Attached files

file filename
EX-21.1 - SUBSIDIARIES OF REGISTRANT - TECH DATA CORPexhibit21-1.htm
EX-10.52 - CHANGE IN CONTROL SEVERANCE POLICY - TECH DATA CORPexhibit10-52.htm
EX-10.50 - AMENDED AND RESTATED CREDIT AGREEMENT - TECH DATA CORPexhibit10-50.htm
EX-10.51 - EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - TECH DATA CORPexhibit10-51.htm
EX-31.A - CERTIFICATION - TECH DATA CORPexhibit31-a16.htm
EX-31.B - CERTIFICATION - TECH DATA CORPexhibit31-b16.htm
EX-32.A - CERTIFICATION - TECH DATA CORPexhibit32-a16.htm
EX-32.B - CERTIFICATION - TECH DATA CORPexhibit32-b16.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF REGISTERED INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - TECH DATA CORPexhibit23-1.htm


 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
FORM 10-K
 

(Mark One)
 
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2016
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from             to             .

Commission File Number 0-14625
 

TECH DATA CORPORATION
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Florida
59-1578329
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
5350 Tech Data Drive
Clearwater, Florida
33760
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code): (727) 539-7429
 
 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Common stock, par value $.0015 per share
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act: None
 
 
Indicate by a check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x   No   ¨
Indicate by a check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes   ¨   No   x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “accelerated filer”, “large accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated Filer
x

Accelerated Filer
¨
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated Filer
¨
Smaller Reporting Company Filer
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨ No  x
Aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates was $2,036,301,933 based on the reported last sale price of common stock on July 31, 2015 which is the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
 
Class
March 9, 2016
Common stock, par value $.0015 per share
35,087,522
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
The registrant’s Proxy Statement for use at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders on June 1, 2016, is incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent stated herein.
 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 1.
ITEM 1A.
ITEM 1B.
ITEM 2.
ITEM 3.
ITEM 4.
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 5.
ITEM 6.
ITEM 7.
ITEM 7A.
ITEM 8.
ITEM 9.
ITEM 9A.
ITEM 9B.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 10
ITEM 11
ITEM 12
ITEM 13
ITEM 14.
 
 
 
 
 
ITEM 15.
 
 
Exhibits
 
Certifications
 
 

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PART I
ITEM 1.    Business.

OVERVIEW
Tech Data Corporation (“Tech Data”, "we", "our", "us" or the “Company”) is one of the world’s largest wholesale distributors of technology products. We serve as an indispensable link in the technology supply chain by bringing products from the world’s leading technology vendors to market, as well as providing our customers with advanced logistics capabilities and value-added services. Our customers include approximately 105,000 value-added resellers (“VARs”), direct marketers, retailers and corporate resellers who support the diverse technology needs of end users. We sell to customers in more than 100 countries throughout North America, South America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The two primary geographic markets we serve are the Americas and Europe. For a discussion of our geographic reporting segments, see Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”
Some of our key financial objectives are to gain share in select product areas in the geographies in which we operate and to improve operating income by growing gross profit faster than operating costs. In addition, we focus on deploying the right level of capital that yields solid operating cash flow generation and a return on invested capital that is above our weighted average cost of capital.
Key to achieving our financial objectives is our strategy of execution, diversification and innovation that we believe differentiates our business in the marketplace.
Execution is fundamental to our business success. We have 22 logistics centers where each day, tens of millions of dollars of technology products are received from vendors, picked and packed and shipped to our customers. Products are generally shipped from regionally located logistics centers the same day the orders are received. In addition, execution is marked by a high level of service provided to our customers through our company’s technical, sales and marketing support, electronic commerce tools, product integration services and financing programs.
Our diversification strategy seeks to continuously remix our product, customer and services portfolios towards higher growth and higher return market segments through organic growth initiatives and acquisitions. We believe that as industry standardization, cloud computing, mobility, the Internet of Things ("IoT") and other potentially disruptive factors transform the way technology is used and delivered, we will leverage our highly efficient infrastructure to capture new market opportunities in our strategic focus areas of data center, software, mobility, consumer electronics, integrated supply chain services and other value-added service offerings.
The final tenet of our strategy is innovation. Our IT systems and e-business tools and programs have provided our business with the flexibility to effectively navigate fluctuations in market conditions, structural changes in the technology industry, as well as changes created by products we sell. These IT systems and e-business tools and programs have also worked to strengthen our vendor and customer relationships, while at the same time improving the efficiency of these business partners.
We believe our strategy of execution, diversification and innovation will continue to strengthen our value proposition with vendor partners and reseller customers while positioning us for continued market expansion and profitable growth.
HISTORY
Tech Data was incorporated in 1974 to market data processing supplies such as tapes, disk packs, and custom and stock tab forms for mini and mainframe computers directly to end users. With the advent of microcomputer dealers, we made the transition to a wholesale distributor in 1984 by broadening our product line to include hardware products and withdrawing entirely from end-user sales.
From fiscal 1989 through fiscal 2011, we expanded geographically through the acquisitions of several distribution companies in both the Americas and Europe, strengthening our position in certain product and customer segments. In fiscal 2008, we executed an agreement with Brightstar Corp. ("Brightstar"), one of the world's largest wireless products distributors and supply chain solutions providers, to establish a joint venture in Europe. In fiscal 2013, we acquired Brightstar’s fifty percent ownership interest in this joint venture, herinafter referred to as Tech Data Mobile. Tech Data Mobile distributes mobile phones and other wireless devices to a variety of customers including mobile operators, dealers, agents, retailers and e-tailers in certain European markets.
In fiscal 2012, we made two acquisitions in the European technology distribution marketplace. The addition of these businesses expanded our product and customer portfolios and continued to add desired skill sets, while leveraging our logistics infrastructure in Europe. Also in fiscal 2012, we executed an agreement with Brightstar to establish TDMobility, a joint venture in the United States. In fiscal 2014, we acquired Brightstar's fifty percent ownership interest in this joint venture, hereinafter referred to as Tech Data Mobile Solutions. Tech Data Mobile Solutions simplifies the selling, delivery and support of mobile services for our reseller customers serving the small and medium business markets.
In fiscal 2013, we completed the acquisition of several distribution companies of Specialist Distribution Group (collectively "SDG"), the distribution arm of Specialist Computer Holdings PLC, a privately-held IT services company headquartered in the United Kingdom. The acquisition of SDG supports the Company’s diversification strategy by strengthening its European data center and broadline offerings in

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key markets and expanding the Company’s vendor and customer portfolios, while leveraging the Company’s existing pan-European infrastructure.
In March 2015, we entered into an agreement for the sale of our business operations in Chile and Peru and also committed to a plan to exit our business operations in Uruguay as we did not believe these operations would generate consistently acceptable returns on invested capital. In June 2015, the Company completed the acquisition of Signature Technology Group, Inc. ("STG"), a provider of data center and professional services throughout North America.
INDUSTRY
The wholesale distribution model has proven to be well suited for both manufacturers and publishers of technology products (also referred to in this document as “vendors”) and resellers of those products. The large number of resellers makes it cost efficient for vendors to rely on wholesale distributors to serve this diverse and highly fragmented customer base.
Resellers in the traditional distribution model are able to build efficiencies and reduce their costs by relying on distributors, such as Tech Data, for a number of services, including multi-vendor solutions, product configuration/integration, marketing support, financing, technical support, and inventory management, which includes direct shipment to end-users and, in some cases, provides end-users with the distributors’ inventory availability.
Due to the large number of vendors and products, resellers often cannot, or choose not to, establish direct purchasing relationships with vendors. As a result, they frequently rely on wholesale distributors, such as Tech Data, who leverage purchasing costs across multiple vendors to satisfy a significant portion of the resellers' product procurement, logistics, financing, marketing and technical support needs.
The technology distribution industry continues to address a broad spectrum of reseller and vendor requirements. While some vendors have elected to sell directly to resellers or end-users for particular customer and product segments, we believe that a vast majority of vendors continue to embrace traditional distributors that have proven capabilities to manage multiple products and resellers, provide access to fragmented markets, and deliver products in a cost-effective and efficient manner.
New products and market opportunities have helped to offset the impact on technology distributors of vendor direct sales. Further, vendors continue to seek the logistics expertise of distributors to penetrate highly fragmented markets such as the small- and medium-sized business (“SMB”) sector, which relies on VARs, our primary customer base, to gain access to and support for new technology. The economies of scale and global reach of large industry-leading and well-capitalized distributors are expected to continue to be significant competitive advantages in this marketplace.
PRODUCTS AND VENDORS
We distribute and market hundreds of thousands of products from more than 1,200 of the world’s leading technology hardware suppliers, networking equipment suppliers, software publishers, and other suppliers of technology peripherals, consumer electronics, digital displays and mobile phone hardware and accessories. These products are typically purchased directly from the vendor on a non-exclusive basis. Conversely, our vendor agreements do not restrict us from selling similar products manufactured by competitors, nor do they require us to sell a specified quantity of product. As a result, we have the flexibility to terminate or curtail sales of one product line in favor of another due to technological change, pricing considerations, product availability, customer demand, or vendor distribution policies. Overall, we believe that our diversified and evolving product portfolio will provide a solid platform for continued growth.
We continually evolve our product line in order to provide our customers with access to the latest technology products. However, from time to time, the demand for certain products that we sell exceeds the supply available from the vendor. In such cases, we generally receive an allocation of the available products. We believe that our ability to compete is not adversely affected by these periodic shortages and the resulting allocations.
We believe that our vendor agreements are in the form customarily used by manufacturers and distributors. Agreements typically contain provisions that allow termination by either party upon a short notice period. In most instances, a vendor who elects to terminate a distribution agreement will repurchase the vendor’s products carried in the distributor’s inventory.
Many of our vendor agreements also allow for stock rotation and price protection provisions. Stock rotation rights give us the ability, subject to certain limitations, to return for credit or exchange a portion of those inventory items purchased from the vendor. Price protection situations occur when a vendor credits us for declines in inventory value resulting from the vendor’s price reductions. Along with our inventory management policies and practices, these provisions reduce our risk of loss due to slow-moving inventory, vendor price reductions, product updates or obsolescence.
Sometimes the industry practices discussed above are not embodied in agreements and do not protect us in all cases from declines in inventory value. However, we believe that these practices provide a significant level of protection from such declines, although no assurance can be given that such practices will continue or that they will adequately protect us against declines in inventory value. We sell products in various countries throughout the world, and product categories may vary from region to region. Our consolidated revenue mix may fluctuate between and within our operating segments as well as within our product categories. These fluctuations can be influenced by our diversification strategies, new product offerings and supply and demand fluctuations within our operating regions.

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Our product mix is divided into five strategic focus categories, which are primarily comprised of the following products:
Broadline
notebooks, tablets, desktops, printers, printer supplies and components
Data center
industry standard servers, proprietary servers, networking, and storage
Software
virtualization, cloud, security, desktop applications, operating systems and utilities software
Mobility
mobile phones and accessories
Consumer electronics
TV's, digital displays, consumer audio-visual devices and network-attached consumer devices

Our consolidated net sales for fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014 within our strategic focus categories approximated the following:
Year ended January 31:
 
2015
 
2014
Broadline
 
47%
 
46%
Data center
 
22%
 
23%
Software
 
18%
 
18%
Mobility
 
10%
 
9%
Consumer electronics
 
3%
 
4%

We generated approximately 20%, 15% and 13% of our consolidated net sales in fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively, from products purchased from Apple, Inc. In addition, approximately 18%, 19% and 21% of our consolidated net sales in fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014 were generated from products purchased from Hewlett-Packard Company (“HP”). HP split into two companies, HP Inc. (“HPI”) and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (“HPE”), effective November 1, 2015. The amounts presented in relation to HP include the combined sales generated from products purchased from HPI and HPE. There were no other vendors that accounted for 10% or more of our consolidated net sales in fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014.
CUSTOMERS AND SERVICES
Our products are purchased directly from vendors in significant quantities and are marketed to an active reseller base of approximately 105,000 VARs, direct marketers, retailers and corporate resellers. No single customer accounted for more than 10% of our net sales during fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014.
The market for VARs is attractive because VARs generally rely on distributors as their principal source of technology products and the related financing for the products. This reliance is due to VARs typically not wanting to invest the resources to establish a large number of direct purchasing relationships or stock significant product inventories. Direct marketers, retailers and corporate resellers may establish direct relationships with vendors for their highest volume products, but utilize distributors as the primary source for other product requirements and an alternative source for products acquired directly.
In addition to an extensive product offering from the world's leading technology vendors, we provide resellers a high level of customer service through our training and technical support, suite of electronic commerce tools, customized shipping documents, product

