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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.Financial_Report.xls
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14 OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934. - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.ex31-1.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO SECTION 1350. - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.ex32-1.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF WOLF & COMPANY, P.C. - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.ex23-1.htm
EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO SECTION 1350. - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.ex32-2.htm
EX-10.13 - SECOND AMENDMENT TO LEASE AGREEMENT BETWEEN HILSSIDE SQUARE, LLC AND FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC. DATED AS OF FEBRUARY 2015 - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.leaseam.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14 OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934. - FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC.ex31-2.htm


 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K

(Mark One)
[X]
ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
 
[   ]
TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT
 
For the transition period from ________________ to _______________
 
333-147193
(Commission file number)
 
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc.
 (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Nevada
 
20-8325616
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   
 
(IRS Employer Identification No.)
                                                                                                 
8 Hillside Avenue, Suite 108
Montclair, NJ 07042
 
(973) 744-1565
 (Address and telephone number of principal executive offices)
 
N/A
 (Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes [   ]     No [X]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. 
Yes [X]    No [   ]

Indicate by check mark whether the issuer (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes [X]     No [   ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files.   Yes [X]    No [   ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in the definitive proxy or information statement incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or amendment to Form 10-K. Yes [X] No [   ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a small reporting company.  See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer [   ]
Accelerated filer [   ]
Non-accelerated filer   [   ]
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)  
Smaller reporting company [X]
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes [   ]  No [X]
 
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2014, was $19,784,800.
 
As of March 27, 2015, there were 29,324,938 shares of common stock outstanding.


 
 
   
Page
Number
     
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
     
Item 1.
Description of Business
1
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
10
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
22
Item 2.
Properties
22
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
22
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
22
     
PART II.
   
     
Item 5.
Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
23
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
24
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
24
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
29
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
29
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
29
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
30
Item 9B.
Other Information
30
   
 
PART III.
   
     
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance
31
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
36
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
40
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
42
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
42
     
PART IV.
   
     
Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
43
     
SIGNATURES
 
44

 
 
FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (including the section regarding Management's Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation) contains forward-looking statements regarding our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Words such as "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "seeks," "estimates" and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not deemed to represent an all-inclusive means of identifying forward-looking statements as denoted in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Additionally, statements concerning future matters are forward-looking statements.

Although forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K reflect the good faith judgment of our management, such statements can only be based on facts and factors currently known by us. Consequently, forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties and actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes discussed in or anticipated by the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences in results and outcomes include, without limitation, those specifically addressed under the heading "Risks Factors" below, as well as those discussed elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Readers are urged not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We file reports with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). Our electronic filings with the SEC (including our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to these reports) are available free of charge on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. You can also read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. You can obtain additional information about the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an Internet site (www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, including us.

We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements in order to reflect any event or circumstance that may arise after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, except as required by law. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made throughout the entirety of this Annual Report, which are designed to advise interested parties of the risks and factors that may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
  
Item 1.  Description of Business

Overview
 
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. ("we", the "Company" or the "Registrant") is a biopharmaceutical company specializing in discovering, developing and commercializing molecular imaging pharmaceuticals with initial applications in the area of cardiology. Molecular imaging pharmaceuticals are radiopharmaceuticals that enable early detection of disease through the visualization of subtle changes in biochemical and biological processes.  Our initial focus has been on the development of novel cardiovascular imaging agents that can more efficiently and effectively detect and assess acute and chronic forms of coronary artery disease, or CAD.  We currently have two clinical-stage molecular imaging pharmaceutical product candidates: 18-F TPP (BFPET) and 18-F FCPHA (CardioPET).

Corporate History
 
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. (f/k/a Commercial E-Waste Management Inc.) was organized in January 2007 under the laws of the State of Nevada to serve as an electronics waste management solution provider, specializing in the collection, retirement, storage and remarketing of excess, damaged or obsolete electronic assets. FluoroPharma Inc. was organized in June 2003 under the laws of the State of Delaware to engage in the discovery, development and commercialization of proprietary products for the positron emission tomography (PET) market.  Pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger by and among FluoroPharma Medical, Inc., FluoroPharma, Inc., and FPI Merger Corporation., a wholly owned Delaware subsidiary of FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. (“MergerCo”), on May 16, 2011, MergerCo merged with and into FluoroPharma Inc., and FluoroPharma Inc., as the surviving corporation, became a wholly owned subsidiary of FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. (the “Merger”)  Since the Merger, we have conducted our business through our wholly-owned subsidiary.

 
Our Product Candidates
 
BFPET (18-F TPP)
 
Our BFPET program has ([18F]-labeled cationic lipophilic tetraphosphonium, 18-F TPP) as an imaging agent designed for use in stress-testing for patients with known or suspected CAD. 18-F TPP measures the cardiovascular blood flow through the detection of ischemic (i.e. reversibly damaged) and infarcted (i.e., irreversibly damaged) myocardium (i.e., heart) tissue. Its mechanism of action is to enter the myocardial cells of the heart muscle in direct proportion to blood flow and membrane potential--the most important indicators of adequate cardiac blood supply. Since ischemic and infarcted myocardial cells take up significantly less 18-F TPP than normal healthy myocardial cells do, 18-F TPP can distinguish ischemic and infarcted cells from those that are healthy. If approved, 18-F TPP will represent one of the first molecular imaging blood flow agents commercialized for use in the cardiovascular segment of the PET imaging market.
 
Currently, cardiac perfusion imaging is performed with SPECT tracers such as Sestamibi, Thallium-201 or the PET tracer Rubidium-82. However, SPECT imaging only has approximately 75% diagnostic accuracy with research showing that 10% of patients cleared as “normal” were subsequently found to be “abnormal” using PET imaging. The current PET tracer Rubidium-82 has experienced FDA recall and high cost issues.
 
18-F TPP successfully completed a Phase Ia clinical trial in 12 healthy volunteers with no adverse events and no clinically significant changes noted in follow-up clinical and laboratory testing. The results of the trial demonstrated the required dosimetry, safety profile and high resolution myocardial imaging pharmacokinetics to justify a controlled Phase II clinical trial. We have  announced that we will begin Phase II trials at Massachusetts General Hospital to assess its efficacy in CAD subjects; and currently expect actual enrollment to commence in the first half of 2015.
 
CardioPET (18-F FCPHA)
 
Our CardioPET program has (Trans-9-[18F]-Fluoro-3, 4-Methyleneheptadecanoic Acid, 18-F FCPHA) as a molecular imaging agent designed to assess myocardial metabolism for patients with CAD. 18-F FCPHA allows for the potential detection of ischemic (i.e. reversibly damaged) and infarcted (i.e. irreversibly damaged) myocardium (i.e. heart) tissue in patients with known or suspected acute and chronic CAD.
 
In addition, 18-F FCPHA could be used for Cardiac Viability Assessment (“CVA”) for the prediction of improvement prior to and/or following revascularization in patients with acute CAD, including myocardial infarction, or heart attack). 18-F FCPHA allows for the identification of damaged but viable heart tissue, which is important since revascularization in those patients with substantial viable myocardium results in improved left ventricular function and survival. Importantly, 18-F FCPHA, if approved, may have several significant advantages for assessing cardiac viability using PET, and would likely represent the first imaging agent available in the U.S. for use in patients with acute and chronic CAD that cannot undergo stress-testing. 18-F FCPHA is designed to provide the metabolic component for CVA.

The safety and tolerability of 18-F FCPHA have been demonstrated in a Phase I trial conducted at the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Enrollment in Phase II trials has been completed at four sites in Belgium to assess its safety and efficacy in CAD patients.  The Phase II clinical trial plan for 18-F FCPHA is an open label trial designed to assess the safety and diagnostic performance of 18-F FCPHA as compared to myocardial perfusion imaging and angiography as a gold standard of background disease. Specifically, the Phase II trial consists of between 30-100 individuals with known stable chronic CAD who cannot undergo stress-testing for the evaluation of suspected or proven CAD. Interim results of imaging data received from the Phase II clinical trial and interim results were presented in February 2014. The enrollment for the Phase II clinical trial of CardioPET was closed in mid-December 2014. 

