, including in connection with providing liquidity events for the Managed REITs’ stockholders. At March 31, 2017, CPA®:17 – Global and CPA®:18 – Global collectively owned all or a portion of 445


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 8
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

properties, including certain properties in which we have an ownership interest. Substantially all of these properties, totaling approximately 51.6 million square feet, were net leased to 213 tenants, with an average occupancy rate of approximately 99.8%. The Managed REITs and CESH I also had interests in 161 operating properties, totaling approximately 19.8 million square feet in the aggregate.

Note 2. Basis of Presentation

Basis of Presentation

Our interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form 10-Q and, therefore, do not necessarily include all information and footnotes necessary for a fair statement of our consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, or GAAP.

In the opinion of management, the unaudited financial information for the interim periods presented in this Report reflects all normal and recurring adjustments necessary for a fair statement of financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. Our interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes for the year ended December 31, 2016, which are included in the 2016 Annual Report, as certain disclosures that would substantially duplicate those contained in the audited consolidated financial statements have not been included in this Report. Operating results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of operating results for an entire year.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and the disclosure of contingent amounts in our consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Basis of Consolidation

Our consolidated financial statements reflect all of our accounts, including those of our controlled subsidiaries and our tenancy-in-common interest as described below. The portions of equity in consolidated subsidiaries that are not attributable, directly or indirectly, to us are presented as noncontrolling interests. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

When we obtain an economic interest in an entity, we evaluate the entity to determine if it should be deemed a variable interest entity, or VIE, and, if so, whether we are the primary beneficiary and are therefore required to consolidate the entity. We apply accounting guidance for consolidation of VIEs to certain entities in which the equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support from other parties. Fixed price purchase and renewal options within a lease, as well as certain decision-making rights within a loan or joint-venture agreement, can cause us to consider an entity a VIE. Limited partnerships and other similar entities that operate as a partnership will be considered a VIE unless the limited partners hold substantive kick-out rights or participation rights. Significant judgment is required to determine whether a VIE should be consolidated. We review the contractual arrangements provided for in the partnership agreement or other related contracts to determine whether the entity is considered a VIE, and to establish whether we have any variable interests in the VIE. We then compare our variable interests, if any, to those of the other variable interest holders to determine which party is the primary beneficiary of the VIE based on whether the entity (i) has the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the economic performance of the VIE and (ii) has the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. The liabilities of these VIEs are non-recourse to us and can only be satisfied from each VIE’s respective assets.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 9
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

At March 31, 2017, we considered 29 entities VIEs, 22 of which we consolidated as we are considered the primary beneficiary. The following table presents a summary of selected financial data of the consolidated VIEs included in the consolidated balance sheets (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Net investments in properties
$
781,413

 
$
786,379

Net investments in direct financing leases
37,904

 
60,294

In-place lease and tenant relationship intangible assets, net
179,492

 
182,177

Above-market rent intangible assets, net
70,245

 
71,852

Total assets
1,113,291

 
1,150,093

 
 
 
 
Non-recourse debt, net
$
164,660

 
$
406,574

Total liabilities
239,591

 
548,659


At both March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, our seven unconsolidated VIEs included our interests in six unconsolidated real estate investments and one unconsolidated entity among our interests in the Managed Programs, all of which we account for under the equity method of accounting. We do not consolidate these entities because we are not the primary beneficiary and the nature of our involvement in the activities of these entities allows us to exercise significant influence on, but does not give us power over, decisions that significantly affect the economic performance of these entities. As of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the net carrying amount of our investments in these entities was $151.9 million and $152.9 million, respectively, and our maximum exposure to loss in these entities was limited to our investments.

At March 31, 2017, we had an investment in a tenancy-in-common interest in various underlying international properties. Consolidation of this investment is not required as such interest does not qualify as a VIE and does not meet the control requirement for consolidation. Accordingly, we account for this investment using the equity method of accounting. We use the equity method of accounting because the shared decision-making involved in a tenancy-in-common interest investment provides us with significant influence on the operating and financial decisions of this investment.

At times, the carrying value of our equity investments may fall below zero for certain investments. We intend to fund our share of the jointly owned investments’ future operating deficits should the need arise. However, we have no legal obligation to pay for any of the liabilities of such investments nor do we have any legal obligation to fund operating deficits. At March 31, 2017, none of our equity investments had carrying values below zero.

On April 20, 2016, we formed a limited partnership, CESH I, for the purpose of developing, owning, and operating student housing properties and similar investments in Europe. CESH I commenced fundraising in July 2016 through a private placement with an initial offering of $100.0 million and a maximum offering of $150.0 million. Through August 30, 2016, the financial results and balances of CESH I were included in our consolidated financial statements, and we had collected $14.2 million of net proceeds on behalf of CESH I from limited partnership units issued in the private placement primarily to independent investors. On August 31, 2016, we determined that CESH I had sufficient equity to finance its operations and that we were no longer considered the primary beneficiary, and as a result we deconsolidated CESH I and began to account for our interest in it at fair value by electing the equity method fair value option available under U.S. GAAP. The deconsolidation did not have a material impact on our financial position or results of operations. Following the deconsolidation, we continue to serve as the advisor to CESH I (Note 3).