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configuration/integration services and access to flexible financing programs. We also provide services to our vendors by providing them the opportunity to participate in a number of special promotions and marketing services targeted to the needs of our resellers.
As part of our aforementioned diversification strategy, our other strategic areas of focus for the company are integrated supply chain services designed to provide innovative third party logistics and other service offerings to our business partners, as well as value-added, professional services designed to augment our customers' technical capabilities. Service revenues were less than 10% of our consolidated net sales during fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014.
We provide our vendors with access to one of the largest bases of resellers throughout the Americas and Europe, delivering products to those resellers from our 22 regionally located logistics centers. We have located our logistics centers near our customers which enables us to deliver products on a timely basis, thereby reducing the customers’ need to invest in inventory (see also Item 2, "Properties" for further discussion of our locations and logistics centers).
SALES AND ELECTRONIC COMMERCE
Our sales team consists of field sales and inside telemarketing sales representatives. The sales representatives are provided comprehensive training on our policies and procedures, the technical specifications of products, and attend product seminars offered by our vendors. Field sales representatives are typically located in major metropolitan areas in their respective geographies and are supported by inside telemarketing sales teams covering a designated territory. Our team concept provides a strong personal relationship between our customers’ representatives and Tech Data. Customers typically call our inside sales teams on dedicated telephone numbers or contact us through various electronic methods to place orders. If the product is in stock and the customer has available credit, customer orders are generally shipped the same day from the logistics center nearest the customer or the intended end-user.
Customers often utilize our electronic ordering and information systems. Through our website, customers can gain remote access to our information systems to place orders, or check order status, inventory availability and pricing. Certain of our larger customers have electronic data interchange ("EDI") services available whereby orders, order acknowledgments, invoices, inventory status reports, customized pricing information and other industry standard EDI transactions are consummated on-line, which improves efficiency and timeliness for the Company and our customers.
COMPETITION
We operate in a market characterized by intense competition, based on such factors as product availability, credit terms and availability, price, speed of delivery, effectiveness of information systems and e-commerce tools, ability to tailor solutions to customers' needs, quality and depth of product lines and training, as well as service and support provided by the distributor to the customer. We believe we are well equipped to compete effectively with other distributors in all of these areas.
We compete against several distributors in the Americas market, including broad-based IT product distributors such as Ingram Micro Inc. ("Ingram Micro"), Synnex Corp., and to a lesser extent, more specialized distributors such as Arrow Electronics, Inc. (“Arrow”) and Avnet, Inc. (“Avnet”), along with some regional and local distributors. The competitive environment in Europe is more fragmented, with market share spread among several regional and local competitors such as ALSO/Actebis and Esprinet, as well as international distributors such as Ingram Micro, Westcon Group, Inc., Arrow and Avnet.
The Company also faces competition from companies entering or expanding into the logistics and product fulfillment and e-commerce supply chain services market. Additionally, certain direct sales relationships between manufacturers, resellers, and end-users continue to introduce change into the competitive landscape of our industry. As we expand our business into new areas, we may face increased competition from other distributors as well as vendors. However, we believe vendors will continue to sell their products through distributors, such as Tech Data, due to our ability to provide them with access to our broad customer base and serve them in a highly cost-effective and efficient manner. Our logistics capabilities, as well as our sales and marketing, credit and product management expertise, allow our vendors to expand their market coverage while lowering their selling, inventory and fulfillment costs.
EMPLOYEES
On January 31, 2016, we had approximately 9,000 employees (as measured on a full-time equivalent basis). Certain of our employees in various countries outside of the United States are subject to laws providing representation rights to employees through workers' councils. Our success depends on the talent and dedication of our employees and we strive to attract, hire, develop and retain outstanding employees. We believe significant benefits are realized from having a strong and seasoned management team with many years of experience in technology distribution and related industries. We consider relations with our employees to be good.
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC OPERATIONS AND EXPORT SALES
We operate predominately in a single industry segment as a distributor of technology products, logistics management, and other value-added services. While we operate primarily in one industry, we manage our business in two geographic segments: the Americas and Europe.

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Over the past several years, we have expanded our presence in certain existing markets and exited certain markets based upon our assessment of, among other factors, our earnings potential and the risk exposure in those markets, including foreign currency exchange, regulatory and political risks. To the extent we decide to close any of our operations, we may incur charges and operating losses related to such closures and recognize a portion of our accumulated other comprehensive income in connection with such a disposition. For information on our net sales, operating income and identifiable assets by geographic region, see Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
ASSET MANAGEMENT
We manage our inventories in a manner that allows us to maintain sufficient quantities to achieve high order fill rates while attempting to stock only those products in high demand that have a rapid turnover rate. Our business, like that of other distributors, is subject to the risk that the value of inventory will be impacted adversely by suppliers’ price reductions or by technological changes affecting the usefulness or desirability of the products comprising the inventory. Our contracts with many of our vendors provide price protection and stock rotation privileges to reduce the risk of loss due to manufacturer price reductions and slow moving or obsolete inventory. In the event of a vendor price reduction, we generally receive a credit for the impact on products in inventory and we have the right to rotate a certain percentage of purchases, subject to certain limitations. Historically, price protection and stock rotation privileges, as well as our inventory management procedures, have helped reduce the risk of loss of inventory value.
We attempt to control losses on credit sales by closely monitoring customers’ creditworthiness through our IT systems, which contain detailed information on each customer’s payment history and other relevant information. In certain countries, we have obtained credit insurance that insures a percentage of the credit extended by us to certain customers against possible loss. The Company also has arrangements with certain finance companies that provide inventory financing facilities to our customers as an additional approach to mitigate credit risk. Certain of the Company’s vendors subsidize these financing arrangements for the benefit of our customers. Customers who qualify for credit terms are typically granted net 30-day payment terms in the Americas. While credit terms in Europe vary by country, the vast majority of customers are granted credit terms ranging from 30 to 60 days. We also sell products on a prepayment, credit card and cash-on-delivery basis.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AVAILABLE
We are subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We therefore file our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statements, and other documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Such reports may be obtained by visiting the Public Reference Room of the SEC at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room can be obtained by calling the SEC at (800) SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an Internet site (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information.
Our principal Internet address is www.techdata.com. We make available free of charge, through our website, our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Information on Tech Data’s website is not incorporated into this Form 10-K or the Company’s other securities filings and is not a part of them.
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
The following table sets forth the name, age and title of each of the persons who were serving as executive officers of Tech Data as of March 24, 2016:
Name 
 
Age 
 
Title 
Robert M. Dutkowsky
 
61
 
Chief Executive Officer
Charles V. Dannewitz
 
61
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Richard T. Hume
 
56
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
John A. Tonnison
 
47
 
Executive Vice President, Cloud Computing and Chief Information Officer
Néstor Cano
 
51
 
President, Europe
Joseph H. Quaglia
 
51
 
President, the Americas
Alain Amsellem
 
56
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Europe
Beth E. Simonetti
 
50
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer
Jeffrey L. Taylor
 
49
 
Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller
Joseph B. Trepani
 
55
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Americas
David R. Vetter
 
56
 
Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
Robert M. Dutkowsky, Chief Executive Officer, joined Tech Data as Chief Executive Officer and was appointed to the Board of Directors in October 2006. His career began with IBM where, during his 20-year tenure, he served in several senior management positions including Vice President, Distribution - IBM Asia/Pacific. Prior to joining Tech Data, Mr. Dutkowsky served as President, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of Egenera, Inc. (a software and virtualization technology company), from 2004 until 2006, and served as President, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of J.D. Edwards & Co., Inc. (a software company) from 2002 until 2004. He was President, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of GenRad, Inc. from 2000 until 2002. Starting in 1997, Mr. Dutkowsky was Executive Vice President, Markets and Channels, at EMC Corporation before being promoted to President, Data General, in 1999. Mr. Dutkowsky holds a Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University.
Charles V. Dannewitz, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, joined the Company in February 1995 as Vice President of Taxes. He was promoted to Senior Vice President of Taxes in March 2000, and assumed responsibility for worldwide treasury operations in July 2003. In February 2014, he was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Americas. In June 2015, he was promoted to Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Dannewitz was employed by Price Waterhouse from 1981 to 1995, most recently as a tax partner. Mr. Dannewitz is a Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Illinois Wesleyan University.
Richard T. Hume, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, joined the Company in March 2016. Prior to his appointment at the Company, Mr. Hume was employed for over thirty years at IBM. Most recently, from January 2015 to February 2016, Mr. Hume served as General Manager and Chief Operating Officer of Infrastructure and Outsourcing. Prior to that position, from January 2012 to January 2015, Mr. Hume served as General Manager, Europe where he led IBM’s multi-brand European organization. From 2008 to 2011, Mr. Hume served as General Manager, Global Business Partners, directing the growth and channel development initiatives for IBM’s Business Partner Channel. Mr. Hume holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Pennsylvania State University.
John A. Tonnison, Executive Vice President, Cloud Computing and Chief Information Officer, joined the Company in March 2001 as Vice President, Worldwide E-Business and was promoted to Senior Vice President of IT Americas in December 2006. In February 2010, he was appointed to Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer. In July 2015, additional responsibilities were added to the role to include leadership of the strategic directions, operations and go-to-market execution of the Company's cloud business. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Tonnison held executive management positions in the U.S., United Kingdom and Germany with

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Computer 2000, Technology Solutions Network and Mancos Computers. Mr. Tonnison was educated in the United Kingdom and became a U.S. citizen in 2006.
Néstor Cano, President, Europe, joined Computer 2000 (and the Company via acquisition) in July 1989 as a Software Product Manager and served in various management positions within the Company’s operations in Spain and Portugal from 1990 to 1995, after which time he was promoted to Regional Managing Director. In March 1999, he was appointed Executive Vice President of U.S. Sales and Marketing, and in January 2000 was promoted to President, the Americas. Mr. Cano was promoted to President, Worldwide Operations in August 2000 and was appointed to President, Europe in June 2007. Mr. Cano holds a PDG (similar to an Executive MBA) from IESE Business School in Barcelona and an Engineering Degree from Barcelona University.
Joseph H. Quaglia, President, the Americas, joined the Company in May 2006 as Vice President, East and Government Sales and was promoted to Senior Vice President of U.S. Marketing in November 2007. In February 2012, he was appointed to the additional role of President, TDMobility and he was promoted to President, the Americas in November 2013. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Quaglia held senior management positions with CA Technologies, StorageNetworks Inc. and network software provider Atabok. Mr. Quaglia holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Indiana State University and an M.B.A. from Butler University.
Alain Amsellem, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Europe, joined the Company in 1994 through Tech Data’s acquisition of French distributor, Softmart International S.A. and served as France Finance Director until September 1999 when he was promoted to France Managing Director. In August 2004, Mr. Amsellem was promoted to Senior Vice President of Southern Europe, and was appointed Senior Vice President - Europe Finance & Operations in 2007. In February 2014, he was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Europe. Mr. Amsellem is a Chartered Accountant and holds a degree in management and chartered accountancy from Paris Dauphine University.
Beth E. Simonetti, Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, joined the company in September 2015 as Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer. Prior to joining Tech Data, Ms. Simonetti served as Senior Vice President, Human Resources at Baker & Taylor, Inc. since 2010. Previously, she was an executive search consultant and was with Cardinal Health for 12 years in various HR leadership positions. Ms. Simonetti holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Miami University in Ohio and a Masters of Hospital and Health Services Administration from Ohio State University.
Jeffrey L. Taylor, Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller, joined the Company in May 2007 and held the position of Vice President, Corporate Accounting through April 2011. Mr. Taylor rejoined the Company in October 2012 serving in the same capacity until July 2013 when he was appointed Vice President and Assistant Corporate Controller. In June 2015 he was promoted to Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller. Prior to rejoining the Company in October 2012, Mr. Taylor served in executive financial management with a value-added reseller and previously was employed by Deloitte & Touche ("Deloitte") from 1992 to 2003, most recently as Audit Partner in Russia and including three years in Deloitte's U.S. national office in the Quality Assurance and SEC Services groups. Mr. Taylor holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from San Diego State University.
Joseph B. Trepani, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Americas, joined the Company in March 1990 as Controller and held the position of Director of Operations from October 1991 through January 1995. In February 1995, he was promoted to Vice President and Worldwide Controller and to Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller in March 1998. In June 2015, he was appointed Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Americas. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Trepani was Vice President of Finance for Action Staffing, Inc. from 1989 to 1990. From 1982 to 1989, he was employed by Price Waterhouse. Mr. Trepani is a Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from Florida State University.
David R. Vetter, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, joined the Company in June 1993 as Vice President and General Counsel and was promoted to Corporate Vice President and General Counsel in April 2000. In March 2003, he was promoted to his current position of Senior Vice President, and effective July 2003, was appointed Secretary. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Vetter was employed by the law firm of Robbins, Gaynor & Bronstein, P.A. from 1984 to 1993, most recently as a partner. Mr. Vetter is a member of the Florida Bar Association and holds Bachelor of Arts degrees in English and Economics from Bucknell University and a Juris Doctorate Degree from the University of Florida.