 
Strategic Alliances and Commercial Agreements
 
License Agreement with Massachusetts General Hospital
 
We have two exclusive technology licenses with Massachusetts General Hospital (“MGH”) which we entered into on June 26, 2014 (collectively, the “Agreements”). Those agreements replace the single license agreement with MGH dated April 27, 2009, as amended by letter dated June 21, 2011 and agreement dated October 31, 2011 (the “Original Agreement”). The Agreements provide exclusive licenses for our two lead product candidates, BFPET and CardioPET, two of the three cardiac imaging technologies covered by the Original Agreement. We are in discussions regarding the exclusive license to VasoPET, the third product candidate covered by the Original Agreement, our rights to which ceased upon the termination of the Original Agreement contemporaneously with the execution of the new Agreements. The Agreements were entered into primarily for the purpose of separating our rights and obligations with respect to our different product development programs. Each of the Agreements requires us to pay MGH an initial license fee of $175,000 and annual license maintenance fees of $125,000 each. The Agreements require us to meet certain obligations, including, but not limited to, meeting certain development milestones relating to clinical trials and filings with the United States Food and Drug Administration. MGH has the right to cancel or make non-exclusive certain licenses on certain patents should we fail to meet stipulated obligations and milestones. Additionally, upon commercialization, we are required to make specified milestone payments and royalties on commercial sales.  We are amortizing the cost of these intangible assets over the remaining useful life of the Agreements of 10 years.

We are current with all stipulated obligations and milestones under the Agreements and the Agreements remain in full force and effect. We believe that we maintain a good relationship with MGH and will be able to obtain waivers or extension of our obligations under the Agreements, should the need arise. If MGH were to refuse to provide us with a waiver or extension of any of our obligations or were to cancel or make the license non-exclusive, this would have a material adverse impact on our business as we may be unable to commercialize products without exclusivity and would lose our competitive edge for portions of the patent portfolio. 

Clinical Research Agreements
 
On September 7, 2012, we entered into a Clinical Research Services Agreement (“CRS Agreement”) with SGS Life Science Services (“SGS”), a company with its registered offices in Belgium, for clinical research services relating to our CardioPET Phase II study to assess myocardial perfusion and fatty acid uptake in coronary artery disease (“CAD”) patients. The Phase II trial will be an open label trial designed to assess the safety and diagnostic performance of 18-F FCPHA as compared to stress echocardiography and/or myocardial perfusion imaging, and angiography as a gold standard of background disease.
 
In addition, we engaged FGK Representative Service GmbH to serve as our sponsor in compliance with the laws governing clinical trials conducted in the European Union.  On February 28, 2013, we announced that the Phase II trial had begun. On February 6, 2014, we presented interim data from the trial at the SNMMI mid-winter meeting.  On October 20, 2014, we presented additional interim data at the EANM meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden. In December 2014, we announced that the enrollment for a Phase II clinical trial of CardioPET was closed. We believe that this trial has acquired sufficient patient data allowing for the assessment of the pharmaceutical's safety and quality of 18-F FCPHA generated cardiac images in humans.
 
On May 23, 2014, we entered into a Master Services Agreement with PPD Development, LP, a clinical research organization engaged in the business of managing clinical research programs and providing clinical development and other related services, for the clinical research services relating to the BFPET Phase II study.  The Phase II trial will be an open label trial designed to assess the safety and diagnostic performance of BFPET.  Multiple trial sites are planned in various locations in the United States.  The trial is expected to commence in the first half of 2015.

 
Product Development and Commercialization
 
We intend to develop our products through the completion of Phase II studies and/or Phase III studies at which point we will seek to partner with organizations with the resources necessary to undertake the further development, regulatory approval and commercialization of our products.
 
We believe that while the overall regulatory process for molecular imaging products is currently similar to those governing therapeutic agents, the development timelines may be significantly shorter. Whereas typical clinical trials involving therapeutic agents include efficacy endpoints such as survival, time to disease progression, and progression free survival, all of which must be monitored over long periods (often years), diagnostic imaging agents often take significantly less time to evaluate. This shortened clinical development period relative to therapeutics is a function of the speed with which a molecular imaging study takes place—on the order of several hours, as compared to months. Also, because the results of the scan may be promptly available, the clinical trials do not initially require long term follow-up for primary endpoints that may take significant periods of time to evaluate. Many PET centers in the U.S. routinely perform 20 to 50 PET scans per day. Based on the foregoing, we believe our first product may be able to be commercialized within five years.
 
Market Opportunity
 
Each year, millions of patients undergo molecular imaging studies in the United States. The main reason for these studies is to detect and evaluate ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction in patients with acute and chronic forms of CAD. These studies provide clinical benefit in the initial evaluation of patients with suspected but unproven CAD, and in those patients in whom a diagnosis of CAD has been established and information on prognosis or risk is required. Molecular imaging studies are used for diagnosing the presence or absence of critical coronary artery stenosis, providing prognostic information on long-term outcomes, and stratifying patient risk for adverse cardiac events.

We believe that our market opportunity is a direct function of the number of molecular imaging studies anticipated to be performed per year using PET imaging technologies, and is reflected in the more than 12 million scans in the U.S. alone in patients with suspected acute or chronic forms of CAD.  We expect the market for 18-F TPP, if approved, will be driven by its use (i) as a blood flow imaging agent in combination with stress-testing for the identification of ischemic and infarcted tissue in patients with chronic CAD; and (ii) in combination with a metabolic imaging agent in patients with acute CAD that are undergoing CVA. We expect that the market for 18-F FCPHA, if approved, will derive from the approximately 2.25 million patients in the U.S. annually with chronic forms of CAD that undergo pharmacologic stress-testing due to an inability to perform exercise stress-testing.  Because we believe there is no product currently on the market that may allow for at-rest assessment of this population, we believe 18-F FCPHA may be readily adopted by the cardiology community for the assessment of this patient pool. Within the CVA segment of the CAD market, we believe 18-F FCPHA possesses many significant advantages and may represent an ideal agent for the detection of discordances, and the identification of jeopardized but viable myocardium in the 350,000 patients with presumptive hibernating or stunned myocardium.  

Competition
 
We operate in a highly competitive segment of the pharmaceutical market. If any of our products are ultimately approved for commercialization, we will face competition for market share from large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies such as Lanthaeus, Bracco, GE Healthcare and Mallinckrodt, academic institutions, government agencies, and private and public research institutions engaged in the development and commercialization of existing standard of care products, as well as novel cardiac perfusion agents. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, product development, manufacturing and marketing resources than us. Large pharmaceutical companies have extensive experience in clinical testing and obtaining regulatory approval for products. We also may compete with these organizations to recruit scientists and clinical development personnel. Smaller or early-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies.
 

 
Intellectual Property
 
We believe that clear and extensive patent coverage for our technologies, both domestic and international, is central to our long-term success and intend to continue to allocate resources to protection of our intellectual property accordingly. We have obtained the licenses to our patents and patent applications from MGH, the patent assignee in each case. The issued patents covering our 18-F FCPHA and 18-F TPP technologies include both composition and method of use patents within the field of diagnostic cardiology that expire at various dates between December 2016 and February 2025.
 
We also depend upon the skills, knowledge, experience and know-how of our management and research and development personnel, as well as that of our advisors, consultants and other contractors. To help protect our proprietary know-how, which is not patentable, and for inventions for which patents may be difficult to enforce, we currently rely and will in the future rely on trade secret protection and confidentiality agreements to protect our interests. To this end, we require all of our employees, consultants, advisors and other contractors to enter into confidentiality agreements that prohibit the disclosure of confidential information and, where applicable, require disclosure and assignment to us of the ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions important to our business.
 
Governmental Regulations
 
Government authorities in the United States and foreign countries extensively regulate, among other things, the research, development, testing, manufacture, labeling, promotion, advertising, distribution, sampling, marketing and import and export of pharmaceutical products. Our molecular imaging pharmaceuticals in the United States will be subject to FDA regulation as drugs under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act , or FDCA, and require FDA approval prior to commercial distribution. The process of obtaining governmental approvals and complying with ongoing regulatory requirements requires the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources. In addition, statutes, rules, regulations and policies may change and new legislation or regulations may be issued that could delay such approvals. If we fail to comply with applicable regulatory requirements at any time during the product development process, approval process, or after approval, we may become subject to administrative or judicial sanctions. These sanctions could include the FDA’s refusal to approve pending applications, withdrawals of approvals, clinical holds, warning letters, product recalls, product seizures, total or partial suspension of our operations, injunctions, fines, civil penalties or criminal prosecution. Any agency enforcement action could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
The U.S. regulatory scheme for the development and commercialization of new pharmaceutical products can be divided into three distinct stages as described below.

Preclinical Stage
 
The preclinical stage involves the characterization, product formulation and animal testing necessary to prepare an Investigational New Drug application, or IND, for submission to the FDA. The IND must be reviewed and authorized by the FDA before the drug can be tested in humans. Once a new pharmaceutical agent has been identified and selected for further development, preclinical testing is conducted to confirm pharmacological activity, to generate safety data, to evaluate prototype dosage forms for appropriate release and activity characteristics, and to confirm the integrity and quality of the material to be used in clinical trials. A bulk supply of the active ingredient to support the necessary dosing in initial clinical trials must be secured. Data from the preclinical investigations and detailed information on proposed clinical investigations are compiled in an IND submission and submitted for FDA approval before human clinical trials may begin. If the FDA does not formally communicate an objection to the IND within 30 days, the specific clinical trials outlined in the IND may go forward.
 