Reclassifications

Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation. In connection with our adoption of Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, as described below, we retrospectively reclassified Payments for withholding taxes upon delivery of equity-based awards and exercises of stock options from Net cash provided by operating activities to Net cash used in financing activities within our consolidated statements of cash flows.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 10
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). ASU 2014-09 is a comprehensive new revenue recognition model requiring a company to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to a customer at an amount reflecting the consideration it expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. ASU 2014-09 does not apply to our lease revenues, which constitute a majority of our revenues, but will apply to reimbursed tenant costs and revenues generated from our operating properties and our Investment Management business. We will adopt this guidance for our annual and interim periods beginning January 1, 2018 using one of two methods: retrospective restatement for each reporting period presented at the time of adoption, or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying this guidance recognized at the date of initial application. We have not decided which method of adoption we will use. We are evaluating the impact of the new standard and have not yet determined if it will have a material impact on our business or our consolidated financial statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2016-02 outlines a new model for accounting by lessees, whereby their rights and obligations under substantially all leases, existing and new, would be capitalized and recorded on the balance sheet. For lessors, however, the accounting remains largely unchanged from the current model, with the distinction between operating and financing leases retained, but updated to align with certain changes to the lessee model and the new revenue recognition standard. The new standard also replaces existing sale-leaseback guidance with a new model applicable to both lessees and lessors. Additionally, the new standard requires extensive quantitative and qualitative disclosures. ASU 2016-02 is effective for U.S. GAAP public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years; for all other entities, the final lease standard will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Early application will be permitted for all entities. The new standard must be adopted using a modified retrospective transition of the new guidance and provides for certain practical expedients. Transition will require application of the new model at the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented. The ASU is expected to impact our consolidated financial statements as we have certain operating office and land lease arrangements for which we are the lessee. We are evaluating the impact of the new standard and have not yet determined if it will have a material impact on our business or our consolidated financial statements.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2016-09 amends Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718, Compensation-Stock Based Compensation to simplify various aspects of how share-based payments are accounted for and presented in the financial statements including (i) reflecting income tax effects of share-based payments through the income statement, (ii) allowing statutory tax withholding requirements at the employees’ maximum individual tax rate without requiring awards to be classified as liabilities, and (iii) permitting an entity to make an accounting policy election for the impact of forfeitures on the recognition of expense. ASU 2016-09 is effective for public business entities for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within that reporting period, with early adoption permitted.

We adopted ASU 2016-09 as of January 1, 2017 and elected to account for forfeitures as they occur, rather than to account for them based on an estimate of expected forfeitures. This election was adopted using a modified retrospective transition method, with a cumulative effect adjustment to retained earnings. The related financial statement impact of this adjustment is not material. Depending on several factors, such as the market price of our common stock, employee stock option exercise behavior, and corporate income tax rates, the excess tax benefits associated with the exercise of stock options and the vesting and delivery of restricted share awards, or RSAs, restricted share units, or RSUs, and performance share units, or PSUs, could generate a significant income tax benefit in a particular interim period, potentially creating volatility in Net income attributable to W. P. Carey and basic and diluted earnings per share between interim periods. Under the former accounting guidance, windfall tax benefits related to stock-based compensation were recognized within Additional paid-in capital in our consolidated financial statements. Under ASU 2016-09, these amounts are reflected as a reduction to Provision for income taxes. For reference, windfall tax benefits related to stock-based compensation recorded in Additional paid-in capital for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015 were $6.7 million and $12.5 million, respectively. Windfall tax benefits related to stock-based compensation recorded as a deferred tax benefit for the three months ended March 31, 2017 were $2.2 million.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses. ASU 2016-13 introduces a new model for estimating credit losses based on current expected credit losses for certain types of financial instruments, including loans receivable, held-to-maturity debt securities, and net investments in direct financing leases, amongst other financial instruments. ASU 2016-13 also modifies the impairment model for available-for-sale debt securities and expands the disclosure requirements regarding an entity’s assumptions, models, and methods for estimating the allowance for losses. ASU 2016-13 will be effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 11
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

those fiscal years, with early application of the guidance permitted. We are in the process of evaluating the impact of adopting ASU 2016-13 on our consolidated financial statements.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. ASU 2016-15 intends to reduce diversity in practice for certain cash flow classifications, including, but not limited to (i) debt prepayment or debt extinguishment costs, (ii) contingent consideration payments made after a business combination, (iii) proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, and (iv) distributions received from equity method investees. ASU 2016-15 will be effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early application of the guidance permitted. We are in the process of evaluating the impact of adopting ASU 2016-15 on our consolidated financial statements, and will adopt the standard for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2018.

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-17, Consolidation (Topic 810): Interests Held through Related Parties That Are under Common Control. ASU 2016-17 changes how a reporting entity that is a decision maker should consider indirect interests in a VIE held through an entity under common control. If a decision maker must evaluate whether it is the primary beneficiary of a VIE, it will only need to consider its proportionate indirect interest in the VIE held through a common control party. ASU 2016-17 amends ASU 2015-02, which we adopted on January 1, 2016, and which currently directs the decision maker to treat the common control party’s interest in the VIE as if the decision maker held the interest itself. ASU 2016-17 is effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We adopted ASU 2016-17 as of January 1, 2017 on a prospective basis. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash. ASU 2016-18 intends to reduce diversity in practice for the classification and presentation of changes in restricted cash on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 requires that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash equivalents, and amounts generally described as restricted cash or restricted cash equivalents. Therefore, amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents should be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 will be effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We are in the process of evaluating the impact of adopting ASU 2016-18 on our consolidated financial statements, and will adopt the standard for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2018.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business. ASU 2017-01 intends to clarify the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. Under the current implementation guidance in Topic 805, there are three elements of a business: inputs, processes, and outputs. While an integrated set of assets and activities, collectively referred to as a “set,” that is a business usually has outputs, outputs are not required to be present. ASU 2017-01 provides a screen to determine when a set is not a business. The screen requires that when substantially all of the fair value of the gross assets acquired (or disposed of) is concentrated in a single identifiable asset or a group of similar identifiable assets, the set is not a business. ASU 2017-01 will be effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years, with early adoption permitted. We elected to early adopt ASU 2017-01 on January 1, 2017 on a prospective basis. While our acquisitions have historically been classified as either business combinations or asset acquisitions, certain acquisitions that were classified as business combinations by us likely would have been considered asset acquisitions under the new standard. As a result, transaction costs are more likely to be capitalized since we expect most of our future acquisitions to be classified as asset acquisitions under this new standard. In addition, goodwill that was previously allocated to businesses that were sold or held for sale will no longer be allocated and written off upon sale if future sales were deemed to be sales of assets and not businesses.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. ASU 2017-04 removes step 2 of the goodwill impairment test, which requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation. A goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. All other goodwill impairment guidance will remain largely unchanged. Entities will continue to have the option to perform a qualitative assessment to determine if a quantitative impairment test is necessary. ASU 2017-04 will be effective for public business entities in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years in which a goodwill impairment test is performed, with early adoption permitted. We are in the process of evaluating the impact of adopting ASU 2017-04 on our consolidated financial statements.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 12
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

