Attached files

file filename
EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. 1350 - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit322q12015.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. 1350 - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit321q12015.htm
EX-99.2 - TRIAL SCHEDULE FOR CERTAIN CASES - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit992q12015.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14(A)/15D-14(A) - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit312q12015.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14(A)/15D-14(A) - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit311q12015.htm
EX-99.1 - CERTAIN LITIGATION MATTERS - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibits991q12015.htm
EX-12 - STATEMENTS REGARDING COMPUTATION OF RATIOS OF EARNINGS TO FIXED CHARGES - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit12computationofrati.htm
EX-10.3 - AGREEMENT & GENERAL RELEASE BETWEEN ALTRIA GROUP, INC. AND DAVID R. BERAN - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit103agreementgeneral.htm
EX-10.2 - TIME SHARING TERMINATION LETTER - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.exhibit102timesharingtermi.htm
EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - ALTRIA GROUP, INC.Financial_Report.xls

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
ý
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2015
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                     to                    
Commission File Number 1-08940
Altria Group, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
 
Virginia
 
13-3260245
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
6601 West Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia
 
23230
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (804) 274-2200 
 Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes   þ     No   ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     Yes   þ    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
 
þ
 
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company
  
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes  ¨    No   þ
At April 14, 2015, there were 1,966,557,766 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, par value $0.33 1/3 per share.





ALTRIA GROUP, INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
  
Page No.
PART I -
  
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
  
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
  
Financial Statements (Unaudited)
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
  
  
 
 
 
 
Item 4.
  
  
 
 
 
 
PART II -
  
OTHER INFORMATION
  
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
  
  
 
 
 
 
Item 1A.
  
  
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
  
  
 
 
 
 
Item 6.
  
  
 
 
 
 
Signature
  
  


2


PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements.
Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
March 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Assets
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
3,674

 
$
3,321

Receivables
 
172

 
124

Inventories:
 

 

Leaf tobacco
 
1,019

 
991

Other raw materials
 
200

 
200

Work in process
 
410

 
429

Finished product
 
456

 
420

 
 
2,085

 
2,040

Deferred income taxes
 
1,143

 
1,143

Other current assets
 
159

 
250

Total current assets
 
7,233

 
6,878

Property, plant and equipment, at cost
 
4,784

 
4,755

Less accumulated depreciation
 
2,812

 
2,772

 
 
1,972

 
1,983

Goodwill
 
5,285

 
5,285

Other intangible assets, net
 
12,044

 
12,049

Investment in SABMiller
 
5,850

 
6,183

Finance assets, net
 
1,360

 
1,614

Other assets
 
468

 
483

Total Assets
 
$
34,212

 
$
34,475

 
See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.



3




Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (Continued)
(in millions of dollars, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
March 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
Current portion of long-term debt
 
$
1,000

 
$
1,000

Accounts payable
 
274

 
416

Accrued liabilities:
 

 

Marketing
 
605

 
618

Employment costs
 
67

 
186

Settlement charges
 
4,551

 
3,500

Other
 
890

 
925

Income taxes
 
482

 

Dividends payable
 
1,026

 
1,028

Total current liabilities
 
8,895

 
7,673

Long-term debt
 
12,901

 
13,693

Deferred income taxes
 
5,907

 
6,088

Accrued pension costs
 
978

 
1,012

Accrued postretirement health care costs
 
2,454

 
2,461

Other liabilities
 
515

 
503

Total liabilities
 
31,650

 
31,430

Contingencies (Note 9)
 

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interest
 
34

 
35

Stockholders’ Equity
 
 
 
 
Common stock, par value $0.33 1/3 per share
(2,805,961,317 shares issued)
 
935

 
935

Additional paid-in capital
 
5,754

 
5,735

Earnings reinvested in the business
 
26,271

 
26,277

Accumulated other comprehensive losses
 
(2,945
)
 
(2,682
)
Cost of repurchased stock
(838,798,481 shares at March 31, 2015 and
834,486,794 shares at December 31, 2014)
 
(27,482
)
 
(27,251
)
Total stockholders’ equity attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
2,533

 
3,014

Noncontrolling interests
 
(5
)
 
(4
)
Total stockholders’ equity
 
2,528

 
3,010

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
 
$
34,212

 
$
34,475

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.


4



Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings
(in millions of dollars, except per share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
Net revenues
 
$
5,804

 
$
5,517

Cost of sales
 
1,797

 
1,752

Excise taxes on products
 
1,532

 
1,509

Gross profit
 
2,475

 
2,256

Marketing, administration and research costs
 
610

 
520

Asset impairment and exit costs
 

 
2

Operating income
 
1,865

 
1,734

Interest and other debt expense, net
 
209

 
153

Loss on early extinguishment of debt
 
228

 

Earnings from equity investment in SABMiller
 
(134
)
 
(225
)
Earnings before income taxes
 
1,562

 
1,806

Provision for income taxes
 
544

 
631

Net earnings
 
1,018

 
1,175

Net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests
 

 

Net earnings attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
$
1,018

 
$
1,175

Per share data:
 
 
 
 
Basic and diluted earnings per share attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
$
0.52

 
$
0.59

Dividends declared
 
$
0.52

 
$
0.48


See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.


5



Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Earnings
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)

 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
Net earnings
 
$
1,018

 
$
1,175

Other comprehensive earnings (losses), net of deferred income taxes:
 
 
 
 
Currency translation adjustments
 
(1
)
 

Benefit plans
 
42

 
25

SABMiller
 
(304
)
 
35

Other comprehensive (losses) earnings, net of deferred income taxes
 
(263
)
 
60

 
 
 
 
 
Comprehensive earnings
 
755

 
1,235

Comprehensive earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests
 

 

Comprehensive earnings attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
$
755

 
$
1,235


See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.



6



Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity
for the Year Ended December 31, 2014 and
the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015
(in millions of dollars, except per share data)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
Attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-in
Capital
 
Earnings
Reinvested
in the
Business
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Losses
 
Cost of
Repurchased
Stock
 
Non-controlling
Interests
 
Total
Stockholders’
Equity
Balances, December 31, 2013
 
$
935

 
$
5,714

 
$
25,168

 
$
(1,378
)
 
$
(26,320
)
 
$
(1
)
 
$
4,118

Net earnings (losses) (1)
 

 

 
5,070

 

 

 
(3
)
 
5,067

Other comprehensive losses, net of deferred income taxes
 

 

 

 
(1,304
)
 

 

 
(1,304
)
Stock award activity
 

 
21

 

 

 
8

 

 
29

Cash dividends declared ($2.00 per share)
 

 

 
(3,961
)
 

 

 

 
(3,961
)
Repurchases of common stock
 

 

 

 

 
(939
)
 

 
(939
)
Balances, December 31, 2014
 
935

 
5,735

 
26,277

 
(2,682
)
 
(27,251
)
 
(4
)
 
3,010

Net earnings (losses) (1)
 

 

 
1,018

 

 

 
(1
)
 
1,017

Other comprehensive losses, net of deferred income taxes
 

 

 

 
(263
)
 

 

 
(263
)
Stock award activity
 

 
19

 

 

 
(39
)
 

 
(20
)
Cash dividends declared ($0.52 per share)
 

 

 
(1,024
)
 

 

 

 
(1,024
)
Repurchases of common stock
 

 

 

 

 
(192
)
 

 
(192
)
Balances, March 31, 2015
 
$
935

 
$
5,754

 
$
26,271

 
$
(2,945
)
 
$
(27,482
)
 
$
(5
)
 
$
2,528


(1) 
Net losses attributable to noncontrolling interests for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and for the year ended December 31, 2014 exclude net earnings of $1 million and $3 million, respectively, due to the redeemable noncontrolling interest related to Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars, which is reported in the mezzanine equity section in the condensed consolidated balance sheets at March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014.

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.




7



Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
                                            
 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities
 
 
 
 
Net earnings
 
$
1,018

 
$
1,175

Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to operating cash flows:
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
49

 
50

Deferred income tax benefit
 
(40
)
 
(13
)
Earnings from equity investment in SABMiller
 
(134
)
 
(225
)
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
 
228

 

Cash effects of changes:
 
 
 
 
Receivables, net
 
25

 
2

Inventories
 
(62
)
 
(91
)
Accounts payable
 
(166
)
 
(109
)
Income taxes
 
541

 
601

Accrued liabilities and other current assets
 
(117
)
 
(234
)
Accrued settlement charges
 
1,051

 
919

Pension plan contributions
 
(4
)
 
(4
)
Pension provisions and postretirement, net
 
25

 
11

Other
 
84

 
43

Net cash provided by operating activities
 
2,498

 
2,125

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.






8



Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Continued)
(in millions of dollars)
(Unaudited)
                                            
 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
 
$
(48
)
 
$
(27
)
Proceeds from finance assets
 
147

 
98

Other
 

 
5

Net cash provided by investing activities
 
99

 
76

Cash Used in Financing Activities
 
 
 
 
Long-term debt repaid
 
(793
)
 
(525
)
Repurchases of common stock
 
(192
)
 
(272
)
Dividends paid on common stock
 
(1,026
)
 
(957
)
Premiums and fees related to early extinguishment of debt
 
(226
)
 

Other
 
(7
)
 
(2
)
Cash used in financing activities
 
(2,244
)
 
(1,756
)
Cash and cash equivalents:
 
 
 
 
Increase
 
353

 
445

Balance at beginning of period
 
3,321

 
3,175

Balance at end of period
 
$
3,674

 
$
3,620

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.



9

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Note 1. Background and Basis of Presentation:

Background

At March 31, 2015, Altria Group, Inc.’s wholly-owned subsidiaries included Philip Morris USA Inc. (“PM USA”), which is engaged predominantly in the manufacture and sale of cigarettes in the United States; John Middleton Co. (“Middleton”), which is engaged in the manufacture and sale of machine-made large cigars and pipe tobacco, and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of PM USA; and UST LLC (“UST”), which through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, including U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company LLC (“USSTC”) and Ste. Michelle Wine Estates Ltd. (“Ste. Michelle”), is engaged in the manufacture and sale of smokeless tobacco products and wine. Altria Group, Inc.’s other operating companies included Nu Mark LLC (“Nu Mark”), a wholly-owned subsidiary that is engaged in the manufacture and sale of innovative tobacco products, and Philip Morris Capital Corporation (“PMCC”), a wholly-owned subsidiary that maintains a portfolio of finance assets, substantially all of which are leveraged leases. Other Altria Group, Inc. wholly-owned subsidiaries included Altria Group Distribution Company, which provides sales, distribution and consumer engagement services to certain Altria Group, Inc. operating subsidiaries, and Altria Client Services Inc., which provides various support services, such as legal, regulatory, finance, human resources and external affairs, to Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries. Altria Group, Inc.’s access to the operating cash flows of its wholly-owned subsidiaries consists of cash received from the payment of dividends and distributions, and the payment of interest on intercompany loans by its subsidiaries. At March 31, 2015, Altria Group, Inc.’s principal wholly-owned subsidiaries were not limited by long-term debt or other agreements in their ability to pay cash dividends or make other distributions with respect to their equity interests.
        
At March 31, 2015, Altria Group, Inc. also held approximately 27% of the economic and voting interest of SABMiller plc (“SABMiller”), which Altria Group, Inc. accounts for under the equity method of accounting. Altria Group, Inc. receives cash dividends on its interest in SABMiller if and when SABMiller pays such dividends.

Share Repurchases

Altria Group, Inc.’s share repurchase activity was as follows:
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions, except per share data)
Total number of shares repurchased
 
3.6

 
7.5

Aggregate cost of shares repurchased
 
$
192

 
$
272

Average price per share of shares repurchased
 
$
53.03

 
$
35.98


In April 2013, Altria Group, Inc.’s Board of Directors (the “Board of Directors”) authorized a $300 million share repurchase program and expanded it to $1.0 billion in August 2013 (as expanded, the “April 2013 share repurchase program”). During the third quarter of 2014, Altria Group, Inc. completed the April 2013 share repurchase program, under which Altria Group, Inc. repurchased a total of 27.1 million shares of its common stock at an average price of $36.97 per share.

In July 2014, the Board of Directors authorized a $1.0 billion share repurchase program (the “July 2014 share repurchase program”). At March 31, 2015, Altria Group, Inc. had approximately $326 million remaining in the July 2014 share repurchase program. The timing of share repurchases under this program depends upon marketplace conditions and other factors, and the program remains subject to the discretion of the Board of Directors.

Basis of Presentation

The interim condensed consolidated financial statements of Altria Group, Inc. are unaudited. It is the opinion of Altria Group, Inc.’s management that all adjustments necessary for a fair statement of the interim results presented have been reflected therein. All such adjustments were of a normal recurring nature. Net revenues and net earnings for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the entire year.


10

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

These statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes, which appear in Altria Group, Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014.

Note 2. Acquisition of Green Smoke:

In April 2014, Nu Mark acquired the e-vapor business of Green Smoke, Inc. and its affiliates (“Green Smoke”) for a total purchase price of approximately $130 million. The acquisition complements Nu Mark’s capabilities and enhances its competitive position by adding e-vapor experience, broadening product offerings and strengthening supply chain capabilities.

Green Smoke’s financial position and results of operations have been consolidated with Altria Group, Inc. as of April 1, 2014.

Pro forma results, as well as net revenues and net earnings for Green Smoke subsequent to the acquisition, have not been presented because the acquisition of Green Smoke is not material to Altria Group, Inc.’s consolidated results of operations.

The purchase price allocation has been completed, and there were no changes subsequent to the acquisition date.
Note 3. Benefit Plans:

Subsidiaries of Altria Group, Inc. sponsor noncontributory defined benefit pension plans covering the majority of all employees of Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries. However, employees hired on or after a date specific to their employee group are not eligible to participate in these noncontributory defined benefit pension plans but are instead eligible to participate in a defined contribution plan with enhanced benefits. This transition for new hires occurred from October 1, 2006 to January 1, 2008. In addition, effective January 1, 2010, certain employees of UST’s subsidiaries and Middleton who were participants in noncontributory defined benefit pension plans ceased to earn additional benefit service under those plans and became eligible to participate in a defined contribution plan with enhanced benefits. Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries also provide health care and other benefits to the majority of retired employees.
  
Pension Plans

Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost

Net periodic pension cost consisted of the following:
 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Service cost
 
$
21

 
$
17

Interest cost
 
84

 
86

Expected return on plan assets
 
(135
)
 
(130
)
Amortization:
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
59

 
38

Prior service cost
 
2

 
3

Net periodic pension cost
 
$
31

 
$
14



11

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Employer Contributions

Altria Group, Inc. makes contributions to the pension plans to the extent that the contributions are tax deductible and pays benefits that relate to plans for salaried employees that cannot be funded under Internal Revenue Service regulations. Employer contributions of $4 million were made to Altria Group, Inc.’s pension plans during the three months ended March 31, 2015. Currently, Altria Group, Inc. anticipates making additional employer contributions to its pension plans during the remainder of 2015 of approximately $15 million to $45 million, based on current tax law. However, this estimate is subject to change as a result of changes in tax and other benefit laws, as well as asset performance significantly above or below the assumed long-term rate of return on pension assets, or changes in interest rates.

Postretirement Benefit Plans

Net postretirement health care costs consisted of the following:

 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Service cost
 
$
4

 
$
4

Interest cost
 
26

 
27

Amortization:
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
12

 
7

Prior service credit
 
(10
)
 
(11
)
Net postretirement health care costs
 
$
32

 
$
27

Note 4. Earnings Per Share:

Basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) were calculated using the following:
 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Net earnings attributable to Altria Group, Inc.
 
$
1,018

 
$
1,175

Less: Distributed and undistributed earnings attributable to unvested restricted shares and restricted stock units (also known as deferred stock)
 
(2
)
 
(3
)
Earnings for basic and diluted EPS
 
$
1,016

 
$
1,172

 
 
 
 
 
Weighted-average shares for basic and diluted EPS
 
1,966

 
1,986


12

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Note 5. Other Comprehensive Earnings/Losses:

The following tables set forth the changes in each component of accumulated other comprehensive losses, net of deferred income taxes, attributable to Altria Group, Inc.:

 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2015
 
 
Currency
Translation
Adjustments
 
Benefit Plans
 
SABMiller
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Losses
 
 
(in millions)
Balances, December 31, 2014
 
$
(2
)
 
$
(2,040
)
 
$
(640
)
 
$
(2,682
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive losses before reclassifications
 
(1
)
 

 
(471
)
 
(472
)
Deferred income taxes
 

 

 
164

 
164

Other comprehensive losses before reclassifications, net of deferred income taxes
 
(1
)
 

 
(307
)
 
(308
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified to net earnings
 

 
68

 
4

 
72

Deferred income taxes
 

 
(26
)
 
(1
)
 
(27
)
Amounts reclassified to net earnings, net of deferred income taxes
 

 
42

 
3

 
45

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive (losses) earnings, net of deferred income taxes
 
(1
)
 
42

 
(304
)
(1) 
(263
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balances, March 31, 2015
 
$
(3
)
 
$
(1,998
)
 
$
(944
)
 
$
(2,945
)

 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31, 2014
 
 
Currency
Translation
Adjustments
 
Benefit Plans
 
SABMiller
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Losses
 
 
(in millions)
Balances, December 31, 2013
 
$

 
$
(1,273
)
 
$
(105
)
 
$
(1,378
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive earnings before reclassifications
 

 

 
51

 
51

Deferred income taxes
 

 

 
(18
)
 
(18
)
Other comprehensive earnings before reclassifications, net of deferred income taxes
 

 

 
33

 
33

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amounts reclassified to net earnings
 

 
41

 
3

 
44

Deferred income taxes
 

 
(16
)
 
(1
)
 
(17
)
Amounts reclassified to net earnings, net of deferred income taxes
 

 
25

 
2

 
27

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other comprehensive earnings, net of deferred income taxes
 

 
25

 
35

(1) 
60

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balances, March 31, 2014
 
$

 
$
(1,248
)
 
$
(70
)
 
$
(1,318
)
(1) For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, Altria Group, Inc.’s proportionate share of SABMiller’s other comprehensive earnings/losses consisted primarily of currency translation adjustments.