Clinical Stage
 
The clinical stages of drug development follows a successful IND submission and involve the activities necessary to demonstrate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, and dosage of the substance in humans, as well as the ability to produce the substance in accordance with the FDA’s cGMP requirements. Data from these activities are compiled in a New Drug Application, or NDA, requesting approval to market the drug for a given use, or indication. Clinical trials must be conducted under the supervision of qualified investigators in accordance with good clinical practice, and according to IND-approved protocols detailing, among other things, the study objectives and the parameters, or endpoints, to be used in assessing safety and efficacy. Each trial must be reviewed, approved and conducted under the auspices of an independent Institutional Review Board, or IRB, and each trial, with limited exceptions, must include all subjects’ informed consent. The clinical evaluation stage typically involves the following sequential process:
 
Phase I clinical trials are generally conducted in a limited number of healthy subjects to determine the drug’s safety, tolerability, and biological performance. The total number of subjects in Phase I clinical trials varies, but is generally in the range of 20 to 80 people (or less in some cases, such as drugs with significant human experience).
 
Phase II clinical trials involve administering the drug to subjects suffering from the target disease or condition to evaluate the drug’s potential efficacy and appropriate dose. The number of subjects in Phase II trials is typically several hundred subjects or less.
 
Phase III clinical trials are performed after preliminary evidence suggesting effectiveness has been obtained and safety, tolerability, and appropriate dosing have been established. Phase III clinical trials are intended to gather additional data needed to evaluate the drug’s overall benefit-risk relationship of the drug and to provide adequate instructions for its use. Phase III trials usually include from several hundred to several thousand subjects.
 
Throughout the clinical testing stage, samples of the product made in different batches are tested for stability to establish shelf life constraints. In addition, increasingly large-scale production protocols and written standard operating procedures must be developed for each aspect of commercial manufacture and testing.
 
The clinical trial stage is both costly and time-consuming, and may not be completed successfully within any specified time period, if at all. The FDA closely monitors the progress of each of the three phases of clinical trials that are conducted under an IND and may, at its discretion, reevaluate, alter, suspend, or terminate the testing at any time for various reasons, including a finding that the subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk. The FDA can also request additional clinical testing as a condition to product approval. Additionally, new government requirements may be established that could delay or prevent regulatory approval of our products under development. Furthermore, institutional review boards, which are independent entities constituted to protect human subjects in the institutions in which clinical trials are being conducted, have the authority to suspend clinical trials in their respective institutions at any time for a variety of reasons, including safety issues.

New Drug Application and Review
 
After the successful completion of Phase III clinical trials, the sponsor of the new drug submits an NDA to the FDA requesting approval to market the product for one or more indications. An NDA is a comprehensive, multi-volume application that includes, among other things, the results of all preclinical and clinical studies, information about the drug’s composition, and the sponsor’s plans for producing, packaging, and labeling the drug. In most cases, the NDA must be accompanied by a substantial user fee. FDA has 60 days after submission to review the completeness and organization of the application, and may refuse to accept it for continued review, or refuse to file, if the application is found deficient. After filing, the FDA reviews an NDA to determine, among other things, whether a product is safe and effective for its intended use. Drugs that successfully complete NDA review may be marketed in the United States, subject to all conditions imposed by the FDA.
 

Prior to granting approval, the FDA generally conducts an inspection of the facilities, including outsourced facilities that will be involved in the manufacture, production, packaging, testing and control of the drug product for cGMP compliance. The FDA will not approve the application unless cGMP compliance is satisfactory. If the FDA determines that the marketing application, manufacturing process, or manufacturing facilities are not acceptable, it will outline the deficiencies in the submission and will often request additional testing or information. Notwithstanding the submission of any requested additional information, the FDA ultimately may decide that the marketing application does not satisfy the regulatory criteria for approval and refuse to approve the application by issuing a “not approvable” letter.
 
The length of the FDA’s review can range from a few months to several years or more. Once an NDA is in effect, significant changes such as the addition of one or more new indications for use generally require prior approval of an NDA including additional clinical trials or other data required to demonstrate that the product as modified remains safe and effective.
 
Fast Track Review
 
The Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997, or the Modernization Act, establishes a statutory program for relatively streamlined approval of “Fast Track” products, which are defined under the Modernization Act as new drugs or biologics intended for the treatment of a serious or life-threatening condition that demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs for this condition. Fast Track status requires an official designation by the FDA.
 
Abbreviated New Drug Application and Review
 
An Abbreviated New Drug Application, or ANDA, is a type of NDA that is used for the review and approval of a generic drug product. A generic drug product is one that is the same as a previously approved innovator drug product, which means it has the same active ingredient, dosage form, and strength, route of administration, quality, performance characteristics, and intended use. An ANDA is generally not required to include preclinical and clinical data to establish safety and effectiveness. Instead, generic applicants must scientifically demonstrate that their product is bioequivalent to the previously approved drug, which means that it performs in the same manner. None of the products currently under development by FluoroPharma will be eligible for ANDA approval, although it is possible that competing products based on our product could be approved by this route at some future time.
 
Section 505(b)(2) Applications
 
If a proposed drug product represents only a limited change from a product that has already been approved by the FDA, yet differs in more ways than those permitted under the ANDA requirements, then the applicant may be able to submit a type of NDA referred to as a 505(b)(2) application. In effect, a 505(b)(2) applicant is permitted to rely on information in the scientific literature, or previous safety and efficacy determinations by the FDA, rather than submitting the full complement of clinical or other data that would otherwise be required for NDA approval. However, the 505(b)(2) sponsor must provide any additional clinical or other data needed to supplement and/or establish the relevance and applicability of prior findings for the new product formulation. We do not expect any of our current drug portfolio to be granted approval via this process as our products are novel and patent protected.

Post-Approval Phase
 
Once the FDA has approved a new drug for marketing, the product becomes available for physicians to prescribe in the United States. After approval, we must comply with post-approval requirements, including ongoing compliance with cGMP regulations, delivering periodic reports to the FDA, submitting descriptions of any adverse reactions reported, and complying with drug sampling and distribution requirements. We are required to maintain and provide updated safety and efficacy information to the FDA. We are also required to comply with requirements concerning advertising and promotional labeling.
 


Compliance with post-approval requirements will require us to expend time, money, and effort on an ongoing basis. We expect to use third party manufacturers to produce certain of our products in clinical and commercial quantities. Future FDA inspections may identify compliance issues at our facilities or at the facilities of our contract manufacturers that may disrupt production or distribution, or require substantial resources to correct.
 
In addition, discovery of problems with a product or the failure to comply with requirements may result in restrictions including withdrawal or recall of the product from the market or other voluntary or FDA-initiated action that could delay further marketing. Newly discovered or developed safety or efficacy data may require changes to a product’s approved labeling, including the addition of new warnings and contraindications. Also, the FDA may require post-market testing and surveillance to monitor the product’s safety or efficacy, including additional clinical studies, known as Phase IV trials, to evaluate long-term effects.

Other Regulation in the United States
 
Healthcare Reimbursement
 
Government and private sector initiatives to limit the growth of healthcare costs, including price regulation, competitive pricing, coverage and payment policies, and managed-care arrangements, are continuing in many countries where we do business, including the United States. These changes are causing the marketplace to put increased emphasis on the delivery of more cost-effective medical products. Government programs, including Medicare and Medicaid, private healthcare insurance and managed-care plans have attempted to control costs by limiting the amount of reimbursement they will pay for particular procedures or treatments. This has created an increasing level of price sensitivity among customers for our products. Some third-party payers must also approve coverage for new or innovative devices or therapies before they will reimburse healthcare providers who use the medical devices or therapies. Even though a new medical product may have been cleared for commercial distribution, we may find limited demand for the product until reimbursement approval has been obtained from governmental and private third-party payers.
  
Environmental Regulation
 
We are also subject to various environmental laws and regulations both within and outside the United States. Like many other pharmaceutical and medical device companies, our operations involve the use of substances, including hazardous wastes, which are regulated under environmental laws, primarily manufacturing and sterilization processes. We do not expect that compliance with environmental protection laws will have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flow. These laws and regulations are all subject to change, however, and we cannot predict what impact, if any, such changes might have on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
 
Foreign Regulation

Whether or not we obtain FDA approval for a product, we must obtain approval from the comparable regulatory authorities of foreign countries before we can commence clinical trials or marketing of the product in those countries. The approval process varies from country to country, and the time may be longer or shorter than that required for FDA approval. The requirements governing the conduct of clinical trials, product licensing, pricing and reimbursement also vary greatly from country to country. Although governed by the applicable jurisdiction, clinical trials conducted outside of the United States typically are administered under a three-phase sequential process similar to that discussed above for pharmaceutical products.