In February 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-05, Other Income – Gains and Losses from the Derecognition of Nonfinancial Assets (Subtopic 610-20). ASU 2017-05 clarifies that a financial asset is within the scope of Subtopic 610-20 if it meets the definition of an in substance nonfinancial asset. The amendments define the term “in substance nonfinancial asset,” in part, as a financial asset promised to a counterparty in a contract if substantially all of the fair value of the assets (recognized and unrecognized) that are promised to the counterparty in the contract is concentrated in nonfinancial assets. If substantially all of the fair value of the assets that are promised to the counterparty in a contract is concentrated in nonfinancial assets, then all of the financial assets promised to the counterparty are in substance nonfinancial assets within the scope of Subtopic 610-20. This amendment also clarifies that nonfinancial assets within the scope of Subtopic 610-20 may include nonfinancial assets transferred within a legal entity to a counterparty. For example, a parent company may transfer control of nonfinancial assets by transferring ownership interests in a consolidated subsidiary. ASU 2017-05 is effective for periods beginning after December 15, 2017, with early application permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016. We are currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2017-05 on our consolidated financial statements and have not yet determined the method by which we will adopt the standard.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 13
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Note 3. Agreements and Transactions with Related Parties
 
Advisory Agreements with the Managed Programs
 
We have advisory agreements with each of the Managed Programs, pursuant to which we earn fees and are entitled to receive reimbursement for fund management expenses, as well as cash distributions. We also earn fees for serving as the dealer-manager of the offerings of the Managed Programs. The advisory agreements with each of the Managed REITs have terms of one year, may be renewed for successive one-year periods, and are currently scheduled to expire on December 31, 2017, unless otherwise renewed. The advisory agreement with CCIF is subject to renewal on or before January 26, 2018. The advisory agreement with CESH I, which commenced June 3, 2016, will continue until terminated pursuant to its terms.

The following tables present a summary of revenue earned and/or cash received from the Managed Programs for the periods indicated, included in the consolidated financial statements. Asset management revenue excludes amounts received from third parties (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Reimbursable costs from affiliates
$
25,700

 
$
19,738

Asset management revenue
17,367

 
14,590

Distributions of Available Cash
11,793

 
10,981

Structuring revenue
3,834

 
12,721

Dealer manager fees
3,325

 
2,172

Interest income on deferred acquisition fees and loans to affiliates
585

 
194

Other advisory revenue
91

 

 
$
62,695

 
$
60,396

 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
CPA®:17 – Global
$
17,071

 
$
18,192

CPA®:18 – Global 
8,203

 
8,541

CWI 1
6,857

 
11,449

CWI 2
24,465

 
20,534

CCIF
4,941

 
1,680

CESH I
1,158

 

 
$
62,695

 
$
60,396


The following table presents a summary of amounts included in Due from affiliates in the consolidated financial statements (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Short-term loans to affiliates, including accrued interest
$
50,554

 
$
237,613

Distribution and shareholder servicing fees
26,387

 
19,341

Deferred acquisition fees receivable, including accrued interest
16,736

 
21,967

Accounts receivable
4,828

 
5,005

Reimbursable costs
4,422

 
4,427

Current acquisition fees receivable
1,543

 
8,024

Organization and offering costs
927

 
784

Asset management fees receivable
716

 
2,449

 
$
106,113

 
$
299,610




 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 14
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Asset Management Revenue
 
Under the advisory agreements with the Managed Programs, we earn asset management revenue for managing their investment portfolios. The following table presents a summary of our asset management fee arrangements with the Managed Programs:
Managed Program
 
Rate
 
Payable
 
Description
CPA®:17 – Global
 
0.5% - 1.75%
 
2016 50% in cash and 50% in shares of its common stock; 2017 in shares of its common stock
 
Rate depends on the type of investment and is based on the average market or average equity value, as applicable
CPA®:18 – Global
 
0.5% - 1.5%
 
In shares of its class A common stock
 
Rate depends on the type of investment and is based on the average market or average equity value, as applicable
CWI 1
 
0.5%
 
2016 in cash; 2017 in shares of its common stock
 
Rate is based on the average market value of the investment; we are required to pay 20% of the asset management revenue we receive to the subadvisor
CWI 2
 
0.55%
 
In shares of its class A common stock
 
Rate is based on the average market value of the investment; we are required to pay 25% of the asset management revenue we receive to the subadvisor
CCIF
 
1.75% - 2.00%
 
In cash
 
Based on the average of gross assets at fair value; we are required to pay 50% of the asset management revenue we receive to the subadvisor
CESH I
 
1.0%
 
In cash
 
Based on gross assets at fair value

Incentive Fees

We are entitled to receive a quarterly incentive fee on income from CCIF equal to 100% of quarterly net investment income, before incentive fee payments, in excess of 1.875% of CCIF’s average adjusted capital up to a limit of 2.344%, plus 20% of net investment income, before incentive fee payments, in excess of 2.344% of average adjusted capital. We are also entitled to receive from CCIF an incentive fee on realized capital gains of 20%, net of (i) all realized capital losses and unrealized depreciation on a cumulative basis, and (ii) the aggregate amount, if any, of previously paid incentive fees on capital gains since inception.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 15
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Structuring Revenue
 