13

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


The following table sets forth pre-tax amounts by component, reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive losses to net earnings:

 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Benefit Plans: (1)
 
 
 
 
Net loss
 
$
76

 
$
49

Prior service cost/credit
 
(8
)
 
(8
)
 
 
68

 
41

 
 
 
 
 
SABMiller (2)
 
4

 
3

 
 
 
 
 
Pre-tax amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive
losses to net earnings
 
$
72

 
$
44


(1) Amounts are included in net defined benefit plan costs. For further details, see Note 3. Benefit Plans.

(2) Amounts are included in earnings from equity investment in SABMiller.

Note 6. Segment Reporting:

The products of Altria Group, Inc.’s subsidiaries include smokeable products comprised of cigarettes manufactured and sold by PM USA and machine-made large cigars and pipe tobacco manufactured and sold by Middleton; smokeless products, substantially all of which are manufactured and sold by USSTC; and wine produced and/or distributed by Ste. Michelle. The products and services of these subsidiaries constitute Altria Group, Inc.’s reportable segments of smokeable products, smokeless products and wine. The financial services and the innovative tobacco products businesses are included in all other.

Altria Group, Inc.’s chief operating decision maker reviews operating companies income to evaluate the performance of, and allocate resources to, the segments. Operating companies income for the segments is defined as operating income before amortization of intangibles and general corporate expenses. Interest and other debt expense, net, and provision for income taxes are centrally managed at the corporate level and, accordingly, such items are not presented by segment since they are excluded from the measure of segment profitability reviewed by Altria Group, Inc.’s chief operating decision maker.

14

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Segment data were as follows: 
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Net revenues:
 
 
 
 
Smokeable products
 
$
5,221

 
$
4,958

Smokeless products
 
430

 
415

Wine
 
134

 
129

All other
 
19

 
15

Net revenues
 
$
5,804

 
$
5,517

Earnings before income taxes:
 
 
 
 
Operating companies income (loss):
 
 
 
 
Smokeable products
 
$
1,686

 
$
1,531

Smokeless products
 
251

 
239

Wine
 
27

 
22

All other
 
(41
)
 
(1
)
Amortization of intangibles
 
(5
)
 
(5
)
General corporate expenses
 
(53
)
 
(52
)
Operating income
 
1,865

 
1,734

Interest and other debt expense, net
 
(209
)
 
(153
)
Loss on early extinguishment of debt
 
(228
)
 

Earnings from equity investment in SABMiller
 
134

 
225

Earnings before income taxes
 
$
1,562

 
$
1,806


The comparability of operating companies income for the reportable segments was affected by the following:

Tobacco and Health Litigation Items - For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, pre-tax charges related to certain tobacco and health litigation items were recorded in Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings as follows:
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Smokeable products segment
 
$
43

 
$
3

Interest and other debt expense, net
 

 
1

Total
 
$
43

 
$
4

During the first quarter of 2015, PM USA and certain other cigarette manufacturers reached a tentative agreement to resolve approximately 415 pending federal Engle progeny cases. As a result of the tentative agreement, during the three months ended March 31, 2015, PM USA recorded a pre-tax provision of approximately $43 million in marketing, administration and research costs. For further discussion, see Smoking and Health Litigation - Tentative Agreement to Resolve Federal Engle Progeny Cases in Note 9. Contingencies.
Note 7. Finance Assets, net:

In 2003, PMCC ceased making new investments and began focusing exclusively on managing its portfolio of finance assets in order to maximize its operating results and cash flows from its existing lease portfolio activities and asset sales. Accordingly, PMCC’s operating companies income will fluctuate over time as investments mature or are sold.


15

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

At March 31, 2015, finance assets, net, of $1,360 million were comprised of investments in finance leases of $1,402 million, reduced by the allowance for losses of $42 million. At December 31, 2014, finance assets, net, of $1,614 million were comprised of investments in finance leases of $1,656 million, reduced by the allowance for losses of $42 million.

PMCC assesses the adequacy of its allowance for losses relative to the credit risk of its leasing portfolio on an ongoing basis. During the three months ended March 31, 2014, PMCC determined that its allowance for losses exceeded the amount required based on management’s assessment of the credit quality and size of PMCC’s leasing portfolio. As a result, for the three months ended March 31, 2014, PMCC reduced its allowance for losses by $10 million. This decrease to the allowance for losses was recorded as a reduction to marketing, administration and research costs on Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated statement of earnings. PMCC believes that, as of March 31, 2015, the allowance for losses of $42 million was adequate. PMCC continues to monitor economic and credit conditions, and the individual situations of its lessees and their respective industries, and may increase or decrease its allowance for losses if such conditions change in the future.
The activity in the allowance for losses on finance assets for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 was as follows:
 
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
 
(in millions)
Balance at beginning of the year
 
$
42

 
$
52

Decrease to allowance
 

 
(10
)
Balance at March 31
 
$
42

 
$
42


All PMCC lessees were current on their lease payment obligations as of March 31, 2015.
The credit quality of PMCC’s investments in finance leases as assigned by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (“Standard & Poor’s”) and Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) at March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014 was as follows:

 
 
March 31, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
 
 
(in millions)
Credit Rating by Standard & Poor’s/Moody’s:
 
 
 
 
“AAA/Aaa” to “A-/A3”
 
$
260

 
$
417

“BBB+/Baa1” to “BBB-/Baa3”
 
750

 
833

“BB+/Ba1” and Lower
 
392

 
406

Total
 
$
1,402

 
$
1,656


Note 8. Debt:

At March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, Altria Group, Inc. had no short-term borrowings.

Long-term Debt

During the first quarter of 2015, Altria Group, Inc. completed a debt tender offer to purchase for cash $793 million aggregate principal amount of its senior unsecured 9.700% notes due 2018. As a result of the debt tender offer, during the first quarter of 2015, Altria Group, Inc. recorded a pre-tax loss on early extinguishment of debt of $228 million, which included premiums and fees of $226 million and the write-off of the related unamortized debt discount and debt issuance costs of $2 million.
Altria Group, Inc.’s estimate of the fair value of its debt is based on observable market information derived from a third party pricing source and is classified in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. The aggregate fair value of Altria Group, Inc.’s total long-term debt at March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, was $16.2 billion and $17.0 billion, respectively, as compared with its carrying value of $13.9 billion and $14.7 billion, respectively.

16

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Note 9. Contingencies:

Legal proceedings covering a wide range of matters are pending or threatened in various United States and foreign jurisdictions against Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries, including PM USA and UST and its subsidiaries, as well as their respective indemnitees. Various types of claims may be raised in these proceedings, including product liability, consumer protection, antitrust, tax, contraband shipments, patent infringement, employment matters, claims for contribution and claims of competitors or distributors.

Litigation is subject to uncertainty and it is possible that there could be adverse developments in pending or future cases. An unfavorable outcome or settlement of pending tobacco-related or other litigation could encourage the commencement of additional litigation. Damages claimed in some tobacco-related and other litigation are or can be significant and, in certain cases, range in the billions of dollars. The variability in pleadings in multiple jurisdictions, together with the actual experience of management in litigating claims, demonstrate that the monetary relief that may be specified in a lawsuit bears little relevance to the ultimate outcome. In certain cases, plaintiffs claim that defendants’ liability is joint and several. In such cases, Altria Group, Inc. or its subsidiaries may face the risk that one or more co-defendants decline or otherwise fail to participate in the bonding required for an appeal or to pay their proportionate or jury-allocated share of a judgment.  As a result, Altria Group, Inc. or its subsidiaries under certain circumstances may have to pay more than their proportionate share of any bonding- or judgment-related amounts. Furthermore, in those cases where plaintiffs are successful, Altria Group, Inc. or its subsidiaries may also be required to pay interest and attorneys’ fees.

Although PM USA has historically been able to obtain required bonds or relief from bonding requirements in order to prevent plaintiffs from seeking to collect judgments while adverse verdicts have been appealed, there remains a risk that such relief may not be obtainable in all cases. This risk has been substantially reduced given that 46 states and Puerto Rico limit the dollar amount of bonds or require no bond at all. As discussed below, however, tobacco litigation plaintiffs have challenged the constitutionality of Florida’s bond cap statute in several cases and plaintiffs may challenge state bond cap statutes in other jurisdictions as well. Such challenges may include the applicability of state bond caps in federal court. Although Altria Group, Inc. cannot predict the outcome of such challenges, it is possible that the consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position of Altria Group, Inc., or one or more of its subsidiaries, could be materially affected in a particular fiscal quarter or fiscal year by an unfavorable outcome of one or more such challenges.

Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries record provisions in the condensed consolidated financial statements for pending litigation when they determine that an unfavorable outcome is probable and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. At the present time, while it is reasonably possible that an unfavorable outcome in a case may occur, except to the extent discussed elsewhere in this Note 9. Contingencies: (i) management has concluded that it is not probable that a loss has been incurred in any of the pending tobacco-related cases; (ii) management is unable to estimate the possible loss or range of loss that could result from an unfavorable outcome in any of the pending tobacco-related cases; and (iii) accordingly, management has not provided any amounts in the condensed consolidated financial statements for unfavorable outcomes, if any. Litigation defense costs are expensed as incurred.

Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries have achieved substantial success in managing litigation. Nevertheless, litigation is subject to uncertainty and significant challenges remain. It is possible that the consolidated results of operations, cash flows or financial position of Altria Group, Inc., or one or more of its subsidiaries, could be materially affected in a particular fiscal quarter or fiscal year by an unfavorable outcome or settlement of certain pending litigation. Altria Group, Inc. and each of its subsidiaries named as a defendant believe, and each has been so advised by counsel handling the respective cases, that it has valid defenses to the litigation pending against it, as well as valid bases for appeal of adverse verdicts. Each of the companies has defended, and will continue to defend, vigorously against litigation challenges. However, Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries may enter into settlement discussions in particular cases if they believe it is in the best interests of Altria Group, Inc. to do so.

Overview of Altria Group, Inc. and/or PM USA Tobacco-Related Litigation

Types and Number of Cases

Claims related to tobacco products generally fall within the following categories: (i) smoking and health cases alleging personal injury brought on behalf of individual plaintiffs; (ii) smoking and health cases primarily alleging personal injury or seeking court-supervised programs for ongoing medical monitoring and purporting to be brought on behalf of a class

17

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

of individual plaintiffs, including cases in which the aggregated claims of a number of individual plaintiffs are to be tried in a single proceeding; (iii) health care cost recovery cases brought by governmental (both domestic and foreign) plaintiffs seeking reimbursement for health care expenditures allegedly caused by cigarette smoking and/or disgorgement of profits; (iv) class action suits alleging that the uses of the terms “Lights” and “Ultra Lights” constitute deceptive and unfair trade practices, common law or statutory fraud, unjust enrichment, breach of warranty or violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (“RICO”); and (v) other tobacco-related litigation described below. Plaintiffs’ theories of recovery and the defenses raised in pending smoking and health, health care cost recovery and “Lights/Ultra Lights” cases are discussed below.

The table below lists the number of certain tobacco-related cases pending in the United States against PM USA and, in some instances, Altria Group, Inc. as of April 20, 2015, April 21, 2014 and April 22, 2013.
Type of Case
Number of Cases
Pending as of
April 20, 2015
Number of Cases
Pending as of
April 21, 2014
Number of Cases
Pending as of
April 22, 2013
Individual Smoking and Health Cases (1)
64
70
71
Smoking and Health Class Actions and Aggregated Claims Litigation (2)
5
6
6
Health Care Cost Recovery Actions (3)
1
1
1
“Lights/Ultra Lights” Class Actions
12
15
15

(1) Does not include 2,546 cases brought by flight attendants seeking compensatory damages for personal injuries allegedly caused by exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (“ETS”). The flight attendants allege that they are members of an ETS smoking and health class action in Florida, which was settled in 1997 (Broin). The terms of the court-approved settlement in that case allow class members to file individual lawsuits seeking compensatory damages, but prohibit them from seeking punitive damages. Also, does not include individual smoking and health cases brought by or on behalf of plaintiffs in Florida state and federal courts following the decertification of the Engle case (discussed below in Smoking and Health Litigation - Engle Class Action).
(2) Includes as one case the 600 civil actions (of which 346 were actions against PM USA) that were to be tried in a single proceeding in West Virginia (In re: Tobacco Litigation). The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has ruled that the United States Constitution did not preclude a trial in two phases in this case. Issues related to defendants’ conduct and whether punitive damages are permissible were tried in the first phase. Trial in the first phase of this case began in April 2013. In May 2013, the jury returned a verdict in favor of defendants on the claims for design defect, negligence, failure to warn, breach of warranty, and concealment and declined to find that the defendants’ conduct warranted punitive damages. Plaintiffs prevailed on their claim that ventilated filter cigarettes should have included use instructions for the period 1964 - 1969. The second phase, if any, will consist of individual trials to determine liability and compensatory damages on that claim only. In August 2013, the trial court denied all post-trial motions. The trial court entered final judgment in October 2013 and, in November 2013, plaintiffs filed their notice of appeal to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. In November 2014, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals affirmed the final judgment. Plaintiffs filed a petition for rehearing with the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, which the court denied on January 8, 2015. On April 3, 2015, plaintiffs filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court.
(3) See Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation - Federal Government’s Lawsuit below.

International Tobacco-Related Cases

As of April 20, 2015, PM USA is a named defendant in ten health care cost recovery actions in Canada, eight of which also name Altria Group, Inc. as a defendant. PM USA and Altria Group, Inc. are also named defendants in seven smoking and health class actions filed in various Canadian provinces. See Guarantees and Other Similar Matters below for a discussion of the Distribution Agreement between Altria Group, Inc. and Philip Morris International Inc. (“PMI”) that provides for indemnities for certain liabilities concerning tobacco products.

Tobacco-Related Cases Set for Trial

As of April 20, 2015, 29 Engle progeny cases and two individual smoking and health cases against PM USA are set for trial in 2015. Cases against other companies in the tobacco industry are also scheduled for trial in 2015. Trial dates are subject to change.

Trial Results

Since January 1999, excluding the Engle progeny cases (separately discussed below), verdicts have been returned in 56 smoking and health, “Lights/Ultra Lights” and health care cost recovery cases in which PM USA was a defendant.

18

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Verdicts in favor of PM USA and other defendants were returned in 38 of the 56 cases. These 38 cases were tried in Alaska (1), California (6), Florida (10), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (1), Mississippi (1), Missouri (3), New Hampshire (1), New Jersey (1), New York (5), Ohio (2), Pennsylvania (1), Rhode Island (1), Tennessee (2) and West Virginia (2). A motion for a new trial was granted in one of the cases in Florida and in the case in Alaska. In the Alaska case (Hunter), the trial court withdrew its order for a new trial upon PM USA’s motion for reconsideration. Oral argument of plaintiff’s appeal of this ruling occurred in September 2014. See Types and Number of Cases above for a discussion of the trial results in In re: Tobacco Litigation (West Virginia consolidated cases).
    
Of the 18 non-Engle progeny cases in which verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs, 15 have reached final resolution. A verdict against defendants in one health care cost recovery case (Blue Cross/Blue Shield) was reversed and all claims were dismissed with prejudice. In addition, a verdict against defendants in a purported “Lights” class action in Illinois (Price) was reversed and the case was dismissed with prejudice in December 2006, but plaintiff is seeking to reinstate the verdict, which an intermediate appellate court ordered in April 2014. PM USA filed a petition for leave to appeal, which automatically stayed the April 2014 order. In September 2014, the Illinois Supreme Court granted PM USA’s motion for leave to appeal. See “Lights/Ultra Lights” Cases - The Price Case below for a discussion of developments in Price.

As of April 20, 2015, 77 state and federal Engle progeny cases involving PM USA have resulted in verdicts since the Florida Supreme Court’s Engle decision. Forty-one verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs and 36 verdicts were returned in favor of PM USA. See Smoking and Health Litigation - Engle Progeny Trial Court Results below for a discussion of these verdicts.