Under European Union regulatory systems, we may submit marketing authorization applications either under a centralized or decentralized procedure. The centralized procedure, which is available for medicines produced by biotechnology or which are highly innovative, provides for the grant of a single marketing authorization that is valid for all European Union member states. This authorization is a marketing authorization approval, or MAA. The decentralized procedure provides for mutual recognition of national approval decisions. Under this procedure, the holder of a national marketing authorization may submit an application to the remaining member states. Within 90 days of receiving the applications and assessment report, each member state must decide whether to recognize approval. This procedure is referred to as the mutual recognition procedure, or MRP.
 
In addition, regulatory approval of prices is required in most countries other than the United States. We face the risk that the prices which result from the regulatory approval process would be insufficient to generate an acceptable return to us or our collaborators. 
 
Consulting and Advisory Agreements
 
We enter into various consulting and advisory agreements from time to time in the ordinary course of business relating to investor and public relations services.  On March 24, 2014, we entered into a consulting agreement effective as of March 6, 2014 (the "Effective Date") with the Del Mar Consulting Group, Inc. (“Del Mar”) for investor and public relations services.  The consulting agreement has an initial term of four months with successive one month renewal periods until terminated by either party upon not less than 10 days prior notice.  On April 3, 2014, we paid to Del Mar an upfront fee of $125,000 in restricted shares based on the market price of our common stock preceding the Effective Date, which was $0.53 per share. As a result, we issued 235,849 shares of our common stock. We also pay a monthly cash retainer of $10,000 during the term of the consulting agreement. In addition, we have accrued a renewal fee of $125,000 which was payable to Del Mar as of August 6, 2014.
 
Employees
 
As of December 31, 2014, we had five full-time employees.

 
Item 1A.  Risk Factors.
 
RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below with all of the other information included in this annual report before making an investment decision. If any of the possible adverse events described below actually occurs, our business, results of operations or financial condition would likely suffer. In such an event, the market price of our common stock could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Finances, Capital Requirements and Other Financial Matters
 
We are an early-stage company with a history of operating losses that are expected to continue and we are unable to predict the extent of future losses, whether we will generate significant revenues or whether we will achieve or sustain profitability.
 
We are a company in the early stage and our prospects must be considered in light of the uncertainties, risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered by companies in their early stages of operations. We have incurred net losses every year since our inception in 2003 and have generated no revenue from product sales or licenses to date. Our operations have been limited to organizing and staffing our company, acquiring, developing and securing the proprietary rights for, and undertaking pre-clinical development and clinical trials of our product candidates. As of December 31, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $28.8 million. We expect to make substantial expenditures and incur increasing operating costs in the future and our accumulated deficit will increase significantly as we expand development and clinical trial activities for our product candidates. Our losses have had, and are expected to continue to have, an adverse impact on our working capital, total assets and stockholders’ equity. Because of the risks and uncertainties associated with product development, we are unable to predict the extent of any future losses, whether we will ever generate significant revenues or if we will ever achieve or sustain profitability.
 
We will need substantial additional funding and may be unable to raise capital when needed, which would force us to delay, curtail or eliminate one or more of our research and development programs.
 
Our operations have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception. At December 31, 2014, we had cash, cash equivalents and investments in trading securities of approximately $292,075. We will need to seek substantial additional financing to continue our activities beyond such date. We have no bank lines of credit or other arrangements or commitments for such financing and we may not be successful in our efforts to raise needed capital on acceptable terms, if at all. If we are unable to obtain sufficient funding, through a corporate collaboration, debt or equity financing or otherwise, we will be required to curtail or discontinue one or more of our product development programs.
 
We received a report from our independent registered public accounting firm with an explanatory paragraph for the year ended December 31, 2014 with respect to our ability to continue as a going concern, the existence of which may adversely affect our stock price and our ability to raise capital.  
 
In their report dated March 31, 2015, our independent registered public accounting firm expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.  We have incurred losses and negative cash flows from operations since inception, have an accumulated deficit as of December 31, 2014 and require additional financing to fund future operations. Our ability to continue as a going concern is subject to our ability to obtain necessary funding from outside sources, including obtaining additional funding from the sale of our securities.

 
Raising additional funds by issuing securities or through licensing or lending arrangements may cause dilution to our existing stockholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish proprietary rights.
 
To the extent that we raise additional capital by issuing equity securities, the share ownership of existing stockholders will be diluted. Any future debt financing may involve covenants that restrict our operations, including limitations on our ability to incur liens or additional debt, pay dividends, redeem our stock, make certain investments and engage in certain merger, consolidation or asset sale transactions, among other restrictions. In addition, if we raise additional funds through licensing arrangements, it may be necessary to relinquish potentially valuable rights to our product candidates, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or to prevent fraud.  Any inability to report and file our financial results accurately and timely could harm our reputation and adversely impact the trading price of our common stock.
 
Effective internal control is necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud.  If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, we may not be able to manage our business as effectively as we would if an effective control environment existed, and our business and reputation with investors may be harmed.  As a result, our small size and any current internal control deficiencies may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operation and access to capital.  We have not performed an in-depth analysis to determine if historical un-discovered failures of internal controls exist, and may in the future discover areas of our internal control that need improvement.
 
Risks Related to Our Business and Industry
 
Our product candidates are at an early stage of development and may not be successfully developed or commercialized.
 
Our product candidates are in the early stage of development and will require substantial further capital expenditures, development, testing, and regulatory clearances prior to commercialization. Of the large number of drugs in development, only a small percentage successfully complete the United States Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, regulatory approval process and are commercialized. Accordingly, even if we are able to obtain the requisite financing to fund our development programs, we cannot assure you that our product candidates will be successfully developed or commercialized. We are subject to the risk that some or all of our proposed products:
 
will be found to be ineffective or unsafe;
 
will not receive necessary regulatory clearances;
 
will be unable to get to market in a timely manner;
 
will not be capable of being produced in commercial quantities at reasonable costs;
 
will not be successfully marketed; or
 
will not be widely accepted by the medical community.
 
We may experience unanticipated problems relating to product development, testing, regulatory compliance, manufacturing, marketing and competition, and our costs and expenses could exceed current estimates.  We cannot predict whether we will successfully develop and commercialize any products.

 
If we fail to obtain U.S. regulatory approval of our current or future product candidates, we will be unable to commercialize these potential products in the United States.
 
The clinical development, manufacturing, labeling, storage, record-keeping, advertising, promotion, import, export, marketing and distribution of our product candidates are subject to extensive regulation by the FDA in the United States and by comparable health authorities in foreign markets. In the United States, we are not permitted to market our product candidates unless and until we receive FDA approval. The process of obtaining FDA approval is expensive, often takes many years and can vary substantially based upon the type, complexity and novelty of the products involved. In addition to the significant clinical testing requirements, our ability to obtain marketing approval for these products depends on obtaining the final results of required non-clinical testing, including characterization of the manufactured components of our product candidates and validation of our manufacturing processes. With respect to foreign markets, approval procedures vary among countries and, in addition to the aforementioned risks, can involve additional product testing, administrative review periods and agreements with pricing authorities.  Approval of a product candidate in the U.S. or foreign markets may be delayed, limited or denied for many reasons, including, but not limited to:
 
disagreement with the design or implementation of our clinical trials;
 
disagreement with our interpretation of data from preclinical studies or clinical trials;
 
our failure to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FDA or other regulatory agency that a product candidate is safe and effective for any indication;
 
the results of clinical trials may not meet the level of statistical significance required for approval;
 
our inability to demonstrate that a product candidate’s clinical and other benefits outweigh its safety risks; or
 
the manufacturing processes or facilities of third party manufacturers with which we or our collaborators contract for clinical and commercial supplies may not be acceptable or may not be able to supply product in sufficient quantity.
 
Any delay in obtaining, or inability to obtain, applicable regulatory approvals would prevent us from commercializing our product candidates.
 
Any regulatory approvals that we or our partners receive for our product candidates may also be subject to limitations on the indicated uses for which the product candidate may be marketed or contain requirements for potentially costly post-marketing follow-up studies. The subsequent discovery of previously unknown problems with the product candidate, including adverse events of unanticipated severity or frequency, may result in restrictions on the marketing of the product candidate and withdrawal of the product candidate from the market.
 
U.S. manufacturing, labeling, storage and distribution activities also are subject to strict regulating and licensing by the FDA and other authorities. Our failure, or the failure of any manufacturing facilities that supply our product candidates, to continue to meet regulatory standards or to remedy any deficiencies could result in corrective action by the FDA or these other authorities, including the interruption or prevention of marketing, closure of such facilities, and fines or penalties.
 