9



ITEM 1A.    Risk Factors.
The following are certain risk factors that could affect our business, financial position and results of operations. These risk factors should be considered in connection with evaluating the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K because these factors could cause the actual results and conditions to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Before you buy our common stock or other securities, you should know that making such an investment involves risks, including the risks described below. The risks that have been highlighted below are not the only risks of our business. If any of the risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be negatively affected. In that case, the trading price of our common stock or other securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. Risk factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our forward-looking statements are as follows:
Our ability to earn profit is more challenging when sales slow from a down economy as a result of gross profit declining faster than cost reduction efforts taking effect.
High levels of unemployment in the markets we serve, as well as austerity measures that may be implemented by governments in those markets, can constrain economic growth resulting in lower demand for the products and services we sell. When we experience a rapid decline in demand for products we experience more difficulty in achieving the gross profit and operating profit we desire due to the lower sales and increased pricing pressure. The economic environment may also result in changes in vendor terms and conditions, such as rebates, cash discounts and cooperative marketing efforts, which may also result in downward pressure on our gross profit. As a result, there is pressure to reduce the cost of operations in order to maximize operating profits. To the extent we cannot reduce costs to offset such decline in gross profits, our operating profits typically deteriorate. The benefits from cost reductions may also take longer to fully realize and may not fully mitigate the impact of the reduced demand. Should we experience a decline in operating profits, especially in Europe, the valuations we develop for purposes of our goodwill impairment test may be adversely affected, potentially resulting in impairment charges. Deterioration in the financial and credit markets heightens the risk of customer bankruptcies and delays in payment. Future deterioration in the credit markets could result in reduced availability of credit insurance to cover customer accounts. This, in turn, may result in our reducing the credit lines we provide to customers, thereby having a negative impact on our net sales.
Our competitors can take more market share by reducing prices on key vendor products that contribute the most to our profitability.
The Company operates in a highly competitive environment. The technology distribution industry is characterized by intense competition, based primarily on product availability, credit terms and availability, price, effectiveness of information systems and e-commerce tools, speed of delivery, ability to tailor specific solutions to customer needs, quality and depth of product lines and training, service and support. Our customers are not required to purchase any specific volume of products from us and may move business if pricing is reduced by competitors, resulting in lower sales. As a result, we must be extremely flexible in determining when to reduce price to maintain market share and sales volumes and when to allow our sales volumes to decline to maintain the quality of our profitability. The Company competes with a variety of regional, national and international wholesale distributors, some of which may have greater financial resources than the Company.
We are dependent on internal information and telecommunications systems, and any failure of these systems, including system security breaches, data protection breaches, or other cybersecurity attacks, may negatively impact our business and results of operations.  
The Company is highly dependent upon its internal information and telecommunications systems to operate its business. Failures of our internal information or telecommunications systems may prevent us from taking customer orders, shipping products and billing customers. Sales may also be impacted if our customers are unable to access our pricing and product availability information. Additionally, if the Company were to experience a security breakdown, disruption or breach that compromised sensitive information, it could harm our relationships with vendors and customers. The occurrence of any of these events could have a negative impact on our business and results of operations.
We may not be able to ship products if our third party shipping companies cease operations temporarily or permanently.
The Company relies on arrangements with independent shipping companies for the delivery of its products from vendors and to customers. The failure or inability of these shipping companies to deliver products, or the unavailability of their shipping services, even temporarily, may have an adverse effect on the Company's business.
If our vendors do not continue to provide price protection for inventory we purchase from them our profit from the sale of that inventory may decline.
It is very typical in our industry that the value of inventory will decline as a result of price reductions by vendors or technological obsolescence. It is the policy of many of our vendors to protect distributors from the loss in value of inventory due to technological change or the vendors' price reductions. Some vendors, however, may be unwilling or unable to pay the Company for price protection claims or products returned to them under purchase agreements. Moreover, industry practices are sometimes not embodied in written agreements and do not protect the Company in all cases from declines in inventory value. No assurance can be given that such

10


practices to protect distributors will continue, that unforeseen new product developments will not adversely affect the Company, or that the Company will be able to successfully manage its existing and future inventories.
Failure to obtain adequate product supplies from our largest vendors, or terminations of a supply or services agreement, or a significant change in vendor terms or conditions of sale by our largest vendors may negatively affect our net sales and operating profit.
The Company receives a significant percentage of revenues from products it purchases from certain vendors, such as Apple, Inc., HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. These vendors have significant negotiating power over us and rapid, significant and adverse changes in sales terms and conditions, such as reducing the amount of price protection and return rights as well as reducing the level of purchase discounts and rebates they make available to us, may reduce the profit we can earn on these vendors' products and result in loss of revenue and profitability. The Company's gross profit could be negatively impacted if the Company is unable to pass through the impact of these changes to the Company's customers or cannot develop systems to manage ongoing vendor programs. In addition, the Company's standard vendor distribution agreement permits termination without cause by either party upon 30 days notice. The loss of a relationship with any of the Company's key vendors, a change in their strategy (such as increasing direct sales), the merger or reorganization of significant vendors, or significant changes in terms on their products may adversely affect the Company's business.
Changes in our credit rating or other market factors may increase our interest expense or other costs of capital or capital may not be available to us on acceptable terms to fund our working capital needs. The inability to obtain such sources of capital could have an adverse effect on the Company's business.
The Company's business requires substantial capital to operate and to finance accounts receivable and product inventory that are not financed by trade creditors. The Company has historically relied upon cash generated from operations, bank credit lines, trade credit from vendors, proceeds from public offerings of its common stock and proceeds from debt offerings to satisfy its capital needs and to finance growth. The Company utilizes various financing instruments such as receivables securitization, leases, revolving credit facilities and trade receivable purchase agreements. As the financial markets change and new regulations come into effect, the cost of acquiring financing and the methods of financing may change. Changes in our credit rating or other market factors may increase our interest expense or other costs of capital or capital may not be available to us on acceptable terms to fund our working capital needs. The inability to obtain such sources of capital could have an adverse effect on the Company's business. The Company's credit facilities contain various financial and other covenants that may limit the Company's ability to borrow, or limit the Company's flexibility in responding to business conditions. These financing instruments involve variable rate debt, thus exposing the Company to risk of fluctuations in interest rates. Increases in interest rates would result in an increase in the interest expense on the Company's variable debt, which would reduce the Company's profitability.
We conduct business in countries outside of the United States, which exposes us to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates that result in losses in certain periods.
Approximately 65%, 68% and 67% of our net sales in fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014 were generated in countries outside of the United States, which exposes the Company to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The Company may enter into short-term forward exchange or option contracts to hedge this risk. Nevertheless, volatile foreign currency exchange rates increase our risk of loss related to products purchased in a currency other than the currency in which those products are sold. While we maintain policies to protect against fluctuations in currency exchange rates, extreme fluctuations have resulted in our incurring losses in some countries. The realization of any or all of these risks could have a significant adverse effect on our financial results. The translation of the financial statements of foreign operations into U.S. dollars is also impacted by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, which may positively or negatively impact our results of operations. In addition, the value of the Company's equity investment in foreign countries may fluctuate based upon changes in foreign currency exchange rates. These fluctuations, which are recorded in a cumulative translation adjustment account, may result in losses in the event a foreign subsidiary is sold or closed at a time when the foreign currency is weaker than when the Company made investments in the country. In addition, our local competitors in certain markets may have different purchasing models that provide them reduced foreign currency exposure compared to the Company. This may result in market pricing that the Company cannot meet without significantly lower profit on sales.

We have international operations which expose us to risks associated with conducting business in multiple jurisdictions.
The Company's international operations are subject to other risks such as the imposition of governmental controls, export license requirements, restrictions on the export of certain technology, political instability, trade restrictions, tariff changes, difficulties in staffing and managing international operations, changes in the interpretation and enforcement of laws (in particular related to items such as duty and taxation), difficulties in collecting accounts receivable, longer collection periods and the impact of local economic conditions and practices. There can be no assurance that these and other factors will not have an adverse effect on the Company's business.  
In addition, while the Company's labor force in the Americas is currently non-union, employees of certain European subsidiaries are subject to collective bargaining or similar arrangements. The Company does business in certain foreign countries where labor disruption is more common than is experienced in the United States and some of the freight carriers used by the Company are unionized. A labor strike by a group of the Company's employees, one of the Company's freight carriers, one of its vendors, a general strike by civil service employees, or a governmental shutdown could have an adverse effect on the Company's business. Many of the products the Company sells are manufactured in countries other than the countries in which the Company's logistics centers are

11


located. The inability to receive products into the logistics centers because of government action or labor disputes at critical ports of entry may have an adverse effect on the Company's business.
We cannot predict what losses we might incur in litigation matters, regulatory enforcement actions and contingencies that we may be involved with from time to time, including in connection with the restatement of prior financial statements.
The SEC has requested information from the Company with respect to the restatement of certain of our consolidated financial statements and other financial information from fiscal 2009 to fiscal 2013, and the Company is cooperating with the SEC request. See Item 3, “Legal Proceedings.” This pending SEC request for information and other potential proceedings could result in fines and other penalties. The Company has not reserved any amount in respect of these matters in its consolidated financial statements.
The Company cannot predict whether monetary losses, if any, it experiences in any proceedings related to the restatement will be covered by insurance or whether insurance proceeds recovered will be sufficient to offset such losses. Potential civil or regulatory proceedings may also divert the efforts and attention of the Company’s management from business operations.
The Company cannot predict what losses we might incur from other litigation matters, regulatory enforcement actions and contingencies that we may be involved with from time to time. There are various other claims, lawsuits and pending actions against us. We do not expect that the ultimate resolution of these other matters will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position. However, the resolution of certain of these matters could be material to our operating results for any particular period, depending on the level of income for such period. We can make no assurances that we will ultimately be successful in our defense of any of these other matters.

ITEM 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments.
Not applicable.

ITEM 2.    Properties.
Our executive offices are located in Clearwater, Florida. As of January 31, 2016, we operated a total of 22 logistics centers to provide our customers timely delivery of products. There are eleven logistics centers in each of the two regions in which we operate, the Americas and Europe.
As of January 31, 2016, we leased or owned approximately 7.1 million square feet of space. The majority of our office facilities and logistics centers are leased. Our facilities are well maintained and are adequate to conduct our current business. We do not anticipate significant difficulty in renewing our leases as they expire or securing replacement facilities.

ITEM 3.    Legal Proceedings.
Prior to fiscal 2004, one of the Company’s subsidiaries, located in Spain, was audited in relation to various value added tax (“VAT”) matters. As a result of those audits, the Spanish subsidiary received notices of assessment from the Regional Inspection Unit of Spain’s taxing authority that allege the subsidiary did not properly collect and remit VAT. The Spanish subsidiary appealed these assessments to the Madrid Central Economic Administrative Courts beginning in March 2010. Following the administrative court proceedings the matter was appealed to the Spanish National Appellate Court. During 2013, the Spanish National Appellate Court issued an opinion upholding the assessment for several of the assessed years. During fiscal 2015, the Madrid Central Economic Administrative Court issued a decision revoking the penalties for certain of the assessed years. As a result of that decision, during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2015 the Company decreased its accrual for costs associated with this matter by $6.2 million, which is recorded in "value added tax assessments" in the Consolidated Statement of Income. During fiscal 2016, the Spanish Supreme Court issued final decisions which barred the assessments for several of the assessed years. As a result of these decisions, during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2016 the Company decreased its accrual for costs associated with this matter by $25.4 million, including $16.4 million related to an accrual for assessments and penalties recorded in “value added tax assessments” and $9.0 million related to accrued interest recorded in “interest expense” in the Consolidated Statement of Income. Additionally, as a result of these decisions, the Company paid certain assessed amounts of $12.3 million during fiscal 2016. The Company believes that the Spanish subsidiary's defense to the remaining assessments has solid legal grounds and is continuing to vigorously defend its position by appealing to the Spanish National Appellate Court and taking other actions to object to the assessments. The Company estimates the total exposure for these assessments, including various penalties and interest, was approximately $4.6 million and $43.7 million at January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively, which is included in "accrued expenses and other liabilities" in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
In December 2010, in a non-unanimous decision, a Brazilian appellate court overturned a 2003 trial court which had previously ruled in favor of the Company’s Brazilian subsidiary related to the imposition of certain taxes on payments abroad related to the licensing of commercial software products, commonly referred to as “CIDE tax”. The Company estimates the total exposure related to CIDE tax, including interest, was approximately $17.3 million and $24.6 million at January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. The Brazilian subsidiary has appealed the unfavorable ruling to the Supreme Court and Superior Court, Brazil's two highest appellate courts. Based on the legal opinion of outside counsel, the Company believes that the chances of success on appeal of this matter are favorable and the Brazilian subsidiary intends to vigorously defend its position that the CIDE tax is not due. However, due to the lack of predictability of the Brazilian court system, the Company has concluded that it is reasonably possible that the Brazilian subsidiary may incur a loss up to the total exposure described above. The Company believes the resolution of this litigation will not be material to the Company’s consolidated net assets or liquidity.