Judgments Paid and Provisions for Tobacco and Health Litigation Items (Including Engle Progeny Litigation)

After exhausting all appeals in those cases resulting in adverse verdicts associated with tobacco-related litigation, since October 2004, PM USA has paid in the aggregate judgments (and related costs and fees) totaling approximately $271 million and interest totaling approximately $144 million as of April 20, 2015. These amounts include payments for Engle progeny judgments (and related costs and fees) totaling approximately $13.8 million and interest totaling approximately $2.5 million.

The changes in Altria Group, Inc.’s accrued liability for tobacco and health litigation items, including related interest costs, for the periods specified below were as follows:
 
For the Three Months Ended March 31,
 
2015
 
2014
 
(in millions)
Accrued liability for tobacco and health litigation items at beginning of period
$
39

 
$
3

Pre-tax charges for:
 
 
 
Tobacco and health judgments

 
3

Related interest costs

 
1

Tentative agreement to resolve federal Engle progeny cases
43

 

Payments
(5
)
 

Accrued liability for tobacco and health litigation items at end of period
$
77

 
$
7


The accrued liability for tobacco and health litigation items, including related interest costs, was included in liabilities on Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated balance sheets. Pre-tax charges for tobacco and health judgments and the tentative agreement to resolve federal Engle progeny cases (discussed below under “Tentative Agreement to Resolve Federal Engle Progeny Cases”) were included in marketing, administration and research costs on Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings. Pre-tax charges for related interest costs were included in interest and other debt expense, net on Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated statements of earnings.


19

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Security for Judgments

To obtain stays of judgments pending current appeals, as of March 31, 2015, PM USA has posted various forms of security totaling approximately $59 million, the majority of which has been collateralized with cash deposits that are included in other assets on the condensed consolidated balance sheet.

Smoking and Health Litigation

Overview

Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in smoking and health cases are based on various theories of recovery, including negligence, gross negligence, strict liability, fraud, misrepresentation, design defect, failure to warn, nuisance, breach of express and implied warranties, breach of special duty, conspiracy, concert of action, violations of deceptive trade practice laws and consumer protection statutes, and claims under the federal and state anti-racketeering statutes. Plaintiffs in the smoking and health cases seek various forms of relief, including compensatory and punitive damages, treble/multiple damages and other statutory damages and penalties, creation of medical monitoring and smoking cessation funds, disgorgement of profits, and injunctive and equitable relief. Defenses raised in these cases include lack of proximate cause, assumption of the risk, comparative fault and/or contributory negligence, statutes of limitations and preemption by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act.

Non-Engle Progeny Trial Results

Summarized below are the non-Engle progeny smoking and health cases pending during 2015 in which verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs and against PM USA. Charts listing the verdicts for plaintiffs in the Engle progeny cases can be found in Smoking and Health Litigation - Engle Progeny Trial Court Results below.

Schwarz: In March 2002, an Oregon jury awarded $168,500 in compensatory damages and $150 million in punitive damages against PM USA. In May 2002, the trial court reduced the punitive damages award to $100 million. In May 2006, the Oregon Court of Appeals affirmed the compensatory damages verdict, reversed the award of punitive damages and remanded the case to the trial court for a second trial to determine the amount of punitive damages, if any. In June 2006, plaintiff petitioned the Oregon Supreme Court to review the portion of the court of appeals’ decision reversing and remanding the case for a new trial on punitive damages. In June 2010, the Oregon Supreme Court affirmed the court of appeals’ decision and remanded the case to the trial court for a new trial limited to the question of punitive damages. In December 2010, the Oregon Supreme Court reaffirmed its earlier ruling and awarded PM USA approximately $500,000 in costs. In March 2011, PM USA filed a claim against the plaintiff for its costs and disbursements on appeal, plus interest. Trial on the amount of punitive damages began in January 2012. In February 2012, the jury awarded plaintiff $25 million in punitive damages. In September 2012, PM USA filed a notice of appeal from the trial court’s judgment with the Oregon Court of Appeals. Oral argument at the Oregon Court of Appeals occurred in September 2014.

See Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation - Federal Government’s Lawsuit below for a discussion of the verdict and post-trial developments in the United States of America healthcare cost recovery case.

Engle Class Action

In July 2000, in the second phase of the Engle smoking and health class action in Florida, a jury returned a verdict assessing punitive damages totaling approximately $145 billion against various defendants, including $74 billion against PM USA. Following entry of judgment, PM USA appealed.

In May 2001, the trial court approved a stipulation providing that execution of the punitive damages component of the Engle judgment will remain stayed against PM USA and the other participating defendants through the completion of all judicial review. As a result of the stipulation, PM USA placed $500 million into an interest-bearing escrow account that, regardless of the outcome of the judicial review, was to be paid to the court and the court was to determine how to allocate or distribute it consistent with Florida Rules of Civil Procedure. In May 2003, the Florida Third District Court of Appeal reversed the judgment entered by the trial court and instructed the trial court to order the decertification of the class. Plaintiffs petitioned the Florida Supreme Court for further review.


20

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

In July 2006, the Florida Supreme Court ordered that the punitive damages award be vacated, that the class approved by the trial court be decertified and that members of the decertified class could file individual actions against defendants within one year of issuance of the mandate. The court further declared the following Phase I findings are entitled to res judicata effect in such individual actions brought within one year of the issuance of the mandate: (i) that smoking causes various diseases; (ii) that nicotine in cigarettes is addictive; (iii) that defendants’ cigarettes were defective and unreasonably dangerous; (iv) that defendants concealed or omitted material information not otherwise known or available knowing that the material was false or misleading or failed to disclose a material fact concerning the health effects or addictive nature of smoking; (v) that defendants agreed to misrepresent information regarding the health effects or addictive nature of cigarettes with the intention of causing the public to rely on this information to their detriment; (vi) that defendants agreed to conceal or omit information regarding the health effects of cigarettes or their addictive nature with the intention that smokers would rely on the information to their detriment; (vii) that all defendants sold or supplied cigarettes that were defective; and (viii) that defendants were negligent. The court also reinstated compensatory damages awards totaling approximately $6.9 million to two individual plaintiffs and found that a third plaintiff’s claim was barred by the statute of limitations. In February 2008, PM USA paid approximately $3 million, representing its share of compensatory damages and interest, to the two individual plaintiffs identified in the Florida Supreme Court’s order.

In August 2006, PM USA sought rehearing from the Florida Supreme Court on parts of its July 2006 opinion, including the ruling (described above) that certain jury findings have res judicata effect in subsequent individual trials timely brought by Engle class members. The rehearing motion also asked, among other things, that legal errors that were raised but not expressly ruled upon in the Florida Third District Court of Appeal or in the Florida Supreme Court now be addressed. Plaintiffs also filed a motion for rehearing in August 2006 seeking clarification of the applicability of the statute of limitations to non-members of the decertified class. In December 2006, the Florida Supreme Court refused to revise its July 2006 ruling, except that it revised the set of Phase I findings entitled to res judicata effect by excluding finding (v) listed above (relating to agreement to misrepresent information), and added the finding that defendants sold or supplied cigarettes that, at the time of sale or supply, did not conform to the representations of fact made by defendants. In January 2007, the Florida Supreme Court issued the mandate from its revised opinion. Defendants then filed a motion with the Florida Third District Court of Appeal requesting that the court address legal errors that were previously raised by defendants but have not yet been addressed either by the Florida Third District Court of Appeal or by the Florida Supreme Court. In February 2007, the Florida Third District Court of Appeal denied defendants’ motion. In May 2007, defendants’ motion for a partial stay of the mandate pending the completion of appellate review was denied by the Florida Third District Court of Appeal. In May 2007, defendants filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court. In October 2007, the United States Supreme Court denied defendants’ petition. In November 2007, the United States Supreme Court denied defendants’ petition for rehearing from the denial of their petition for writ of certiorari.

In February 2008, the trial court decertified the class, except for purposes of the May 2001 bond stipulation, and formally vacated the punitive damages award pursuant to the Florida Supreme Court’s mandate. In April 2008, the trial court ruled that certain defendants, including PM USA, lacked standing with respect to allocation of the funds escrowed under the May 2001 bond stipulation and would receive no credit at that time from the $500 million paid by PM USA against any future punitive damages awards in cases brought by former Engle class members.

In May 2008, the trial court, among other things, decertified the limited class maintained for purposes of the May 2001 bond stipulation and, in July 2008, severed the remaining plaintiffs’ claims except for those of Howard Engle. The only remaining plaintiff in the Engle case, Howard Engle, voluntarily dismissed his claims with prejudice.

Engle Progeny Cases

The deadline for filing Engle progeny cases, as required by the Florida Supreme Court’s Engle decision, expired in January 2008. As of April 20, 2015, approximately 3,125 state court cases were pending against PM USA or Altria Group, Inc. asserting individual claims by or on behalf of approximately 4,200 state court plaintiffs.  Furthermore, as of April 20, 2015, approximately 435 cases were pending against PM USA in federal district court asserting individual claims by or on behalf of a similar number of federal court plaintiffs. Most of these federal cases are pending in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida. Moreover, most of these federal cases are subject to resolution pursuant to the agreement described below under Tentative Agreement to Resolve Federal Engle Progeny Cases. Because of a number of factors, including, but not limited to, docketing delays, duplicated filings and overlapping dismissal orders, these numbers are estimates.

21

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


In July 2013, the district court issued an order transferring, for case management purposes, all the Middle District of Florida Engle progeny cases to a judge presiding in the District of Massachusetts. The order directed that the cases will remain in the Middle District of Florida and that such judge will be designated a judge of that district for purposes of managing the cases. The U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida dismissed a significant number of cases, of which approximately 750 were appealed by plaintiffs to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. In September 2014, the Eleventh Circuit affirmed those dismissals.

Tentative Agreement to Resolve Federal Engle Progeny Cases

On February 25, 2015, PM USA, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company (“R.J. Reynolds”) and Lorillard Tobacco Company (“Lorillard”) reached a tentative agreement to resolve approximately 415 pending federal Engle progeny cases (the “Federal Engle Agreement”). Under the terms of the Federal Engle Agreement, PM USA paid into escrow approximately $43 million on March 11, 2015, which is included in other current assets on Altria Group, Inc.’s condensed consolidated balance sheet at March 31, 2015. PM USA recorded a pre-tax provision of approximately $43 million in the first quarter of 2015. Federal cases that were in trial as of February 25, 2015 and those that have previously reached final verdict are not included in the Federal Engle Agreement. Engle progeny lawsuits pending in Florida state courts are also not part of the Federal Engle Agreement. The Federal Engle Agreement is conditioned on approval by all federal court plaintiffs in the cases resolved by the Federal Engle Agreement or as the parties otherwise agree. On February 25, 2015, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida issued an order staying all upcoming federal trials pending final approval of the Federal Engle Agreement.

Engle Progeny Trial Results

As of April 20, 2015, 77 federal and state Engle progeny cases involving PM USA have resulted in verdicts since the Florida Supreme Court Engle decision. Forty-one verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs.

Thirty-six verdicts were returned in favor of PM USA, of which 27 were state cases (Gelep, Kalyvas, Gil de Rubio, Warrick, Willis, Russo (formerly Frazier), C. Campbell, Rohr, Espinosa, Oliva, Weingart, Junious, Szymanski, Hancock, D. Cohen, LaMotte, J. Campbell, Dombey, Haldeman, Blasco, Gonzalez, Banks, Surico, Baum, Bishop, Vila, and McMannis) and 9 were federal cases (Gollihue, McCray, Denton, Wilder, Jacobson, Reider, Davis, Starbuck, and Sowers). In addition, there have been a number of mistrials, only some of which have resulted in new trials as of April 20, 2015. The juries in the Reider and Banks cases returned zero damages verdicts in favor of PM USA. The juries in the Weingart and Hancock cases returned verdicts against PM USA awarding no damages, but the trial court in each case granted an additur. In the Russo case (formerly Frazier), however, the Florida Third District Court of Appeal reversed the judgment in defendants’ favor in April 2012 and remanded the case for a new trial. Defendants sought review of the case in the Florida Supreme Court, which was granted in September 2013. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court affirmed the reversal, rejecting defendants’ argument that the statute of repose applies to fraud and conspiracy claims in Engle progeny cases. The case is currently being re-tried. On April 17, 2015, defendants moved for a rehearing in the Florida Supreme Court.
 
The charts below list the verdicts and post-trial developments in certain Engle progeny cases in which verdicts were returned in favor of plaintiffs (including Hancock, where the verdict originally was returned in favor of PM USA). The first chart lists such cases that are pending as of April 20, 2015; the second chart lists such cases that were pending within the previous 12 months, but that are now concluded.

Currently-Pending Cases
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Gore
Date:     March 2015

Verdict:
On March 26, 2015, an Indian River County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds, awarding $2 million in compensatory damages and allocating 23% of the fault to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
On April 10, 2015, defendants filed post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and for a new trial.

22

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Pollari
Date:     March 2015

Verdict:
On March 25, 2015, a Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds, awarding $10 million in compensatory damages (to be divided equally between the defendants) and $1.5 million in punitive damages against each defendant.

Post-Trial Developments:
On April 7, 2015, PM USA filed post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and for a new trial.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Zamboni
Date:     February 2015

Verdict:
On February 26, 2015, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds awarding $340,000 in compensatory damages and allocating 10% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $34,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
On April 15, 2015, PM USA and R.J. Reynolds filed a motion for judgment in defendants’ favor in accordance with the Eleventh Circuit’s decision in Graham.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Caprio
Date:     February 2015

Verdict:
On February 24, 2015, a Broward County jury returned a partial verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds, Lorillard and Liggett Group LLC (“Liggett Group”). The jury found against defendants on class membership, allocating 25% of the fault to PM USA. The jury also found $559,172 in economic damages. The jury deadlocked with respect to the intentional torts, certain elements of compensatory damages and punitive damages.

Post-Trial Developments:
On March 11, 2015, PM USA filed post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the partial verdict and for a new trial.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: McKeever
Date:     February 2015

Verdict:
On February 20, 2015, a Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, awarding approximately $5.8 million in compensatory damages and allocating 60% of the fault to PM USA. The jury also awarded plaintiff approximately $11.63 million in punitive damages. However, the jury found in favor of PM USA on the statute of repose defense to plaintiff’s intentional tort and punitive damages claims.
 
Post-Trial Developments:
On March 6, 2015, PM USA filed various post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and motions for a new trial. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in the Hess and Russo cases and, on April 17, 2015, defendants moved for a rehearing.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Brown
Date:     January 2015

Verdict:
On January 21, 2015, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict against PM USA awarding plaintiff approximately $8.3 million in compensatory damages and $9 million in punitive damages.

23

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Post-Trial Developments:
On February 24, 2015, the trial court entered final judgment. On March 23, 2015, PM USA filed various post-trial motions, including motions to alter or amend the judgment and for a new trial or, in the alternative, remittitur of the damages awards.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Allen
Date:     November 2014

Verdict:
A Duval County jury returned a verdict against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds awarding plaintiff approximately $3.1 million in compensatory damages and allocating 6% of the fault to PM USA. The jury also awarded approximately $7.76 million in punitive damages against each defendant. This was a retrial of a 2011 trial that awarded plaintiff $6 million in compensatory damages and $17 million in punitive damages against each defendant.

Post-Trial Developments:
In December 2014, defendants filed various post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and motions for a new trial.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Perrotto
Date:     November 2014

Verdict:
A Palm Beach County jury returned a verdict against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds, Lorillard and Liggett Group awarding plaintiff approximately $4.1 million in compensatory damages and allocating 25% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $1.02 million).

Post-Trial Developments:
In December 2014, the court entered final judgment and plaintiff filed a motion for a new trial. In addition, in December 2014, defendants filed various post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and motions for a new trial.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Boatright
Date:     November 2014

Verdict:
A Polk County jury returned a verdict against PM USA and Liggett Group awarding plaintiff $15 million in compensatory damages and allocating 85% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $12.75 million). In addition, in November 2014, the jury awarded plaintiff approximately $19.7 million in punitive damages against PM USA and $300,000 in punitive damages against Liggett Group.

Post-Trial Developments:
In November 2014, PM USA filed various post-trial motions and, on January 20, 2015, the court denied PM USA’s motions for a new trial and for remittitur, but agreed to reduce the compensatory damages award by the jury’s assessment of comparative fault. On February 9, 2015, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Second District Court of Appeal, and, on February 10, 2015, PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $3.98 million.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Kerrivan
Date:     October 2014

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds awarding plaintiff $15.8 million in compensatory damages and allocating 50% of the fault to PM USA. The jury also awarded plaintiff $25.3 million in punitive damages and allocated $15.7 million to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
The trial court entered final judgment awarding plaintiff $15.8 million in compensatory damages and $25.3 million in punitive damages. In December 2014, defendants filed various post-trial motions, including a renewed motion for judgment

24

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

or for a new trial. Plaintiff agreed to waive the bond for the appeal.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Lourie
Date:     October 2014

Verdict:
A Hillsborough County jury returned a verdict against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard awarding plaintiff approximately $1.37 million in compensatory damages and allocating 27% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $370,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
In October 2014, defendants filed a motion for judgment and a motion for a new trial. In November 2014, the court denied defendants’ post-trial motions and entered final judgment. Later in November 2014, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Second District Court of Appeal, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $370,318.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Berger
Date:     September 2014

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict against PM USA awarding plaintiff $6.25 million in compensatory damages and $20.76 million in punitive damages.