Regulatory authorities also will require post-marketing surveillance to monitor and report to the FDA potential adverse effects of our product candidates. If approved, any of our product candidates’ subsequent failure to comply with applicable regulatory requirements could, among other things, result in warning letters, fines, suspension or revocation of regulatory approvals, product recalls or seizures, operating restrictions, injunctions and criminal prosecutions.

 
Delays in the commencement of our clinical trials could result in increased costs and delay our ability to pursue regulatory approval.
 
The commencement of clinical trials can be delayed for a variety of reasons, including delays in:
 
obtaining regulatory clearance to commence a clinical trial;
 
identifying, recruiting and training suitable clinical investigators and contracting;
 
reaching agreement on acceptable terms with prospective clinical research organizations, or CROs, and trial sites, the terms of which can be subject to extensive negotiation, may be subject to modification from time to time and may vary significantly among different CROs and trial sites;
 
obtaining sufficient quantities of a product candidate for use in clinical trials;
 
obtaining Investigator Review Board, or IRB, or ethics committee approval to conduct a clinical trial at a prospective site;
 
identifying, recruiting and enrolling patients to participate in a clinical trial; and
 
retaining patients who have initiated a clinical trial but may withdraw due to adverse events from the compounds, insufficient efficacy, fatigue with the clinical trial process or personal issues.
 
Any delays in the commencement of our clinical trials may delay our ability to pursue regulatory approval for our product candidates. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of a product candidate.
 
Delays in clinical testing could result in increased costs to us and delay our ability to generate revenue.
 
Once a clinical trial has begun, patient recruitment and enrollment may be slower than we anticipate. Clinical trials may also be delayed as a result of ambiguous or negative interim results or difficulties in obtaining sufficient quantities of product manufactured in accordance with regulatory requirements. Further, a clinical trial may be modified, suspended or terminated by us, an IRB, an ethics committee or a data safety monitoring committee overseeing the clinical trial, any clinical trial site with respect to that site, or the FDA or other regulatory authorities due to a number of factors, including:
 
failure to conduct the clinical trial in accordance with regulatory requirements or our clinical protocols;
 
inspection of the clinical trial operations or clinical trial site by the FDA or other regulatory authorities resulting in the imposition of a clinical hold;
 
unforeseen safety issues or any determination that the clinical trial presents unacceptable health risks; and
 
lack of adequate funding to continue the clinical trial.
 
Changes in regulatory requirements and guidance also may occur and we may need to amend clinical trial protocols to reflect these changes. Amendments may require us to resubmit our clinical trial protocols to IRBs for re-examination, which may impact the costs, timing and the likelihood of a successful completion of a clinical trial. If we experience delays in the completion of, or if we must terminate, any clinical trial of any product candidate, our ability to obtain regulatory approval for that product candidate will be delayed and the commercial prospects, if any, for the product candidate may suffer as a result. In addition, many of these factors may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of a product candidate.

 
We rely on third parties to conduct our clinical trials. If these third parties do not meet our deadlines or otherwise conduct the trials as required, our clinical development programs could be delayed or unsuccessful and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize our product candidates when expected or at all.
 
We do not have the ability to conduct all aspects of our preclinical testing or clinical trials ourselves and intend to continue to rely upon such CROs, as well as medical institutions, clinical investigators and consultants, to conduct our clinical trials in accordance with our clinical protocols. Our CROs, investigators and other third parties play a significant role in the conduct of these trials and the subsequent collection and analysis of data from the clinical trials. There is no guarantee that any CROs, investigators and other third parties upon which we rely for administration and conduct of our clinical trials will devote adequate time and resources to such trials or perform as contractually required. If any of these third parties fail to meet expected deadlines, fail to adhere to our clinical protocols or otherwise perform in a substandard manner, our clinical trials may be extended, delayed or terminated and may result in additional costs . In addition, principal investigators for our clinical trials may serve as scientific advisors or consultants to us from time to time and receive cash or equity compensation in connection with such services. If these relationships and any related compensation result in perceived or actual conflicts of interest, the integrity of the data generated at the applicable clinical trial site may be jeopardized.
 
If we are unable to establish sales and marketing capabilities or fail to enter into agreements with third parties to market, distribute and sell any products we may successfully develop, we may not be able to effectively market and sell any such products and generate product revenue.
 
We do not currently have the infrastructure for the sales, marketing and distribution of any of our product candidates, and must build this infrastructure or make arrangements with third parties to perform these functions in order to commercialize any products that we may successfully develop. The establishment and development of a sales force, either by us and/or jointly with a partner, or the establishment of a contract sales force to market any products we may develop, will be expensive and time-consuming and could delay any product launch. If we, or our partners, are unable to establish sales and marketing capability or any other non-technical capabilities necessary to commercialize any products we may successfully develop, we will need to contract with third parties to market and sell such products. We may not be able to establish arrangements with third-parties on acceptable terms, if at all.
 
We license patent rights from third party owners. If such owners do not properly maintain or enforce the patents underlying such licenses, our competitive position and business prospects will be harmed.
 
We are party to a number of licenses that give us rights to third party intellectual property that is necessary or useful for our business. In particular, we have obtained certain rights from Massachusetts General Hospital, for our composition of matter patents and some method of use patents. We may enter into additional licenses to third party intellectual property in the future. Our success will depend in part on the ability of our licensors to obtain, maintain and enforce patent protection for their intellectual property, in particular, those patents to which we have secured exclusive rights. Our licensors may not successfully prosecute the patent applications to which we are licensed. Even if patents issue with respect to these patent applications, our licensors may fail to maintain these patents, may determine not to pursue litigation against other companies that are infringing these patents, or may pursue such litigation less aggressively than we would. In addition, our licensors may terminate their agreements with us in the event we breach the applicable license agreement and fail to cure the breach within a specified period of time. Without protection for the intellectual property we license, other companies might be able to offer substantially identical products for sale, which could adversely affect our competitive business position and harm our business prospects. Our proprietary rights may not adequately protect our intellectual property and product candidates and if we cannot obtain adequate protection of our intellectual property and product candidates, we may not be able to successfully market our product candidates.

 
Our commercial success will depend in part on obtaining and maintaining intellectual property protection for our technologies and product candidates. We will only be able to protect our technologies and product candidates from unauthorized use by third parties to the extent that valid and enforceable patents cover them, or that other market exclusionary rights apply.
 
Our issued patents may be subject to challenge and possibly invalidated by third parties. Changes in either the patent laws or in the interpretations of patent laws in the United States or other countries may diminish the market exclusionary ability of our intellectual property.
 
In addition, others may independently develop similar or alternative compounds and technologies that may be outside the scope of our intellectual property. Should third parties obtain patent rights to similar compounds or radiolabeling technology, this may have an adverse effect on our business.
 
To the extent that consultants or key employees apply technological information independently developed by them or by others to our product candidates, disputes may arise as to the proprietary rights of the information, which may not be resolved in our favor. Consultants and key employees that work with our confidential and proprietary technologies are required to assign all intellectual property rights in their discoveries to us. However, these consultants or key employees may terminate their relationship with us, and we cannot preclude them indefinitely from dealing with our competitors. If our trade secrets become known to competitors with greater experience and financial resources, the competitors may copy or use our trade secrets and other proprietary information in the advancement of their products, methods or technologies. If we were to prosecute a claim that a third party had illegally obtained and was using our trade secrets, it would be expensive and time consuming and the outcome would be unpredictable. In addition, courts outside the United States are sometimes less willing to protect trade secrets than courts in the United States. Moreover, if our competitors independently develop equivalent knowledge, we would lack any contractual claim to this information, and our business could be harmed.
 
Our ability to commercialize our product candidates will depend on our ability to sell such products without infringing the patent or proprietary rights of third parties. If we are sued for infringing intellectual property rights of third parties, such litigation will be costly and time consuming and an unfavorable outcome would have a significant adverse effect on our business.
 
Our ability to commercialize any of our product candidates that we may successfully develop will depend on our ability to sell such products without infringing the patents or other proprietary rights of third parties. Third party intellectual property in the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology, and radiopharmaceutical technologies are complicated, and third party intellectual property rights in these fields are continuously evolving. We have not performed searches for third party intellectual property rights that may raise freedom-to-operate issues, and we have not obtained legal opinions regarding commercialization of our product candidates. As such, there may be existing patents that may affect our ability to commercialize our product candidates.
 
In addition, because patent applications are published 18 months after their filing, and because applications can take several years to issue, there may be currently pending third party patent applications that are unknown to us, which may later result in issued patents. If a third party claims that we infringe on its patents or other proprietary rights, we could face a number of issues that could seriously harm our competitive position, including:
 
infringement claims that, with or without merit, can be costly and time consuming to litigate, can delay the regulatory approval process and can divert management’s attention from our core business strategy;
 
substantial damages for past infringement which we may have to pay if a court determines that our products or technologies infringe upon a competitor’s patent or other proprietary rights;
 
if a license is available from a holder, we may have to pay substantial royalties or grant cross licenses to our patents or other proprietary rights; and
 
redesigning our process so that it does not infringe the third party intellectual property, which may not be possible, or which may require substantial time and expense including delays in bringing our own products to market.
 