12


In addition to the CIDE tax matter discussed above, the Company’s Brazilian subsidiary has been undergoing several examinations of non-income related taxes. Given the lack of predictability of the Brazilian tax system, the Company believes that it is reasonably possible that a loss may have been incurred. However, due to the complex nature of the Brazilian tax system and the absence of communication from the local tax authorities regarding these examinations, the Company is currently unable to determine the likelihood of these examinations resulting in assessments or to estimate the amount of loss, if any, that may be reasonably possible if such assessment were to be made.
The SEC has requested information from the Company with respect to the restatement of certain of our consolidated financial statements and other financial information from fiscal 2009 to 2013. The Company is cooperating with the SEC’s request for information.
The Company is subject to various other legal proceedings and claims arising in the ordinary course of business. The Company’s management does not expect that the outcome in any of these other legal proceedings, individually or collectively, will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

ITEM 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures.
Not applicable.  


13



PART II

ITEM 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc. (“NASDAQ”) under the symbol “TECD.” We have not paid cash dividends since fiscal 1983 and the Board of Directors has no current plans to institute a cash dividend payment policy in the foreseeable future. The table below presents the quarterly high and low market prices for our common stock as reported by the NASDAQ. As of March 9, 2016, there were 223 holders of record and we believe that there were 16,566 beneficial holders.
 
MARKET PRICE





















14


STOCK PERFORMANCE CHART
The five-year stock performance chart below assumes an initial investment of $100 on February 1, 2011 and compares the cumulative total return for Tech Data, the NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S.) Index, and the Standard Industrial Classification, or SIC, Code 5045 – Computer and Peripheral Equipment and Software. The comparisons in the table are provided in accordance with SEC requirements and are not intended to forecast or be indicative of possible future performance of our common stock.  

Comparison of Cumulative Total Return
Assumes Initial Investment of $100 on February 1, 2011
Among Tech Data Corporation,
NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S.) Index and SIC Code 5045
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
Tech Data Corporation
100
 
111
 
109
 
115
 
122
 
133
NASDAQ Stock Market (U.S.) Index
100
 
107
 
122
 
161
 
184
 
188
SIC Code 5045 – Computer and Peripheral Equipment and Software
100
 
103
 
101
 
140
 
139
 
151

 Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans 

Information regarding the Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans can be found under Item 12 of this Report.
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities
None.




15


Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

There were no shares repurchased by the Company during the quarter ended January 31, 2016. During the first quarter of fiscal 2016, the Company completed the $100.0 million share repurchase program approved by the Board of Directors in December 2014. In June 2015, the Company's Board of Directors authorized an additional share repurchase program of up to $100.0 million of the Company's common stock. The Company completed this share repurchase program in October 2015. During fiscal 2016, the Company repurchased 2,497,029 shares at an average price of $58.87 per share, for a total cost, including expenses, of approximately $147.0 million under these programs. Cumulatively since fiscal 2006, the Company has repurchased approximately 30 million shares at an average price of $43.25 per share, for a total cost, including expenses, of approximately $1.3 billion.
SHARE REPURCHASES




16


ITEM 6.    Selected Financial Data.
The following table sets forth certain selected consolidated financial data. This information should be read in conjunction with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report.
FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL SUMMARY

Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income statement data: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net sales
$
26,379,783

 
$
27,670,632

 
$
26,821,904

 
$
25,358,329

 
$
25,647,313

Gross profit
1,286,661

 
1,393,954

 
1,362,346

 
1,303,054

 
1,377,441

Operating income (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
401,428

 
267,635

 
227,513

 
263,720

 
304,546

Consolidated net income (2) (6) (7) (8) (9)
265,736

 
175,172

 
179,932

 
183,040

 
201,202

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interest (10)

 

 

 
(6,785
)
 
(10,452
)
Net income attributable to shareholders of Tech Data Corporation
$
265,736

 
$
175,172

 
$
179,932

 
$
176,255

 
$
190,750

Net income per share attributable to shareholders of Tech Data Corporation—basic
$
7.40

 
$
4.59

 
$
4.73

 
$
4.53

 
$
4.36

Net income per share attributable to shareholders of Tech Data Corporation—diluted
$
7.36

 
$
4.57

 
$
4.71

 
$
4.50

 
$
4.30

Dividends per common share

 

 

 

 

Balance sheet data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Working capital (11)
$
1,889,415

 
$
1,834,997

 
$
1,851,447

 
$
1,700,485

 
$
1,720,564

Total assets
6,358,288

 
6,136,725

 
7,167,576

 
6,828,291

 
5,796,268

Revolving credit loans and current maturities of long-term debt, net
18,063

 
13,303

 
43,481

 
167,522

 
48,490

Long-term debt, less current maturities
348,608

 
351,576

 
352,031

 
351,789

 
57,253

Equity attributable to shareholders of Tech Data Corporation
2,005,755

 
1,960,143

 
2,098,611

 
1,918,369

 
1,953,804

(1)
During fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, the Company recorded a gain of $98.4 million, $5.1 million and $35.5 million, respectively, associated with legal settlements, net of attorney fees and expenses, with certain manufacturers of LCD flat panel and cathode ray tube displays (see further discussion in Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).
(2)
During fiscal 2016, the Company recorded a net benefit of $17.8 million for VAT matters related to its European subsidiaries, including a net benefit in operating expenses of $8.8 million in relation to assessments and penalties and a $9.0 million benefit for the reversal of associated interest expense. During fiscal 2015, the Company recorded a decrease in its accrual for VAT matters related to its Spanish subsidiary of $6.2 million (see further discussion in Note 13 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).
(3)
During fiscal 2015 and 2014, the Company recorded restatement and remediation related expenses of $22.0 million and $53.8 million, respectively (see further discussion in Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).
(4)
During fiscal 2013, the Company increased its accrual for various VAT matters related to its Spanish subsidiary by $41.0 million, including operating expenses of $29.5 million in relation to the assessment and penalties and $11.5 million for associated interest expense.
(5)
During fiscal 2012, the Company recorded a $28.3 million loss on disposal of subsidiaries related to the closure of certain of the Company’s operations in Latin America.
(6)
During fiscal 2015, the Company recorded income tax benefits of $19.2 million primarily related to the reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances in certain jurisdictions in Europe, partially offset by income tax expenses of $5.6 million related to undistributed earnings on assets held for sale in certain Latin American jurisdictions (see further discussion in Note 8 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).
(7)
During fiscal 2014, the Company recorded income tax benefits of $45.3 million for the reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances primarily related to certain jurisdictions in Europe (see further discussion in Note 8 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).
(8)
During fiscal 2013, the Company recorded a $25.1 million reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances related to a specific jurisdiction in Europe.
(9)
During fiscal 2012, the Company recorded a $13.6 million reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances which was substantially offset by the write-off of deferred income tax assets associated with the closure of Brazil’s commercial operations.
(10)
During fiscal 2013, the Company completed the acquisition of Brightstar Corp.’s fifty percent ownership interest in a consolidated mobility distribution joint venture between Tech Data and Brightstar Corp.
(11)
Working capital represents total current assets less total current liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

17



ITEM 7.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report on Form 10-K, including this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”), contains forward-looking statements, as described in the “safe harbor” provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties and actual results could differ materially from those projected. These forward-looking statements regarding future events and the future results of Tech Data Corporation (“Tech Data”, “we”, “our”, “us” or the “Company”) are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts, and projections about the industries in which we operate and the beliefs and assumptions of our management. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “targets,” “goals,” “projects,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” variations of such words, and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements that refer to projections of our future financial performance, our anticipated growth and trends in our businesses, and other characterizations of future events or circumstances, are forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned that these forward-looking statements are only predictions and are subject to risks, uncertainties, and assumptions. Therefore, actual results may differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. Readers are referred to the cautionary statements and important factors discussed in Item 1A, "Risk Factors" in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 31, 2016 for further information. We undertake no obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason.
OVERVIEW
Tech Data is one of the world’s largest wholesale distributors of technology products. We serve as an indispensable link in the technology supply chain by bringing products from the world’s leading technology vendors to market, as well as providing our customers with advanced logistics capabilities and value-added services. Our customers include value-added resellers, direct marketers, retailers and corporate resellers who support the diverse technology needs of end users. We manage our business in two geographic segments: the Americas and Europe.
We believe our strategy of execution, diversification and innovation differentiates us in the markets we serve and we believe we have opportunities for further gains in market share as our vendors bring more of their products through distribution and our customer satisfaction ratings continue to improve. We continually evaluate the current and potential profitability and return on our investments in all geographies and consider changes in current and future investments based on risks, opportunities and current and anticipated market conditions. In connection with these evaluations, we may incur additional costs to the extent we decide to increase or decrease our investments in certain geographies. For example, in March 2015, we entered into an agreement for the sale of our business operations in Chile and Peru and also committed to a plan to exit our business operations in Uruguay as we did not believe these operations would generate consistently acceptable returns on invested capital. We will also continue to evaluate targeted strategic investments across our operations and new business opportunities and invest in those markets and product segments we believe provide us with the greatest opportunities for profitable growth. One example of these investments is our acquisition in June 2015 of Signature Technology Group, Inc., a leading provider of data center and professional services throughout North America. Finally, from a balance sheet perspective, we require working capital primarily to finance accounts receivable and inventory. We have historically relied upon debt, trade credit from our vendors, and accounts receivable financing programs for our working capital needs. At January 31, 2016 we had a debt to total capital ratio (calculated as total debt divided by the aggregate of total debt and total equity) of 15%.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
The information included within MD&A is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate these estimates, including those related to accounts receivable, inventory, vendor incentives, goodwill and intangible assets, deferred taxes, and contingencies. Our estimates and judgments are based on currently available information, historical results, and other assumptions we believe are reasonable. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates. We believe the critical accounting policies discussed below affect the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.
Accounts Receivable
We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts receivable and sales returns for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments and estimated product returns by customers for exchange or credit. In estimating the required allowance, we take into consideration the overall quality and aging of the receivable portfolio, the existence of credit insurance and specifically identified customer risks. Also influencing our estimates are the following: (i) the large number of customers and their dispersion across wide geographic areas; (ii) the fact that no single customer accounts for more than 10% of our net sales; (iii) the value and adequacy of collateral received from customers, if any; (iv) our historical write-off and sales returns experience; and (v) the current economic environment. If actual customer performance were to deteriorate to an extent not expected by us, additional allowances may be required which could have an adverse effect on our consolidated financial results. Conversely, if actual customer performance were to improve to an extent not expected by us, a reduction in allowances may be required which could have a favorable effect on our consolidated financial results.