Under the terms of the advisory agreements with the Managed REITs and CESH I, we earn revenue for structuring and negotiating investments and related financing. We do not earn any structuring revenue from the Managed BDCs. The following table presents a summary of our structuring fee arrangements with the Managed REITs and CESH I:
Managed Program
 
Rate
 
Payable
 
Description
CPA®:17 – Global
 
1% - 1.75%, 4.5%
 
In cash; for non net-lease investments, 1% - 1.75% upon completion; for net-lease investments, 2.5% upon completion, with 2% deferred and payable in three interest-bearing annual installments
 
Based on the total aggregate cost of the net-lease investments made; also based on the total aggregate cost of the non net-lease investments or commitments made; total limited to 6% of the contract prices in aggregate
CPA®:18 – Global
 
4.5%
 
In cash; for all investments, other than readily marketable real estate securities for which we will not receive any acquisition fees, 2.5% upon completion, with 2% deferred and payable in three interest-bearing annual installments
 
Based on the total aggregate cost of the investments or commitments made; total limited to 6% of the contract prices in aggregate
CWI REITs
 
2.5%
 
In cash upon completion
 
Based on the total aggregate cost of the lodging investments or commitments made; loan refinancing transactions up to 1% of the principal amount; we are required to pay 20% and 25% to the subadvisors of CWI 1 and CWI 2, respectively; total for each CWI REIT limited to 6% of the contract prices in aggregate
CESH I
 
2.0%
 
In cash upon completion
 
Based on the total aggregate cost of investments or commitments made, including the acquisition, development, construction, or re-development of the investments

Reimbursable Costs from Affiliates
 
The Managed Programs reimburse us for certain costs that we incur on their behalf, which consist primarily of broker-dealer commissions, marketing costs, an annual distribution and shareholder servicing fee, and certain personnel and overhead costs, as applicable. The following tables present summaries of such fee arrangements:

Broker-Dealer Selling Commissions
Managed Program
 
Rate
 
Payable
 
Description
CWI 2 Class A Shares
 
$0.70 (a)
 
In cash upon share settlement; 100% re-allowed to broker-dealers
 
Per share sold
CWI 2 Class T Shares
 
$0.19 (a)
 
In cash upon share settlement; 100% re-allowed to broker-dealers
 
Per share sold
CCIF Feeder Funds
 
0% - 3%
 
In cash upon share settlement; 100% re-allowed to broker-dealers
 
Based on the selling price of each share sold; CCIF 2016 T’s offering closed on April 28, 2017
CESH I
 
Up to 7.0% of gross offering proceeds
 
In cash upon limited partnership unit settlement; 100% re-allowed to broker-dealers
 
Based on the selling price of each limited partnership unit sold
__________


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 16
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

(a)
In March 2017, CWI 2 announced that its board of directors had determined to extend its offering through December 31, 2017. The amounts shown represent the selling commissions prior to the suspension of the offering on March 31, 2017 in order to determine updated estimated net asset values per share, or NAVs, as of December 31, 2016 and, as a result, new offering prices for the extended offering. CWI 2 filed a registration statement with the SEC on April 14, 2017, which became effective on April 27, 2017, and the selling commissions for the extended offering will be $0.84 and $0.23 per Class A and Class T shares, respectively. Fundraising in connection with the extended offering commenced in May 2017.

Dealer Manager Fees
Managed Program
 
Rate
 
Payable
 
Description
CWI 2 Class A Shares
 
$0.30 (a)
 
Per share sold
 
In cash upon share settlement; a portion may be re-allowed to broker-dealers
CWI 2 Class T Shares
 
$0.26 (a)
 
Per share sold
 
In cash upon share settlement; a portion may be re-allowed to broker-dealers
CCIF Feeder Funds
 
2.50% - 3.0%
 
Based on the selling price of each share sold
 
In cash upon share settlement; a portion may be re-allowed to broker-dealers; CCIF 2016 T’s offering closed on April 28, 2017
CESH I
 
Up to 3.0% of gross offering proceeds
 
Per limited partnership unit sold
 
In cash upon limited partnership unit settlement; a portion may be re-allowed to broker-dealers
__________
(a)
Represents the dealer manager fees prior to the suspension of the offering on March 31, 2017 in order to determine updated NAVs as of December 31, 2016 and, as a result, new offering prices for the extended offering. CWI 2 filed a registration statement with the SEC on April 14, 2017, which became effective on April 27, 2017, and the new dealer manager fees for the extended offering will be $0.36 and $0.31 per Class A and Class T shares, respectively. Fundraising in connection with the extended offering commenced in May 2017.

Annual Distribution and Shareholder Servicing Fee
Managed Program
 
Rate
 
Payable
 
Description
CPA®:18 – Global Class C Shares
 
1.0%
 
Accrued daily and payable quarterly in arrears in cash; a portion may be re-allowed to selected dealers
 
Based on the purchase price per share sold or, once it was reported, the NAV; cease paying when underwriting compensation from all sources equals 10% of gross offering proceeds
CWI 2 Class T Shares
 
1.0%
 
Accrued daily and payable quarterly in arrears in cash; a portion may be re-allowed to selected dealers
 
Based on the purchase price per share sold or, once it was reported, the NAV; cease paying on the earlier of six years or when underwriting compensation from all sources equals 10% of gross offering proceeds
Carey Credit Income Fund 2016 T (one of the CCIF Feeder Funds)
 
0.9%
 
Payable quarterly in arrears in cash; a portion may be re-allowed to selected dealers
 
Based on the weighted-average net price of shares sold in the public offering; quarterly cash payments will begin to accrue in July 2017, the second quarter after the close of the public offering, and payment will commence in the fourth quarter of 2017; cease paying on the earlier of when underwriting compensation from all sources equals 10% of gross offering proceeds or the date at which a liquidity event occurs