Post-Trial Developments:
The court entered final judgment against PM USA in September 2014. In October 2014, the court entered an order scheduling post-trial motions and confirming that plaintiff agreed to waive bond for appeal. Also in October 2014, PM USA filed a motion for a new trial or, in the alternative, remittitur of the jury’s damages awards.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Harris
Date:    July 2014

Verdict:
The U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard awarding approximately $1.73 million in compensatory damages and allocating 15% of the fault to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
Defendants filed motions for a defense verdict because the jury’s findings indicated that plaintiff was not a member of the Engle class. In December 2014, the court entered final judgment in favor of plaintiff and, on January 15, 2015, defendants filed a renewed motion for judgment as a matter of law or, in the alternative, a motion for a new trial. Defendants also filed a motion to alter or amend the final judgment.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Griffin
Date:    June 2014

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA awarding approximately $1.27 million in compensatory damages and allocating 50% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $630,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
The court entered final judgment against PM USA in July 2014. In August 2014, PM USA filed a motion to amend the judgment to reduce plaintiff’s damages by the amount paid by collateral sources, which the court denied in September 2014. In October 2014, PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $640,543 and filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.


25

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Burkhart
Date:    May 2014

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard awarding $5 million in compensatory damages and allocating fault among the defendants as follows: 15% to PM USA, 25% to R.J. Reynolds and 10% to Lorillard. The court declined defendants’ request to reduce the compensatory damages award by the jury’s assessment of comparative fault, imposing joint and several liability. The jury also awarded plaintiff $2.5 million in punitive damages, allocating $750,000 to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
In July 2014, defendants filed post-trial motions, including a renewed motion for judgment or, alternatively, for a new trial or remittitur of the damages awards, which the court denied in September 2014. In October 2014, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Bowden
Date:    March 2014

Verdict:
A Duval County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded plaintiff $5 million in compensatory damages and allocated 30% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $1.5 million).

Post-Trial Developments:
The court entered final judgment against defendants in March 2014. In April 2014, defendants filed post-trial motions, including motions for a new trial and to set aside the verdict. In May 2014, the court denied defendants’ post-trial motions. In June 2014, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida First District Court of Appeal, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $1.5 million.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Goveia
Date:    February 2014

Verdict:
An Orange County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded $850,000 in compensatory damages and allocated 35% of the fault against each defendant (an amount of $297,500). The jury also awarded $2.25 million in punitive damages against each defendant.

Post-Trial Developments:
In February 2014, defendants filed post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and for a new trial. In April 2014, the court denied defendants’ motions and entered final judgment against defendants. In April 2014, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Fifth District Court of Appeal. In May 2014, PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $2.5 million.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Cuculino
Date:    January 2014

Verdict:
A Miami-Dade County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA. The jury awarded plaintiff $12.5 million in compensatory damages and allocated 40% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $5 million).

Post-Trial Developments:
In January 2014, the court entered final judgment against PM USA, and PM USA filed post-trial motions, including motions to set aside the verdict and for a new trial. In March 2014 and April 2014, the court denied PM USA’s post-trial motions. Also in April 2014, PM USA filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Third District Court of Appeal, plaintiff cross-appealed and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $5 million.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

26

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Plaintiff: Rizzuto
Date:    August 2013

Verdict:
A Hernando County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and Liggett Group. The jury awarded plaintiff $12.55 million in compensatory damages.

Post-Trial Developments:
In September 2013, defendants filed post-trial motions, including a motion to reduce damages. In September 2013, the court granted a remittitur in part on economic damages, which the court reduced from $2.55 million to $1.1 million for a total award of $11.1 million in compensatory damages. The court declined defendants’ request to reduce the compensatory damages award by the jury’s assessment of comparative fault, imposing joint and several liability for the compensatory damages. The court denied all other motions except for defendants’ motion for a juror interview, which was granted. In October 2013, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Fifth District Court of Appeal, which ordered resolution of the juror issue prior to appeal. In December 2013, subsequent to the juror interview, the court entered an order that granted no relief with respect to the alleged misconduct of the juror. Plaintiff agreed to waive the bond for the appeal.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Skolnick
Date:    June 2013

Verdict:
A Palm Beach County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded plaintiff $2.555 million in compensatory damages and allocated 30% of the fault to each defendant (an amount of $766,500).

Post-Trial Developments:
In June 2013, defendants and plaintiff filed post-trial motions. The court entered final judgment against defendants in July 2013. In November 2013, the trial court denied plaintiff’s post-trial motion and, in December 2013, denied defendants’ post-trial motions. Defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal, and plaintiffs cross-appealed in December 2013. Also in December 2013, PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $766,500.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Starr-Blundell
Date:    June 2013

Verdict:
A Duval County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded plaintiff $500,000 in compensatory damages and allocated 10% of the fault to each defendant (an amount of $50,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
In June 2013, the defendants filed a motion to set aside the verdict and to enter judgment in accordance with their motion for directed verdict or, in the alternative, for a new trial, which was denied in October 2013. In November 2013, final judgment was entered in favor of plaintiff affirming the compensatory damages award. In December 2013, plaintiff filed a notice of appeal to the Florida First District Court of Appeal. Plaintiff agreed to waive the bond for the appeal.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Ruffo
Date:    May 2013

Verdict:
A Miami-Dade County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and Lorillard. The jury awarded plaintiff $1.5 million in compensatory damages and allocated 12% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $180,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
In May 2013, defendants filed several post-trial motions, including motions for a new trial and to set aside the verdict, which the trial court denied in October 2013 and entered final judgment in favor of plaintiff. In October 2013, PM USA and Lorillard appealed to the Florida Third District Court of Appeal, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $180,000. In November 2014, the Florida Third District Court of Appeal affirmed the final judgment and, in the fourth quarter of 2014, PM USA recorded a provision on its consolidated balance sheet of approximately $193,000 for the judgment plus interest.

27

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Graham
Date:    May 2013

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded $2.75 million in compensatory damages and allocated 10% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $275,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
In June 2013, defendants filed several post-trial motions, including motions for judgment as a matter of law and for a new trial, which the trial court denied in September 2013. In October 2013, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $277,750. On April 8, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit found in favor of defendants and reversed the trial court’s ruling.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Searcy
Date:    April 2013

Verdict:
A jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded $6 million in compensatory damages (allocating 30% of the fault to each defendant) and $10 million in punitive damages against each defendant.

Post-Trial Developments:
In June 2013, the trial court entered final judgment declining defendants’ request to reduce the compensatory damages award by the jury’s assessment of comparative fault and imposing joint and several liability for the compensatory damages. In July 2013, defendants filed various post-trial motions, including motions requesting reductions in damages. In September 2013, the district court reduced the compensatory damages award to $1 million and the punitive damages award to $1.67 million against each defendant. The district court denied all other post-trial motions. Plaintiffs filed a motion to reconsider the district court’s remittitur and, in the alternative, to certify the issue to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, both of which the court denied in October 2013. In November 2013, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. In December 2013, defendants filed an amended notice of appeal after the district court corrected a clerical error in the final judgment, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of approximately $2.2 million.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Buchanan
Date:     December 2012        

Verdict:
A Leon County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and Liggett Group. The jury awarded $5.5 million in compensatory damages and allocated 37% of the fault to each of the defendants (an amount of approximately $2 million).

Post-Trial Developments:
In December 2012, defendants filed several post-trial motions, including motions for a new trial and to set aside the verdict. In March 2013, the trial court denied all motions and entered final judgment against PM USA and Liggett Group refusing to reduce the compensatory damages award by plaintiff’s comparative fault and holding PM USA and Liggett Group jointly and severally liable for $5.5 million. In April 2013, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida First District Court of Appeal, and PM USA posted a bond in the amount of $2.5 million. In July 2014, the Florida First District Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment, but certified to the Florida Supreme Court the issue of the statute of repose, which was before the court in Hess. In August 2014, defendants filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. In September 2014, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the case pending the outcome of Hess. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in Hess and, on April 17, 2015, PM USA moved for a rehearing.


28

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Hancock
Date:     August 2012        

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in the amount of zero damages and allocated 5% of the fault to each of the defendants (PM USA and R.J. Reynolds). The trial court granted an additur of approximately $110,000, which is subject to the jury’s comparative fault finding.

Post-Trial Developments:
In August 2012, defendants moved to set aside the verdict and to enter judgment in accordance with their motion for directed verdict. Defendants also moved to reduce damages, which motion the court granted. The trial court granted defendants’ motion to set off the damages award by the amount of economic damages paid by third parties, which will reduce further any final award. In October 2012, the trial court entered final judgment. PM USA’s portion of the damages was approximately $700. In November 2012, both sides filed notices of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal affirmed the trial court’s verdict.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Calloway
Date:     May 2012        

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds, Lorillard and Liggett Group. The jury awarded approximately $21 million in compensatory damages and allocated 25% of the fault against PM USA, but the trial court ruled that it will not apply the comparative fault allocations because the jury found against each defendant on the intentional tort claims. The jury also awarded approximately $17 million in punitive damages against PM USA, approximately $17 million in punitive damages against R.J. Reynolds, approximately $13 million in punitive damages against Lorillard and approximately $8 million in punitive damages against Liggett Group.

Post-Trial Developments:
In May and June 2012, defendants filed motions to set aside the verdict and for a new trial. In August 2012, the trial court denied the remaining post-trial motions and entered final judgment, reducing the total compensatory damages award to $16.1 million but leaving undisturbed the separate punitive damages awards. In September 2012, PM USA posted a bond in an amount of $1.5 million and defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal. In August 2013, plaintiff filed a motion to determine the sufficiency of the bond in the trial court on the ground that the bond cap statute is unconstitutional, which the court denied.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Hallgren
Date:     January 2012        

Verdict:
A Highland County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded approximately $2 million in compensatory damages and allocated 25% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $500,000). The jury also awarded $750,000 in punitive damages against each of the defendants.

Post-Trial Developments:
The trial court entered final judgment in March 2012. In April 2012, PM USA posted a bond in an amount of approximately $1.25 million. In May 2012, defendants filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Second District Court of Appeal. In October 2013, the Second District Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment. In November 2013, defendants filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. In June 2014, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the case pending the outcome of Russo (presenting the same statute of repose issue as Hess). On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in the Hess and Russo cases and, on April 17, 2015, defendants moved for a rehearing. On April 6, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the case pending the outcome of Soffer (presenting the issue of whether Engle progeny plaintiffs may seek punitive damages on their negligence and strict liability claims).


29

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Kayton (formerly Tate)
Date:     July 2010

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA. The jury awarded $8 million in compensatory damages and allocated 64% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $5.1 million). The jury also awarded approximately $16.2 million in punitive damages against PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
In August 2010, the trial court entered final judgment, and PM USA filed its notice of appeal and posted a $5 million bond. In November 2012, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal reversed the punitive damages award and remanded the case for a new trial on plaintiff’s conspiracy claim. Upon retrial, if the jury finds in plaintiff’s favor on that claim, the original $16.2 million punitive damages award will be reinstated. PM USA filed a motion for rehearing, which was denied in January 2013. In January 2013, plaintiff and defendant each filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. In June 2013, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the appeal pending the outcome of Hess. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in Hess and, on April 17, 2015, PM USA moved for a rehearing.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Putney
Date:     April 2010

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Liggett Group. The jury awarded approximately $15.1 million in compensatory damages and allocated 15% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $2.3 million). The jury also awarded $2.5 million in punitive damages against PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
In August 2010, the trial court entered final judgment. PM USA filed its notice of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal and, in November 2010, posted a $1.6 million bond. In June 2013, the Fourth District Court of Appeal reversed and remanded the case for further proceedings, holding that the trial court erred in (1) not reducing the compensatory damages award as excessive and (2) not instructing the jury on the statute of repose in connection with plaintiff’s conspiracy claim that resulted in the $2.5 million punitive damages award. In July 2013, plaintiff filed a motion for rehearing, which the Fourth District Court of Appeal denied in August 2013. In September 2013, both parties filed notices to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. In December 2013, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the appeal pending the outcome of the Hess case. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in Hess and, on April 17, 2015, PM USA moved for a rehearing.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: R. Cohen
Date:     March 2010

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds. The jury awarded $10 million in compensatory damages and allocated 33 1/3% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of approximately $3.3 million). The jury also awarded a total of $20 million in punitive damages, assessing separate $10 million awards against each defendant.

Post-Trial Developments:
In July 2010, the trial court entered final judgment and, in August 2010, PM USA filed its notice of appeal. In October 2010, PM USA posted a $2.5 million bond. In September 2012, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal affirmed the compensatory damages award but reversed and remanded the punitive damages verdict. The Fourth District returned the case to the trial court for a new jury trial on plaintiff’s fraudulent concealment claim. If the jury finds in plaintiff’s favor on that claim, the $10 million punitive damages award against each defendant will be reinstated. In January 2013, plaintiff and defendants each filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court. In February 2013, the Fourth District granted defendants’ motion to stay the mandate. In March 2013, plaintiff filed a motion for review of the stay order with the Florida Supreme Court, which was denied in April 2013. In June 2013,

30

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

plaintiff moved to consolidate with Hess and Kayton, which defendants did not oppose, but in October 2013, plaintiff withdrew the motion for consolidation. In February 2014, the Florida Supreme Court stayed the appeal pending the outcome of the Hess case. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense in Hess and, on April 17, 2015, PM USA moved for a rehearing.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Naugle
Date:     November 2009

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA. The jury awarded approximately $56.6 million in compensatory damages and $244 million in punitive damages. The jury allocated 90% of the fault to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
In March 2010, the trial court entered final judgment reflecting a reduced award of approximately $13 million in compensatory damages and $26 million in punitive damages. In April 2010, PM USA filed its notice of appeal and posted a $5 million bond. In August 2010, upon the motion of PM USA, the trial court entered an amended final judgment of approximately $12.3 million in compensatory damages and approximately $24.5 million in punitive damages to correct a clerical error. In June 2012, the Fourth District Court of Appeal affirmed the amended final judgment. In July 2012, PM USA filed a motion for rehearing. In December 2012, the Fourth District withdrew its prior decision, reversed the verdict as to compensatory and punitive damages and returned the case to the trial court for a new trial on the question of damages. In December 2012, plaintiff filed a motion for rehearing en banc or for certification to the Florida Supreme Court, which was denied in January 2013. In February 2013, plaintiff and PM USA each filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court, which the Florida Supreme Court denied in February 2014. Upon retrial on the question of damages, in October 2013, the new jury awarded approximately $3.7 million in compensatory damages and $7.5 million in punitive damages. In October 2013, PM USA filed post-trial motions, which the trial court denied in April 2014. In May 2014, PM USA filed a notice of appeal to the Fourth District Court of Appeal and plaintiff cross-appealed. Also in May 2014, PM USA filed a rider with the Florida Supreme Court to make the previously-posted Naugle bond applicable to the retrial judgment.

________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Hess
Date:     February 2009

Verdict:
A Broward County jury found in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA. The jury awarded $3 million in compensatory damages and $5 million in punitive damages. In June 2009, the trial court entered final judgment and awarded plaintiff $1.26 million in actual damages and $5 million in punitive damages. The judgment reduced the jury’s $3 million award of compensatory damages due to the jury allocating 42% of the fault to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
PM USA filed a notice of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal in July 2009. In May 2012, the Fourth District reversed and vacated the punitive damages award on the basis that it was barred by the statute of repose and affirmed the judgment in all other respects, upholding the compensatory damages award of $1.26 million. In June 2012, both parties filed rehearing motions with the Fourth District, which were denied in September 2012. In October 2012, PM USA and plaintiff filed notices to invoke the Florida Supreme Court’s discretionary jurisdiction. In the first quarter of 2013, PM USA recorded a provision on its condensed consolidated balance sheet of approximately $3.2 million for the judgment plus interest and associated costs. In June 2013, the Florida Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction of plaintiff’s petition for review, but declined to accept jurisdiction of PM USA’s petition. On April 2, 2015, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the statute of repose defense and reinstated the punitive damages award against PM USA. On April 17, 2015, PM USA moved for a rehearing.

31

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Concluded Cases
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Landau
Date:     February 2015

Verdict:
On February 19, 2015, a jury in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard awarding $100,000 in compensatory damages. One defendant settled the case, which resolved all claims against all defendants, including PM USA.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Tullo
Date:     April 2011        

Verdict:
A Palm Beach County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, Lorillard and Liggett Group. The jury awarded a total of $4.5 million in compensatory damages and allocated 45% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $2.025 million).

