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EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - INCYTE CORPincy-20150930ex321bacf96.htm
EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - INCYTE CORPincy-20150930ex3228b0828.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - INCYTE CORPincy-20150930ex3128772e0.htm
EX-10.2 - EX-10.2 - INCYTE CORPincy-20150930ex102103f37.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - INCYTE CORPincy-20150930ex311f194fb.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2015

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from             to            

 

Commission File Number: 0-27488

 

INCYTE CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

Delaware

 

94-3136539

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer
Identification No.)

 

 

 

1801 Augustine Cut-Off

Wilmington, DE  19803

 

19803

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

(302) 498-6700

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes   No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).   Yes   No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer 

 

Accelerated filer 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer 

 

Smaller reporting company 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes   No

 

The number of outstanding shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, $0.001 par value, was 186,001,815 as of October 23, 2015.

 

 

 

 


 

INCYTE CORPORATION

 

INDEX

 

 

 

PART I: FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

 

 

 

Item 1. 

Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

 

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

 

Item 2. 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

24 

 

 

 

Item 3. 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

41 

 

 

 

Item 4. 

Controls and Procedures

41 

 

 

 

PART II: OTHER INFORMATION 

42 

 

 

 

Item 1A. 

Risk Factors

42 

 

 

 

Item 6. 

Exhibits

60 

 

 

 

 

Signatures

61 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit Index

62 

 

 

 

2


 

PART I:    FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.    Financial Statements

 

INCYTE CORPORATION

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except number of shares and par value)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

December 31,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014*

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

445,801

 

$

452,297

 

Marketable securities—available-for-sale

 

 

189,244

 

 

147,966

 

Restricted cash and investments

 

 

517

 

 

500

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

86,966

 

 

57,933

 

Inventory

 

 

2,428

 

 

358

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

9,712

 

 

19,641

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

23,246

 

 

20,519

 

Total current assets

 

 

757,914

 

 

699,214

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restricted cash and investments

 

 

18,111

 

 

14,000

 

Long term investment

 

 

35,714

 

 

 —

 

Inventory

 

 

17,838

 

 

19,078

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

83,186

 

 

81,790

 

Other assets, net

 

 

19,169

 

 

15,987

 

Total assets

 

$

931,932

 

$

830,069

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

27,366

 

$

24,462

 

Accrued compensation

 

 

30,070

 

 

34,422

 

Interest payable

 

 

3,316

 

 

1,841

 

Accrued and other current liabilities

 

 

82,209

 

 

62,270

 

Deferred revenue—collaborative agreements

 

 

12,857

 

 

12,880

 

Convertible senior notes

 

 

5

 

 

85,640

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

155,823

 

 

221,515

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible senior notes

 

 

623,928

 

 

603,478

 

Other liabilities

 

 

50,863

 

 

54,552

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

9,712

 

 

19,641

 

Deferred revenue—collaborative agreements

 

 

2,869

 

 

12,511

 

Total liabilities

 

 

843,195

 

 

911,697

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity (deficit):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding as of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 400,000,000 shares authorized; 185,956,247 and 170,876,619 shares issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively

 

 

186

 

 

171

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

1,922,989

 

 

1,701,904

 

Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income

 

 

(275)

 

 

1,815

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(1,834,163)

 

 

(1,785,518)

 

Total stockholders’ equity (deficit)

 

 

88,737

 

 

(81,628)

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity (deficit)

 

$

931,932

 

$

830,069

 


*   The condensed consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2014 has been derived from the audited financial statements at that date.

See accompanying notes.

 

3


 

INCYTE CORPORATION

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(unaudited,  in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended 

 

Nine Months Ended 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

    

2015

    

2014

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product revenues, net

 

$

161,259

 

$

97,837

 

$

418,994

 

$

251,513

 

Product royalty revenues

 

 

18,138

 

 

12,093

 

 

51,175

 

 

34,259

 

Contract revenues

 

 

8,214

 

 

88,214

 

 

39,643

 

 

101,643

 

Other revenues

 

 

 —

 

 

3

 

 

58

 

 

107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

 

 

187,611

 

 

198,147

 

 

509,870

 

 

387,522

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product revenues

 

 

8,040

 

 

221

 

 

17,268

 

 

576

 

Research and development

 

 

132,073

 

 

88,537

 

 

362,882

 

 

248,806

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

47,599

 

 

39,446

 

 

144,147

 

 

117,320

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total costs and expenses

 

 

187,712

 

 

128,204

 

 

524,297

 

 

366,702

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

 

 

(101)

 

 

69,943

 

 

(14,427)

 

 

20,820

 

Interest and other income, net

 

 

3,026

 

 

885

 

 

5,800

 

 

2,410

 

Interest expense

 

 

(11,209)

 

 

(11,463)

 

 

(35,390)

 

 

(34,312)

 

Unrealized loss on long term investment

 

 

(31,289)

 

 

 —

 

 

(4,115)

 

 

 —

 

Debt exchange expense on senior note conversions

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(265)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income (loss) before provision for income taxes

 

 

(39,573)

 

 

59,365

 

 

(48,132)

 

 

(11,347)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

9

 

 

72

 

 

513

 

 

191

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

 

$

(39,582)

 

$

59,293

 

$

(48,645)

 

$

(11,538)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

(0.22)

 

$

0.35

 

$

(0.27)

 

$

(0.07)

 

Diluted

 

$

(0.22)

 

$

0.33

 

$

(0.27)

 

$

(0.07)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares used in computing  net income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

181,387

 

 

168,592

 

 

177,378

 

 

167,288

 

Diluted

 

 

181,387

 

 

189,046

 

 

177,378

 

 

167,288

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

4


 

INCYTE CORPORATION

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

    

2015

    

2014

 

Net income (loss)

 

$

(39,582)

 

$

59,293

 

$

(48,645)

 

$

(11,538)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gains (loss) on restricted investments and marketable securities, net of tax

 

 

(394)

 

 

(166)

 

 

(260)

 

 

(79)

 

Reclassification adjustment for realized gains on marketable securities

 

 

(1,830)

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,830)

 

 

 —

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income

 

 

(2,224)

 

 

(166)

 

 

(2,090)

 

 

(79)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comprehensive income (loss)

 

$

(41,806)

 

$

59,127

 

$

(50,735)

 

$

(11,617)

 

 

See accompanying notes.