18


Inventory
We value our inventory at the lower of its cost or market value, cost being determined on a moving average cost basis, which approximates the first-in, first-out method. We write down our inventory for estimated obsolescence equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and the estimated market value based upon an aging analysis of the inventory on hand, specifically known inventory-related risks (such as technological obsolescence and the nature of vendor terms surrounding price protection and product returns), foreign currency fluctuations for foreign-sourced products, and assumptions about future demand. Market conditions or changes in terms and conditions by our vendors that are less favorable than those projected by management may require additional inventory write-downs, which could have an adverse effect on our consolidated financial results.
Vendor Incentives
We receive incentives from vendors related to cooperative advertising allowances, infrastructure funding, volume rebates and other incentive agreements. These incentives are generally under quarterly, semi-annual or annual agreements with the vendors; however, some of these incentives are negotiated on an ad-hoc basis to support specific programs mutually developed with the vendor. Unrestricted volume rebates and early payment discounts received from vendors are recorded when they are earned as a reduction of inventory and as a reduction of cost of products sold as the related inventory is sold. Vendor incentives for specifically identified cooperative advertising programs and infrastructure funding are recorded when earned as adjustments to product costs or selling, general and administrative expenses, depending on the nature of the programs.  
We also provide reserves for receivables on vendor programs for estimated losses resulting from vendors’ inability to pay or rejections by vendors of claims. Should amounts recorded as outstanding receivables from vendors be deemed uncollectible, additional allowances may be required which could have an adverse effect on our consolidated financial results. Conversely, if actual vendor performance were to improve to an extent not expected by us, a reduction in allowances may be required which could have a favorable effect on our consolidated financial results.
Goodwill, Intangible Assets and Other Long-Lived Assets
We perform an annual review for the potential impairment of the carrying value of goodwill, or more frequently if current events and circumstances indicate a possible impairment. For purposes of our goodwill analysis, we have two reporting units, which are also our operating segments. We evaluate the appropriateness of performing a qualitative assessment, on a reporting unit level, based on current circumstances. If the results of the qualitative assessment indicate that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is greater than its carrying amount, the two-step impairment test will not be performed. The factors that were considered in the qualitative analysis included macroeconomic conditions, industry and market considerations, cost factors such as increases in product cost, labor, or other costs that would have a negative effect on earnings and cash flows; and other relevant entity-specific events and information.
If we conclude that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then the two-step impairment test is performed. The first step of the impairment test compares the fair value of our reporting units with their carrying amounts, including goodwill. The fair values of the reporting units are estimated using market and discounted cash flow approaches. The assumptions used in the market approach are based on the value of a business through an analysis of multiples of guideline companies and recent sales or offerings of a comparable entity. The assumptions used in the discounted cash flow approach are based on historical and forecasted revenue, operating costs, future economic conditions, and other relevant factors. If the carrying amount exceeds fair value, then the second step of the impairment test is performed to measure the amount of any impairment loss. The amount of an impairment loss is recognized as the excess of the carrying value of goodwill over its implied fair value and is charged to expense in the period identified. We perform our annual review for goodwill impairment as of January 31st of each fiscal year. If actual results are substantially lower than the projections used in our valuation methodology, or if market discount rates or our market capitalization substantially increase or decrease, respectively, our future valuations could be adversely affected, potentially resulting in future impairment charges.
We also examine the carrying value of our intangible assets with finite lives, which includes capitalized software and development costs, purchased intangibles, and other long-lived assets as current events and circumstances warrant determining whether there are any impairment losses. Factors that may cause an intangible asset or other long-lived asset impairment include negative industry or economic trends and significant under-performance relative to historical or projected future operating results.
Income Taxes
We record valuation allowances to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. We consider all positive and negative evidence available in determining the potential of realizing deferred tax assets, including the scheduled reversal of temporary differences, recent cumulative losses, recent and projected future taxable income, and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies. In making this determination, we place greater emphasis on recent cumulative losses and recent taxable income due to the inherent lack of subjectivity associated with these factors. If we determine it is more likely than not that we will be able to use a deferred tax asset in the future in excess of its net carrying value, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance would be made to reduce income tax expense, thereby increasing net income in the period such determination is made. Should we determine that we are not likely to realize all or part of our net deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance would be made to increase income tax expense, thereby reducing net income in the period such determination is made.

19


Contingencies
We accrue for contingent obligations, including estimated legal costs, when the obligation is probable and the amount is reasonably estimable. As facts concerning contingencies become known, we reassess our position and make appropriate adjustments to the financial statements. Estimates that are particularly sensitive to future changes include those related to tax, legal, and other regulatory matters such as imports and exports, the imposition of international governmental controls, changes in the interpretation and enforcement of international laws (in particular related to items such as duty and taxation), and the impact of local economic conditions and practices, which are all subject to change as events evolve and as additional information becomes available during the administrative and litigation process.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
See Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for the discussion on recent accounting pronouncements.
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The following table sets forth our Consolidated Statement of Income as a percentage of net sales. 
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Net sales
100.00

%
 
100.00

%
 
100.00

%
Cost of products sold
95.12

 
 
94.96

 
 
94.92

 
Gross profit
4.88

 
 
5.04

 
 
5.08

 
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses
3.76

 
 
4.03

 
 
4.16

 
     LCD settlements, net
(0.37
)
 
 
(0.02
)
 
 
(0.13
)
 
     Value added tax assessments
(0.03
)
 
 
(0.02
)
 
 
0.00

 
Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.00

 
 
0.08

 
 
0.20

 
Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
0.00

 
 
0.00

 
 
0.00

 
 
3.36

 
 
4.07

 
 
4.23

 
Operating income
1.52

 
 
0.97

 
 
0.85

 
Interest expense
0.05

 
 
0.10

 
 
0.10

 
Other expense (income), net
0.02

 
 
0.01

 
 
(0.01
)
 
Income before income taxes
1.45

 
 
0.86

 
 
0.76

 
Provision for income taxes
0.44

 
 
0.23

 
 
0.09

 
Net income
1.01

%
 
0.63

%
 
0.67

%

In addition to disclosing financial results that are determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”), the Company also discloses certain non-GAAP financial information, including:
Net sales, gross profit, and selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A”) as adjusted for the impact of changes in foreign currencies (referred to as “impact of changes in foreign currencies” or “constant currency”) and the impact of the exit of business operations in Chile, Peru, and Uruguay (referred to as "impact of exited operations") which is reflected in our results of operations by removing the impact from the periods presented;
Non-GAAP operating income, which is defined as operating income as adjusted to exclude LCD settlements, net, value added tax assessments, restatement and remediation related expenses, loss on disposal of subsidiaries and acquisition-related intangible asset amortization;
Non-GAAP net income, which is defined as net income as adjusted to exclude the tax effected impact of LCD settlements, net, value added tax assessments and related interest expense, restatement and remediation related expenses, loss on disposal of subsidiaries, acquisition-related intangible asset amortization and the reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances and income taxes on undistributed earnings of assets held for sale; and
Non-GAAP net income per share - diluted, which is defined as net income per share - diluted as adjusted for the per share, tax effected impact of the items described above.
Management believes that providing this additional information is useful to investors because it provides a meaningful comparison of our performance between periods.


20


NET SALES

The following tables summarize our net sales and change in net sales by geographic region for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 (in billions):

Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
Consolidated net sales, as reported
 
$
26,380

 
$
27,671

 
(4.7)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
2,781

 

 
 
Impact of exited operations
 
(21
)
 
(317
)
 
 
Consolidated net sales, as adjusted
 
$
29,140

 
$
27,354

 
6.5%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Americas net sales, as reported
 
$
10,357

 
$
10,406

 
(0.5)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
173

 

 
 
Impact of exited operations
 
(21
)
 
(317
)
 
 
Americas net sales, as adjusted
 
$
10,509

 
$
10,089

 
4.2%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Europe net sales, as reported
 
$
16,023

 
$
17,265

 
(7.2)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
2,608

 

 
 
Europe net sales, as adjusted
 
$
18,631

 
$
17,265

 
7.9%


2016 - 2015 NET SALES COMMENTARY

AMERICAS
EUROPE
The increase in net sales in the Americas, as adjusted, of $420 million is primarily due to growth in data center and consumer electronics product categories.
The increase in net sales in Europe, as adjusted, of approximately $1.4 billion is primarily due to growth in broadline, mobility and data center product categories. The majority of our trade regions posted year-over-year sales growth, most notably Germany, Iberia and Italy.

21


Year ended January 31:
 
2015
 
2014
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consolidated net sales, as reported
 
$
27,671

 
$
26,822

 
3.2%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
342

 

 
 
Consolidated net sales, as adjusted
 
$
28,013

 
$
26,822

 
4.4%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Americas net sales, as reported
 
$
10,406

 
$
10,189

 
2.1%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
85

 

 
 
Americas net sales, as adjusted
 
$
10,491

 
$
10,189

 
3.0%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Europe net sales, as reported
 
$
17,265

 
$
16,633

 
3.8%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
257

 

 
 
Europe net sales, as adjusted
 
$
17,522

 
$
16,633

 
5.3%
2015 - 2014 NET SALES COMMENTARY
AMERICAS
EUROPE
The increase in net sales in the Americas, as adjusted, of $302 million is primarily attributable to stronger demand for broadline products, particularly personal computer systems.
The increase in net sales in Europe, as adjusted, of $889 million is primarily attributable to stronger demand for broadline products, particularly personal computer systems, and mobility products.
GROSS PROFIT
The following tables provide an analysis of our gross profit and gross profit as a percentage of net sales for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 (in millions):
Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit, as reported
 
$
1,287

 
$
1,394

 
(7.7)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
143

 

 
 
Gross profit, as adjusted
 
$
1,430

 
$
1,394

 
2.6%
The increase in gross profit, as adjusted, of $36 million is primarily due to increased sales, as adjusted for the impact of changes in foreign currencies and exited operations, in both regions. The decline in our year-over-year gross profit as a percentage of net sales is primarily attributable to changes in vendor and product mix.

22


Year ended January 31:
 
2015
 
2014
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit, as reported
 
$
1,394

 
$
1,362

 
2.3%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
20

 

 
 
Gross profit, as adjusted
 
$
1,414

 
$
1,362

 
3.8%
The increase in gross profit, as adjusted, of $52 million is primarily due to increased sales in both regions, as adjusted for the impact of changes in foreign currencies. The slight decline in our year-over-year gross profit as a percentage of net sales is primarily attributable to changes in product and customer mix.
OPERATING EXPENSES
SELLING GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES
The following tables provide an analysis of our selling, general and administrative expenses:
Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
SG&A, as reported
 
$
991

 
$
1,114

 
(11.0)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
108

 

 
 
SG&A, as adjusted
 
$
1,099

 
$
1,114

 
(1.3)%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SG&A as a percentage of net sales, as reported
 
3.76
%
 
4.03
%
 
(27) bps
The decrease in SG&A as a percentage of net sales compared to the prior year is primarily due to greater operating leverage as we generated sales growth while keeping our costs relatively flat in local currency.
Year ended January 31:
 
2015
 
2014
 
Percent Change
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
SG&A, as reported
 
$
1,114

 
$
1,117

 
(0.2)%
Impact of changes in foreign currencies
 
11

 

 
 
SG&A, as adjusted
 
$
1,125

 
$
1,117

 
0.7%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SG&A as a percentage of net sales, as reported
 
4.03
%
 
4.16
%
 
(13) bps
The decrease in SG&A as a percentage of net sales compared to the prior year is primarily due to greater operating leverage as we generated sales growth while keeping our costs relatively flat in local currency.
LCD SETTLEMENTS, NET
The Company has been a claimant in proceedings seeking damages from certain manufacturers of LCD flat panel and cathode ray tube displays. During fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, the Company reached settlement agreements with certain manufacturers in the amount of $98.4 million, $5.1 million and $35.5 million, respectively, net of attorney fees and expenses.
VALUE ADDED TAX ASSESSMENTS
Prior to fiscal 2004, one of the Company’s subsidiaries, located in Spain, was audited in relation to various value added tax (“VAT”) matters. As a result of those audits, the Spanish subsidiary received notices of assessment that allege the subsidiary did not properly collect and remit VAT. During fiscal 2015, an administrative court issued a decision revoking the penalties for certain of the assessed years. As a result of that decision, during the year ended January 31, 2015 the Company decreased its accrual for costs associated with this matter by $6.2 million.
During fiscal 2016, the Spanish Supreme Court issued final decisions barring the assessments for several of the assessed years. As a result of these decisions, during the year ended January 31, 2016, the Company decreased its accrual for the assessments and penalties associated with this matter by $16.4 million (see Note 13 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion).