Post-Trial Developments:
In April 2011, the trial court entered final judgment. In July 2011, PM USA filed its notice of appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal and posted a $2 million bond. In August 2013, the Fourth District Court of Appeal affirmed the judgment. In October 2013, defendants filed a notice to invoke the discretionary jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court, which declined jurisdiction in September 2014. In the third quarter of 2014, PM USA recorded a provision on its condensed consolidated balance sheet of approximately $3.9 million for the judgment plus interest and associated costs and paid this amount in October 2014.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Plaintiff: Barbanell
Date:     August 2009

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA, awarding $5.3 million in compensatory damages. The judge had previously dismissed the punitive damages claim. In September 2009, the trial court entered final judgment and awarded plaintiff $1.95 million in actual damages. The judgment reduced the jury’s compensatory damages award due to the jury allocating 36.5% of the fault to PM USA.

Post-Trial Developments:
A notice of appeal was filed by PM USA in September 2009. In February 2012, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal reversed the judgment, holding that the statute of limitations barred plaintiff’s claims. In October 2012, on motion for rehearing, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal withdrew its prior decision and affirmed the trial court’s judgment. In November 2012, PM USA filed a notice to invoke the jurisdiction of the Florida Supreme Court, which the Florida Supreme Court denied. In the first quarter of 2014, PM USA recorded a provision on its condensed consolidated balance sheet of approximately $3.6 million for the judgment plus interest and associated costs. In March 2014, PM USA filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court, which was denied in June 2014. Also in June 2014, PM USA paid the judgment plus interest and associated costs in the amount of approximately $3.6 million.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Engle Progeny Appellate Issues

Three Florida federal district courts (in the Merlob, B. Brown and Burr cases) ruled in 2008 that the findings in the first phase of the Engle proceedings cannot be used to satisfy elements of plaintiffs’ claims, and two of those rulings (B. Brown and Burr) were certified by the trial court for interlocutory review. The certification in both cases was granted by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and the appeals were consolidated. The appeal in Burr was dismissed for lack of prosecution, and the case was ultimately dismissed on statute of limitations grounds.


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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

In July 2010, the Eleventh Circuit ruled in B. Brown that, as a matter of Florida law, plaintiffs do not have an unlimited right to use the findings from the original Engle trial to meet their burden of establishing the elements of their claims at trial. The Eleventh Circuit did not reach the issue of whether the use of the Engle findings violates defendants’ due process rights. Rather, the court held that plaintiffs may only use the findings to establish those specific facts, if any, that they demonstrate with a reasonable degree of certainty were actually decided by the original Engle jury. The Eleventh Circuit remanded the case to the district court to determine what specific factual findings the Engle jury actually made.

After the remand of B. Brown, several state appellate rulings superseded the Eleventh Circuit’s ruling on Florida state law. These cases include Martin, a case against R.J. Reynolds in Escambia County, and J. Brown, a case against R.J. Reynolds in Broward County. In December 2011, petitions for writ of certiorari were filed with the United States Supreme Court by R.J. Reynolds in Campbell, Martin, Gray and Hall and by PM USA and Liggett Group in Campbell. The United States Supreme Court denied defendants’ certiorari petitions in March 2012.

In Douglas, in March 2012, the Florida Second District Court of Appeal issued a decision affirming the judgment of the trial court in favor of the plaintiff and upholding the use of the Engle jury findings with respect to strict liability claims but certified to the Florida Supreme Court the question of whether granting res judicata effect to the Engle jury findings violates defendants’ federal due process rights. In March 2013, the Florida Supreme Court affirmed the final judgment entered in favor of plaintiff upholding the use of the Engle jury findings with respect to strict liability and negligence claims. PM USA filed its petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court in August 2013, which the court denied in October 2013.

Meanwhile, in the Waggoner case, the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida ruled in December 2011 that application of the Engle findings to establish the wrongful conduct elements of plaintiffs’ claims consistent with Martin or J. Brown did not violate defendants’ due process rights.  PM USA and the other defendants sought appellate review of the due process ruling. In February 2012, the district court denied the motion for interlocutory appeal, but did apply the ruling to all active pending federal Engle progeny cases. As a result, R.J. Reynolds appealed the rulings in the Walker and Duke cases to the Eleventh Circuit, which, in September 2013, rejected the due process defense and affirmed the underlying judgments. In October 2013, R.J. Reynolds filed a petition for rehearing or rehearing en banc. Thereafter, the Eleventh Circuit vacated its decision and substituted a new opinion. In November 2013, the Eleventh Circuit denied R.J. Reynolds’ initial petition for rehearing. R.J. Reynolds filed a petition for rehearing en banc or panel rehearing of the substituted decision, which was denied in January 2014. In March 2014, R.J. Reynolds filed petitions for writ of certiorari to the United States Supreme Court in the Walker and Duke cases, as well as in J. Brown. Defendants filed petitions for writ of certiorari in eight other Engle progeny cases that were tried in Florida state courts, including one case, Barbanell, in which PM USA is the defendant. In these eight petitions, defendants asserted questions similar to those in Walker, Duke and J. Brown. In June 2014, the United States Supreme Court denied defendants’ petitions for writ of certiorari in all 11 cases.

In Graham, an Engle progeny case against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds on appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, defendants argued that the Engle progeny plaintiffs’ product liability claims are impliedly preempted by federal law. On April 8, 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit found in favor of defendants on the basis of federal preemption and reversed the trial court’s denial of judgment as a matter of law.

In Soffer, an Engle progeny case against R.J. Reynolds, the Florida First District Court of Appeal held that Engle progeny plaintiffs can recover punitive damages only on their intentional tort claims. In February 2014, the Florida Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction over plaintiff’s appeal from the Florida First District Court of Appeal’s holding and heard oral argument in December 2014.

In Ciccone, an Engle progeny case against R.J. Reynolds, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal held that Engle progeny plaintiffs could establish class membership by showing that they developed symptoms during the Engle class period that could, in hindsight, be attributed to their smoking-related disease. The court certified a conflict with Castleman, a Florida First District Court of Appeal decision, which held that manifestation requires Engle progeny plaintiffs to have been aware during the class period that they had a disease caused by smoking in order to establish class membership. The Florida Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction in the Ciccone case in June 2014 and heard oral argument in December 2014.



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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Florida Bond Statute

In June 2009, Florida amended its existing bond cap statute by adding a $200 million bond cap that applies to all state Engle progeny lawsuits in the aggregate and establishes individual bond caps for individual Engle progeny cases in amounts that vary depending on the number of judgments in effect at a given time. Plaintiffs in three state Engle progeny cases against R.J. Reynolds in Alachua County, Florida (Alexander, Townsend and Hall) and one case in Escambia County (Clay) challenged the constitutionality of the bond cap statute. The Florida Attorney General intervened in these cases in defense of the constitutionality of the statute.

Trial court rulings were rendered in Clay, Alexander, Townsend and Hall rejecting the plaintiffs’ bond cap statute challenges in those cases. The plaintiffs unsuccessfully appealed these rulings. In Alexander, Clay and Hall, the District Court of Appeal for the First District of Florida affirmed the trial court decisions and certified the decision in Hall for appeal to the Florida Supreme Court, but declined to certify the question of the constitutionality of the bond cap statute in Clay and Alexander. The Florida Supreme Court granted review of the Hall decision, but, in September 2012, the court dismissed the appeal as moot. In October 2012, the Florida Supreme Court denied the plaintiffs’ rehearing petition. In August 2013, in Calloway, discussed further above, plaintiff filed a motion in the trial court to determine the sufficiency of the bond posted by defendants on the ground that the bond cap statute is unconstitutional, which was denied.

No federal court has yet addressed the constitutionality of the bond cap statute or the applicability of the bond cap to Engle progeny cases tried in federal court. However, in April 2013, PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard filed a motion in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida to have the court apply the Florida bond cap statute to all federal Engle progeny cases. In August 2013, the court denied the motion without prejudice on the grounds that it was premature to adjudicate such issue.

Other Smoking and Health Class Actions
 
Since the dismissal in May 1996 of a purported nationwide class action brought on behalf of allegedly addicted smokers, plaintiffs have filed numerous putative smoking and health class action suits in various state and federal courts. In general, these cases purport to be brought on behalf of residents of a particular state or states (although a few cases purport to be nationwide in scope) and raise addiction claims and, in many cases, claims of physical injury as well.

Class certification has been denied or reversed by courts in 59 smoking and health class actions involving PM USA in Arkansas (1), California (1), the District of Columbia (2), Florida (2), Illinois (3), Iowa (1), Kansas (1), Louisiana (1), Maryland (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (1), Nevada (29), New Jersey (6), New York (2), Ohio (1), Oklahoma (1), Pennsylvania (1), Puerto Rico (1), South Carolina (1), Texas (1) and Wisconsin (1).

As of April 20, 2015, PM USA and Altria Group, Inc. are named as defendants, along with other cigarette manufacturers, in seven class actions filed in the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Ontario. In Saskatchewan, British Columbia (two separate cases) and Ontario, plaintiffs seek class certification on behalf of individuals who suffer or have suffered from various diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema, heart disease or cancer, after smoking defendants’ cigarettes. In the actions filed in Alberta, Manitoba and Nova Scotia, plaintiffs seek certification of classes of all individuals who smoked defendants’ cigarettes. See Guarantees and Other Similar Matters below for a discussion of the Distribution Agreement between Altria Group, Inc. and PMI that provides for indemnities for certain liabilities concerning tobacco products.

Medical Monitoring Class Actions

In medical monitoring actions, plaintiffs seek to recover the cost for, or otherwise the implementation of, court-supervised programs for ongoing medical monitoring purportedly on behalf of a class of individual plaintiffs. Plaintiffs in these cases seek to impose liability under various product-based causes of action and the creation of a court-supervised program providing members of the purported class Low Dose CT (“LDCT”) scanning in order to identify and diagnose lung cancer. Plaintiffs in these cases do not seek punitive damages, although plaintiffs in Donovan have indicated they may seek to treble any damages awarded. The future defense of these cases may be negatively impacted by evolving medical standards and practice.


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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

One medical monitoring class action is currently pending against PM USA. In Donovan, filed in December 2006 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts, plaintiffs purportedly brought the action on behalf of the state’s residents who are: age 50 or older; have smoked the Marlboro brand for 20 pack-years or more; and have neither been diagnosed with lung cancer nor are under investigation by a physician for suspected lung cancer. The Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, in answering questions certified to it by the district court, held in October 2009 that under certain circumstances state law recognizes a claim by individual smokers for medical monitoring despite the absence of an actual injury. The court also ruled that whether or not the case is barred by the applicable statute of limitations is a factual issue to be determined by the trial court. The case was remanded to federal court for further proceedings. In June 2010, the district court granted in part the plaintiffs’ motion for class certification, certifying the class as to plaintiffs’ claims for breach of implied warranty and violation of the Massachusetts Consumer Protection Act, but denying certification as to plaintiffs’ negligence claim. In July 2010, PM USA petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit for appellate review of the class certification decision. The petition was denied in September 2010. As a remedy, plaintiffs have proposed a 28-year medical monitoring program with an approximate cost of $190 million. In October 2011, PM USA filed a motion for class decertification, which motion was denied in March 2012. In February 2013, the district court amended the class definition to extend to individuals who satisfy the class membership criteria through February 26, 2013, and to exclude any individual who was not a Massachusetts resident as of February 26, 2013. In January 2014, plaintiffs filed motions for partial summary judgment and to strike affirmative defenses. In December 2014, the court issued its rulings on plaintiffs’ previously-filed motions, granting and denying the motions in part. Trial is scheduled to begin January 25, 2016.

Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation

Overview

In the health care cost recovery litigation, governmental entities seek reimbursement of health care cost expenditures allegedly caused by tobacco products and, in some cases, of future expenditures and damages. Relief sought by some but not all plaintiffs includes punitive damages, multiple damages and other statutory damages and penalties, injunctions prohibiting alleged marketing and sales to minors, disclosure of research, disgorgement of profits, funding of anti-smoking programs, additional disclosure of nicotine yields, and payment of attorney and expert witness fees.

The claims asserted include the claim that cigarette manufacturers were “unjustly enriched” by plaintiffs’ payment of health care costs allegedly attributable to smoking, as well as claims of indemnity, negligence, strict liability, breach of express and implied warranty, violation of a voluntary undertaking or special duty, fraud, negligent misrepresentation, conspiracy, public nuisance, claims under federal and state statutes governing consumer fraud, antitrust, deceptive trade practices and false advertising, and claims under federal and state anti-racketeering statutes.

Defenses raised include lack of proximate cause, remoteness of injury, failure to state a valid claim, lack of benefit, adequate remedy at law, “unclean hands” (namely, that plaintiffs cannot obtain equitable relief because they participated in, and benefited from, the sale of cigarettes), lack of antitrust standing and injury, federal preemption, lack of statutory authority to bring suit and statutes of limitations. In addition, defendants argue that they should be entitled to “set off” any alleged damages to the extent the plaintiffs benefit economically from the sale of cigarettes through the receipt of excise taxes or otherwise. Defendants also argue that these cases are improper because plaintiffs must proceed under principles of subrogation and assignment. Under traditional theories of recovery, a payor of medical costs (such as an insurer) can seek recovery of health care costs from a third party solely by “standing in the shoes” of the injured party. Defendants argue that plaintiffs should be required to bring any actions as subrogees of individual health care recipients and should be subject to all defenses available against the injured party.

Although there have been some decisions to the contrary, most judicial decisions in the United States have dismissed all or most health care cost recovery claims against cigarette manufacturers. Nine federal circuit courts of appeals and eight state appellate courts, relying primarily on grounds that plaintiffs’ claims were too remote, have ordered or affirmed dismissals of health care cost recovery actions. The United States Supreme Court has refused to consider plaintiffs’ appeals from the cases decided by five circuit courts of appeals. In 2011, in the health care cost recovery case brought against PM USA and other defendants by the City of St. Louis, Missouri and approximately 40 Missouri hospitals, a verdict was returned in favor of defendants.


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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Individuals and associations have also sued in purported class actions or as private attorneys general under the Medicare as Secondary Payer (“MSP”) provisions of the Social Security Act to recover from defendants Medicare expenditures allegedly incurred for the treatment of smoking-related diseases. Cases were brought in New York (2), Florida (2) and Massachusetts (1). All were dismissed by federal courts.

In addition to the cases brought in the United States, health care cost recovery actions have also been brought against tobacco industry participants, including PM USA and Altria Group, Inc., in Israel (dismissed), the Marshall Islands (dismissed) and Canada (10), and other entities have stated that they are considering filing such actions.

In September 2005, in the first of several health care cost recovery cases filed in Canada, the Canadian Supreme Court ruled that legislation passed in British Columbia permitting the lawsuit is constitutional, and, as a result, the case, which had previously been dismissed by the trial court, was permitted to proceed. PM USA’s and other defendants’ challenge to the British Columbia court’s exercise of jurisdiction was rejected by the Court of Appeals of British Columbia and, in April 2007, the Supreme Court of Canada denied review of that decision. In December 2009, the Court of Appeals of British Columbia ruled that certain defendants can proceed against the Federal Government of Canada as third parties on the theory that the Federal Government of Canada negligently misrepresented to defendants the efficacy of a low tar tobacco variety that the Federal Government of Canada developed and licensed to defendants. In May 2010, the Supreme Court of Canada granted leave to the Federal Government of Canada to appeal this decision and leave to defendants to cross-appeal the Court of Appeals’ decision to dismiss claims against the Federal Government of Canada based on other theories of liability. In July 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada dismissed the third-party claims against the Federal Government of Canada.

Since the beginning of 2008, the Canadian Provinces of British Columbia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia have brought health care reimbursement claims against cigarette manufacturers. PM USA is named as a defendant in the British Columbia and Quebec cases, while both Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA are named as defendants in the New Brunswick, Ontario, Newfoundland and Labrador, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia cases. The territory of Nunavut has passed similar legislation. See Guarantees and Other Similar Matters below for a discussion of the Distribution Agreement between Altria Group, Inc. and PMI that provides for indemnities for certain liabilities concerning tobacco products.

Settlements of Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation

In November 1998, PM USA and certain other United States tobacco product manufacturers entered into the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (the “MSA”) with 46 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa and the Northern Marianas to settle asserted and unasserted health care cost recovery and other claims. PM USA and certain other United States tobacco product manufacturers had previously entered into agreements to settle similar claims brought by Mississippi, Florida, Texas and Minnesota (together with the MSA, the “State Settlement Agreements”). The State Settlement Agreements require that the original participating manufacturers make annual payments of approximately $9.4 billion, subject to adjustments for several factors, including inflation, market share and industry volume. In addition, the original participating manufacturers are required to pay settling plaintiffs’ attorneys’ fees, subject to an annual cap of $500 million. For the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, the aggregate amount recorded in cost of sales with respect to the State Settlement Agreements and the Fair and Equitable Tobacco Reform Act of 2004 was approximately $1.1 billion for each period.

The State Settlement Agreements also include provisions relating to advertising and marketing restrictions, public disclosure of certain industry documents, limitations on challenges to certain tobacco control and underage use laws, restrictions on lobbying activities and other provisions.