Such actions could harm our competitive position and our ability to generate revenue and could result in increased costs.

We may incur substantial product liability or indemnification claims relating to the clinical testing of our product candidates.
 
We face an inherent risk of product liability exposure related to the testing of our product candidates in human clinical trials, and claims could be brought against us if use or misuse of one of our product candidates causes, or merely appears to have caused, personal injury or death. While we have and intend to maintain product liability insurance relating to our clinical trials, our coverage may not be sufficient to cover claims that may be made against us and we may be unable to maintain such insurance. Any claims against us, regardless of their merit, could severely harm our financial condition, strain our management and other resources or destroy the prospects for commercialization of the product which is the subject of any such claim. We are unable to predict if we will be able to obtain or maintain product liability insurance for any products that that may be approved for marketing. Additionally, we have entered into various agreements where we indemnify third parties for certain claims relating to the testing and use of our product candidates. These indemnification obligations may require us to pay significant sums of money for claims that are covered by these indemnifications.
 
If any product candidates that we may successfully develop do not gain market acceptance among physicians, patients and the medical community, we will be unable to generate significant revenue,.
 
Even if our product candidates receive regulatory approval, they may not gain market acceptance among physicians, patients, healthcare payers and the medical community. Coverage and reimbursement of our product candidates by third party payers, including government payers, generally is also necessary for commercial success. The degree of market acceptance of any approved products will depend on a number of factors, including::
 
limited indications of regulatory approvals;
 
the establishment and demonstration in the medical community of the clinical efficacy and safety of our product candidates and their potential advantages over existing diagnostic compounds;
 
the prevalence and severity of any side effects;
 
our ability to offer our product candidates at an acceptable price;
 
the relative convenience and ease of administration of our products;
 
the strength of marketing and distribution support; and
 
sufficient third party coverage or reimbursement.
 
The failure of any of our product candidates to gain market acceptance could impair our ability to generate revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on our future business,
 
We have no manufacturing capabilities and rely on third parties to manufacture our preclinical and clinical supplies and expect to continue to rely on third parties to produce commercial supplies of any approved product candidate, which reliance could adversely impact our business.
 
We have no commercial manufacturing facility for our product candidates and no experience in manufacturing commercial quantities of our product candidates. As such, we are dependent on third parties to supply our product candidates according to our specifications, in sufficient quantities, on time, in compliance with appropriate regulatory standards and at competitive prices. We cannot be sure that we will be able to obtain an adequate supply of our product candidates on acceptable terms, or at all. If any third party becomes unable or unwilling to deliver sufficient quantities of our product candidates to us on a timely basis and in accordance with applicable specifications and other regulatory requirements, it would materially adversely affect clinical development and potential commercialization of the product.


 
Third party manufacturers are required to maintain compliance with cGMPs and will be subject to inspections by the FDA or comparable agencies in other jurisdictions to confirm such compliance. In the event that the FDA or such other agencies determine that our third party suppliers have not complied with cGMP, our clinical trials could be terminated or subjected to a clinical hold until such time as we are able to obtain appropriate replacement material.  Any delay, interruption or other issues that arise in the manufacture, packaging, or storage of our products as a result of a failure of the facilities or operations of our third party suppliers to pass any regulatory agency inspection could significantly impair our ability to develop and commercialize our products.
 
We do not expect to have the resources or capacity to commercially manufacture any of our proposed products, if approved, and will likely continue to be dependent upon third party manufacturers. Our dependence on third parties to manufacture and supply us with clinical trial materials and any approved products may adversely affect our ability to develop and commercialize our products on a timely basis or at all.
 
Our competitors may develop products that are less expensive, safer or more effective, which may diminish or eliminate the commercial success of any potential products that we may successfully develop and seek to commercialize.
 
If our competitors market products that are less expensive, safer or more effective than our future products developed from our product candidates, or that reach the market before our product candidates, we may not achieve commercial success. For example, if approved, 18-F TPP’s primary competition in the non-acute setting will be perfusion imaging agents such as sestamibi produced by Lanthaeus Medical, tetrophosmin produced by GE Healthcare, and generic thallium, the majority U.S. suppliers being Mallinckrodt and Lantheus Medical. The market may choose to continue utilizing the existing products for any number of reasons, including familiarity with or pricing of these existing products. The failure of 18-F TPP or any of our product candidates to compete with products marketed by our competitors would impair our ability to generate revenue, which would have a material adverse effect on our future business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
We expect to compete with several pharmaceutical companies including Lanthaeus, Bracco, GE Healthcare and Mallinckrodt, and our competitors may:
 
develop and market products that are less expensive or more effective than our future products;
 
commercialize competing products before we or our partners can launch any products developed from our product candidates;
 
operate larger research and development programs or have substantially greater financial resources than we do;
 
initiate or withstand substantial price competition more successfully than we can;
 
have greater success in recruiting skilled technical and scientific workers from the limited pool of available talent;
 
more effectively negotiate third party licenses and strategic relationships;

secure reimbursement faster;  and
 
take advantage of acquisition or other opportunities more readily than we can.
 
We expect to compete for market share against large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, smaller companies that are collaborating with larger pharmaceutical companies, new companies, academic institutions, government agencies and other public and private research organizations.

 
In addition, the life sciences industry is characterized by rapid technological change. Because our research approach integrates many technologies, it may be difficult for us to stay abreast of the rapid changes in each technology. If we fail to stay at the forefront of technological change, we may be unable to compete effectively. Our competitors may render our technologies obsolete by advances in existing technological approaches or the development of new or different approaches, potentially eliminating the advantages in our product discovery process that we believe we derive from our research approach and proprietary technologies.

The use of hazardous materials in our operations may subject us to environmental claims or liabilities.
 
Our research and development activities involve the use of hazardous materials, including chemicals and biological and radioactive materials. Injury or contamination from these materials may occur and we could be held liable for any damages, which could exceed our available financial resources. This liability could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
We are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations governing the use, manufacture, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous materials and waste products. We may be required to incur significant costs to comply with environmental laws and regulations in the future that could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
If we fail to attract and retain senior management, consultants, advisors and scientific and technical personnel, our product development and commercialization efforts could be impaired.
 
Our performance is substantially dependent on the performance of our senior management and key scientific and technical personnel, particularly Thijs Spoor, our president, chairman and chief executive officer. Although we have entered into an employment agreement there is no assurance that he will remain in our employ for the entire term of such employment agreement. The loss of the services of any member of our senior management or our scientific or technical staff may significantly delay or prevent the development of our product candidates and other business objectives by diverting management’s attention to transition matters and identification of suitable replacements, if any, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.
 
We also rely on consultants and advisors to assist us in formulating our research and development strategy. All of our consultants and advisors are either self-employed or employed by other organizations, and they may have conflicts of interest or other commitments, such as consulting or advisory contracts with other organizations, that may affect their ability to contribute to us.
 
In addition, we believe that we will need to recruit additional executive management and scientific and technical personnel. There is currently intense competition for skilled executives and employees with relevant scientific and technical expertise, and this competition is likely to continue. The inability to attract and retain sufficient scientific, technical and managerial personnel could limit or delay our product development efforts, which would adversely affect the development of our product candidates and commercialization of our potential products and growth of our business.
 
 
Market acceptance of our potential products will be limited if users are unable to obtain adequate reimbursement from third party payers.
 
Our ability or the ability of our collaborators to commercialize any of our product candidates that we successfully develop may depend, in part, on the extent to which government health administration authorities, private health insurers and other organizations will reimburse consumers for the cost of these products. Significant uncertainty exists as to the reimbursement status of newly approved health care products. Each of our product candidates is intended to replace or alter existing therapies or procedures. These third party payers may conclude that our product candidates are less safe, effective or cost-effective than these existing therapies or procedures. If third party payers do not approve our product candidates for reimbursement or fail to reimburse for them adequately, sales will suffer as some physicians or their patients will opt for a competing product that is approved for reimbursement or is adequately reimbursed. Even if third party payers make reimbursement available, these payers’ reimbursement policies may adversely affect our ability and the ability of our potential collaborators to sell our potential products on a profitable basis.
 
In addition, legislation and regulations affecting the pricing of our product candidates may change in ways adverse to us before or after the FDA or other regulatory agencies approve any of our product candidates for marketing. While we cannot predict the likelihood of any of these legislative or regulatory proposals, if any government or regulatory agencies adopt these proposals, they could materially adversely affect our business prospects, financial condition and results of operations.