5


 

INCYTE CORPORATION

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(48,645)

 

$

(11,538)

 

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization of debt discounts

 

 

34,279

 

 

29,192

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

52,775

 

 

46,253

 

Debt exchange expense on senior note conversions

 

 

 —

 

 

265

 

Realized gain on marketable securities

 

 

(1,830)

 

 

 —

 

Unrealized loss on long term investment

 

 

4,115

 

 

 —

 

Excess tax benefit from stock based compensation

 

 

(2,094)

 

 

(74)

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

(29,033)

 

 

(74,225)

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

 

 

(1,918)

 

 

(9,703)

 

Inventory

 

 

(830)

 

 

(2,588)

 

Accounts payable

 

 

2,904

 

 

7,503

 

Accrued and other liabilities

 

 

16,469

 

 

6,102

 

Deferred revenue—collaborative agreements

 

 

(9,665)

 

 

(9,651)

 

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

 

16,527

 

 

(18,464)

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long term investments

 

 

(39,829)

 

 

 —

 

Capital expenditures

 

 

(19,107)

 

 

(22,021)

 

Purchases of marketable securities

 

 

(94,376)

 

 

(113,281)

 

Sale and maturities of marketable securities

 

 

52,831

 

 

381

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(100,481)

 

 

(134,921)

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restricted investments, net

 

 

(128)

 

 

 —

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock under stock plans

 

 

76,871

 

 

64,151

 

Direct financing arrangements repayments

 

 

(1,379)

 

 

 —

 

Excess tax provision from stock based compensation

 

 

2,094

 

 

74

 

Cash paid in connection with exchange of 4.75% convertible senior notes due 2015

 

 

 —

 

 

(265)

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

77,458

 

 

63,960

 

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(6,496)

 

 

(89,425)

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

 

452,297

 

 

471,429

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

$

445,801

 

$

382,004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental Schedule of Cash Flow Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest paid

 

$

7,698

 

$

5,245

 

Incomes taxes paid

 

$

86

 

$

167

 

Reclassification to additional paid in capital in connection with conversions or exchanges of 4.75% convertible senior notes due 2015

 

$

88,962

 

$

4,656

 

Purchase of property and equipment financed by direct financing lease

 

$

 —

 

$

26,815

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

 

6


 

INCYTE CORPORATION

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

September 30, 2015

(Unaudited)

 

1.     Organization and business

 

Incyte Corporation (“Incyte,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) is a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing proprietary therapeutics, primarily for oncology. Our pipeline includes compounds in various stages, ranging from preclinical to late stage development, and a commercialized product, JAKAFI® (ruxolitinib). Our operations are treated as one operating segment.

 

2.     Summary of significant accounting policies

 

Basis of presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X.  The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2015 and the condensed consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive loss and cash flows for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, are unaudited, but include all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, which we consider necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position, operating results and cash flows for the periods presented.  The condensed consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2014 has been derived from audited financial statements.

 

Although we believe that the disclosures in these financial statements are adequate to make the information presented not misleading, certain information and footnote information normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Results for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of results for any future interim period or for the entire year. The accompanying financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Principles of Consolidation.    The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Incyte Corporation and our wholly owned subsidiaries, including Incyte Holdings Corporation, Incyte International Holdings Sarl, and Incyte Europe Sarl. All inter-company accounts, transactions, and profits have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Foreign Currency Translation. Operations in non-U.S. entities are recorded in the functional currency of each entity. For financial reporting purposes, the functional currency of an entity is determined by a review of the source of an entity's most predominant cash flows. The results of operations for any non-U.S. dollar functional currency entities are translated from functional currencies into U.S. dollars using the average currency rate during each month, which approximates the results that would be obtained using actual currency rates on the dates of individual transactions. Assets and liabilities are translated using currency rates at the end of the period. Adjustments resulting from translating the financial statements of our foreign entities that use their local currency as the functional currency into the U.S. dollars are reflected as a component of other comprehensive income (loss). Transaction gains and losses are recorded in interest and other income, net in the condensed consolidated statements of operations. To date, both the translation gains or losses in other comprehensive income and the transaction gains or losses in interest and other income, net have been immaterial.

 

Use of Estimates.  The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk.  Cash, cash equivalents, marketable securities, trade receivables and restricted investments are financial instruments which potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk. The estimated fair value of financial instruments approximates the carrying value based on available market information. We primarily invest our excess available funds in notes and bills issued by the U.S. government and its agencies and corporate debt securities and, by policy, limit the amount of credit exposure to any one issuer and to any one type of investment, other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government. Our receivables mainly relate to our product sales of JAKAFI and collaborative agreements with pharmaceutical companies. We have not experienced any significant credit

7


 

losses on cash, cash equivalents, marketable securities, trade receivables or restricted investments to date and do not require collateral on receivables.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents.    Cash and cash equivalents are held in U.S. banks or in custodial accounts with banks. Cash equivalents are defined as all liquid investments and money market funds with maturity from date of purchase of 90 days or less that are readily convertible into cash.

 

Marketable Securities—Available-for-Sale.  All marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale. Available-for-sale securities are carried at fair value, based on quoted market prices and observable inputs, with unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity  (deficit). We classify marketable securities that are available for use in current operations as current assets on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. Realized gains and losses and declines in value judged to be other than temporary for available-for-sale securities are included in “Interest and other income, net.” The cost of securities sold is based on the specific identification method.

 

Accounts Receivable.  As of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, we had no allowance for doubtful accounts. We provide an allowance for doubtful accounts based on experience and specifically identified risks. Accounts receivable are carried at fair value and charged off against the allowance for doubtful accounts when we determine that recovery is unlikely and we cease collection efforts.

 

Inventory.    Inventories are determined at the lower of cost or market value with cost determined under the specific identification method and may consist of raw materials, work in process and finished goods. We began capitalizing inventory in mid-November 2011 once the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approved JAKAFI as the related costs were expected to be recoverable through the commercialization of the product. Costs incurred prior to approval of JAKAFI have been recorded as research and development expense in our statements of operations. As a result, cost of product revenues for the next 12 to 15 months will reflect a lower average per unit cost of materials.

 

The raw materials and work-in-process inventory is not subject to expiration and the shelf life for finished goods inventory is 36 months from the start of manufacturing of the finished goods. We evaluate for potential excess inventory by analyzing current and future product demand relative to the remaining product shelf life. We build demand forecasts by considering factors such as, but not limited to, overall market potential, market share, market acceptance and patient usage. We classify inventory as current on the condensed consolidated balance sheets when we expect inventory to be consumed for commercial use within the next twelve months.

 

Variable Interest Entities. We perform an initial and on-going evaluation of the entities with which we have variable interests, such as equity ownership, in order to identify entities (i) that do not have sufficient equity investment at risk to permit the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support or (ii) in which the equity investors lack an essential characteristic of a controlling financial interest as variable interest entities (“VIE” or “VIEs”). If an entity is identified as a VIE, we perform an assessment to determine whether we have both (i) the power to direct activities that most significantly impact the VIE’s economic performance and (ii) have the obligation to absorb losses from or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. If both of these criteria are satisfied, we are identified as the primary beneficiary of the VIE.  As of September 30, 2015, there were no entities in which we held a variable interest which we determined to be VIEs.

 

Equity Method Investments.    In circumstances where we have the ability to exercise significant influence over the operating and financial policies of a company in which we have an investment, the investment is accounted for either (i) under the equity method of accounting or (ii) at fair value by electing the fair value option under U.S. GAAP.   In assessing whether we exercise significant influence, we consider the nature and magnitude of our investment, any voting and protective rights we hold, any participation in the governance of the other company, and other relevant factors such as the presence of a collaboration or other business relationship. Under the equity method of accounting, we record within our results of operations our share of income or loss of the investee company.  Under the fair value option, our investment is carried at fair value on our condensed consolidated balance sheets as a long term investment and all changes in fair value are reported in our condensed consolidated statements of operations as an unrealized gain (loss) on long term investment.

 

Property and Equipment.  Property and equipment is stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation is recorded using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets (generally three to five years). Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the estimated useful life of the assets or lease term.

 

Management continually reviews the estimated useful lives of technologically sensitive equipment and believes that those estimates appropriately reflect the current useful life of our assets. In the event that a currently unknown

8


 

significantly advanced technology became commercially available, we would re-evaluate the value and estimated useful lives of our existing equipment, possibly having a material impact on the financial statements.