NPM Adjustment Disputes

PM USA is participating in proceedings regarding potential downward adjustments (the “NPM Adjustment”) to MSA payments made by manufacturers that are signatories to the MSA (the “participating manufacturers” or “PMs”) for 2003-2013. The NPM Adjustment is a reduction in MSA payments that applies if the PMs collectively lose at least a specified level of market share to non-participating manufacturers (“NPMs”) between 1997 and the year at issue, subject

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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

to certain conditions and defenses. The independent auditor appointed under the MSA calculates the maximum amount, if any, of the NPM Adjustment for any year in respect of which such NPM Adjustment is potentially applicable.

2003-2012 NPM Adjustment Disputes - Settlement with 24 States and Territories

PM USA has settled the NPM Adjustment disputes for the years 2003-2012 with 24 of the 52 MSA states and territories (the 24 states and territories are referred to as the “signatory states,” and the remaining MSA states and territories are referred to as the “non-signatory states”). Pursuant to the settlement, PM USA expects to receive a total of at least $599 million for 2003-2012. Of this total, PM USA had already received $579 million in the form of reductions to its MSA payments in 2013 or 2014 and received the remaining $20 million as a reduction to its MSA payment in 2015.

PM USA recorded $519 million of the $599 million as a reduction to cost of sales that increased its reported pre-tax earnings by $483 million and $36 million in the first quarter of 2013 and second quarter of 2013, respectively. The remainder of the $599 million consists of $80 million attributable to two states that joined the settlement after having been found subject to the 2003 NPM Adjustment by an arbitration panel in the third quarter of 2013, as discussed below. As a result of the arbitration panel’s findings, however, PM USA had already recorded $54 million in pre-tax earnings in respect of those two states for the 2003 NPM Adjustment before they joined the settlement, leaving an additional $26 million to be recorded when they joined the settlement. The $54 million already recorded consisted of $37 million recorded as a reduction to cost of sales and $17 million recorded as interest income. Because the $80 million settlement recovery would all be recorded as a reduction to cost of sales, upon these two states’ joinder of the settlement in the second quarter of 2014, PM USA recorded a further $43 million reduction to cost of sales while also recording a $17 million reduction in interest income to reverse the earlier recording of interest income in that amount. The result was a net increase in reported pre-tax earnings of $26 million in the second quarter of 2014.

In addition, the settlement provides that the NPM Adjustment provision will be revised and streamlined as to the signatory states for the years after 2012. Under the revised provision, the 2013 and 2014 NPM Adjustments are “transition years,” for which the PMs receive specified payments. PM USA has already received $35 million for the 2013 transition year pursuant to this revised provision in the form of a reduction to its MSA payments in 2014, resulting in a reduction to cost of sales in the first quarter of 2014. PM USA also received an additional $3 million for the 2013 transition year as a result of the two additional states joining the settlement in the form of a reduction to its MSA payment in 2015. In addition, PM USA received $41 million for the 2014 transition year in the form of a reduction to its MSA payment in 2015. PM USA, R.J. Reynolds and Lorillard (the “original participating manufacturers” or “OPMs”) have agreed that the amounts they receive under the settlement for the transition years and subsequent years will be allocated among them pursuant to a formula that modifies the MSA allocation formula in a manner favorable to PM USA, although the extent to which it remains favorable to PM USA will depend upon future developments.

Many of the non-signatory states objected to the settlement before the arbitration panel hearing the 2003 NPM Adjustment dispute. In March 2013, the panel issued a stipulated partial settlement and award (the “Stipulated Award”) rejecting the objections and permitting the settlement to proceed. Fourteen of the non-signatory states filed motions in their state courts to vacate and/or modify the Stipulated Award in whole or part. Decisions by the Pennsylvania, Missouri and Maryland courts on such motions, and the subsequent appeals of those rulings, are discussed below.  One state’s motion was denied without an appeal by the state. Another state’s motions remain pending in its state trial court. As for the remaining states, rulings rejecting their motions to vacate the Stipulated Award are on appeal by the respective states, or the motions have been voluntarily dismissed or stayed pending further state action.

2003-2014 NPM Adjustment Disputes - Continuing Disputes with Non-Signatory States

PM USA has continued to pursue the NPM Adjustments for 2003 and subsequent years with respect to the non-signatory states. Under the MSA, once all conditions for the NPM Adjustment for a particular year are met, each state may avoid an NPM Adjustment to its share of the PMs’ MSA payments for that year by establishing that it diligently enforced a qualifying escrow statute during the entirety of that year. Such a state’s share of the NPM Adjustment would then be reallocated to any states that are found not to have diligently enforced for that year. For 2003-2012, all conditions for the NPM Adjustment have been met, either by determination or agreement among the parties. For 2013-2014, one condition (that the disadvantages of the MSA were a “significant factor” contributing to the PMs’ collective loss of market share) potentially remains in dispute.  Proceedings as to the “significant factor” issue for 2013 have been initiated, and proceedings as to the “significant factor” issue for 2014 cannot be commenced until the second half of April 2016.

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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


2003 NPM Adjustment. With one exception (Montana), the courts have ruled that the states’ claims of diligent enforcement are to be submitted to arbitration. PM USA and other PMs entered into an agreement with most of the MSA states and territories concerning the 2003 NPM Adjustment, under which such states and territories would receive a partial liability reduction of 20% for the 2003 NPM Adjustment in the event the arbitration panel determined that they did not diligently enforce during 2003. The Montana state courts ruled that Montana may litigate its diligent enforcement claims in state court, rather than in arbitration. In June 2012, the PMs and Montana entered a consent decree pursuant to which Montana would not be subject to the 2003 NPM Adjustment.

The 2003 arbitration was conducted from July 2010 to September 2013. Following discovery, the PMs determined no longer to contest the 2003 diligent enforcement claims of 14 of the non-signatory states in the arbitration. In the Stipulated Award, the arbitration panel ruled that the total 2003 NPM Adjustment would be reduced pro rata by the aggregate allocable share of the signatory states (at the relevant time, approximately 46%) to determine the maximum amount of the 2003 NPM Adjustment potentially available from the non-signatory states whose diligent enforcement claims the PMs continued to contest (the “pro rata judgment reduction”).

In September 2013, the arbitration panel issued rulings regarding the 15 contested states and territories that had not as of that time joined the settlement, ruling that six of them (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico and Pennsylvania) did not diligently enforce during 2003 and that nine of them did. Based on this ruling, the PMs are entitled to receive from the six non-diligent states the entire 2003 NPM Adjustment remaining after the pro rata judgment reduction. PM USA believes it is entitled to receive an NPM Adjustment for 2003 based on this ruling, after reflecting the 20% partial liability reduction noted above, of approximately $145 million. PM USA recorded this $145 million as a reduction to cost of sales, which increased its reported pre-tax earnings in the third quarter of 2013. In addition, PM USA believes it would be entitled to interest on this amount of approximately $89 million. PM USA recorded $64 million of this amount as interest income, which reduced interest and other debt expense, net in the first quarter of 2014, but did not yet record the remaining $25 million based on its assessment of a certain dispute concerning interest discussed below.

After PM USA recorded these amounts, two of the six non-diligent states (Indiana and Kentucky) joined the settlement and became signatory states.  Those two states account for (i) $37 million of the $145 million NPM Adjustment for 2003 that PM USA recorded and (ii) $17 million of the interest that PM USA recorded.  PM USA will retain those amounts from the two states, plus receive additional amounts as part of the settlement recoveries for the 2003-2012 NPM Adjustment disputes described above. The remaining four states account for approximately (i) $108 million of the $145 million 2003 NPM Adjustment that PM USA recorded and (ii) $66 million of the $89 million of interest to which PM USA believes it would be entitled on the $145 million (and $47 million of the $64 million of interest that PM USA recorded). Each of these four states has filed a motion in its state court to (i) vacate the panel’s ruling as to its diligence and (ii) to modify the pro rata judgment reduction and to substitute a reduction method more favorable to the state. These four states have also raised a dispute concerning the independent auditor’s calculation of interest. In addition, one of the other OPMs has raised a dispute concerning the allocation of the interest and disputed payments account earnings among the OPMs.

In April 2014, a Pennsylvania state trial court denied Pennsylvania’s motion to vacate the arbitration panel’s ruling that Pennsylvania had not diligently enforced, but granted Pennsylvania’s motion to modify, with respect to Pennsylvania, the pro rata judgment reduction. In May 2014, a Missouri state trial court ruled similarly on Missouri’s motions. In July 2014, a Maryland state trial court denied both Maryland’s motion to vacate the arbitration panel’s ruling that Maryland had not diligently enforced and Maryland’s motion to vacate or modify the pro rata judgment reduction. In April 2015, a Pennsylvania intermediate appellate court affirmed the trial court’s modification, with respect to Pennsylvania, of the pro rata judgment reduction. PM USA intends to seek further discretionary judicial review of the Pennsylvania appellate decision. PM USA is also appealing the Missouri decision modifying the pro rata judgment reduction. Maryland is appealing its court’s decisions declining to modify the pro rata judgment reduction and denying its motion to vacate the arbitration panel’s diligence ruling as to Maryland. The motions filed by the fourth state, New Mexico, remain pending in its state trial court.


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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

As a result of the Pennsylvania state trial court ruling, the total 2014 MSA payment credit PM USA received on account of the 2003 NPM Adjustment from the four states was reduced from $108 million to $79 million, and the interest PM USA received from the four states was $48 million rather than the $66 million in interest to which PM USA believes it would be entitled from those four states. If PM USA obtains and is successful in judicial review of the Pennsylvania intermediate appellate court ruling, it will recover the difference ($29 million of 2003 NPM Adjustment and $18 million in interest (subject to the separate interest disputes referenced above)), with interest, as a credit against a subsequent MSA payment. If PM USA is not successful in obtaining discretionary judicial review of the Pennsylvania intermediate appellate ruling, or if PM USA is not successful in any further discretionary review that may be granted, it would need to reverse $29 million of the 2003 NPM Adjustment and part of the interest that it recorded. Because the Missouri state trial court ruling post-dated PM USA’s April 2014 MSA payment, that ruling did not reduce the credit that PM USA received against that payment. If PM USA is not successful on judicial review of the Missouri court’s ruling, it will be required to return approximately $12 million of the 2003 NPM Adjustment and $7 million of the interest it received (in each case subject to confirmation by the independent auditor), plus applicable interest, and would need to make corresponding reversals to amounts previously recorded. In connection with the Missouri appeal, PM USA has posted a bond in the amount of $22 million. In addition, the other litigation and disputes discussed above could further reduce PM USA’s recovery on the 2003 NPM Adjustment or recovery of interest and potentially require PM USA to return amounts previously received and/or reverse amounts previously recorded. No assurance can be given that PM USA’s request for discretionary judicial review of the Pennsylvania intermediate appellate ruling (or the outcome of any further discretionary review that may be granted), PM USA’s appeals of the Missouri trial court ruling, Maryland’s appeals of its trial court rulings or the other litigation and disputes discussed above, will be resolved in a manner favorable to PM USA.

2004-2014 NPM Adjustments. Proceedings regarding state diligent enforcement claims for 2004-2014 have not yet been scheduled. PM USA believes that the MSA requires these claims to be determined in a multi-state arbitration, although a number of non-signatory states have filed motions in their state courts contending that the claims are to be determined in separate arbitrations for individual states or that there is no arbitrable dispute for 2004. No assurance can be given as to when proceedings for 2004-2014 will be scheduled or the precise form those proceedings will take.

The independent auditor has calculated that PM USA’s share of the maximum potential NPM Adjustments for these years is (exclusive of interest or earnings): $388 million for 2004, $181 million for 2005, $154 million for 2006, $185 million for 2007, $250 million for 2008, $211 million for 2009, $218 million for 2010, $166 million for 2011, $211 million for 2012, $219 million for 2013 and $247 million for 2014. These maximum amounts will be reduced by a judgment reduction to reflect the settlement with the signatory states. The judgment reduction for the 2004-2014 NPM Adjustments has not yet been determined. In addition, these maximum amounts may also be further reduced by other developments, including agreements that may be entered in the future, disputes that may arise or recalculation of the NPM Adjustment amounts by the independent auditor. Finally, PM USA’s recovery of these amounts, even as reduced, is dependent upon subsequent determinations of non-signatory states’ diligent enforcement claims. The availability and amount of any NPM Adjustment for 2004-2014 from the non-signatory states will not be finally determined in the near term. There is no assurance that the OPMs and other MSA-participating manufacturers will ultimately receive any adjustment from the non-signatory states as a result of these proceedings. PM USA’s receipt of amounts on account of the 2003 NPM Adjustment and interest from non-signatory states does not provide any assurance that PM USA will receive any NPM Adjustment amounts (or associated interest or earnings) for 2004 or any subsequent year.

Other Disputes Related to MSA Payments

In addition to the disputed NPM Adjustments described above, MSA states and PMs, including PM USA, conducted another arbitration to resolve certain other disputes related to the calculation of the participating manufacturers’ payments under the MSA. PM USA disputed the method by which ounces of “roll your own” tobacco had been converted to cigarettes for purposes of calculating the downward volume adjustments to its MSA payments, but in February 2013, the arbitration panel issued a ruling in favor of the MSA states. This same arbitration panel also issued a ruling in the dispute over whether the “adjusted gross” or the “net” number of cigarettes on which federal excise tax is paid is the correct methodology for calculating MSA payments due from a certain subsequent participating manufacturer. As a result of this

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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

ruling, the affected subsequent participating manufacturer is expected to make additional payments to the MSA states, although the exact amount of such payments remains in dispute.

Other MSA-Related Litigation

Since the MSA’s inception, NPMs and/or their distributors or customers have filed a number of challenges to the MSA and related legislation. They have named as defendants the states and their officials, in an effort to enjoin enforcement of important parts of the MSA and related legislation, and/or participating manufacturers, in an effort to obtain damages. To date, no such challenge has been successful, and the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, Ninth and Tenth Circuits have affirmed judgments in favor of defendants in 16 such cases.  

Federal Government’s Lawsuit

In 1999, the United States government filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia against various cigarette manufacturers, including PM USA, and others, including Altria Group, Inc., asserting claims under three federal statutes, namely the Medical Care Recovery Act (“MCRA”), the MSP provisions of the Social Security Act and the civil provisions of RICO. Trial of the case ended in June 2005. The lawsuit sought to recover an unspecified amount of health care costs for tobacco-related illnesses allegedly caused by defendants’ fraudulent and tortious conduct and paid for by the government under various federal health care programs, including Medicare, military and veterans’ health benefits programs, and the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. The complaint alleged that such costs total more than $20 billion annually. It also sought what it alleged to be equitable and declaratory relief, including disgorgement of profits that arose from defendants’ allegedly tortious conduct, an injunction prohibiting certain actions by defendants, and a declaration that defendants are liable for the federal government’s future costs of providing health care resulting from defendants’ alleged past tortious and wrongful conduct. In September 2000, the trial court dismissed the government’s MCRA and MSP claims, but permitted discovery to proceed on the government’s claims for relief under the civil provisions of RICO.

The government alleged that disgorgement by defendants of approximately $280 billion is an appropriate remedy and the trial court agreed. In February 2005, however, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit held that disgorgement is not a remedy available to the government under the civil provisions of RICO. In October 2005, the United States Supreme Court denied the government’s petition for writ of certiorari.

In June 2005, the government filed with the trial court its proposed final judgment seeking remedies of approximately $14 billion, including $10 billion over a five-year period to fund a national smoking cessation program and $4 billion over a 10-year period to fund a public education and counter-marketing campaign. Further, the government’s proposed remedy would have required defendants to pay additional monies to these programs if targeted reductions in the smoking rate of those under 21 were not achieved according to a prescribed timetable. The government’s proposed remedies also included a series of measures and restrictions applicable to cigarette business operations, including, but not limited to, restrictions on advertising and marketing, potential measures with respect to certain price promotional activities and research and development, disclosure requirements for certain confidential data and implementation of a monitoring system with potential broad powers over cigarette operations.

In August 2006, the federal trial court entered judgment in favor of the government. The court held that certain defendants, including Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA, violated RICO and engaged in seven of the eight “sub-schemes” to defraud that the government had alleged. Specifically, the court found that:
 
defendants falsely denied, distorted and minimized the significant adverse health consequences of smoking;

defendants hid from the public that cigarette smoking and nicotine are addictive;

defendants falsely denied that they control the level of nicotine delivered to create and sustain addiction;

defendants falsely marketed and promoted “low tar/light” cigarettes as less harmful than full-flavor cigarettes;

defendants falsely denied that they intentionally marketed to youth;


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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

defendants publicly and falsely denied that ETS is hazardous to non-smokers; and

defendants suppressed scientific research.
 