Risks Related to our Common Stock
 
Our stock price may be volatile.
 
The stock market, particularly in recent years, has experienced significant volatility particularly with respect to pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences company stocks. The volatility of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences company stocks often does not relate to the operating performance of the companies represented by the stock. Factors that could cause this volatility in the market price of our common stock include:
 
results from and any delays in our clinical trials;
 
failure or delays in entering additional product candidates into clinical trials;
 
failure or discontinuation of any of our research programs;
 
delays in establishing new strategic relationships;
 
delays in the development or commercialization of our potential products;
 
market conditions in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors and issuance of new or changed securities analysts’ reports or recommendations;
 
actual and anticipated fluctuations in our financial and operating results;
 
developments or disputes concerning our intellectual property or other proprietary rights;
 
introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by us or our competitors;
 
issues in manufacturing our potential products;
 
market acceptance of our potential products;
 
third party healthcare reimbursement policies;
 
FDA or other domestic or foreign regulatory actions affecting us or our industry;
 
litigation or public concern about the safety of our product candidates; and
 
additions or departures of key personnel.
 
These and other external factors may cause the market price and demand for our common stock to fluctuate substantially, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their shares of common stock and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our common stock. In the past, when the market price of a stock has been volatile, holders of that stock have instituted securities class action litigation against the company that issued the stock. If any of our stockholders brought a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management.
 
 
We have not and do not anticipate paying any dividends on our common stock.
 
We have paid no dividends on our common stock to date and it is not anticipated that any dividends will be paid to holders of our common stock in the foreseeable future. While our future dividend policy will be based on the operating results and capital needs of the business, it is currently anticipated that any earnings will be retained to finance our future expansion and for the implementation of our business plan. As an investor, you should take note of the fact that a lack of a dividend can further affect the market value of our stock, and could significantly affect the value of any investment in our Company.

Because we became public with a reverse merger, we may not be able to attract the attention of major brokerage firms.
 
There may be risks associated with us becoming public through a “reverse merger.”  Securities analysts of major brokerage firms may not provide coverage of us since there is no incentive to brokerage firms to recommend the purchase of our common stock.  No assurance can be given that brokerage firms will, in the future, want to conduct any secondary offerings on behalf of our post-merger company.
 
The limited trading market for our common stock results in limited liquidity for shares of our common stock and significant volatility in our stock price.
 
Although prices for our shares of common stock are quoted on the OTC.QB, there is little current trading and no assurance can be given that an active public trading market will develop or, if developed, that it will be sustained.  The OTC.QB is generally regarded as a less efficient and less prestigious trading market than other national markets.  There is no assurance if or when our common stock will be quoted on another more prestigious exchange or market.  Active trading markets generally result in lower price volatility and more efficient execution of buy and sell orders.  The absence of an active trading market reduces the liquidity of our common stock.
 
The market price of our stock is likely to be highly volatile because for some time there will likely be a thin trading market for the stock, which causes trades of small blocks of stock to have a significant impact on our stock price.  As a result of the lack of trading activity, the quoted price for our common stock on the OTC.QB is not necessarily a reliable indicator of its fair market value.  Further, if we cease to be quoted, holders of our common stock would find it more difficult to dispose of, or to obtain accurate quotations as to the market value of, our common stock, and the market value of our common stock would likely decline.
 
Our common stock is currently deemed a “penny stock,” which makes it more difficult for our investors to sell their shares.
 
Our common stock is subject to the “penny stock” rules adopted under Section 15(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).  The penny stock rules generally apply to companies whose common stock is not listed on The NASDAQ Stock Market or other national securities exchange and trades at less than $4.00 per share, other than companies that have had average revenue of at least $6,000,000 for the last three years or that have tangible net worth of at least $5,000,000 ($2,000,000 if the company has been operating for three or more years).  These rules require, among other things, that brokers who trade penny stock to persons other than “established customers” complete certain documentation, make suitability inquiries of investors and provide investors with certain information concerning trading in the security, including a risk disclosure document and quote information under certain circumstances.  Many brokers have decided not to trade penny stocks because of the requirements of the penny stock rules and, as a result, the number of broker-dealers willing to act as market makers in such securities is limited.  If we remain subject to the penny stock rules for any significant period, it could have an adverse effect on the market, if any, for our securities.  If our securities are subject to the penny stock rules, investors will find it more difficult to dispose of our securities.
 

Offers or availability for sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock may cause the price of our common stock to decline.
 
If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market upon the expiration of any statutory holding period, under Rule 144, or issued upon the exercise of outstanding options or warrants, it could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang” and in anticipation of which the market price of our common stock could fall.  The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could make more difficult our ability to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

Our articles of incorporation allows for our board of directors to create new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.
 
Our board of directors, or our Board, has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock and has designated 3,500,000 preferred shares as Series A Preferred Stock and 12,000,000 preferred shares as Series B Preferred Stock. Our Board also has the authority to issue additional shares of our preferred stock without further stockholder approval. As a result, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that would grant to holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. In addition, our Board could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that has greater voting power than our common stock or that is convertible into our common stock, which could decrease the relative voting power of our common stock or result in dilution to our existing stockholders.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

Not Applicable.

Item 2.  Properties.

Our offices are located in Montclair, New Jersey pursuant to a lease expiring on April 30, 2018 that provides for a monthly rent of $6,350.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

In July 2013, an action was filed against us in the United States District Court for the District of Nevada. The action, Todd Nelson v. Fluoropharma Medical, Inc. and  Does 1 through 10,  No. 13 CV 01152 JAD CWH, alleges that the plaintiff suffered losses attributable to our refusal to honor certain stock options after February 28, 2012.  Plaintiff seeks at least $325,200 in damages, as well as punitive and exemplary damages, prejudgment interest, and costs. Discovery has closed and we are reviewing our options to dismiss Plaintiff's claims without the necessity of a trial.

We are not aware of any other material, active, pending or threatened proceeding, nor are we, or any subsidiary, involved as a plaintiff or defendant in any other material proceeding or pending litigation.
 
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
 
Not applicable.


PART II
 
Item 5.  Market for Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
 
Our common stock is quoted on the OTC.QB under the symbol “FPMI”. The following table sets forth, for the calendar periods indicated the range of the high and low last reported of the Company’s common stock, as reported by the OTC.QB. The quotations represent inter-dealer prices without retail mark-ups, mark-downs or commissions, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.  The quotations may be rounded for presentation. 

2014
   
High
     
Low
 
First Quarter
 
$
0.74
   
$
0.51
 
Second Quarter
 
$
0.90
   
$
0.67
 
Third Quarter
 
$
0.68
   
$
0.56
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.62
   
$
0.40
 
                 
2013
               
First Quarter
 
$
0.91
   
$
0.77
 
Second Quarter
 
$
0.84
   
$
0.55
 
Third Quarter
 
$
0.70
   
$
0.52
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.67
   
$
0.51
 
 
As of March 10, 2015, we had approximately 175 stockholders of record.  Our transfer agent is VStock Transfer, LLC, Cedarhurst, New York.
 
Dividend Policy

We have not previously paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not anticipate or contemplate paying dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to utilize all available funds to develop our business. We can give no assurances that we will ever have excess funds available to pay dividends.
  
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table reflects, as of December 31, 2014, compensation plans pursuant to which the Company is authorized to issue options, warrants or other rights to purchase shares of its common stock, including the number of shares issuable under outstanding options, warrants and rights issued under the plans and the number of shares remaining available for issuance under the plans:

Plan category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights (a)
   
Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights (b)
   
Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a)) (c)
 
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders
   
4,644,428
   
$
0.68
     
1,831,322
 
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders
   
--
     
--
     
--
 
Total
   
4,644,428
   
$
0.68
     
1,831,322
 
 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data.

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

This report contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements containing the words “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “projects,” “will,” and other words of similar import or the negative of those terms or expressions. Forward-looking statements in this report include, but are not limited to, expectations of future levels of research and development spending, general and administrative spending, levels of capital expenditures and operating results, sufficiency of our capital resources, our intention to pursue and consummate strategic opportunities available to us, including sales of certain of our assets. Forward-looking statements subject to certain known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.  These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to those described in “Risk Factors” of the reports filed with the SEC.
 
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere herein.
 
Overview
 
We are a biopharmaceutical company specializing in discovering, developing and commercializing molecular imaging pharmaceuticals with initial applications in the area of cardiology. Molecular imaging pharmaceuticals are radiopharmaceuticals that enable early detection of disease through the visualization of subtle changes in biochemical and biological processes.  We currently have two clinical-stage molecular imaging pharmaceutical product candidates: CardioPET and BFPET. Additionally we have identified potential candidates that may be useful in the detection and/or treatment of vulnerable plaque.
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) published Accounting Standards Update 2014-10, “Development Stage Entities” (ASU 2014-10).  ASU 2014-10 removed the development stage entity guidance under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 915 (ASC 915), “Development Stage Entities”, thereby removing the financial reporting distinction between development stage entities and other reporting entities.
 