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 17
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Personnel and Overhead Costs
Managed Program
 
Payable
 
Description
CPA®:17 – Global and CPA®:18 – Global
 
In cash
 
Personnel and overhead costs, excluding those related to our legal transactions group, our senior management, and our investments team, are charged to the CPA® REITs based on the average of the trailing 12-month aggregate reported revenues of the Managed Programs and us, and are capped at 2.0% and 2.2% of each CPA® REIT’s pro rata lease revenues for 2017 and 2016, respectively; for the legal transactions group, costs are charged according to a fee schedule
CWI 1
 
In cash
 
Actual expenses incurred, excluding those related to our senior management; allocated between the CWI REITs based on the percentage of their total pro rata hotel revenues for the most recently completed quarter
CWI 2
 
In cash
 
Actual expenses incurred, excluding those related to our senior management; allocated between the CWI REITs based on the percentage of their total pro rata hotel revenues for the most recently completed quarter
CCIF and CCIF Feeder Funds
 
In cash
 
Actual expenses incurred, excluding those related to their investment management team and senior management team
CESH I
 
In cash
 
Actual expenses incurred

Organization and Offering Costs
Managed Program
 
Payable
 
Description
CWI 2
 
In cash; within 60 days after the end of the quarter in which the offering terminates
 
Actual costs incurred up to 1.5% of the gross offering proceeds
CCIF and CCIF Feeder Funds
 
In cash; payable monthly
 
Up to 1.5% of the gross offering proceeds; we are required to pay 50% of the organization and offering costs we receive to the subadvisor
CESH I
 
N/A
 
In lieu of reimbursing us for organization and offering costs, CESH I will pay us limited partnership units, as described below under Other Advisory Revenue

For CCIF, total reimbursements to us for personnel and overhead costs and organization and offering costs may not exceed 18% of total Front End Fees, as defined in its Declaration of Trust, so that total funds available for investment may not be lower than 82% of total gross proceeds.

Other Advisory Revenue

Under the limited partnership agreement we have with CESH I, we pay all organization and offering costs on behalf of CESH I, and instead of being reimbursed by CESH I on a dollar-for-dollar basis for those costs, we receive limited partnership units of CESH I equal to 2.5% of its gross offering proceeds. This revenue, which commenced in the third quarter of 2016, is included in Other advisory revenue in the consolidated statements of income and totaled less than $0.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 18
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Expense Support and Conditional Reimbursements

Under the expense support and conditional reimbursement agreement we have with each of the CCIF Feeder Funds, we and the CCIF subadvisor are obligated to reimburse the CCIF Feeder Funds 50% of the excess of the cumulative distributions paid to the CCIF Feeder Funds’ shareholders over the available operating funds on a monthly basis. Following any month in which the available operating funds exceed the cumulative distributions paid to its shareholders, the excess operating funds are used to reimburse us and the CCIF subadvisor for any expense payment we made within three years prior to the last business day of such month that have not been previously reimbursed by the CCIF Feeder Fund, up to the lesser of (i) 1.75% of each CCIF Feeder Fund’s average net assets or (ii) the percentage of each CCIF Feeder Fund’s average net assets attributable to its common shares represented by other operating expenses during the fiscal year in which such expense support payment from us and the CCIF’s subadvisor was made, provided that the effective rate of distributions per share at the time of reimbursement is not less than such rate at the time of expense payment.
 
Distributions of Available Cash
 
We are entitled to receive distributions of up to 10% of the Available Cash (as defined in the respective advisory agreements) from the operating partnerships of each of the Managed REITs, as described in their respective operating partnership agreements, payable quarterly in arrears.

Other Transactions with Affiliates
 
Loans to Affiliates

From time to time, our board of directors has approved the making of unsecured loans from us to certain of the Managed Programs, at our sole discretion, with each loan at a rate equal to the rate at which we are able to borrow funds under our senior credit facility (Note 10), for the purpose of facilitating acquisitions approved by their respective investment committees that they would not otherwise have had sufficient available funds to complete or, in the case of CWI 1, for the purpose of replacing the existing credit facility that it had with a bank.

The following table sets forth certain information regarding our loans to affiliates (dollars in thousands):
 
 
Interest Rate at
March 31, 2017
 
Maturity Date at March 31, 2017
 
Maximum Loan Amount Authorized at March 31, 2017
 
Principal Outstanding Balance at (a)
Managed Program
 
 
 
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
CPA®:18 – Global (b)
 
LIBOR + 1.00%
 
10/31/2017
 
$
50,000

 
$
27,500

 
$
27,500

CWI 1 (b)
 
LIBOR + 1.00%
 
3/22/2018
 
25,000

 
22,835

 

CWI 2
 
N/A
 
N/A
 
250,000

 

 
210,000

CESH I (c)
 
N/A
 
N/A
 
35,000

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
50,335

 
$
237,500

__________
(a)
Amounts exclude accrued interest of $0.2 million and $0.1 million at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.
(b)
LIBOR means London Interbank Offered Rate.
(c)
In May 2017, we made loans totaling $14.5 million to CESH I, maturing in May 2018, at an annual interest rate of LIBOR plus 1.0% (Note 17).

Other

On February 2, 2016, an entity in which we, one of our employees, and third parties owned 38.3%, 0.5%, and 61.2%, respectively, and which we consolidated, sold a self-storage property (Note 15). In connection with the sale, we made a distribution of $0.1 million to the employee, representing the employee’s share of the net proceeds from the sale.

At March 31, 2017, we owned interests ranging from 3% to 90% in jointly owned investments in real estate, including a jointly controlled tenancy-in-common interest in several properties, with the remaining interests generally held by affiliates. In addition, we owned stock of each of the Managed REITs and CCIF, and limited partnership units of CESH I. We consolidate certain of these investments and account for the remainder either (i) under the equity method of accounting or (ii) at fair value by electing the equity method fair value option available under U.S. GAAP (Note 6).