 

Lease Accounting.  We account for operating leases by recording rent expense on a straight-line basis over the expected life of the lease, commencing on the date we gain possession of leased property. We include tenant improvement allowances and rent holidays received from landlords and the effect of any rent escalation clauses as adjustments to straight-line rent expense over the expected life of the lease.

 

Capital leases are reflected as a liability at the inception of the lease based on the present value of the minimum lease payments or, if lower, the fair value of the property. Assets under capital leases are recorded in property and equipment, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets and depreciated in a manner similar to other property and equipment.

 

Certain construction projects may be accounted for as direct financing arrangements, whereby we record, over the construction period, the full cost of the asset in property and equipment, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. A corresponding liability is also recorded, net of leasehold improvements paid for by us, and is amortized over the expected lease term through monthly rental payments using the effective interest method.

 

Income Taxes.  We account for income taxes using the asset and liability approach which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the carrying amount of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and amounts reportable for income tax purposes. In addition, we follow the guidance related to accounting for uncertainty in income taxes. This guidance creates a single model to address uncertainty in tax positions and clarifies the accounting for income taxes by prescribing the minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before it is recognized in the financial statements.

 

Financing Costs Related to Long-term Debt.  Costs associated with obtaining long-term debt are deferred and amortized over the term of the related debt using the effective interest method. Such costs are included in other assets, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Grant Accounting.  Grant amounts received from government agencies for operations are deferred and are amortized into income over the service period of the grant. Grant amounts received for purchases of capital assets are deferred and amortized into interest and other income, net over the useful life of the related capital assets. Such amounts are recorded in other liabilities on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Share.    Our basic and diluted income (losses) per share are calculated by dividing the net income (loss) by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during all periods presented. Options to purchase stock and shares issuable upon the conversion of convertible debt are included in diluted net income (loss) per share calculations, unless the effects are anti-dilutive.

 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss).    Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) consists of realized and unrealized gains or losses on marketable securities and restricted cash and investments.

 

Revenue Recognition.    Revenues are recognized when (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (2) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (3) the price is fixed or determinable and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. Revenues are deferred for fees received before earned or until no further obligations exist. We exercise judgment in determining that collectability is reasonably assured or that services have been delivered in accordance with the arrangement. We assess whether the fee is fixed or determinable based on the payment terms associated with the transaction and whether the sales price is subject to refund or adjustment. We assess collectability based primarily on the customer’s payment history and on the creditworthiness of the customer.

 

Product Revenues

 

Our product revenues consist of U.S. sales of JAKAFI and are recognized once we meet all four revenue recognition criteria described above. In November 2011, we began shipping JAKAFI to our specialty pharmacy customers, which in turn dispense JAKAFI to patients in fulfillment of prescriptions.

 

We recognize revenues for product received by our specialty pharmacy customers net of allowances for customer credits, including estimated rebates, chargebacks, discounts, returns, distribution service fees, patient assistance programs, and Medicare Part D coverage gap reimbursements. Product shipping and handling costs are included in cost of product revenues.

 

Customer Credits:  Our specialty pharmacy customers are offered various forms of consideration, including allowances, service fees and prompt payment discounts. We expect our specialty pharmacy customers will earn prompt

9


 

payment discounts and, therefore, we deduct the full amount of these discounts from total product sales when revenues are recognized. Service fees are also deducted from total product sales as they are earned.

 

Rebates:    Allowances for rebates include mandated discounts under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program. Rebate amounts are based upon contractual agreements or legal requirements with public sector (e.g. Medicaid) benefit providers. Rebates are amounts owed after the final dispensing of the product to a benefit plan participant and are based upon contractual agreements or legal requirements with public sector benefit providers. The accrual for rebates is based on statutory discount rates and expected utilization as well as historical data we have accumulated since product launch. Our estimates for expected utilization of rebates are based on data received from our specialty pharmacy customers. Rebates are generally invoiced and paid in arrears so that the accrual balance consists of an estimate of the amount expected to be incurred for the current quarter’s activity, plus an accrual balance for known prior quarters’ unpaid rebates. If actual future rebates vary from estimates, we may need to adjust prior period accruals, which would affect revenue in the period of adjustment.

 

Chargebacks:  Chargebacks are discounts that occur when contracted customers purchase directly from a specialty pharmacy, or an intermediary distributor. Contracted customers, which currently consist primarily of Public Health Service institutions, non-profit clinics, and Federal government entities purchasing via the Federal Supply Schedule, generally purchase the product at a discounted price. The specialty pharmacy or distributor, in turn, charges back to us the difference between the price initially paid by the specialty pharmacy or distributor and the discounted price paid to the specialty pharmacy or distributor by the customer. The accrual for chargebacks is based on the estimated contractual discounts on the inventory levels on hand in our distribution channel. If actual future chargebacks vary from estimates, we may need to adjust prior period accruals, which would affect revenue in the period of adjustment.

 

Medicare Part D Coverage Gap:  Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit mandates manufacturers to fund 50% of the Medicare Part D insurance coverage gap for prescription drugs sold to eligible patients. Our estimates for the expected Medicare Part D coverage gap are based on historical invoices received and in part from data received from our specialty pharmacy customers. Funding of the coverage gap is generally invoiced and paid in arrears so that the accrual balance consists of an estimate of the amount expected to be incurred for the current quarter’s activity, plus an accrual balance for known prior quarters. If actual future funding varies from estimates, we may need to adjust prior period accruals, which would affect revenue in the period of adjustment.

 

Co-payment Assistance:  Patients who have commercial insurance and meet certain eligibility requirements may receive co-payment assistance. We accrue a liability for co-payment assistance based on actual program participation and estimates of program redemption using data provided by third-party administrators.

 

Product Royalty Revenues

 

Royalty revenues on commercial sales for ruxolitinib (marketed as JAKAVI® outside the United States) by Novartis Pharmaceutical International Ltd. (“Novartis”) are based on net sales of licensed products in licensed territories as provided by Novartis. We recognize royalty revenues in the period the sales occur.

 

Cost of Product Revenues

 

Cost of product revenues includes all JAKAFI related costs that are recoverable through the commercialization of the product. Beginning in October 2014, we became obligated to pay tiered, low single digit royalties under our collaboration and license agreement to Novartis on all future sales of JAKAFI in the United States which are included in cost of product revenues.

 

Contract and License Revenues

 

Under agreements involving multiple deliverables, services and/or rights to use assets that we entered into prior to January 1, 2011, the multiple elements are divided into separate units of accounting when certain criteria are met, including whether the delivered items have stand-alone value to the customer and whether there is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered items. When separate units of accounting exist, consideration is allocated among the separate elements based on their respective fair values. The determination of fair value of each element is based on objective evidence from historical sales of the individual elements by us to other customers. If such evidence of fair value for each undelivered element of the arrangement does not exist, all revenue from the arrangement is deferred until such time that evidence of fair value for each undelivered element does exist or until all elements of the arrangement are delivered. When elements are specifically tied to a separate earnings process, revenue is recognized when the specific performance obligation tied to the element is completed. When revenues for an element are not specifically tied to a separate earnings process, they are recognized ratably over the term of the agreement. We assess whether a substantive milestone exists at the inception of our agreements. For all milestones within our arrangements

10


 

that are considered substantive, we recognize revenue upon the achievement of the associated milestone. If a milestone is not considered substantive, we would recognize the applicable milestone payment over the remaining period of performance under the arrangement. As of September 30, 2015, all remaining potential milestones under our collaborative arrangements are considered substantive.