The court did not impose monetary penalties on defendants, but ordered the following relief: (i) an injunction against “committing any act of racketeering” relating to the manufacturing, marketing, promotion, health consequences or sale of cigarettes in the United States; (ii) an injunction against participating directly or indirectly in the management or control of the Council for Tobacco Research, the Tobacco Institute, or the Center for Indoor Air Research, or any successor or affiliated entities of each; (iii) an injunction against “making, or causing to be made in any way, any material false, misleading, or deceptive statement or representation or engaging in any public relations or marketing endeavor that is disseminated to the United States public and that misrepresents or suppresses information concerning cigarettes”; (iv) an injunction against conveying any express or implied health message through use of descriptors on cigarette packaging or in cigarette advertising or promotional material, including “lights,” “ultra lights” and “low tar,” which the court found could cause consumers to believe one cigarette brand is less hazardous than another brand; (v) the issuance of “corrective statements” in various media regarding the adverse health effects of smoking, the addictiveness of smoking and nicotine, the lack of any significant health benefit from smoking “low tar” or “light” cigarettes, defendants’ manipulation of cigarette design to ensure optimum nicotine delivery and the adverse health effects of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke; (vi) the disclosure on defendants’ public document websites and in the Minnesota document repository of all documents produced to the government in the lawsuit or produced in any future court or administrative action concerning smoking and health until 2021, with certain additional requirements as to documents withheld from production under a claim of privilege or confidentiality; (vii) the disclosure of disaggregated marketing data to the government in the same form and on the same schedule as defendants now follow in disclosing such data to the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) for a period of 10 years; (viii) certain restrictions on the sale or transfer by defendants of any cigarette brands, brand names, formulas or cigarette businesses within the United States; and (ix) payment of the government’s costs in bringing the action.

Defendants appealed and, in May 2009, a three judge panel of the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit issued a per curiam decision largely affirming the trial court’s judgment against defendants and in favor of the government. Although the panel largely affirmed the remedial order that was issued by the trial court, it vacated the following aspects of the order:
 
its application to defendants’ subsidiaries;

the prohibition on the use of express or implied health messages or health descriptors, but only to the extent of extraterritorial application;

its point-of-sale display provisions; and

its application to Brown & Williamson Holdings.

The Court of Appeals panel remanded the case for the trial court to reconsider these four aspects of the injunction and to reformulate its remedial order accordingly. Furthermore, the Court of Appeals panel rejected all of the government’s and intervenors’ cross-appeal arguments and refused to broaden the remedial order entered by the trial court. The Court of Appeals panel also left undisturbed its prior holding that the government cannot obtain disgorgement as a permissible remedy under RICO.

In July 2009, defendants filed petitions for a rehearing before the panel and for a rehearing by the entire Court of Appeals. Defendants also filed a motion to vacate portions of the trial court’s judgment on the grounds of mootness because of the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (“FSPTCA”), granting the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (the “FDA”) broad authority over the regulation of tobacco products. In September 2009, the Court of Appeals entered three per curiam rulings. Two of them denied defendants’ petitions for panel rehearing or for rehearing en banc. In the third per curiam decision, the Court of Appeals denied defendants’ suggestion of mootness and motion for partial vacatur. In February 2010, PM USA and Altria Group, Inc. filed their certiorari petitions with the United States Supreme Court. In addition, the federal government and the intervenors filed their own certiorari petitions, asking the court to reverse an earlier Court of Appeals decision and hold that civil RICO allows the trial court to order disgorgement as well as other equitable relief, such as smoking cessation remedies, designed to redress continuing

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

consequences of prior RICO violations. In June 2010, the United States Supreme Court denied all of the parties’ petitions. In July 2010, the Court of Appeals issued its mandate lifting the stay of the trial court’s judgment and remanding the case to the trial court. As a result of the mandate, except for those matters remanded to the trial court for further proceedings, defendants are now subject to the injunction discussed above and the other elements of the trial court’s judgment.

In February 2011, the government submitted its proposed corrective statements and the trial court referred issues relating to a document repository to a special master. Defendants filed a response to the government’s proposed corrective statements and filed a motion to vacate the trial court’s injunction in light of the FSPTCA, which motion was denied in June 2011. Defendants appealed the trial court’s ruling to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In July 2012, the Court of Appeals affirmed the district court’s denial of defendants’ motion to vacate the district court’s injunction.

Remaining issues pending include: (i) the content of the court-ordered corrective communications and (ii) the requirements related to point-of-sale signage. In November 2012, the district court issued its order specifying the content of the corrective communications described above. The district court’s order required the parties to engage in negotiations with the special master regarding implementation of the corrective communications remedy for television, newspapers, cigarette pack onserts and websites. In January 2013, defendants filed a notice of appeal from the order on the content and vehicles of the corrective communications and a motion to hold the appeal in abeyance pending completion of the negotiations, which the U.S. Court of Appeals granted in February 2013. In January 2014, the parties submitted a motion for entry of a consent order in the district court, setting forth their agreement on the implementation details of the corrective communications remedy. The agreement provides that the “trigger date” for implementation is after the appeal on the content of the communications has been exhausted. Also in January 2014, the district court convened a hearing and ordered further briefing. A number of amici who sought modification or rejection of the agreement for a variety of reasons were given leave to appear: National Newspaper Publishers Association, National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters, Inc., National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, The Little Rock Sun Community Newspaper, Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., The CW Network, LLC, Univision Communications Inc., Radio One, Inc., TV One, LLC, Interactive One, LLC, Fox Broadcasting Company, Viacom Inc. and A&E Television Networks, LLC. In April 2014, the parties filed an amended proposed consent order and accompanying submission in the district court seeking entry of a revised agreement on the implementation details of the corrective communications remedy. In June 2014, the district court approved the April 2014 proposed consent order. Also in June 2014, defendants filed a notice of appeal of the consent order solely for the purpose of perfecting the U.S. Court of Appeals’ jurisdiction over the pending appeal relating to the content and vehicles of the corrective communications and, in July 2014, defendants moved to consolidate this appeal with the appeal filed in January 2013. The U.S. Court of Appeals granted the motion to consolidate in August 2014. Oral argument occurred on February 23, 2015.

In the second quarter of 2014, Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA recorded provisions on each of their respective balance sheets totaling $31 million for the estimated costs of implementing the corrective communications remedy.  This estimate is subject to change due to several factors, including the outcome of the appeal on the content of the corrective communications, though Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA do not expect any change in this estimate to be material.

The consent order approved by the district court in June 2014 did not address the requirements related to point-of-sale signage. In May 2014, the district court ordered further briefing by the parties on the issue of corrective statements on point-of-sale signage, which was completed in June 2014.

In December 2011, the parties to the lawsuit entered into an agreement as to the issues concerning the document repository. Pursuant to this agreement, PM USA agreed to deposit an amount of approximately $3.1 million into the district court in installments over a five-year period.

“Lights/Ultra Lights” Cases
 
Overview

Plaintiffs in certain pending matters seek certification of their cases as class actions and allege, among other things, that the uses of the terms “Lights” and/or “Ultra Lights” constitute deceptive and unfair trade practices, common law or

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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

statutory fraud, unjust enrichment or breach of warranty, and seek injunctive and equitable relief, including restitution and, in certain cases, punitive damages. These class actions have been brought against PM USA and, in certain instances, Altria Group, Inc. or its subsidiaries, on behalf of individuals who purchased and consumed various brands of cigarettes, including Marlboro Lights, Marlboro Ultra Lights, Virginia Slims Lights and Superslims, Merit Lights and Cambridge Lights. Defenses raised in these cases include lack of misrepresentation, lack of causation, injury and damages, the statute of limitations, non-liability under state statutory provisions exempting conduct that complies with federal regulatory directives, and the First Amendment. As of April 20, 2015, a total of 12 such cases are pending in various U.S. state courts.

The Good Case

In May 2006, a federal trial court in Maine granted PM USA’s motion for summary judgment in Good, a purported “Lights” class action, on the grounds that plaintiffs’ claims are preempted by the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act (“FCLAA”) and dismissed the case. In December 2008, the United States Supreme Court ruled that plaintiffs’ claims are not barred by federal preemption. Although the Court rejected the argument that the FTC’s actions were so extensive with respect to the descriptors that the state law claims were barred as a matter of federal law, the Court’s decision was limited: it did not address the ultimate merits of plaintiffs’ claim, the viability of the action as a class action or other state law issues. The case was returned to the federal court in Maine and consolidated with other federal cases in the multidistrict litigation proceeding discussed below. In June 2011, the plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed the case without prejudice after the district court denied plaintiffs’ motion for class certification, concluding the litigation.

Federal Multidistrict Proceeding and Subsequent Developments

Since the December 2008 United States Supreme Court decision in Good, and through April 20, 2015, 26 purported “Lights” class actions were served upon PM USA and, in certain cases, Altria Group, Inc. These cases were filed in 15 states, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia. All of these cases either were filed in federal court or were removed to federal court by PM USA and were transferred and consolidated by the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (“JPMDL”) before the U.S. District Court for the District of Maine for pretrial proceedings (“MDL proceeding”).

In November 2010, the district court in the MDL proceeding denied plaintiffs’ motion for class certification in four cases, covering the jurisdictions of California, the District of Columbia, Illinois and Maine. These jurisdictions were selected by the parties as sample cases, with two selected by plaintiffs and two selected by defendants. Plaintiffs sought appellate review of this decision but, in February 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit denied plaintiffs’ petition for leave to appeal. Later that year, plaintiffs in 13 cases voluntarily dismissed without prejudice their cases. In April 2012, the JPMDL remanded the remaining four cases (Phillips, Tang, Wyatt and Cabbat) back to the federal district courts in which the suits originated. These cases were ultimately resolved in a manner favorable to PM USA.

“Lights” Cases Dismissed, Not Certified or Ordered De-Certified

As of April 20, 2015, in addition to the federal district court in the MDL proceeding, 18 courts in 19 “Lights” cases have refused to certify class actions, dismissed class action allegations, reversed prior class certification decisions or have entered judgment in favor of PM USA.

Trial courts in Arizona, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Tennessee, Washington and Wisconsin have refused to grant class certification or have dismissed plaintiffs’ class action allegations. Plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed a case in Michigan after a trial court dismissed the claims plaintiffs asserted under the Michigan Unfair Trade and Consumer Protection Act. Several appellate courts have issued rulings that either affirmed rulings in favor of Altria Group, Inc. and/or PM USA or reversed rulings entered in favor of plaintiffs.

In Florida, an intermediate appellate court overturned an order by a trial court that granted class certification in Hines. The Florida Supreme Court denied review in January 2008. The Supreme Court of Illinois overturned a judgment that awarded damages to a certified class in the Price case, although plaintiffs are seeking reinstatement of the judgment. See The Price Case below for further discussion. In Louisiana, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit dismissed a purported “Lights” class action (Sullivan) on the grounds that plaintiffs’ claims were preempted by the FCLAA. In New York, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit overturned a trial court decision in Schwab that granted plaintiffs’

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Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

motion for certification of a nationwide class of all U.S. residents that purchased cigarettes in the United States that were labeled “Light” or “Lights.” In July 2010, plaintiffs in Schwab voluntarily dismissed the case with prejudice. In Ohio, the Ohio Supreme Court overturned class certifications in the Marrone and Phillips cases. Plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed without prejudice both cases in August 2009, but refiled in federal court as the Phillips case discussed above. The Supreme Court of Washington denied a motion for interlocutory review filed by the plaintiffs in the Davies case that sought review of an order by the trial court that refused to certify a class. Plaintiffs subsequently voluntarily dismissed the Davies case with prejudice. In August 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit affirmed the Illinois federal district court’s dismissal of “Lights” claims brought against PM USA in the Cleary case. In Curtis, a certified class action, in May 2012, the Minnesota Supreme Court affirmed the trial court’s entry of summary judgment in favor of PM USA, concluding this litigation.

In Lawrence, in August 2012, the New Hampshire Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s order to certify a class and subsequently denied plaintiffs’ rehearing petition. In October 2012, the case was dismissed after plaintiffs filed a motion to dismiss the case with prejudice, concluding this litigation.


State Trial Court Class Certifications

State trial courts have certified classes against PM USA in several jurisdictions. Over time, several such cases have been dismissed by the courts at the summary judgment stage. Certified class actions remain pending at the trial or appellate level in Massachusetts (Aspinall), California (Brown), Missouri (Larsen) and Arkansas (Miner). (See also Price, discussed below.) Significant developments in these cases include:
 
Aspinall: In August 2004, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court affirmed the class certification order. In August 2006, the trial court denied PM USA’s motion for summary judgment and granted plaintiffs’ cross-motion for summary judgment on the defenses of federal preemption and a state law exemption to Massachusetts’ consumer protection statute. On motion of the parties, the trial court subsequently reported its decision to deny summary judgment to the appeals court for review and stayed further proceedings pending completion of the appellate review. In March 2009, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court affirmed the order denying summary judgment to PM USA and granting the plaintiffs’ cross-motion. In January 2010, plaintiffs moved for partial summary judgment as to liability claiming collateral estoppel from the findings in the case brought by the Department of Justice (see Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation - Federal Government’s Lawsuit described above). In March 2012, the trial court denied plaintiffs’ motion. In February 2013, the trial court, upon agreement of the parties, dismissed without prejudice plaintiffs’ claims against Altria Group, Inc. PM USA is now the sole defendant in the case. In September 2013, the case was transferred to the Business Litigation Session of the Massachusetts Superior Court. Also in September 2013, plaintiffs filed a motion for partial summary judgment on the scope of remedies available in the case, which the Massachusetts Superior Court denied in February 2014, concluding that plaintiffs cannot obtain disgorgement of profits as an equitable remedy and that their recovery is limited to actual damages or $25 per class member if they cannot prove actual damages greater than $25. Plaintiffs filed a motion asking the trial court to report its February 2014 ruling to the Massachusetts Appeals Court for review, which the trial court denied. In March 2014, plaintiffs petitioned the Massachusetts Appeals Court for review of the ruling, which the appellate court denied. Trial is scheduled to begin October 19, 2015.

Brown: In June 1997, plaintiffs filed suit in California state court alleging that domestic cigarette manufacturers, including PM USA and others, violated California law regarding unfair, unlawful and fraudulent business practices.  In May 2009, the California Supreme Court reversed an earlier trial court decision that decertified the class and remanded the case to the trial court.  At that time, the class consisted of individuals who, at the time they were residents of California, (i) smoked in California one or more cigarettes manufactured by PM USA that were labeled and/or advertised with the terms or phrases “light,” “medium,” “mild,” “low tar,” and/or “lowered tar and nicotine,” but not including any cigarettes labeled or advertised with the terms or phrases “ultra light” or “ultra low tar,” and (ii) who were exposed to defendant’s marketing and advertising activities in California.  Plaintiffs are seeking restitution of a portion of the costs of “light” cigarettes purchased during the class period and injunctive relief ordering corrective communications. In September 2012, at the plaintiffs’ request, the trial court dismissed all defendants except PM USA from the lawsuit.  Trial began in April 2013. In May 2013 the plaintiffs redefined the class to include California residents who smoked in California one or more of

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defendant’s Marlboro Lights cigarettes between January 1, 1998 and April 23, 2001, and who were exposed to defendant’s marketing and advertising activities in California. In June 2013, PM USA filed a motion to decertify the class. Trial concluded in July 2013. In September 2013, the court issued a final Statement of Decision, in which the court found that PM USA violated California law, but that plaintiffs had not established a basis for relief. On this basis, the court granted judgment for PM USA. The court also denied PM USA’s motion to decertify the class. In October 2013, the court entered final judgment in favor of PM USA. In November 2013, plaintiffs moved for a new trial, which the court denied. In December 2013, plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal and PM USA filed a conditional cross-appeal. In February 2014, the trial court awarded PM USA $764,553 in costs. Also in February 2014, plaintiffs appealed the costs award.

Larsen: In August 2005, a Missouri Court of Appeals affirmed the class certification order. In December 2009, the trial court denied plaintiffs’ motion for reconsideration of the period during which potential class members can qualify to become part of the class. The class period remains 1995-2003. In June 2010, PM USA’s motion for partial summary judgment regarding plaintiffs’ request for punitive damages was denied. In April 2010, plaintiffs moved for partial summary judgment as to an element of liability in the case, claiming collateral estoppel from the findings in the case brought by the Department of Justice (see Health Care Cost Recovery Litigation - Federal Government’s Lawsuit described above). The plaintiffs’ motion was denied in December 2010. In June 2011, PM USA filed various summary judgment motions challenging the plaintiffs’ claims. In August 2011, the trial court granted PM USA’s motion for partial summary judgment, ruling that plaintiffs could not present a damages claim based on allegations that Marlboro Lights are more dangerous than Marlboro Reds. The trial court denied PM USA’s remaining summary judgment motions. Trial in the case began in September 2011 and, in October 2011, the court declared a mistrial after the jury failed to reach a verdict. In January 2014, the trial court reversed its prior ruling granting partial summary judgment against plaintiffs’ “more dangerous” claim and allowed plaintiffs to pursue that claim. In October 2014, PM USA filed motions to decertify the class and for partial summary judgment on plaintiffs’ “more dangerous” claim. Re-trial is scheduled to begin on February 22, 2016.