23


In fiscal 2016, the Company determined that it had additional VAT liabilities due in one of its European subsidiaries. As a result, the Company recorded a charge of $7.6 million during the year ended January 31, 2016 for VAT and associated costs.
RESTATEMENT AND REMEDIATION RELATED EXPENSES
Restatement and remediation related expenses primarily include legal, accounting and third party consulting fees associated with (i) the restatement of certain of the Company's consolidated financial statements and other financial information from fiscal 2009 to fiscal 2013, (ii) the Audit Committee investigation to review the Company's accounting practices, (iii) incremental external audit and supplemental procedures by the Company in connection with the preparation of the Company's financial statements, and (iv) other incremental legal, accounting and consulting fees incurred as a result of the Company's restatement related investigation, regulatory requests for information or in connection with the Company's remediation of material weaknesses and other control deficiencies identified during the restatement. During fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, the Company incurred restatement and remediation related expenses of approximately $0.8 million, $22.0 million and $53.8 million, respectively. The Company has remediated all material weaknesses identified during the restatement.
LOSS ON DISPOSAL OF SUBSIDIARIES
During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015, we committed to a plan to sell our business operations in Chile and Peru. The sale was completed during March 2015 at an amount approximating net book value. In March 2015, we also committed to a plan to exit our business operations in Uruguay. During fiscal 2016 and 2015, the Company incurred a loss of $0.7 million and $1.3 million, respectively, for charges related to the plan to exit its business operations in Uruguay and the loss on the sale of its business operations in Chile and Peru. The Company has completed the sale of its operations in Chile and Peru as well as the exit of its operations in Uruguay.
OPERATING INCOME
The following tables provide an analysis of GAAP operating income ("GAAP OI") and non-GAAP operating income ("non-GAAP OI") on a consolidated and regional basis as well as a reconciliation of GAAP operating income to non-GAAP operating income on a consolidated and regional basis for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 (in millions):
2016-2015 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $38 million, GAAP operating income increased by approximately $171 million, or 64%, while non-GAAP operating income increased by approximately $50 million, or 16%.
2015-2014 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $10 million, GAAP operating income increased by approximately $50 million, or 22% while non-GAAP operating income increased by approximately $43 million, or 16%.


24


CONSOLIDATED GAAP TO NON-GAAP RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING INCOME
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income
$
401.4

 
$
267.6

 
$
227.5

LCD settlements, net
(98.4
)
 
(5.1
)
 
(35.5
)
Value added tax assessments
(8.8
)
 
(6.2
)
 

Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.8

 
22.1

 
53.8

Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
0.7

 
1.3

 

Acquisition-related intangible assets amortization expense
23.4

 
28.3

 
29.1

Non-GAAP operating income
$
319.1

 
$
308.0

 
$
274.9

We do not consider stock-based compensation expenses in assessing the performance of our operating segments, and therefore the Company reports stock-based compensation expenses separately. The following table summarizes our operating income by geographic region.
OPERATING INCOME BY REGION

Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
   Americas
$
235.6

 
$
145.1

 
$
156.1

   Europe
180.7

 
136.2

 
80.2

   Stock-based compensation expense
(14.9
)
 
(13.7
)
 
(8.8
)
   Total
$
401.4

 
$
267.6

 
$
227.5

2016-2015 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $3 million, GAAP operating income in the Americas increased by approximately $93 million, or 64% and non-GAAP operating income in the Americas decreased approximately $3 million, or 2%.
2015-2014 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $2 million, GAAP operating income in the Americas decreased by approximately $9 million, or 6% and non-GAAP operating income in the Americas increased approximately $14 million, or 10%.

25


AMERICAS GAAP TO NON-GAAP RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING INCOME
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income - Americas
$
235.6

 
$
145.1

 
$
156.1

LCD settlements, net
(98.4
)
 
(5.1
)
 
(35.5
)
Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.2

 
4.0

 
13.2

Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
0.7

 
1.3

 

Acquisition-related intangible assets amortization expense
1.8

 
0.7

 
0.2

Non-GAAP operating income - Americas
$
139.9

 
$
146.0

 
$
134.0

2016-2015 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $35 million, Europe's GAAP operating income increased by approximately $79 million, or 58% and Europe's non-GAAP operating income increased approximately $54 million, or 31%.
2015-2014 COMMENTARY
Excluding the unfavorable impact of changes in foreign currencies of approximately $8 million, Europe's GAAP operating income increased by approximately $64 million, or 80% and Europe's non-GAAP operating income increased approximately $34 million, or 22%.
EUROPE GAAP TO NON-GAAP RECONCILIATION OF OPERATING INCOME
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income - Europe
$
180.7

 
$
136.2

 
$
80.2

Value added tax assessments
(8.8
)
 
(6.2
)
 

Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.6

 
18.1

 
40.6

Acquisition-related intangible assets amortization expense
21.6

 
27.5

 
29.0

Non-GAAP operating income - Europe
$
194.1

 
$
175.6

 
$
149.8

INTEREST EXPENSE
 
 
 
 
Percent change:
Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2016 to 2015
 
2015 to 2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense
 
$
14.5

 
$
26.5

 
$
26.6

 
(45.4
)%
 
(0.2
)%
Percentage of net sales
 
0.05
%
 
0.10
%
 
0.10
%
 
 
 
 
The decrease in interest expense for fiscal 2016 compared to fiscal 2015 is primarily attributable to a $9.0 million benefit recorded in fiscal 2016 for the reversal of interest expense previously accrued related to the Spanish Supreme Court decision in connection with the

26


VAT assessments in one of the Company's subsidiaries in Spain discussed above (see Note 13 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion) and lower average borrowings under our financing facilities.
OTHER EXPENSE (INCOME), NET
 
 
 
 
Percent change:
Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2016 to 2015
 
2015 to 2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other expense (income), net
 
$
4.5

 
$
1.9

 
$
(3.4
)
 
137.6
%
 
(155.9
)%
Percentage of net sales
 
0.02
%
 
0.01
%
 
(0.01
)%
 
 
 
 
Other expense (income), net, consists primarily of gains and losses on investments in life insurance policies to fund the Company's nonqualified deferred compensation plan, interest income, discounts on the sale of accounts receivable and net foreign currency exchange gains and losses on certain financing transactions and the related derivative instruments used to hedge such financing transactions. The change in other expense (income), net, during fiscal 2016 compared to fiscal 2015 is primarily attributable to higher losses on investments in life insurance policies of $4.6 million partially offset by an increase in net foreign currency exchange gains on certain financing transactions.
The change in other expense (income), net during fiscal 2015 compared to fiscal 2014 is primarily attributable to a gain of $2.7 million in fiscal 2014 related to the acquisition of the remaining fifty percent ownership interest in TDMobility from Brightstar Corp., our joint venture partner, an increase in net foreign currency exchange losses on certain financing transactions and higher discounts on the sale of accounts receivable.


27


PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES
2016-2015 COMMENTARY
The increase in the effective tax rate of approximately 4 percentage points in fiscal 2016 as compared to fiscal 2015 is primarily due to the impact of the following:
In fiscal 2015, we recorded income tax benefits of $19.2 million for the reversal of valuation allowances primarily related to specific jurisdictions in Europe, which had been recorded in prior fiscal years. During fiscal 2015, we also recorded income tax expenses of $5.6 million related to undistributed earnings on assets held for sale in certain Latin American jurisdictions.
The effective tax rates for both fiscal 2016 and fiscal 2015 are impacted by the relative mix of earnings and losses within the taxing jurisdictions in which we operate.
The increase in the absolute dollar amount of the provision for income taxes in fiscal 2016 as compared to fiscal 2015 is primarily due to an increase in taxable earnings during fiscal 2016, the reversal of certain valuation allowances in fiscal 2015, and the relative mix of earnings and losses within the taxing jurisdictions in which we operate.
2015-2014 COMMENTARY
The increase in the effective tax rate of approximately 15 percentage points in fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 is primarily due to the impact of the following:
In fiscal 2014, we recorded income tax benefits of $45.3 million for the reversal of valuation allowances primarily related to specific jurisdictions in Europe, which had been recorded in prior fiscal years.
In fiscal 2015, we recorded income tax benefits of $19.2 million for the reversal of valuation allowances primarily related to specific jurisdictions in Europe, which had been recorded in prior fiscal years. During fiscal 2015, we also recorded income tax expenses of $5.6 million related to undistributed earnings on assets held for sale in certain Latin American jurisdictions.
The effective tax rates for both fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014 are impacted by the relative mix of earnings and losses within the taxing jurisdictions in which we operate.
The increase in the absolute dollar amount of the provision for income taxes in fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 is primarily due to an increase in taxable earnings during fiscal 2015, the year-over-year change in the reversal of certain valuation allowances and adjustments to income tax reserves, and the relative mix of earnings and losses within the taxing jurisdictions in which we operate.

28


NET INCOME AND NET INCOME PER SHARE - DILUTED

The following tables provide an analysis of GAAP net income and net income per share-diluted and non-GAAP net income and net income per share-diluted as well as a reconciliation of results recorded in accordance with GAAP and non-GAAP financial measures for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 ($ in millions, except per share data):


GAAP TO NON-GAAP RECONCILIATION OF NET INCOME (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
265.7

 
$
175.2

 
$
179.9

LCD settlements, net
(63.2
)
 
(3.2
)
 
(22.0
)
Value added tax assessments and related interest expense
(12.7
)
 
(6.2
)
 

Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.6

 
16.5

 
39.1

Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
0.6

 
1.3

 

Reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances and income taxes on undistributed earnings of assets held for sale

 
(13.6
)
 
(45.3
)
Acquisition-related intangible assets amortization expense
17.2

 
20.8

 
21.3

Non-GAAP net income
$
208.2

 
$
190.8

 
$
173.0

(1)
Amounts presented net of tax.

GAAP TO NON-GAAP RECONCILIATION OF NET INCOME PER SHARE-DILUTED (1)
Year ended January 31:


2016
 
2015
 
2014
Net income per share-diluted
$
7.36

 
$
4.57

 
$
4.71

LCD settlements, net
(1.75
)
 
(0.08
)
 
(0.58
)
Value added tax assessments and related interest expense
(0.35
)
 
(0.16
)
 

Restatement and remediation related expenses
0.02

 
0.43

 
1.02

Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
0.02

 
0.03

 

Reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances and income taxes on undistributed earnings of assets held for sale

 
(0.36
)
 
(1.19
)
Acquisition-related intangible assets amortization expense
0.47

 
0.54

 
0.56

Non-GAAP net income per share-diluted
$
5.77

 
$
4.97

 
$
4.52

(1)
Amounts presented net of tax.

29


IMPACT OF INFLATION
During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, we do not believe that inflation had a material impact on our consolidated results of operations or on our financial position.
SEASONALITY

Our quarterly operating results have fluctuated significantly in the past and will likely continue to do so in the future as a result of currency fluctuations and seasonal variations in the demand for the products and services we sell. Narrow operating margins may magnify the impact of these factors on our operating results. Recent historical seasonal variations have included an increase in European demand during our fiscal fourth quarter and decreased demand in other fiscal quarters. Given that the majority of our net sales are derived from Europe, our consolidated results closely follow the seasonality trends in Europe. The seasonal trend in Europe typically results in greater operating leverage, and therefore, lower SG&A as a percentage of net sales in the region and on a consolidated basis during the second semester of our fiscal year, particularly in our fourth quarter. Additionally, the life cycles of major products, as well as the impact of future acquisitions and divestitures, may also materially impact our business, financial condition, or results of operations (see Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding our quarterly results).



30



LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Our discussion of liquidity and capital resources includes an analysis of our cash flows and capital structure for all periods presented.

CASH CONVERSION CYCLE
As a distribution company, our business requires significant investment in working capital, particularly accounts receivable and inventory, partially financed through our accounts payable to vendors. An important driver of our operating cash flows is our cash conversion cycle (also referred to as “net cash days”). Our net cash days are defined as days of sales outstanding in accounts receivable plus days of supply on hand in inventory, less days of purchases outstanding in accounts payable. We manage our cash conversion cycle on a daily basis throughout the year and our reported financial results reflect that cash conversion cycle at the balance sheet date. The following tables present the components of our cash conversion cycle, in days, as of January 31, 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013.
CASH FLOWS
The following table summarizes Tech Data’s Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows:
Year ended January 31:
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided by (used in):
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating activities
 
$
189.0

 
$
119.4

 
$
379.1

Investing activities
 
(41.8
)
 
(21.1
)
 
(24.0
)
Financing activities
 
(143.3
)
 
(49.1
)
 
(127.3
)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
 
(15.7
)
 
(72.1
)
 
1.7

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
 
$
(11.8
)
 
$
(22.9
)
 
$
229.5


OPERATING ACTIVITIES
The increase in cash resulting from operating activities in fiscal 2016 compared to fiscal 2015 can be primarily attributed to higher earnings partially offset by higher income taxes paid.
The decrease in cash provided by operating activities in fiscal 2015 compared to 2014 is primarily due to changes in the cash conversion cycle, including a 2 day decrease in fiscal 2014 due to lower days of sales outstanding and a 1 day increase in fiscal 2015, primarily due to lower days of purchases outstanding as illustrated above.