 

On January 1, 2011, updated guidance on the recognition of revenues for agreements with multiple deliverables became effective and applies to any agreements we may enter into on or after January 1, 2011. This updated guidance (i) relates to whether multiple deliverables exist, how the deliverables in a revenue arrangement should be separated and how the consideration should be allocated; (ii) requires companies to allocate revenues in an arrangement using estimated selling prices of deliverables if a vendor does not have vendor-specific objective evidence or third-party evidence of selling price; and (iii) eliminates the use of the residual method and requires companies to allocate revenues using the relative selling price method. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, we did not enter into any agreements that are subject to this updated guidance. If we enter into an agreement with multiple deliverables after January 1, 2011 or amend existing agreements, this updated guidance could have a material effect on our financial statements.

 

Our collaborations often include contractual milestones, which typically relate to the achievement of pre-specified development, regulatory and commercialization events. These three categories of milestone events reflect the three stages of the life-cycle of our drugs, which we describe in more detail in the following paragraphs.

 

The regulatory review and approval process, which includes preclinical testing and clinical trials of each drug candidate, is lengthy, expensive and uncertain. Securing approval by the FDA requires the submission of extensive preclinical and clinical data and supporting information to the FDA for each indication to establish a drug candidate’s safety and efficacy. The approval process takes many years, requires the expenditure of substantial resources, involves post-marketing surveillance and may involve ongoing requirements for post-marketing studies. Before commencing clinical investigations of a drug candidate in humans, we must submit an Investigational New Drug application (“IND”), which must be reviewed by the FDA.

 

The steps generally required before a drug may be marketed in the United States include preclinical laboratory tests, animal studies and formulation studies, submission to the FDA of an IND for human clinical testing, performance of adequate and well-controlled clinical trials in three phases, as described below, to establish the safety and efficacy of the drug for each indication, submission of a new drug application (“NDA”) or biologics license application (“BLA”) to the FDA for review and FDA approval of the NDA or BLA.

 

Similar requirements exist within foreign regulatory agencies as well. The time required satisfying the FDA requirements or similar requirements of foreign regulatory agencies may vary substantially based on the type, complexity and novelty of the product or the targeted disease.

 

Preclinical testing includes laboratory evaluation of product pharmacology, drug metabolism, and toxicity, which includes animal studies, to assess potential safety and efficacy as well as product chemistry, stability, formulation, development, and testing. The results of the preclinical tests, together with manufacturing information and analytical data, are submitted to the FDA as part of an IND. The FDA may raise safety concerns or questions about the conduct of the clinical trials included in the IND, and any of these concerns or questions must be resolved before clinical trials can proceed. We cannot be sure that submission of an IND will result in the FDA allowing clinical trials to commence. Clinical trials involve the administration of the investigational drug or the marketed drug to human subjects under the supervision of qualified investigators and in accordance with good clinical practices regulations covering the protection of human subjects. Clinical trials typically are conducted in three sequential phases, but the phases may overlap or be combined. Phase I usually involves the initial introduction of the investigational drug into healthy volunteers to evaluate its safety, dosage tolerance, absorption, metabolism, distribution and excretion. Phase II usually involves clinical trials in a limited patient population to evaluate dosage tolerance and optimal dosage, identify possible adverse effects and safety risks, and evaluate and gain preliminary evidence of the efficacy of the drug for specific indications. Phase III clinical trials usually further evaluate clinical efficacy and safety by testing the drug in its final form in an expanded patient population, providing statistical evidence of efficacy and safety, and providing an adequate basis for labeling. We cannot guarantee that Phase I, Phase II or Phase III testing will be completed successfully within any specified period of time, if at all. Furthermore, we, the institutional review board for a trial, or the FDA may suspend clinical trials at any time on various grounds, including a finding that the subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk.

 

Generally, the milestone events contained in our collaboration agreements coincide with the progression of our drugs from development, to regulatory approval and then to commercialization. The process of successfully discovering a new development candidate, having it approved and successfully commercialized is highly uncertain. As such, the milestone payments we may earn from our partners involve a significant degree of risk to achieve. Therefore, as a drug candidate progresses through the stages of its life-cycle, the value of the drug candidate generally increases.

 

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Research and Development Costs.    Our policy is to expense research and development costs as incurred. We often contract with clinical research organizations (CROs) to facilitate, coordinate and perform agreed upon research and development of a new drug. To ensure that research and development costs are expensed as incurred, we record monthly accruals for clinical trials and preclinical testing costs based on the work performed under the contract.

 

These CRO contracts typically call for the payment of fees for services at the initiation of the contract and/or upon the achievement of certain clinical trial milestones. In the event that we prepay CRO fees, we record the prepayment as a prepaid asset and amortize the asset into research and development expense over the period of time the contracted research and development services are performed. Most professional fees, including project and clinical management, data management, monitoring, and medical writing fees are incurred throughout the contract period. These professional fees are expensed based on their percentage of completion at a particular date. Our CRO contracts generally include pass through fees. Pass through fees include, but are not limited to, regulatory expenses, investigator fees, travel costs, and other miscellaneous costs, including shipping and printing fees. We expense the costs of pass through fees under our CRO contracts as they are incurred, based on the best information available to us at the time. The estimates of the pass through fees incurred are based on the amount of work completed for the clinical trial and are monitored through correspondence with the CROs, internal reviews and a review of contractual terms. The factors utilized to derive the estimates include the number of patients enrolled, duration of the clinical trial, estimated patient attrition, screening rate and length of the dosing regimen. CRO fees incurred to set up the clinical trial are expensed during the setup period.

 

Under our clinical trial collaboration agreements we may be reimbursed for certain development costs incurred. Such costs are recorded as a reduction of research and development expense in the period in which the related expense is incurred.

 

Stock Compensation.    Share-based payment transactions with employees, which include stock options, restricted stock units (“RSUs”) and performance shares (“PSUs”), are recognized as compensation expense over the requisite service period based on their estimated fair values as well as expected forfeiture rates.  The stock compensation process requires significant judgment and the use of estimates, particularly surrounding Black-Scholes assumptions such as stock price volatility over the option term and expected option lives, as well as expected forfeiture rates and the probability of PSUs vesting.  The fair value of stock options, which are subject to graded vesting, are recognized as compensation expense over the requisite service period using the accelerated attribution method.  The fair value of RSUs, which are generally subject to cliff vesting, are recognized as compensation expense over the requisite service period using the straight line attribution method.  The fair value of PSUs are recognized as compensation expense beginning at the time in which the performance conditions are deemed probable of achievement, over the remaining requisite service period. We recorded $17.6 million and $52.8 million of stock compensation expense on our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, respectively. We recorded $15.5 million and $46.3 million of stock compensation expense on our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014, respectively.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In August 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2014-15, “Presentation of Financial Statements—Going Concern,” to provide guidance on management’s responsibility in evaluating whether there is substantial doubt about a company’s ability to continue as a going concern and about related footnote disclosures. For each reporting period, management will be required to evaluate whether there are conditions or events that raise substantial doubt about a company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year from the date the financial statements are issued. This guidance is effective for the annual period ending after December 15, 2016, and for annual periods and interim periods thereafter. Early application is permitted. We do not believe the pending adoption of ASU No. 2014-15 will have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers,” which provides a five step approach to be applied to all contracts with customers. ASU No. 2014-09 also requires expanded disclosures about revenue recognition. This guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods therein.  Early adoption is permitted for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016.  We are currently analyzing the impact of ASU No. 2014-09 on our results of operations and, at this time, we are unable to determine the impact on the new standard, if any, on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-02, “Amendments to the Consolidation Analysis,” which affects reporting entities that are required to evaluate whether they should consolidate certain legal entities.  The amendments place more emphasis in the consolidation evaluation on variable interests other than fee arrangements such as principal investment risk (including debt or equity interests), guarantees of the value of the assets or liabilities of the VIE, written put options on the assets of the VIE, or similar obligations. Additionally, the amendments reduce the extent to which related party arrangements cause an entity to be considered a primary beneficiary. This guidance is to be