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 19
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)


Note 4. Net Investments in Properties
 
Real Estate

Real estate, which consists of land and buildings leased to others, at cost, and which are subject to operating leases, and real estate under construction, is summarized as follows (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Land
$
1,111,911

 
$
1,128,933

Buildings
4,078,343

 
4,053,334

Real estate under construction
19,583

 
21,859

Less: Accumulated depreciation
(508,624
)
 
(472,294
)
 
$
4,701,213

 
$
4,731,832

 
During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the U.S. dollar weakened against the euro, as the end-of-period rate for the U.S. dollar in relation to the euro increased by 1.4% to $1.0691 from $1.0541. As a result of this fluctuation in foreign exchange rates, the carrying value of our real estate increased by $26.4 million from December 31, 2016 to March 31, 2017.

Depreciation expense, including the effect of foreign currency translation, on our real estate was $35.4 million and $34.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Real Estate Under Construction

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, we capitalized real estate under construction totaling $15.4 million, including accrual activity of $2.4 million, primarily related to construction projects on our properties. As of March 31, 2017, we had two construction projects in progress, and as of December 31, 2016, we had three construction projects in progress. Aggregate unfunded commitments totaled approximately $123.1 million and $135.2 million as of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively.

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, we fully funded and completed an expansion project in Windsor, Connecticut at a cost totaling $3.3 million. In addition, we placed into service amounts totaling $17.8 million related to partially completed build-to-suit projects or other expansion projects during the three months ended March 31, 2017.

Dispositions of Real Estate

During the three months ended March 31, 2017, we sold a parcel of vacant land and transferred ownership of two properties to the related mortgage lender, excluding the sale of one property that was classified as held for sale as of December 31, 2016 (Note 15). As a result, the carrying value of our real estate decreased by $31.6 million from December 31, 2016 to March 31, 2017.

Future Dispositions of Real Estate

During the year ended December 31, 2016, two tenants exercised options to repurchase the properties they are leasing from us in accordance with their lease agreements during 2017 for an aggregate of $21.6 million. At March 31, 2017, the properties had an aggregate asset carrying value of $16.1 million. There was no accounting impact during 2017 or 2016 related to the exercise of these options. We currently expect that one of these repurchases will be completed in the second quarter of 2017 and the other will be completed in the third quarter of 2017, but there can be no assurance that either will be completed within those timeframes.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 20
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Operating Real Estate
 
At both March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, Operating real estate consisted of our investments in two hotels. Below is a summary of our Operating real estate (in thousands): 
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Land
$
6,041

 
$
6,041

Buildings
75,742

 
75,670

Less: Accumulated depreciation
(13,211
)
 
(12,143
)
 
$
68,572

 
$
69,568


Depreciation expense on our operating real estate was $1.1 million and $1.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Assets Held for Sale

Below is a summary of our properties held for sale (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
Real estate, net
$
7,048

 
$

Intangible assets, net
7,716

 

Net investments in direct financing leases

 
26,247

Assets held for sale
$
14,764

 
$
26,247


At March 31, 2017, we had one property classified as Assets held for sale with a carrying value of $14.8 million.

At December 31, 2016, we had one property classified as Assets held for sale with a carrying value of $26.2 million. In addition, there was a deferred tax liability of $2.5 million related to this property as of December 31, 2016, which is included in Deferred income taxes in the consolidated balance sheets. The property was sold during the three months ended March 31, 2017 (Note 15).

Note 5. Finance Receivables
 
Assets representing rights to receive money on demand or at fixed or determinable dates are referred to as finance receivables. Our finance receivables portfolio consists of our Net investments in direct financing leases, notes receivable, and deferred acquisition fees. Operating leases are not included in finance receivables as such amounts are not recognized as an asset in the consolidated financial statements.
 
Net Investments in Direct Financing Leases
 
Interest income from direct financing leases, which was included in Lease revenues in the consolidated financial statements, was $16.2 million and $18.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the U.S. dollar weakened against the euro, resulting in a $4.9 million increase in the carrying value of Net investments in direct financing leases from December 31, 2016 to March 31, 2017.

Note Receivable

At March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, we had a note receivable with an outstanding balance of $10.2 million and $10.4 million, respectively, representing the expected future payments under a sales type lease, which was included in Other assets, net in the consolidated financial statements. Earnings from our note receivable are included in Lease termination income and other in the consolidated financial statements.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 21
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Deferred Acquisition Fees Receivable
 
As described in Note 3, we earn revenue in connection with structuring and negotiating investments and related mortgage financing for the CPA® REITs. A portion of this revenue is due in equal annual installments over three years, provided the CPA® REITs meet their respective performance criteria. Unpaid deferred installments, including accrued interest, from the CPA® REITs were included in Due from affiliates in the consolidated financial statements.
 
Credit Quality of Finance Receivables
 
We generally seek investments in facilities that we believe are critical to a tenant’s business and that we believe have a low risk of tenant default. As of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, we had allowances for credit losses of $13.5 million and $13.3 million, respectively, on a single direct financing lease, including the impact of foreign currency translation. This allowance was established in the fourth quarter of 2015. During the three months ended March 31, 2016, we increased the allowance by $7.1 million, which was recorded in Property expenses, excluding reimbursable tenant costs in the consolidated financial statements, due to a decline in the estimated amount of future payments we will receive from the tenant, including the possible early termination of the direct financing lease. At both March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, none of the balances of our finance receivables were past due. There were no modifications of finance receivables during the three months ended March 31, 2017.

We evaluate the credit quality of our finance receivables utilizing an internal five-point credit rating scale, with one representing the highest credit quality and five representing the lowest. A credit quality of one through three indicates a range of investment grade to stable. A credit quality of four through five indicates a range of inclusion on the watch list to risk of default. The credit quality evaluation of our finance receivables was last updated in the first quarter of 2017. We believe the credit quality of our deferred acquisition fees receivable falls under category one, as the CPA® REITs are expected to have the available cash to make such payments.
 