31


The significant components of our investing and financing cash flow activities are listed below.
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
2016
$34.0 million of capital expenditures
$27.8 million of cash paid for the acquisition of Signature Technology Group, Inc.
$20.0 million of proceeds from the sale of our subsidiaries in Chile and Peru
2015
$28.2 million of capital expenditures
$7.1 million of proceeds from the sale of a building
2014
$28.9 million of capital expenditures
$6.4 million of cash provided by acquisitions, primarily due to the final settlement of the purchase price for the acquisition of Specialist Distribution Group
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
2016
$147.0 million paid for the repurchase of shares of common stock under our share repurchase program
$5.9 million of net borrowings on our revolving credit lines
2015
$53.0 million paid for the repurchase of shares of common stock under our share repurchase program
$5.1 million related to acquisition earn-out payments
$7.3 million of net borrowings on our revolving credit lines
2014
$122.7 million of net repayments on our revolving credit lines
$6.2 million related to acquisition earn-out payments

CAPITAL RESOURCES AND DEBT COMPLIANCE
Our debt to total capital ratio was 15% at January 31, 2016. We believe a conservative approach to our capital structure will continue to support us in the current global economic environment. As part of our capital structure and to provide us with significant liquidity, we have a diverse range of financing facilities across our geographic regions with various financial institutions. Also providing us liquidity are our cash and cash equivalents balances across our regions which are deposited and/or invested with various financial institutions. We are exposed to risk of loss on funds deposited with these financial institutions; however, we monitor our financing and depository financial institution partners regularly for credit quality. We believe that our existing sources of liquidity, including our financing facilities, cash resources and cash provided by operating activities are sufficient to meet our working capital needs and cash requirements for at least the next 12 months. Apart from our working capital needs, we expect to incur total capital expenditures of approximately $42 million during fiscal 2017 for equipment and machinery in our logistics centers, office facilities and IT systems.
At January 31, 2016, we had approximately $531.2 million in cash and cash equivalents, of which $495.7 million was held in our foreign subsidiaries. As discussed above, the Company currently has sufficient resources, cash flows and liquidity within the United States to fund current and expected future working capital requirements. Historically, the Company has utilized and reinvested cash earned outside the United States to fund foreign operations and expansion, and plans to continue reinvesting such earnings and future earnings indefinitely outside of the United States. If the Company’s plans for the use of cash earned outside of the United States change in the future, cash and cash equivalents held by our foreign subsidiaries could not be repatriated to the United States without potential negative income tax consequences.
The following is a discussion of our various financing facilities:
Senior notes
In September 2012, the Company issued $350.0 million aggregate principal amount of 3.75% Senior Notes in a public offering (the "Senior Notes") resulting in cash proceeds of approximately $345.8 million, net of debt discount and debt issuance costs of approximately $1.3 million and $2.9 million, respectively. The debt discount and debt issuance costs incurred in connection with the public offering are amortized over the life of the Senior Notes as additional interest expense using the effective interest method. We pay interest on the Senior Notes semi-annually in arrears on March 21 and September 21 of each year, ending on the maturity date of September 21, 2017. We may, at our option, redeem the Senior Notes at any time in whole or in part, at a redemption price equal to the greater of (i) 100% of the principal amount of the Senior Notes to be redeemed or (ii) the sum of the present values of the remaining scheduled payments of principal and interest on the Senior Notes being redeemed, discounted at a rate equal to the sum of the

32


applicable Treasury Rate plus 50 basis points, plus accrued and unpaid interest up to the date of redemption. The Senior Notes rank equal in right of payment to all of our other senior unsecured indebtedness and senior in right of payment to all of our subordinated indebtedness.
Other credit facilities
We have a $500.0 million revolving credit facility with a syndicate of banks (the “Credit Agreement”). The credit agreement was amended on November 5, 2015, which, among other things, provides for (i) a maturity date of November 5, 2020, (ii) an interest rate on borrowings, facility fees and letter of credit fees based on our non-credit enhanced senior unsecured debt rating as determined by Standard & Poor’s Rating Service and Moody’s Investor Service, and (iii) the ability to increase the facility to a maximum of $750.0 million, subject to certain conditions. We pay interest on advances under the Credit Agreement at the applicable LIBOR rate (or similar interbank offered rates depending on currency draw) plus a predetermined margin that is based on our debt rating. There were no amounts outstanding under the Credit Agreement at January 31, 2016 and 2015.
We also have an agreement with a syndicate of banks (the "Receivables Securitization Program") that allows us to transfer an undivided interest in a designated pool of U.S. accounts receivable, on an ongoing basis, to provide collateral for borrowings up to a maximum of $400.0 million. Under this program, the Company transfers certain U.S. trade receivables into a wholly-owned bankruptcy remote special purpose entity. Such receivables, which are recorded in the Consolidated Balance Sheet, totaled $721.1 million and $594.9 million at January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. As collections reduce accounts receivable balances included in the collateral pool, the Company may transfer interests in new receivables to bring the amount available to be borrowed up to the maximum. The Receivables Securitization Program was renewed in August 2015 with a maturity date of November 16, 2017, and interest is to be paid on advances at the applicable commercial paper or LIBOR rate plus an agreed-upon margin. There were no amounts outstanding under the Receivables Securitization Program at January 31, 2016 and 2015.
In addition to the facilities described above, we have various other committed and uncommitted lines of credit and overdraft facilities totaling approximately $308.0 million at January 31, 2016 to support our operations. Most of these facilities are provided on an unsecured, short-term basis and are reviewed periodically for renewal. There was $18.1 million outstanding on these facilities at January 31, 2016, at a weighted average interest rate of 5.26%, and there was $12.8 million outstanding at January 31, 2015, at a weighted average interest rate of 4.97%.
At January 31, 2016, we had also issued standby letters of credit of $29.6 million. These letters of credit typically act as a guarantee of payment to certain third parties in accordance with specified terms and conditions. The issuance of these letters of credit reduces the Company's borrowing availability under certain of the above-mentioned credit facilities.
Certain of our credit facilities contain limitations on the amounts of annual dividends and repurchases of common stock and require compliance with other obligations, warranties and covenants. The financial ratio covenants within these credit facilities include a maximum debt to capitalization ratio and a minimum interest coverage ratio. At January 31, 2016, we were in compliance with all such financial covenants. In light of these financial covenants, the Company’s maximum borrowing availability on its credit facilities was restricted to $845.9 million, of which $18.1 million was outstanding at January 31, 2016.
Accounts receivable purchase agreements
We have uncommitted accounts receivable purchase agreements under which certain accounts receivable may be sold, without recourse, to third-party financial institutions. Under these programs, we may sell certain accounts receivable in exchange for cash less a discount, as defined in the agreements. Available capacity under these programs, which we use as a source of working capital funding, is dependent on the level of accounts receivable eligible to be sold into these programs and the financial institutions' willingness to purchase such receivables. In addition, certain of these agreements also require that we continue to service, administer and collect the sold accounts receivable. At January 31, 2016 and 2015, the Company had a total of $554.2 million and $310.9 million, respectively, of accounts receivable sold to and held by financial institutions under these agreements. During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, discount fees recorded under these facilities were $4.4 million, $4.4 million, and $3.4 million, respectively, which are included as a component of "other expense (income), net" in the Company's Consolidated Statement of Income.
Share repurchase programs
During fiscal 2016, we repurchased 2,497,029 shares of our common stock at a cost of $147.0 million in connection with our two $100.0 million share repurchase program approved by the Board of Directors in June 2015 and December 2014. These share repurchase programs were completed during fiscal 2016.






33


RETURN ON INVESTED CAPITAL
As discussed previously, one of our key financial objectives is to earn a return on invested capital ("ROIC") above our weighted average cost of capital. Our ROIC is calculated based on non-GAAP operating income (as previously defined), on an after-tax basis, divided by the average total debt and non-GAAP shareholders’ equity balances, less cash, for the prior five quarters. Management believes that providing this additional information is useful to investors because it provides a meaningful comparison of our performance between periods. The following table presents a detailed calculation of our ROIC:
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
ROIC (A/B)
13%
 
11%
 
10%
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-GAAP Net Operating Profit After Tax ("NOPAT") (A):
 
 
 
 
 
Non-GAAP Operating Income
$
319.1

 
$
308.0

 
$
274.9

Non-GAAP effective tax rate
28.5
%
 
31.8
%
 
31.5
%
Non-GAAP NOPAT (Non-GAAP operating income x (1 - non-GAAP effective tax rate))
$
228.2

 
$
210.2

 
$
188.2

 
 
 
 

 
 
Average Invested Capital (B):
 
 
 

 
 
Short-term debt (5-qtr average)
$
16.5

 
$
40.3

 
$
66.6

Long-term debt (5-qtr average)
350.4

 
352.0

 
351.7

Non-GAAP Shareholders' Equity (5-qtr average)
1,943.7

 
2,103.3

 
1,973.2

Total average capital
2,310.6

 
2,495.6

 
2,391.5

Less: Cash (5-qtr average)
(597.7
)
 
(573.2
)
 
(459.0
)
Average invested capital less average cash
$
1,712.9

 
$
1,922.4

 
$
1,932.5

(A/B) ROIC is calculated as Non-GAAP Net Operating Profit After Tax divided by Average Invested Capital (less average cash)
CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
As of January 31, 2016, future payments of debt and amounts due under future minimum lease payments, including minimum commitments under an agreement for data center services, are as follows (in millions):
 
 
Operating leases
 
Debt (1)
 
Total  
Fiscal year:
 
 
 
 
 
2017
$
46.6

 
$
31.2

 
$
77.8

2018
42.7

 
363.1

 
405.8

2019
34.8

 
0.0

 
34.8

2020
30.2

 
0.0

 
30.2

2021
27.2

 
0.0

 
27.2

Thereafter
22.8

 
0.0

 
22.8

Total payments
204.3

 
394.3

 
598.6

Less amounts representing interest

 
(26.2
)
 
(26.2
)
Total principal payments
$
204.3

 
$
368.1

 
$
572.4


(1)
Amounts include interest on the Senior Notes calculated at the fixed rate of 3.75% per year and exclude estimated interest on the committed and uncommitted revolving credit facilities as these facilities are at variable rates of interest.
Fair value renewal and escalation clauses exist for a substantial portion of the operating leases included above. Purchase orders for the purchase of inventory and other goods and services are not included in the table above. We are not able to determine the aggregate amount of such purchase orders that represent contractual obligations, as purchase orders typically represent authorizations to purchase rather than binding agreements. For the purposes of this table, contractual obligations for purchase of goods or services are defined as agreements that are enforceable and legally binding on the Company and that specify all significant terms, including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. Our purchase orders are based on our current demand expectations and are fulfilled by our vendors within short time horizons. We do not have significant non-cancelable agreements for the purchase of inventory or other goods specifying minimum quantities or set prices that exceed our expected requirements for the next three months. We also enter into contracts for outsourced services; however, the

34


obligations under these contracts were not significant, other than an agreement for data center services included above, and the contracts generally contain clauses allowing for cancellation without significant penalty.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
Synthetic Lease Facility
We have a synthetic lease facility with a group of financial institutions (the "Synthetic Lease") under which we lease certain logistics centers and office facilities from a third-party lessor that expires in June 2018. Properties leased under the Synthetic Lease are located in Clearwater and Miami, Florida; Fort Worth, Texas; Fontana, California; Suwanee, Georgia; Swedesboro, New Jersey; and South Bend, Indiana. The Synthetic Lease is accounted for as an operating lease and rental payments are calculated at the applicable LIBOR rate plus a margin based on our credit ratings.
Upon not less than 30 days notice, at our option, we may purchase one or any combination of the properties, at an amount equal to each of the property's cost, as long as the lease balance does not decrease below a defined amount. Upon not less than 270 days, nor more than 360 days, prior to the lease expiration, we may, at our option, i) purchase a minimum of two of the properties, at an amount equal to each of the property's cost, ii) exercise the option to renew the lease for a minimum of two of the properties or iii) exercise the option to remarket a minimum of two of the properties and cause a sale of the properties. If we elect to remarket the properties, we have guaranteed the lessor a percentage of the cost of each property, in the aggregate amount of approximately $133.8 million. Future minimum lease payments under the Synthetic Lease are approximately $3.0 million per year.
The Synthetic Lease contains covenants that must be complied with, similar to the covenants described in certain of the credit facilities discussed in Note 7 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. As of January 31, 2016, the Company was in compliance with all such covenants.
Guarantees
As is customary in the technology industry, to encourage certain customers to purchase product from us, we have arrangements with certain finance companies that provide inventory financing facilities for our customers. In conjunction with certain of these arrangements, we have agreements with the finance companies that would require us to repurchase certain inventory, which might be repossessed from the customers by the finance companies. Due to various reasons, including among other items, the lack of information regarding the amount of saleable inventory purchased from us still on hand with the customer at any point in time, our repurchase obligations relating to inventory cannot be reasonably estimated. Repurchases of inventory by us under these arrangements have been insignificant to date.
We also provide additional financial guarantees to finance companies on behalf of certain customers. The majority of these guarantees are for an indefinite period of time, where we would be required to perform if the customer is in default with the finance company related to purchases made from us. We review the underlying credit for these guarantees on at least an annual basis. As of January 31, 2016 and 2015, the outstanding amount of guarantees under these arrangements totaled $4.6 million and $5.5 million, respectively. We believe that, based on historical experience, the likelihood of a material loss pursuant to the above inventory repurchase obligations and guarantees is remote.