12


 

applied using a modified retrospective approach by recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to equity as of the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. The amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods therein. We are currently analyzing the impact of ASU No. 2015-03, if any, on our condensed consolidated financial statements. 

 

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-03, “Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs,” which requires debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs is not affected by the amendments in this update.  This guidance is to be applied retrospectively and is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015 and interim periods therein.  Early adoption is permitted. We are currently analyzing the impact of ASU No. 2015-03 on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3.     Fair value of financial instruments

 

FASB accounting guidance defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (“the exit price”) in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The standard outlines a valuation framework and creates a fair value hierarchy in order to increase the consistency and comparability of fair value measurements and the related disclosures. In determining fair value we use quoted prices and observable inputs. Observable inputs are inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of us. The fair value hierarchy is broken down into three levels based on the source of inputs as follows:

 

Level 1—Valuations based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2—Valuations based on observable inputs and quoted prices in active markets for similar assets and liabilities.

 

Level 3—Valuations based on inputs that are unobservable and models that are significant to the overall fair value measurement.

 

At September 30, 2015, our marketable securities consist of investments in U.S. government agencies and corporate debt securities that are classified as available-for-sale. During the three months ended September 30, 2015, we sold our portfolio of mortgage-backed securities for a realized gain of $1.8 million which is recorded in interest and other income, net on the condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

At September 30, 2015 our Level 2 corporate debt securities were valued using readily available pricing sources which utilize market observable inputs, including the current interest rate and other characteristics for similar types of investments. At December 31, 2014, our Level 2 corporate debt securities and mortgage-backed securities were valued using readily available pricing sources which utilize market observable inputs, including the current interest rate and other characteristics for similar types of instruments.

 

The following fair value hierarchy table presents information about each major category of our financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2015 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurement at Reporting Date Using:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quoted Prices in

 

Significant Other

 

Significant

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active Markets for

 

Observable

 

Unobservable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identical Assets

 

Inputs

 

Inputs

 

Balance as of

 

 

    

(Level 1)

    

(Level 2)

    

(Level 3)

    

September 30, 2015

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

445,801

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

445,801

 

Corporate debt securities

 

 

 —

 

 

189,244

 

 

 —

 

 

189,244

 

Long term investment (Note 7)

 

 

35,714

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

35,714

 

Total assets

 

$

481,515

 

$

189,244

 

$

 —

 

$

670,759

 

 

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The following fair value hierarchy table presents information about each major category of our financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of December 31, 2014 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurement at Reporting Date Using:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quoted Prices in

 

Significant Other

 

Significant

 

 

 

 

 

 

Active Markets for

 

Observable

 

Unobservable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Identical Assets

 

Inputs

 

Inputs

 

Balance as of

 

 

    

(Level 1)

    

(Level 2)

    

(Level 3)

    

December 31, 2014

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

452,297

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

452,297

 

Corporate debt securities

 

 

 —

 

 

144,402

 

 

 —

 

 

144,402

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

 —

 

 

3,564

 

 

 —

 

 

3,564

 

Total assets

 

$

452,297

 

$

147,966

 

$

 —

 

$

600,263

 

 

The following is a summary of our marketable security portfolio as of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net

 

Net

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized

 

Unrealized

 

Unrealized

 

Estimated

 

 

    

Cost

    

Gains

    

Losses

    

Fair Value

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

September 30, 2015

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Corporate debt securities

 

$

189,519

 

$

 —

 

$

(275)

 

$

189,244

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corporate debt securities

 

$

144,684

 

$

 —

 

$

(282)

 

$

144,402

 

Mortgage backed securities

 

 

1,461

 

 

2,103

 

 

 —

 

 

3,564

 

 

 

$

146,145

 

$

2,103

 

$

(282)

 

$

147,966

 

 

Our corporate debt securities generally have contractual maturity dates of between 12 to 18 months. Because of the potential for prepayment on mortgage-backed securities, they are not categorized by contractual maturity at December 31, 2014.

 

4.     Concentration of Credit Risk

 

In December 2009, we entered into a license, development and commercialization agreement with Eli Lilly and Company (“Lilly”). In November 2009, we entered into a collaboration and license agreement with Novartis. The concentration of credit risk related to our collaborative partners is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of Total

 

Percentage of Total

 

 

 

Contract Revenues for the

 

Contract Revenues for the

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

    

 

2015

    

2014

    

 

Collaboration Partner A

    

61

%  

96

%  

    

76

%  

91

%  

 

Collaboration Partner B

 

39

%  

4

%  

 

24

%  

9

%  

 

 

Collaboration Partner A and Collaboration Partner B comprised in the aggregate 27% and 26% of the accounts receivable balance as of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively.

 

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In November 2011, we began commercialization and distribution of JAKAFI to a number of specialty pharmacies. Our product revenues are concentrated in a number of specialty pharmacy customers. The concentration of credit risk related to our specialty pharmacy customers is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of Total Net

 

Percentage of Total Net

 

 

 

Product Revenues for the

 

Product Revenues for the

 

 

 

Three Months Ended September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended September 30,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

    

 

2015

    

2014

    

 

Customer A

    

29

%  

29

%  

    

28

%  

29

%  

 

Customer B

 

18

%  

23

%  

 

19

%  

22

%  

 

Customer C

 

13

%  

10

%  

 

13

%  

10

%  

 

Customer D

 

9

%  

8

%  

 

9

%  

10

%  

 

 

We are exposed to risks associated with extending credit to specialty pharmacy customers related to the sale of products. Customer A, Customer B, Customer C and Customer D comprised in the aggregate 51% and 54% of the accounts receivable balance as of September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively.

 

5.     Inventory

 

Our inventory balance consists of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

 

December 31,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

    

 

 

  

 

 

  

Raw materials

 

$

283

 

$

591

 

Work-in-process

 

 

17,555

 

 

18,487

 

Finished goods

 

 

2,428

 

 

358

 

 

 

 

20,266

 

 

19,436

 

Inventories-current

 

 

2,428

 

 

358

 

Inventories-non-current

 

$

17,838

 

$

19,078

 

 

Inventories, stated at the lower of cost or market, consist of raw materials, work in process and finished goods. At September 30, 2015, $2.4 million of inventory was classified as current on the condensed consolidated balance sheet as we expect this inventory to be consumed for commercial use within the next twelve months. At September 30, 2015, $17.8 million of inventory was classified as non-current on the condensed consolidated balance sheet as we did not expect this inventory to be consumed for commercial use within the next twelve months. We obtain a number of inventory components from single source suppliers due to technology, availability, price, quality or other considerations. The loss of a single source supplier, the deterioration of its relationship with a single source supplier, or any unilateral violation of the contractual terms under which we are supplied components by a single source supplier could adversely affect our total revenues and gross margins.