Miner: In June 2007, the United States Supreme Court reversed the lower court rulings in Miner (formerly known as Watson) that denied plaintiffs’ motion to have the case heard in a state, as opposed to federal, trial court. The Supreme Court rejected defendants’ contention that the case must be tried in federal court under the “federal officer” statute. Following remand, the case was removed again to federal court in Arkansas and transferred to the MDL proceeding discussed above. In November 2010, the district court in the MDL proceeding remanded the case to Arkansas state court. In December 2011, plaintiffs voluntarily dismissed their claims against Altria Group, Inc. without prejudice. In March 2013, plaintiffs filed a class certification motion. In November 2013, the trial court granted class certification. The certified class includes those individuals who, from November 1, 1971 through June 22, 2010, purchased Marlboro Lights, including Marlboro Ultra Lights, for personal consumption in Arkansas. PM USA filed a notice of appeal of the class certification ruling to the Arkansas Supreme Court in December 2013. On February 26, 2015, the Arkansas Supreme Court affirmed the trial court’s class certification order. No trial date has been set.

Other Developments

In Oregon (Pearson), a state court denied plaintiffs’ motion for interlocutory review of the trial court’s refusal to certify a class. In February 2007, PM USA filed a motion for summary judgment based on federal preemption and the Oregon statutory exemption. In September 2007, the district court granted PM USA’s motion based on express preemption under the FCLAA, and plaintiffs appealed this dismissal and the class certification denial to the Oregon Court of Appeals. In June 2013, the Oregon Court of Appeals reversed the trial court’s denial of class certification and remanded to the trial court for further consideration of class certification. In July 2013, PM USA filed a petition for reconsideration with the Oregon Court of Appeals, which was denied in August 2013. PM USA filed its petition for review to the Oregon Supreme Court in October 2013, which the court accepted in January 2014. Oral argument occurred in June 2014.

In December 2009, the state trial court in Carroll (formerly known as Holmes) (pending in Delaware) denied PM USA’s motion for summary judgment based on an exemption provision in the Delaware Consumer Fraud Act. In January 2011, the trial court allowed the plaintiffs to file an amended complaint substituting class representatives and naming Altria Group, Inc. and PMI as additional defendants. In February 2013, the trial court approved the parties’ stipulation to the

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dismissal without prejudice of Altria Group, Inc. and PMI, leaving PM USA as the sole defendant in the case. On March 9, 2015, plaintiffs moved for class certification.

The Price Case

Trial in Price commenced in state court in Illinois in January 2003 and, in March 2003, the judge found in favor of the plaintiff class and awarded $7.1 billion in compensatory damages and $3.0 billion in punitive damages against PM USA. In December 2005, the Illinois Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s judgment in favor of the plaintiffs. In November 2006, the United States Supreme Court denied plaintiffs’ petition for writ of certiorari and, in December 2006, the Circuit Court of Madison County enforced the Illinois Supreme Court’s mandate and dismissed the case with prejudice.

In December 2008, plaintiffs filed with the trial court a petition for relief from the final judgment that was entered in favor of PM USA. Specifically, plaintiffs sought to vacate the judgment entered by the trial court on remand from the 2005 Illinois Supreme Court decision overturning the verdict on the ground that the United States Supreme Court’s December 2008 decision in Good demonstrated that the Illinois Supreme Court’s decision was “inaccurate.” PM USA filed a motion to dismiss plaintiffs’ petition and, in February 2009, the trial court granted PM USA’s motion on the basis that the petition was not timely filed. In March 2009, the Price plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal with the Fifth Judicial District of the Appellate Court of Illinois. In February 2011, the intermediate appellate court ruled that the petition was timely filed and reversed the trial court’s dismissal of the plaintiffs’ petition and, in September 2011, the Illinois Supreme Court declined PM USA’s petition for review. As a result, the case was returned to the trial court for proceedings on whether the court should grant the plaintiffs’ petition to reopen the prior judgment. In February 2012, plaintiffs filed an amended petition, which PM USA opposed. Subsequently, in responding to PM USA’s opposition to the amended petition, plaintiffs asked the trial court to reinstate the original judgment.  The trial court denied plaintiffs’ petition in December 2012. In January 2013, plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal with the Fifth Judicial District. In January 2013, PM USA filed a motion asking the Illinois Supreme Court to immediately exercise its jurisdiction over the appeal. In February 2013, the Illinois Supreme Court denied PM USA’s motion. Oral argument on plaintiffs’ appeal to the Fifth Judicial District was heard in October 2013. In April 2014, the Fifth Judicial District reversed and ordered reinstatement of the original $10.1 billion trial court judgment against PM USA. In May 2014, PM USA filed in the Illinois Supreme Court a petition for a supervisory order and a petition for leave to appeal. The filing of the petition for leave to appeal automatically stayed the Fifth District’s mandate pending disposition by the Illinois Supreme Court. Also in May 2014, plaintiffs filed a motion seeking recusal of Justice Karmeier, one of the Illinois Supreme Court justices, which PM USA opposed. In September 2014, the Illinois Supreme Court granted PM USA’s motion for leave to appeal and took no action on PM USA’s motion for a supervisory order. Justice Karmeier denied plaintiffs’ motion seeking his recusal. On February 9, 2015, plaintiffs filed a new motion seeking recusal or disqualification of Justice Karmeier. On March 11, 2015, the Illinois Supreme Court denied plaintiffs’ request that it order the disqualification of Justice Karmeier and referred the recusal request to Justice Karmeier to decide. Oral argument is scheduled for May 19, 2015.
 
In June 2009, the plaintiff in an individual smoker lawsuit (Kelly) brought on behalf of an alleged smoker of “Lights” cigarettes in Madison County, Illinois state court filed a motion seeking a declaration that his claims under the Illinois Consumer Fraud Act are not (i) barred by the exemption in that statute based on his assertion that the Illinois Supreme Court’s decision in Price is no longer good law in light of the decisions by the United States Supreme Court in Good and Watson, and (ii) preempted in light of the United States Supreme Court’s decision in Good. In September 2009, the court granted plaintiff’s motion as to federal preemption, but denied it with respect to the state statutory exemption.

Certain Other Tobacco-Related Litigation
 
Tobacco Price Case

One case remains pending in Kansas (Smith) in which plaintiffs allege that defendants, including PM USA and Altria Group, Inc., conspired to fix cigarette prices in violation of antitrust laws. Plaintiffs’ motion for class certification was granted. In March 2012, the trial court granted defendants’ motions for summary judgment. Plaintiffs sought the trial court’s reconsideration of its decision, but in June 2012, the trial court denied plaintiffs’ motion for reconsideration. Plaintiffs appealed the decision, and defendants cross-appealed the trial court’s class certification decision, to the Court of Appeals of Kansas. In July 2014, the Court of Appeals affirmed the entry of summary judgment in favor of defendants. Plaintiffs filed a petition for review in the Kansas Supreme Court in August 2014.


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Ignition Propensity Cases 

PM USA and Altria Group, Inc. are currently facing litigation alleging that a fire caused by cigarettes led to individuals’ deaths.  In a Kentucky case (Walker), the federal district court denied plaintiffs’ motion to remand the case to state court and dismissed plaintiffs’ claims in February 2009. Plaintiffs subsequently filed a notice of appeal. In October 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed the portion of the district court decision that denied remand of the case to Kentucky state court and remanded the case to Kentucky state court. The Sixth Circuit did not address the merits of the district court’s dismissal order. Defendants’ petition for rehearing with the Sixth Circuit was denied in December 2011. Defendants filed a renewed motion to dismiss in state court in March 2013. Based on new evidence, in June 2013, defendants removed the case for a second time to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky and re-filed their motion to dismiss in June 2013. In July 2013, plaintiffs filed a motion to remand the case to Kentucky state court, which was granted in March 2014.

False Claims Act Case

PM USA is a defendant in a qui tam action filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia (United States ex rel. Anthony Oliver) alleging violation of the False Claims Act in connection with sales of cigarettes to the U.S. military. The relator contends that PM USA violated “most favored customer” provisions in government contracts and regulations by selling cigarettes to non-military customers in overseas markets at more favorable prices than it sold to the U.S. military exchange services for resale on overseas military bases in those same markets. The relator has dropped Altria Group, Inc. as a defendant and has dropped claims related to post-MSA price increases on cigarettes sold to the U.S. military. In July 2012, PM USA filed a motion to dismiss, which was granted on jurisdictional grounds in June 2013, and the case was dismissed with prejudice. In July 2013, the relator appealed the dismissal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In August 2014, the Court of Appeals reversed the jurisdictional issue and remanded the case to the district court for further proceedings, including consideration of PM USA’s alternative grounds for dismissal. In October 2014, PM USA filed a second motion to dismiss in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for lack of subject matter jurisdiction based on issues left unresolved by the opinion of the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Argentine Grower Cases

PM USA and Altria Group, Inc. are named as defendants in six cases (Hupan, Chalanuk, Rodriguez Da Silva, Aranda, Taborda and Biglia) filed in Delaware state court against multiple defendants by the parents of Argentine children born with alleged birth defects. Plaintiffs in these cases allege that they grew tobacco in Argentina under contract with Tabacos Norte S.A., an alleged subsidiary of PMI, and that they and their infant children were exposed directly and in utero to hazardous herbicides and pesticides used in the production and cultivation of tobacco. Plaintiffs seek compensatory and punitive damages against all defendants. In December 2012, Altria Group, Inc. and certain other defendants were dismissed from the Hupan, Chalanuk and Rodriguez Da Silva cases. Altria Group, Inc. and certain other defendants were dismissed from Aranda, Taborda and Biglia in May 2013, October 2013 and February 2014, respectively. The three remaining defendants in the six cases are PM USA, Philip Morris Global Brands Inc. (a subsidiary of PMI) and Monsanto Company. Following discussions regarding indemnification for these cases pursuant to the Distribution Agreement between PMI and Altria Group, Inc., PMI and PM USA have agreed to resolve conflicting indemnity demands after final judgments are entered. See Guarantees and Other Similar Matters below for a discussion of the Distribution Agreement. In April 2014, all three defendants in the Hupan case filed motions to dismiss for failure to state a claim, and PM USA and Philip Morris Global Brands filed separate motions to dismiss based on the doctrine of forum non conveniens. All proceedings in the other five cases are currently stayed pending the court’s resolution of the motions to dismiss filed in Hupan.

UST Litigation
 
Claims related to smokeless tobacco products generally fall within the following categories:

First, UST and/or its tobacco subsidiaries have been named in certain actions in West Virginia (See In re: Tobacco Litigation above) brought by or on behalf of individual plaintiffs against cigarette manufacturers, smokeless tobacco manufacturers and other organizations seeking damages and other relief in connection with injuries allegedly sustained as a result of tobacco usage, including smokeless tobacco products. Included among the plaintiffs are five individuals

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(Unaudited)

alleging use of USSTC’s smokeless tobacco products and alleging the types of injuries claimed to be associated with the use of smokeless tobacco products. USSTC, along with other non-cigarette manufacturers, has remained severed from such proceedings since December 2001.

Second, UST and/or its tobacco subsidiaries has been named in a number of other individual tobacco and health suits over time. Plaintiffs’ allegations of liability in these cases are based on various theories of recovery, such as negligence, strict liability, fraud, misrepresentation, design defect, failure to warn, breach of implied warranty, addiction and breach of consumer protection statutes. Plaintiffs seek various forms of relief, including compensatory and punitive damages, and certain equitable relief, including but not limited to disgorgement. Defenses raised in these cases include lack of causation, assumption of the risk, comparative fault and/or contributory negligence, and statutes of limitations. USSTC is currently named in one such action in Florida (Vassallo). In December 2014, the court entered a scheduling order setting trial to commence in the first quarter of 2016.

Environmental Regulation

Altria Group, Inc. and its subsidiaries (and former subsidiaries) are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the discharge of materials into the environment, or otherwise related to environmental protection, including, in the United States: The Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (commonly known as “Superfund”), which can impose joint and several liability on each responsible party. Subsidiaries (and former subsidiaries) of Altria Group, Inc. are involved in several matters subjecting them to potential costs of remediation and natural resource damages under Superfund or other laws and regulations. Altria Group, Inc.’s subsidiaries expect to continue to make capital and other expenditures in connection with environmental laws and regulations.

Altria Group, Inc. provides for expenses associated with environmental remediation obligations on an undiscounted basis when such amounts are probable and can be reasonably estimated. Such accruals are adjusted as new information develops or circumstances change. Other than those amounts, it is not possible to reasonably estimate the cost of any environmental remediation and compliance efforts that subsidiaries of Altria Group, Inc. may undertake in the future. In the opinion of management, however, compliance with environmental laws and regulations, including the payment of any remediation costs or damages and the making of related expenditures, has not had, and is not expected to have, a material adverse effect on Altria Group, Inc.’s consolidated results of operations, capital expenditures, financial position or cash flows.

Guarantees and Other Similar Matters

In the ordinary course of business, certain subsidiaries of Altria Group, Inc. have agreed to indemnify a limited number of third parties in the event of future litigation. At March 31, 2015, Altria Group, Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries (i) had $66 million of unused letters of credit obtained in the ordinary course of business; (ii) were contingently liable for $32 million of guarantees, consisting primarily of surety bonds, related to their own performance; and (iii) had a redeemable noncontrolling interest of $34 million recorded on its condensed consolidated balance sheet. In addition, from time to time, subsidiaries of Altria Group, Inc. issue lines of credit to affiliated entities. These items have not had, and are not expected to have, a significant impact on Altria Group, Inc.’s liquidity.

Under the terms of a distribution agreement between Altria Group, Inc. and PMI (the “Distribution Agreement”), entered into as a result of Altria Group, Inc.’s 2008 spin-off of its former subsidiary PMI, liabilities concerning tobacco products will be allocated based in substantial part on the manufacturer. PMI will indemnify Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA for liabilities related to tobacco products manufactured by PMI or contract manufactured for PMI by PM USA, and PM USA will indemnify PMI for liabilities related to tobacco products manufactured by PM USA, excluding tobacco products contract manufactured for PMI. Altria Group, Inc. does not have a related liability recorded on its condensed consolidated balance sheet at March 31, 2015 as the fair value of this indemnification is insignificant.

As more fully discussed in Note 10. Condensed Consolidating Financial Information, PM USA has issued guarantees relating to Altria Group, Inc.’s obligations under its outstanding debt securities, borrowings under its $3.0 billion senior unsecured 5-year revolving credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) and amounts outstanding under its commercial paper program.

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Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)

Note 10. Condensed Consolidating Financial Information:

PM USA, which is a 100% owned subsidiary of Altria Group, Inc., has guaranteed Altria Group, Inc.’s obligations under its outstanding debt securities, borrowings under its Credit Agreement and amounts outstanding under its commercial paper program (the “Guarantees”). Pursuant to the Guarantees, PM USA fully and unconditionally guarantees, as primary obligor, the payment and performance of Altria Group, Inc.’s obligations under the guaranteed debt instruments (the “Obligations”), subject to release under certain customary circumstances as noted below.
The Guarantees provide that PM USA guarantees the punctual payment when due, whether at stated maturity, by acceleration or otherwise, of the Obligations. The liability of PM USA under the Guarantees is absolute and unconditional irrespective of: any lack of validity, enforceability or genuineness of any provision of any agreement or instrument relating thereto; any change in the time, manner or place of payment of, or in any other term of, all or any of the Obligations, or any other amendment or waiver of or any consent to departure from any agreement or instrument relating thereto; any exchange, release or non-perfection of any collateral, or any release or amendment or waiver of or consent to departure from any other guarantee, for all or any of the Obligations; or any other circumstance that might otherwise constitute a defense available to, or a discharge of, Altria Group, Inc. or PM USA.
The obligations of PM USA under the Guarantees are limited to the maximum amount as will not result in PM USA’s obligations under the Guarantees constituting a fraudulent transfer or conveyance, after giving effect to such maximum amount and all other contingent and fixed liabilities of PM USA that are relevant under Bankruptcy Law, the Uniform Fraudulent Conveyance Act, the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act or any similar federal or state law to the extent applicable to the Guarantees. For this purpose, “Bankruptcy Law” means Title 11, U.S. Code, or any similar federal or state law for the relief of debtors.

PM USA will be unconditionally released and discharged from the Obligations upon the earliest to occur of:

the date, if any, on which PM USA consolidates with or merges into Altria Group, Inc. or any successor;

the date, if any, on which Altria Group, Inc. or any successor consolidates with or merges into PM USA;

the payment in full of the Obligations pertaining to such Guarantees; and

the rating of Altria Group, Inc.’s long-term senior unsecured debt by Standard & Poor’s of A or higher.

At March 31, 2015, the respective principal 100% owned subsidiaries of Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA were not limited by long-term debt or other agreements in their ability to pay cash dividends or make other distributions with respect to their equity interests.
The following sets forth the condensed consolidating balance sheets as of March 31, 2015 and December 31, 2014, condensed consolidating statements of earnings and comprehensive earnings for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014, and condensed consolidating statements of cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2015 and 2014 for Altria Group, Inc., PM USA and, collectively, Altria Group, Inc.’s other subsidiaries that are not guarantors of Altria Group, Inc.’s debt instruments (the “Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries”). The financial information is based on Altria Group, Inc.’s understanding of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) interpretation and application of Rule 3-10 of SEC Regulation S-X.
The financial information may not necessarily be indicative of results of operations or financial position had PM USA and the Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries operated as independent entities. Altria Group, Inc. and PM USA account for investments in their subsidiaries under the equity method of accounting.

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