35


ITEM 7A.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
As a large global organization, we face exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve and could have a material impact on our financial results in the future. In the normal course of business, we employ established policies and procedures to manage our exposure to fluctuations in the value of foreign currencies. It is our policy to utilize financial instruments to reduce risks where internal netting cannot be effectively employed. Additionally, we do not enter into derivative instruments for speculative or trading purposes. With respect to our internal netting practices, we will consider inventory as an economic hedge against foreign currency exposure in accounts payable in certain circumstances. This practice offsets such inventory against corresponding accounts payable denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the subsidiary buying the inventory, when determining our net exposure to be hedged using traditional forward contracts. Under this strategy, we would expect to increase or decrease our selling prices for products purchased in foreign currencies based on fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates affecting the underlying accounts payable. To the extent we incur a foreign currency exchange loss (gain) on the underlying accounts payable denominated in the foreign currency, we would expect to see a corresponding increase (decrease) in gross profit as the related inventory is sold. This strategy can result in a certain degree of quarterly earnings volatility as the underlying accounts payable is remeasured using the foreign currency exchange rate prevailing at the end of each period, or settlement date if earlier, whereas the corresponding increase (decrease) in gross profit is not realized until the related inventory is sold.
Our foreign currency exposure relates to our transactions in Europe, Canada and Latin America, where the currency collected from customers can be different from the currency used to purchase the product. Our transactions in foreign currencies are denominated primarily in the following currencies: U.S. dollar, British pound, Canadian dollar, Czech koruna, Danish krone, euro, Norwegian krone, Polish zloty, Swedish krona and Swiss franc. Our foreign currency risk management objective is to protect our earnings and cash flows from the adverse impact of exchange rate changes through the use of foreign currency forward and swap contracts to primarily hedge intercompany loans, accounts receivable and accounts payable.
We are also exposed to changes in interest rates primarily as a result of our short-term debt used to maintain liquidity and to finance working capital, capital expenditures and acquisitions. Interest rate risk is also present in the forward foreign currency contracts. Our interest rate risk management objective is to limit the impact of interest rate changes on earnings and cash flows and to minimize overall borrowing costs. To achieve our objective, we use a combination of fixed and variable rate debt. The nature and amount of our long-term and short-term debt can be expected to vary as a result of future business requirements, market conditions and other factors. Approximately 95% and 89%, respectively, of our outstanding debt had fixed interest rates at January 31, 2016 and 2015. We utilize various financing instruments, such as receivables securitization, leases, revolving credit facilities, and trade receivable purchase facilities, to finance working capital needs. To the extent that there are changes in interest rates, the fair value of our fixed rate debt may fluctuate.
In order to provide an assessment of our foreign currency exchange rate and interest rate risk, we performed a sensitivity analysis using a value-at-risk (“VaR”) model. The VaR model consisted of using a Monte Carlo simulation to generate 1,000 random market price paths. The VaR model determines the potential impact of the fluctuation in foreign exchange rates and interest rates assuming a one-day holding period, normal market conditions and a 95% confidence level. The VaR is the maximum expected loss in fair value for a given confidence interval to our foreign exchange portfolio due to adverse movements in the rates. The model is not intended to represent actual losses but is used as a risk estimation and management tool. Firm commitments, assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies were excluded from the model.
The following table represents the estimated maximum potential one-day loss in fair value at a 95% confidence level (in thousands), calculated using the VaR model at January 31, 2016 and 2015. We believe that the hypothetical loss in fair value of our foreign exchange derivatives would be offset by the gains in the value of the underlying transactions being hedged.
VaR
As of January 31:

2016
 
2015
(in millions)
 
 
 
Foreign currency exchange rate sensitive financial instruments
$
(735
)
 
$
(9,108
)
Interest rate sensitive financial instruments
(247
)
 
(412
)
Combined portfolio
$
(982
)
 
$
(9,520
)
Actual future gains and losses associated with our derivative positions may differ materially from the analyses performed as of January 31, 2016, due to the inherent limitations associated with predicting the changes in the timing and amount of interest rates, foreign currency exchanges rates, and our actual exposures and positions.  

36


ITEM 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.                     
Index to Financial Statements
 
 
Page  
Financial Statements
 
 
 
Report of Independent Registered Certified Public Accounting Firm
 
 
Consolidated Balance Sheet
 
 
Consolidated Statement of Income
 
 
Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
 
 
Consolidated Statement of Shareholders’ Equity
 
 
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
 
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
 
Financial Statement Schedule
 
 
 
Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts
All schedules and exhibits not included are not applicable, not required or would contain information which is shown in the financial statements or notes thereto.

37



Report of Independent Registered Certified Public Accounting Firm
The Board of Directors and Shareholders of Tech Data Corporation
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Tech Data Corporation and subsidiaries as of January 31, 2016 and 2015, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders' equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2016. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Tech Data Corporation and subsidiaries at January 31, 2016 and 2015, and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2016, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Tech Data Corporation and subsidiaries' internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2016, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) and our report dated March 24, 2016 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.


/s/ Ernst & Young LLP


Tampa, Florida
March 24, 2016


38


TECH DATA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(In thousands, except share amounts)

As of January 31:
2016
 
2015
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
531,169

 
$
542,995

Accounts receivable, less allowances of $45,875 and $50,143
2,995,114

 
2,811,963

Inventories
2,117,384

 
1,959,627

Prepaid expenses and other assets
178,394

 
161,832

Assets held for sale

 
101,706

Total current assets
5,822,061

 
5,578,123

Property and equipment, net
66,028

 
63,104

Goodwill
204,114

 
198,565

Intangible assets, net
159,386

 
176,754

Other assets, net
106,699

 
120,179

Total assets
$
6,358,288

 
$
6,136,725

 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
3,427,580

 
$
3,119,618

Accrued expenses and other liabilities
487,003

 
538,758

Revolving credit loans and current maturities of long-term debt, net
18,063

 
13,303

Liabilities held for sale

 
71,447

Total current liabilities
3,932,646

 
3,743,126

Long-term debt, less current maturities
348,608

 
351,576

Other long-term liabilities
71,279

 
81,880

Total liabilities
4,352,533

 
4,176,582

Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)
 
 
 
Shareholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Common stock, par value $.0015; 200,000,000 shares authorized; 59,245,585 shares issued at January 31, 2016 and 2015; 35,082,183 and 37,379,516 shares outstanding at January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively
89

 
89

Additional paid-in capital
682,227

 
679,973

Treasury stock, at cost (24,163,402 and 21,866,069 shares at January 31, 2016 and 2015)
(1,077,434
)
 
(939,143
)
Retained earnings
2,434,198

 
2,168,462

Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
(33,325
)
 
50,762

Total shareholders' equity
2,005,755

 
1,960,143

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
$
6,358,288

 
$
6,136,725

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements.


39


TECH DATA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
(In thousands, except per share amounts)

Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Net sales
$
26,379,783

 
$
27,670,632

 
$
26,821,904

Cost of products sold
25,093,122

 
26,276,678

 
25,459,558

Gross profit
1,286,661

 
1,393,954

 
1,362,346

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses
990,934

 
1,114,234

 
1,116,553

LCD settlements, net
(98,433
)
 
(5,059
)
 
(35,511
)
Value added tax assessments
(8,796
)
 
(6,229
)
 

Restatement and remediation related expenses
829

 
22,043

 
53,791

Loss on disposal of subsidiaries
699

 
1,330

 

 
885,233

 
1,126,319

 
1,134,833

Operating income
401,428

 
267,635

 
227,513

Interest expense
14,488

 
26,548

 
26,606

Other expense (income), net
4,522

 
1,903

 
(3,402
)
Income before income taxes
382,418

 
239,184

 
204,309

Provision for income taxes
116,682

 
64,012

 
24,377

Net income
$
265,736

 
$
175,172

 
$
179,932

Net income per share
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
7.40

 
$
4.59

 
$
4.73

Diluted
$
7.36

 
$
4.57

 
$
4.71

Weighted average common shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
35,898

 
38,172

 
38,020

Diluted
36,097

 
38,354

 
38,228

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements.
 

40


TECH DATA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(In thousands)
 
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Net income
$
265,736

 
$
175,172

 
$
179,932

Other comprehensive loss:
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustment
(84,087
)
 
(273,809
)
 
(5,536
)
Total comprehensive income (loss)
$
181,649

 
$
(98,637
)
 
$
174,396

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements.
 

41


TECH DATA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(In thousands)  

 
Common Stock
 
Additional
paid-in
capital
 
Treasury
stock
 
Retained
earnings
 
Accumulated  other comprehensive (loss)
income
 
Total
equity
 
Shares  
 
Amount  
 
Balance—January 31, 2013
59,246

 
$
89

 
$
680,715

 
$
(905,900
)
 
$
1,813,358

 
$
330,107

 
$
1,918,369

Issuance of treasury stock for benefit plan and equity-based awards exercised, including related tax benefit of $1,038

 

 
(13,976
)
 
10,964

 

 

 
(3,012
)
Stock-based compensation expense

 

 
8,858

 

 

 

 
8,858

Total other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 
(5,536
)
 
(5,536
)
Net income

 

 

 

 
179,932

 

 
179,932

Balance—January 31, 2014
59,246

 
89

 
675,597

 
(894,936
)
 
1,993,290

 
324,571

 
2,098,611

Purchase of treasury stock, at cost

 

 

 
(52,997
)
 

 

 
(52,997
)
Issuance of treasury stock for benefit plan and equity-based awards exercised, including related tax benefit of $2,302

 

 
(9,292
)
 
8,790

 

 

 
(502
)
Stock-based compensation expense

 

 
13,668

 

 

 

 
13,668

Total other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 
(273,809
)
 
(273,809
)
Net income

 

 

 

 
175,172

 

 
175,172

Balance—January 31, 2015
59,246

 
89

 
679,973

 
(939,143
)
 
2,168,462

 
50,762

 
1,960,143

Purchase of treasury stock, at cost

 

 

 
(147,003
)
 

 

 
(147,003
)
Issuance of treasury stock for benefit plan and equity-based awards exercised, including related tax benefit of $182

 

 
(12,636
)
 
8,712

 

 

 
(3,924
)
Stock-based compensation expense

 

 
14,890

 

 

 

 
14,890

Total other comprehensive loss

 

 

 

 

 
(84,087
)
 
(84,087
)
Net income

 

 

 

 
265,736

 

 
265,736

Balance—January 31, 2016
59,246

 
$
89

 
$
682,227

 
$
(1,077,434
)
 
$
2,434,198

 
$
(33,325
)
 
$
2,005,755

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these financial statements.

42


TECH DATA CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
Year ended January 31:
2016
 
2015
 
2014
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Cash received from customers
$
28,119,687

 
$
29,380,493

 
$
28,253,552

Cash paid to vendors and employees
(27,824,548
)
 
(29,177,542
)
 
(27,775,887
)
Interest paid, net
(20,264
)
 
(24,546
)
 
(23,082
)
Income taxes paid
(85,882
)
 
(59,024
)
 
(75,435
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
188,993

 
119,381

 
379,148

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Acquisition of businesses, net of cash acquired
(27,848
)
 

 
6,377

Acquisition of trademark

 

 
(1,519
)
Expenditures for property and equipment
(20,917
)
 
(18,639
)
 
(15,598
)
Proceeds from sale of fixed assets

 
7,121

 

Software and software development costs
(13,055
)
 
(9,536
)
 
(13,271
)
Proceeds from sale of subsidiaries
20,020