A summary of our finance receivables by internal credit quality rating, excluding our deferred acquisition fees receivable, is as follows (dollars in thousands):
 
 
Number of Tenants / Obligors at
 
Carrying Value at
Internal Credit Quality Indicator
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
1 - 3
 
27
 
27
 
$
625,703

 
$
621,955

4
 
5
 
5
 
71,014

 
70,811

5
 
1
 
1
 
1,669

 
1,644

 
 
 
 
 
 
$
698,386

 
$
694,410


Note 6. Equity Investments in the Managed Programs and Real Estate
 
We own interests in certain unconsolidated real estate investments with the Managed Programs and also own interests in the Managed Programs. We account for our interests in these investments under the equity method of accounting (i.e., at cost, increased or decreased by our share of earnings or losses, less distributions, plus contributions and other adjustments required by equity method accounting, such as basis differences) or at fair value by electing the equity method fair value option available under U.S. GAAP.
 


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 22
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

The following table presents Equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs and real estate, which represents our proportionate share of the income or losses of these investments, as well as certain adjustments related to amortization of basis differences related to purchase accounting adjustments (in thousands):
 
Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Distributions of Available Cash (Note 3)
$
11,793

 
$
10,981

Proportionate share of equity in earnings of equity investments in the Managed Programs
2,199

 
1,112

Amortization of basis differences on equity method investments in the Managed Programs
(290
)
 
(239
)
Total equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs
13,702

 
11,854

Equity in earnings of equity method investments in real estate
2,944

 
4,102

Amortization of basis differences on equity method investments in real estate
(872
)
 
(945
)
Equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs and real estate
$
15,774

 
$
15,011

 
Managed Programs
 
We own interests in the Managed Programs and account for these interests under the equity method because, as their advisor and through our ownership of their common stock, we do not exert control over, but we do have the ability to exercise significant influence on, the Managed Programs. Operating results of the Managed REITs and CESH I are included in the Owned Real Estate segment and operating results of CCIF are included in the Investment Management segment.
 
The following table sets forth certain information about our investments in the Managed Programs (dollars in thousands):
 
 
% of Outstanding Interests Owned at
 
Carrying Amount of Investment at
Fund
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
CPA®:17 – Global
 
3.609
%
 
3.456
%
 
$
106,263

 
$
99,584

CPA®:17 – Global operating partnership
 
0.009
%
 
0.009
%
 

 

CPA®:18 – Global
 
1.843
%
 
1.616
%
 
20,357

 
17,955

CPA®:18 – Global operating partnership
 
0.034
%
 
0.034
%
 
209

 
209

CWI 1
 
1.260
%
 
1.109
%
 
14,781

 
11,449

CWI 1 operating partnership
 
0.015
%
 
0.015
%
 
186

 

CWI 2
 
0.795
%
 
0.773
%
 
6,990

 
5,091

CWI 2 operating partnership
 
0.015
%
 
0.015
%
 
300

 
300

CCIF
 
10.051
%
 
13.322
%
 
23,806

 
23,528

CESH I (a)
 
2.424
%
 
2.431
%
 
2,453

 
2,701

 
 
 
 
 
 
$
175,345

 
$
160,817

__________
(a)
Investment is accounted for at fair value.

CPA®:17 – Global — The carrying value of our investment in CPA®:17 – Global at March 31, 2017 includes asset management fees receivable, for which 241,445 shares of CPA®:17 – Global common stock were issued during the second quarter of 2017. We received distributions from this investment during both the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $1.9 million. We received distributions from our investment in the CPA®:17 – Global operating partnership during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $6.8 million and $6.7 million, respectively.



 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 23
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

CPA®:18 – Global — The carrying value of our investment in CPA®:18 – Global at March 31, 2017 includes asset management fees receivable, for which 114,548 shares of CPA®:18 – Global class A common stock were issued during the second quarter of 2017. We received distributions from this investment during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $0.3 million and $0.2 million, respectively. We received distributions from our investment in the CPA®:18 – Global operating partnership during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $1.7 million and $1.3 million, respectively.

CWI 1 — The carrying value of our investment in CWI 1 at March 31, 2017 includes asset management fees receivable, for which 113,744 shares of CWI 1 common stock were issued during the second quarter of 2017. We received distributions from this investment during both the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $0.2 million. We received distributions from our investment in the CWI 1 operating partnership during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $1.7 million and $2.5 million, respectively.

CWI 2 The carrying value of our investment in CWI 2 at March 31, 2017 includes asset management fees receivable, for which 64,433 shares of CWI 2 class A common stock were issued during the second quarter of 2017. We received distributions from this investment during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $0.1 million and less than $0.1 million, respectively. We received distributions from our investment in the CWI 2 operating partnership during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $1.6 million and $0.5 million, respectively.

CCIF We received distributions from this investment during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 of $0.3 million and $0.1 million, respectively.

CESH I Under the limited partnership agreement we have with CESH I, we pay all organization and offering costs on behalf of CESH I, and instead of being reimbursed by CESH I on a dollar-for-dollar basis for those costs, we receive limited partnership units of CESH I equal to 2.5% of its gross offering proceeds (Note 3). We have elected to account for our investment in CESH I at fair value by selecting the equity method fair value option available under U.S. GAAP. We record our investment in CESH I on a one quarter lag; therefore, the balance of our equity method investment in CESH I recorded as of March 31, 2017 is based on the estimated fair value of our equity method investment in CESH I as of December 31, 2016. We did not receive distributions from this investment during the three months ended March 31, 2017.

At March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the aggregate unamortized basis differences on our equity investments in the Managed Programs were $34.6 million and $31.7 million, respectively.