 

The raw materials and work-in-process inventory is not subject to expiration and the shelf life for finished goods inventory is 36 months from the start of manufacturing of the finished goods. We evaluate for potential excess inventory by analyzing current and future product demand relative to the remaining product shelf life. We build demand forecasts by considering factors such as, but not limited to, overall market potential, market share, market acceptance and patient usage.

 

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6.    Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consists of the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 30,

December 31,

 

 

    

2015

    

2014

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Office equipment

    

$

6,288

 

$

6,090

    

Laboratory equipment

 

 

29,334

    

 

26,800

 

Computer equipment

 

 

21,719

 

 

18,648

 

Building and leasehold improvements

 

 

67,905

 

 

64,926

 

 

 

 

125,246

 

 

116,464

 

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

 

(42,060)

 

 

(34,674)

 

 

 

$

83,186

 

$

81,790

 

 

In 2013, we entered into a lease agreement for a new corporate headquarters, which consists of approximately 190,000 square feet of laboratory and office space located in Wilmington, Delaware. The term of this lease is 15 years from the date of commencement. The construction of the facility was completed and the lease commenced on October 1, 2014 with a monthly lease rate of $0.5 million for the first 10 years of the lease and with the monthly lease rate increasing annually during the last five years of the lease.

 

We are accounting for the lease as a direct financing arrangement whereby over the construction period, we recorded the value of the facility (consisting of the estimated fair value of the existing shell, plus construction costs incurred) as a capital asset, with a corresponding lease liability, net of build out costs paid for by us during the construction period. The lease liability will be amortized over the term of the lease using the effective interest method. In addition, we have posted a $15.0 million letter of credit for the facility lease for the benefit of the landlord, which is collateralized by a restricted investments account for the same amount. This amount was recorded as restricted cash and investments on the condensed consolidated balance sheets and will be reduced over a period of time during the duration of the lease. The letter of credit could be subject to accelerated reductions if we meet certain pre-defined financial targets. Restricted investments related to this direct financing lease on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014 were $14.1 million and $14.5 million, respectively.

 

On August 21, 2015, we entered into an Agreement of Sale with Augustine Land II, L.P. (the “Seller”) to purchase the leased land and office building for approximately $79.9 million. The Agreement of Sale contains customary representations and warranties regarding the property and closing of the acquisition is subject to certain standard closing conditions. Closing of the acquisition is expected to occur no later than April 1, 2016, unless the Seller elects to extend the closing date for up to 60 days. Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement of Sale, we initially made a $4.0 million deposit with a third party escrow agent and a $4.0 million deposit with the Seller. The escrow agent held the deposit until the building inspection process was completed, and the escrow agent released the $4.0 million to the Seller in October 2015 as an additional deposit. As of September 30, 2015, the purchase of the leased land and office building has not closed, and the closing is anticipated in the first quarter of 2016. The $4.0 million escrow deposit is recorded as long term restricted cash and investments and the deposit made to the Seller is recorded in long term other assets, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at September 30, 2015. The $8.0 million has also been reflected within capital expenditures on the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2015.

 

7.    License agreements

 

Novartis

 

In November 2009, we entered into a Collaboration and License Agreement with Novartis. Under the terms of the agreement, Novartis received exclusive development and commercialization rights outside of the United States to our JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib and certain back-up compounds for hematologic and oncology indications, including all hematological malignancies, solid tumors and myeloproliferative diseases. We retained exclusive development and commercialization rights to JAKAFI (ruxolitinib) in the United States and in certain other indications.  Novartis also received worldwide exclusive development and commercialization rights to our c-MET inhibitor compound capmatinib and certain back-up compounds in all indications. We retained options to co-develop and to co-promote capmatinib in the United States.

 

Under this agreement, we received an upfront payment and immediate milestone payment totaling $210.0 million and were initially eligible to receive up to $1.2 billion in milestone payments across multiple indications upon the achievement of pre-specified events, including up to $174.0 million for the achievement of development

16


 

milestones, up to $495.0 million for the achievement of regulatory milestones and up to $500.0 million for the achievement of commercialization milestones. As of September 30, 2015, we have recognized in the aggregate $102.0 million for the achievement of development milestones and $160.0 million for the achievement of regulatory milestones.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2015, under this agreement, we recognized and received a $5.0 million development milestone based on the formal initiation by Novartis of a Phase II clinical trial evaluating capmatinib for a third indication and a $25.0 million regulatory milestone triggered by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency adopting a positive opinion for JAKAVI (ruxolitinib) for the treatment of adult patients with polycythemia vera who are resistant to or intolerant of hydroxyurea. In 2014, we recognized and received a $60.0 million regulatory milestone related to reimbursement of JAKAVI (ruxolitinib) in Europe, a $25.0 million regulatory milestone for the approval of JAKAVI in Japan for the treatment of patients with myelofibrosis and a $7.0 million development milestone based on the formal initiation by Novartis of a Phase II clinical trial evaluating capmatinib in non-small cell lung cancer.  In 2013, we recognized and received a $25.0 million development milestone payment under this agreement based on the formal initiation by Novartis of a Phase II clinical trial evaluating capmatinib. In 2012, we recognized and received a $40.0 million regulatory milestone payment under this agreement for the achievement of a predefined milestone for the European Union regulatory approval of JAKAVI. In 2011, we recognized and received a $15.0 million development milestone payment under this agreement for the achievement of a predefined milestone in the Phase I dose-escalation trial for capmatinib in patients with solid tumors and a $10.0 million regulatory milestone payment for the approval of JAKAFI in the United States. We determined that each of these milestones were substantive as their achievement required substantive efforts by us and was at risk until the milestones were ultimately achieved. We also are eligible to receive tiered, double-digit royalties ranging from the upper-teens to the mid-twenties on future JAKAVI net sales outside of the United States. Since the achievement of the $60.0 million regulatory milestone related to reimbursement of JAKAVI in Europe, we are obligated to pay to Novartis tiered royalties in the low single digits on future JAKAFI net sales within the United States. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, such royalties payable to Novartis on net sales within the United States totaled $7.4 million and $15.5 million, respectively, and are reflected in cost of product revenues on the condensed consolidated statement of operations.  Each company is responsible for costs relating to the development and commercialization of ruxolitinib in its respective territories, with costs of collaborative studies shared equally. Novartis is now responsible for all costs relating to the development and commercialization of capmatinib.

 

The Novartis agreement will continue on a program-by-program basis until Novartis has no royalty payment obligations with respect to such program or, if earlier, the termination of the agreement or any program in accordance with the terms of the agreement. Royalties are payable by Novartis on a product-by-product and country-by-country basis until the latest to occur of (1) the expiration of the last valid claim of the licensed patent rights covering the licensed product in the relevant country, (2) the expiration of regulatory exclusivity for the licensed product in such country and (3) a specified period from first commercial sale in such country of the licensed product by Novartis or its affiliates or sublicensees. The agreement may be terminated in its entirety or on a program-by-program basis by Novartis for convenience. The agreement may also be terminated by either party under certain other circumstances, including material breach.

 

At December 31, 2009, we recorded $10.9 million of reimbursable costs incurred prior to the effective date of the agreement as deferred revenue on the consolidated balance sheet. These costs were recognized on a straight line basis through December 2013 consistent with the aforementioned upfront and milestone payments. Future reimbursable costs incurred after the effective date of the agreement with Novartis are recorded net against the related research and development expenses. At September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, $0.3 million and $0.3 million, respectively, of reimbursable costs were included in accounts receivable on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. Research and development expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 were net of $0.3 million and $1.3 million, respectively, of costs reimbursed by Novartis. Research and development expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014 were net of $0.5 million and $2.7 million, respectively, of costs reimbursed by Novartis.

 

Contract revenue under the Novartis agreement was $5.0 million and $30.0 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, respectively. Contract revenue under the Novartis agreement was $85.0 million and $92.0 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014, respectively. Product royalty revenue related to Novartis net sales of JAKAVI outside of the United States was $18.1 million and $51.2 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, respectively. Product royalty revenue related to Novartis net sales of JAKAVI outside of the United States was $12.1 million and $34.3 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014, respectively. At September 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, $18.2 million and $14.8 million, respectively, of product royalties were included in accounts receivable on the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

17


 

Lilly

 

In December 2009, we entered into a License, Development and Commercialization Agreement with Lilly. Under the terms of the agreement, Lilly received exclusive worldwide development and commercialization rights to our JAK inhibitor baricitinib, and certain back-up compounds for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We received an upfront payment of $90.0 million, and were initially eligible to receive up to $665.0 million in substantive milestone payments across multiple indications upon the achievement of pre-specified events, including up to $150.0 million for the achievement of development milestones, up to $365.0 million for the achievement of regulatory milestones and up to $150.0 million for the achievement of commercialization milestones. As of September 30, 2015, we have recognized and received in the aggregate $99.0 million for the achievement of development milestones. 

 

In 2012, we recognized and received a $50.0 million development milestone under this agreement for the achievement of a predefined milestone for the initiation of the rheumatoid arthritis Phase III program for baricitinib. In 2010, we recognized and received a $30.0 million development milestone payment based upon the initial three month data in the Phase IIa clinical trial of baricitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and a $19.0 million development milestone payment for the Phase IIb clinical trial initiation of baricitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We determined the 2012 and 2010 milestones to be substantive as their achievement required substantive efforts by us and was at risk until the milestones were ultimately achieved. We also could receive tiered, double-digit royalty payments on future global net sales with rates ranging up to 20% if the product is successfully commercialized.

 

We retained options to co-develop our JAK inhibitors with Lilly on a compound-by-compound and indication-by-indication basis. Lilly is responsible for all costs relating to the development and commercialization of the compounds unless we elect to co-develop any compounds or indications. If we elect to co-develop any compounds and/or indications, we would be responsible for funding 30% of the associated future global development costs from the initiation of a Phase IIb trial through regulatory approval. We would receive an incremental royalty rate increase across all tiers resulting in effective royalty rates ranging up to the high twenties on potential future global net sales for compounds and/or indications that we elect to co-develop. We also retained an option to co-promote products in the United States. In July 2010, we elected to co-develop baricitinib with Lilly in rheumatoid arthritis and we are responsible for funding 30% of the associated future global development costs for this indication from the initiation of the Phase IIb trial through regulatory approval.

 

Research and development expenses recorded under the Lilly agreement representing 30% of the global development costs for baricitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were $6.4 million and $28.3 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, respectively. Research and development expenses recorded under the Lilly agreement representing 30% of the global development costs for baricitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were $11.5 million and $38.3 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014, respectively. We have retained certain mechanisms to give us cost protection as baricitinib advances in clinical development. We can defer our portion of co-development study costs by indication if they exceed a predetermined level. This deferment would be credited against future milestones or royalties and we would still be eligible for the full incremental royalties related to the co-development option. In addition, even if we have started co-development funding for any indication, we can at any time opt out and stop future co-development cost sharing. If we elect to do this we would still be eligible for our base royalties plus an incremental pro-rated royalty commensurate with our contribution to the total co-development cost for those indications for which we co-funded. The Lilly agreement will continue until Lilly no longer has any royalty payment obligations or, if earlier, the termination of the agreement in accordance with its terms. Royalties are payable by Lilly on a product-by-product and country- by-country basis until the latest to occur of (1) the expiration of the last valid claim of the licensed patent rights covering the licensed product in the relevant country, (2) the expiration of regulatory exclusivity for the licensed product in such country and (3) a specified period from first commercial sale in such country of the licensed product by Lilly or its affiliates or sublicensees. The agreement may be terminated by Lilly for convenience, and may also be terminated under certain other circumstances, including material breach.

 

We determined that there were two deliverables under the agreement: (i) the worldwide license and (ii) our obligations in connection with a co-development option. We concluded that these deliverables should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting and the $90.0 million upfront payment should be recognized on a straight line basis as revenue through December 2016, our estimated performance period under the agreement.

 

Contract revenue under the Lilly agreement was $3.2 million and $9.6 million, respectively, for each of the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 and 2014.

 

Agenus

 

In January 2015, we entered into a License, Development and Commercialization Agreement with Agenus Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, 4 Antibody AG, which we collectively refer to as Agenus. Under this agreement, the parties have agreed to collaborate on the discovery of novel immuno therapeutics using Agenus’ proprietary Retrocyte

18


 

Display antibody discovery platform. The agreement became effective on February 18, 2015, upon the expiration of the waiting period under the Hart Scott Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (“HSR Act”).

 

Under the terms of this agreement, we received exclusive worldwide development and commercialization rights to four checkpoint modulators directed against GITR, OX40, LAG-3 and TIM-3. In addition to the initial four program targets, we and Agenus have the option to jointly nominate and pursue additional targets within the framework of the collaboration. These targets may be designated profit share programs, where all costs and profits are shared equally by us and Agenus, or royalty bearing programs, where we will be responsible for all costs associated with discovery, preclinical activities, clinical development and commercialization activities. The programs relating to GITR and OX40 are profit share programs and the programs relating to LAG-3 and TIM-3 are royalty bearing programs. For each royalty bearing product, Agenus will be eligible to receive up to $155 million in future contingent development, regulatory and commercialization milestones as well as tiered royalties on global net sales ranging from 6% to 12%. For each profit share product, Agenus will be eligible to receive up to $20 million in future contingent development milestones. Additionally, Agenus retains co-promotion participation rights in the United States on any profit share product. For each royalty bearing product, Agenus has reserved the right to elect to co fund 30% of development costs for a commensurate increase in royalties. The agreement may be terminated by us for convenience and may also be terminated under certain other circumstances, including material breach.

 

In January 2015, we also entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement with Agenus Inc. pursuant to which we agreed to purchase approximately 7.76 million shares of Agenus Inc. common stock for an aggregate purchase price of $35.0 million in cash, or approximately $4.51 per share. We completed the purchase of the shares on February 18, 2015. On February 18, 2015 the closing price of Agenus Inc. common shares on The NASDAQ Stock Market was $5.13 per share and, therefore, the value of the 7.76 million shares acquired by us was $39.8 million. We have agreed not to dispose of any of the shares of common stock for a period of 12 months and Agenus Inc. has agreed to certain registration rights with respect to the shares of common stock.