Interests in Other Unconsolidated Real Estate Investments

We own equity interests in single-tenant net-leased properties that are generally leased to companies through noncontrolling interests (i) in partnerships and limited liability companies that we do not control but over which we exercise significant influence or (ii) as tenants-in-common subject to common control. Generally, the underlying investments are jointly owned with affiliates. We account for these investments under the equity method of accounting. Earnings for each investment are recognized in accordance with each respective investment agreement.

The following table sets forth our ownership interests in our equity investments in real estate, excluding the Managed Programs, and their respective carrying values (dollars in thousands):
 
 
 
 
 
 
Carrying Value at
Lessee
 
Co-owner
 
Ownership Interest
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
The New York Times Company
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
45%
 
$
69,666

 
$
69,668

Frontier Spinning Mills, Inc.
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
40%
 
24,130

 
24,138

Beach House JV, LLC (a)
 
Third Party
 
N/A
 
15,105

 
15,105

Actebis Peacock GmbH (b)
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
30%
 
11,260

 
11,205

C1000 Logistiek Vastgoed B.V. (b) (c)
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
15%
 
8,700

 
8,739

Waldaschaff Automotive GmbH and Wagon Automotive Nagold GmbH (b) (d)
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
33%
 
7,583

 
8,887

Wanbishi Archives Co. Ltd. (e)
 
CPA®:17 – Global
 
3%
 
351

 
334

 
 
 
 
 
 
$
136,795

 
$
138,076

__________


 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 24
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

(a)
This investment is in the form of a preferred equity interest.
(b)
The carrying value of this investment is affected by fluctuations in the exchange rate of the euro.
(c)
This investment represents a tenancy-in-common interest, whereby the property is encumbered by the debt for which we are jointly and severally liable. The co-obligor is CPA®:17 – Global and the amount due under the arrangement was approximately $69.0 million at March 31, 2017. Of this amount, $10.4 million represents the amount we agreed to pay and is included within the carrying value of the investment at March 31, 2017.
(d)
This balance decreased primarily due to our proportionate share of approximately $1.5 million of an impairment charge recognized by the investment during the three months ended March 31, 2017, which was recorded in Equity in earnings of equity method investments in the Managed Programs and real estate in the consolidated financial statements.
(e)
The carrying value of this investment is affected by fluctuations in the exchange rate of the yen.

We received aggregate distributions of $3.8 million and $4.0 million from our other unconsolidated real estate investments for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. At March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the aggregate unamortized basis differences on our unconsolidated real estate investments were $7.2 million and $6.7 million, respectively.

Note 7. Goodwill and Other Intangibles

We have recorded net lease and internal-use software development intangibles that are being amortized over periods ranging from three years to 40 years. In addition, we have several ground lease intangibles that are being amortized over periods of up to 99 years. In-place lease and tenant relationship intangibles are included in In-place lease and tenant relationship intangible assets, net in the consolidated financial statements. Above-market rent intangibles are included in Above-market rent intangible assets, net in the consolidated financial statements. Below-market ground lease (as lessee), trade name, and internal-use software development intangibles are included in Other assets, net in the consolidated financial statements. Below-market rent, above-market ground lease (as lessee), and below-market purchase option intangibles are included in Below-market rent and other intangible liabilities, net in the consolidated financial statements.

The following table presents a reconciliation of our goodwill (in thousands):
 
Owned Real Estate
 
Investment Management
 
Total
Balance at January 1, 2017
$
572,313

 
$
63,607

 
$
635,920

Foreign currency translation adjustments
951

 

 
951

Balance at March 31, 2017
$
573,264

 
$
63,607

 
$
636,871




 
W. P. Carey 3/31/2017 10-Q 25
                    

 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

Intangible assets, intangible liabilities, and goodwill are summarized as follows (in thousands):
 
March 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
 
Gross Carrying Amount
 
Accumulated Amortization
 
Net Carrying Amount
 
Gross Carrying Amount
 
Accumulated Amortization
 
Net Carrying Amount
Finite-Lived Intangible Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Internal-use software development costs
$
18,600

 
$
(5,757
)
 
$
12,843

 
$
18,568

 
$
(5,068
)
 
$
13,500

 
18,600

 
(5,757
)
 
12,843

 
18,568

 
(5,068
)
 
13,500

Lease Intangibles:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In-place lease and tenant relationship
1,151,213

 
(346,113
)
 
805,100

 
1,148,232

 
(322,119
)
 
826,113

Above-market rent
633,179

 
(225,699
)
 
407,480

 
632,383

 
(210,927
)
 
421,456

Below-market ground lease
17,801

 
(1,325
)
 
16,476

 
23,140

 
(1,381
)
 
21,759

 
1,802,193

 
(573,137
)
 
1,229,056

 
1,803,755

 
(534,427
)
 
1,269,328

Indefinite-Lived Goodwill and Intangible Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Goodwill
636,871

 

 
636,871

 
635,920

 

 
635,920

Trade name
3,975

 

 
3,975

 
3,975

 

 
3,975

Below-market ground lease
878

 

 
878

 
866

 

 
866

 
641,724

 

 
641,724

 
640,761

 

 
640,761

Total intangible assets
$
2,462,517

 
$
(578,894
)
 
$
1,883,623

 
$
2,463,084

 
$
(539,495
)
 
$
1,923,589

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Finite-Lived Intangible Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Below-market rent
$
(133,547
)
 
$
40,800

 
$
(92,747
)
 
$
(133,137
)
 
$
38,231

 
$
(94,906
)
Above-market ground lease
(12,979
)
 
2,523

 
(10,456
)
 
(12,948
)
 
2,362

 
(10,586
)
 
(146,526
)
 
43,323

 
(103,203
)
 
(146,085
)
 
40,593

 
(105,492
)
Indefinite-Lived Intangible Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Below-market purchase option
(16,711
)
 

 
(16,711
)
 
(16,711
)
 

 
(16,711
)
Total intangible liabilities
$
(163,237
)
 
$
43,323