 

Upon closing of the Agenus transaction on February 18, 2015, we paid total consideration of $60.0 million to Agenus Inc.  Of the $60.0 million, $39.8 million was allocated to our stock purchase in Agenus Inc. and was recorded as a long term investment on the condensed consolidated balance sheets and $20.2 million was allocated to research and development expense on the condensed consolidated statement of operations. 

 

We have concluded Agenus Inc. is not a VIE because it has sufficient equity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support and its at-risk equity holders have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest. We own approximately 9% of the outstanding shares of Agenus Inc. common stock and conclude that we have the ability to exercise significant influence, but not control, over Agenus Inc. based primarily on our ownership interest, the level of intra-entity transactions between us and Agenus related to development expenses, as well as other qualitative factors. We have elected the fair value option to account for our long term investment in Agenus Inc. whereby the investment is marked to market through earnings in each reporting period.  We believe the fair value option to be the most appropriate accounting method to account for securities in publicly held collaborators for which we have significant influence. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, we recorded an unrealized loss of $31.3 million and $4.1 million, respectively, based on the decrease in the market price of Agenus Inc.’s common stock at September 30, 2015 to $4.60 per share. For the three months ended June 30, 2015, Agenus Inc. reported total revenues of $6.4 million and a net loss of $40.4 million within their consolidated financial statements. For the six months ended June 30, 2015, Agenus Inc. reported total revenues of $10.3 million and a net loss of $59.2 million within their consolidated financial statements.

 

Research and development expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, also included $3.8 million and $9.4 million, respectively, of development costs incurred pursuant to the Agenus arrangement. At September 30, 2015, a total of $7.0 million of such costs were included in accrued and other liabilities on the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

 

Hengrui

 

On September 1, 2015, we entered into a License and Collaboration Agreement with Jiangsu Hengrui Medicine Co., Ltd. (“Hengrui”). Under this agreement, Incyte received exclusive development and commercialization rights worldwide, with the exception of Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, to SHR-1210 (now INCSHR1210), an investigational PD-1 monoclonal antibody, and certain back-up compounds. INCSHR1210 is currently in clinical development. 

 

Under the terms of this agreement, we paid Hengrui an upfront payment of $25 million during the three months ended September 30, 2015 which was recorded in research and development expense on the condensed consolidated statement of operations. Hengrui is also eligible to receive potential milestone payments of up to $770 million, consisting of $90 million for regulatory approval milestones, $530 million for commercial performance milestones, and $150 

19


 

million for a clinical superiority milestone.  Also, Hengrui may be eligible to receive tiered royalties in the high-single digits to mid-double digits based on net sales in Incyte territories. Each company will be responsible for costs relating to the development and commercialization of the PD-1 monoclonal antibody in their respective territories.

 

8.     Stock compensation

 

We recorded $17.6 million and $52.8 million of stock compensation expense on our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015, respectively. We recorded $15.5 million and $46.3 million of stock compensation expense on our condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2014, respectively.

 

Stock compensation expense included within our condensed consolidated statements of operations included research and development expense of $10.0 million,  $30.4 million, $8.4 million, and $25.2 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Stock compensation expense included within our condensed consolidated statements of operations also included selling, general and administrative expense of $7.6 million,  $22.4 million, $7.1 million, and $21.1 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively. 

 

We utilized the Black-Scholes valuation model for estimating the fair value of the stock compensation granted, with the following weighted-average assumptions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Employee Stock Options

 

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended

For the Nine Months Ended

 

For the Three Months Ended

For the Nine Months Ended

 

 

 

September 30,

 

September 30,

 

 

      

2015

       

2014

      

2015

      

2014

      

 

2015

      

2014

      

2015

      

2014

      

 

Average risk-free interest rates

 

1.22

%  

1.30

%  

1.35

%  

1.21

%  

 

0.64

%  

0.56

%  

0.64

%  

0.56

%  

 

Average expected life (in years)

 

4.44

 

4.50

 

5.04

 

4.54

 

 

0.50

 

0.50

 

0.50

 

0.50

 

 

Volatility

 

47

%  

51

%  

50

%  

51

%  

 

51

%  

48

%  

51

%  

48

%  

 

Weighted-average fair value (in dollars)

 

46.08

 

21.82

 

34.29

 

25.56

 

 

13.45

 

9.36

 

13.45

 

9.36

 

 

 

The risk-free interest rate is derived from the U.S. Federal Reserve rate in effect at the time of grant. The expected life calculation is based on the observed and expected time to the exercise of options by our employees based on historical exercise patterns for similar type options. Expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of our common stock over the period commensurate with the expected life of the options. A dividend yield of zero is assumed based on the fact that we have never paid cash dividends and have no present intention to pay cash dividends.

 

Option activity under the 2010 Stock Plan was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Subject to

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding Options

 

 

 

Shares Available

 

 

 

Weighted Average

 

 

    

for Grant

    

Shares

    

Exercise Price

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

 

5,399,816

 

14,655,043

 

$

21.96

 

Options granted

 

(1,864,485)

 

1,864,485

 

$

78.40

 

Options exercised

 

 —

 

(4,574,951)

 

$

16.51

 

Options cancelled

 

318,876

 

(318,876)

 

$

44.38

 

Balance at September 30, 2015

 

3,854,207

 

11,625,701

 

$

32.55

 

 

RSU and PSU award activity under the 2010 Stock Plan was as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Subject to

 

 

 

Shares Available

 

Outstanding Awards

 

 

    

for Grant

    

Shares

    

Grant Date Value

 

Balance at December 31, 2014

    

1,001,523

    

398,477

    

 

 —

 

RSUs granted

 

(197,916)

 

197,916

 

$

77.91

 

PSUs granted

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

RSUs cancelled

 

29,671

 

(29,671)

 

$

62.29

 

PSUs cancelled

 

4,958

 

(4,958)

 

$

64.55

 

Balance at September 30, 2015

 

838,236

 

561,764

 

 

 —

 

 

20


 

In January 2014, we began granting RSUs and PSUs to our employees at the share price on the date of grant.   Each RSU represents the right to acquire one share of our common stock. We granted a total of  197,916 RSUs during the nine months ended September 30, 2015 which will cliff vest in three years and will be recognized as stock compensation expense over this period.  Also, in January 2014, Hervé Hoppenot, our President and Chief Executive Officer, was granted a one-time grant of 400,000 RSUs outside of our 2010 Stock Incentive Plan. Vesting of the RSUs will be subject to Mr. Hoppenot’s continued employment on the applicable vesting dates, with one-sixth of the RSUs vesting at the end of each of the calendar years 2014 through 2019, subject to earlier acceleration of vesting upon the occurrence of certain events in accordance with the terms of his employment agreement. As of September 30, 2015, a total of 66,666 RSUs granted to Mr. Hoppenot vested and were released leaving 333,334 RSUs outstanding.  

 

At September 30, 2015, we have only recognized stock compensation expense relating to performance conditions of the outstanding PSUs that are deemed probable of achievement at that date. For PSUs containing performance conditions which have not been deemed probable of achievement at September 30, 2015