In addition, ASU 2014-10 eliminates the requirements for development stage entities to (1) present inception-to-date information in the statements of income, cash flows, and shareholder equity, (2) label the financial statements as those of a development stage entity, (3) disclose a description of the development stage activities in which the entity is engaged, and (4) disclose in the first year in which the entity is no longer a development stage entity that in prior years it had been in the development stage.

Presentation and disclosure requirements under ASC 915 are no longer required for the first annual period beginning after December 15, 2014, including interim periods therein.  Earlier adoption of the new guidance for ASC 915 is permitted for any annual or interim period for which financial statements have not yet been issued for public business entities.  Accordingly, the Company has elected to adopt these changes effective as of June 30, 2014.

Additionally, in August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15, “Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern”, requiring management to assess the reporting entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company is required to comply with this new guidance for their first annual period ending after December 15, 2016, but early adoption is permitted.
 
Management does not expect any other recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards to have a material effect on its results of operations or financial condition.


 
Critical Accounting Policies

This summary of significant accounting policies is presented to assist in understanding our consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements and notes are representations of our management, which is responsible for their integrity and objectivity. These accounting policies conform to U.S. GAAP and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

Accounting for Share-Based Payments

We follow the provisions of ASC Topic 718, which establishes the accounting for transactions in which an entity exchanges equity securities for services and requires companies to expense the estimated fair value of these awards over the requisite service period. We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model in determining fair value. Accordingly, compensation is recognized using the fair value method and expected term accrual requirements as prescribed. 

We account for share-based payments granted to non-employees in accordance with ASC Topic 505, “Equity Based Payments to Non-Employees.” The Company determines the fair value of the stock-based payment as either the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable.  If the fair value of the equity instruments issued is used, it is measured using the stock price and other measurement assumptions as of the earlier of either (1) the date at which a commitment for performance by the counterparty to earn the equity instruments is reached, or (2) the date at which the counterparty’s performance is complete.

The fair value of each share based payment is estimated on the measurement date using the Black-Scholes model with the following assumptions, which are determined at the beginning of each year and utilized in all calculations for that year:

Risk-Free Interest Rate. We utilized the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant with a term consistent with the expected term of our awards.  

Expected Volatility. We calculate the expected volatility based on a volatility index of peer companies as we did not have sufficient historical market information to estimate the volatility of our own stock. 
 
Dividend Yield. We have not declared a dividend on its common stock since its inception and have no intentions of declaring a dividend in the foreseeable future and therefore used a dividend yield of zero.
 
Expected Term. The expected term of options granted represents the period of time that options are expected to be outstanding.  We estimated the expected term of stock options by using the simplified method.  For warrants, the expected term represents the actual term of the warrant.

Forfeitures. Estimates of option forfeitures are based on our experience. We will adjust our estimate of forfeitures over the requisite service period based on the extent to which actual forfeitures differ, or are expected to differ, from such estimates. Changes in estimated forfeitures will be recognized through a cumulative catch-up adjustment in the period of change and will also impact the amount of compensation expense to be recognized in future periods.

 
Derivative Financial Instrument.

We evaluate all financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the consolidated statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, we use a binomial pricing model to value the derivative instruments at inception and on subsequent valuation dates. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period.  Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.
 
At December 31, 2014, we had a derivative warrant liability relating to certain warrants issued in 2013 and 2014 that contain anti-dilution provisions.

Investments
 
Investments that are purchased and held principally for the purpose of selling them in the near term are classified as “trading securities” and reflected on the balance sheet at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses included in earnings.  Investments as of December 31, 2014 are comprised of a single investment in a publicly traded stock and is considered “trading securities”. Gains and losses on the sale of these securities are recorded on the trade date and are determined using the specific identification method.

Impairments

We assess the impairment of long-lived assets, including other intangible assets, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable in accordance with ASC Topic 360-10-35, “Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets.” The determination of related estimated useful lives and whether or not these assets are impaired involves significant judgments, related primarily to the future profitability and/or future value of the assets. We hold investments in companies having operations or technologies in areas that are within or adjacent to our strategic focus when acquired, all of which are privately held and whose values are difficult to determine. We record an investment impairment charge if it believes an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other than temporary.

Management has determined that no impairments had occurred as of December 31, 2014.

Intangible Assets

Our intangible assets consist of technology licenses and are carried at the legal cost to obtain them. Intangible assets are amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life. Useful lives are as follows: technology licenses 5 to 15 years.

Research and Development Costs

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. The cost of intellectual property purchased from others that is immediately marketable or that has an alternative future use is capitalized and amortized as intangible assets. Capitalized costs are amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated economic life of the related asset.

 
Use of Estimates

The accompanying consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with GAAP in the United States of America, and include certain estimates and assumptions which affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Accordingly, actual results may differ from those estimates.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

General
 
To date, we have not generated any revenues from operations and at December 31, 2014, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $28.8 million primarily as a result of research and development, or R&D, expenses and general and administrative, or G&A, expenses. While we may in the future generate revenue from a variety of sources, including license fees, research and development payments in connection with strategic partnerships and/or government grants, our product candidates are at an early stage of development and may never be successfully developed or commercialized. Accordingly, we expect to continue to incur substantial losses from operations for the foreseeable future and there can be no assurance that we will ever generate significant revenues.
 
R&D Expenses
 
Conducting R&D is central to our business. R&D expenses consist primarily of:
 
employee-related expenses, which include salaries and benefits, and rent expense;
 
license fees and annual payments related to in-licensed products and intellectual property;
 
expenses incurred under agreements with CROs, investigative sites and consultants that conduct or provide other services relating to our clinical trials and a substantial portion of our preclinical activities;
 
the cost of acquiring clinical trial materials from third party manufacturers; and
 
costs associated with non-clinical activities, patent filings and regulatory filings.
 
We expect to continue to incur substantial expenses related to our R&D activities for the foreseeable future as we continue product development. Since product candidates in later stages of clinical development generally have higher development costs than those in earlier stages of clinical development, primarily due to the increased size and duration of later stage clinical trials, we expect that our R&D expenses will increase in the future. In addition, if our product development efforts are successful, we expect to incur substantial costs to prepare for potential commercialization of any late-stage product candidates and, in the event one or more of these product candidates receive regulatory approval, to fund the launch of the product.


G&A Expenses
 
G&A expenses consist principally of personnel-related costs, professional fees for legal, consulting and audit services, rent and other general operating expenses not otherwise included in R&D. We anticipate G&A expenses will increase in future periods, reflecting continued and increasing costs associated with:
 
support of our expanded R&D activities;
 
an expanding infrastructure and increased professional fees and other costs associated with the compliance with the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and stock exchange regulatory requirements and compliance; and
 
business development and financing activities.
 
Comparison of Years Ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
G&A expenses were $3,415,340 and $3,049,591 for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The 12.0% increase was due primarily to an increase in legal costs related to litigation and financing, investor relations activities, personnel costs, as well as a general increase in operating expenses. We expect G&A expenses to increase going forward as we proceed to advance our product candidates through the development and regulatory process.
 
R&D expenses were $1,753,500 and $1,312,507 for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The 33.6% increase was due primarily to an increase in expenses related to the initiation of the BFPET trial and increased expenses related to the scientific advisory board. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2014, we incurred approximately $120,000 in R&D grant expenses related to our clinical trials.  We expect R&D expenses to increase in future periods as our product candidates continue through clinical trials and we seek strategic collaborations.
 
Other income (expense), net was $1,038,318 and $(1,245,230) for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  For the year ended December 31, 2014, other income consisted primarily of realized and unrealized losses on trading securities of approximately $74,000, gain on revaluation and modification of our derivative warrant liability of approximately $1,230,000 and interest expense of $104,000 which primarily related to the issuance of notes payable. In addition, for the year ended December 31, 2014, we recorded a gain on settlements of accounts payable of approximately $11,130. For the year ended December 31, 2013, other expenses consisted primarily of realized and unrealized losses on trading securities of approximately $1,055,000, loss on revaluation and modification of our warrant liability of approximately $216,000 and interest expense of $51,000, which primarily related to the exchange of the notes payable for Series B Preferred Stock.  In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2013, we recognized other income of approximately $70,000 from the sale of an insurance company of which we were a policyholder.

Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
We have experienced net losses and negative cash flows from operations since our inception.  We have sustained cumulative losses attributable to common stockholders of approximately $28.8 million as of December 31, 2014.  We have historically financed our operations through issuances of equity and the proceeds of debt instruments. In the past, we have also provided for our cash needs by issuing common stock, options and warrants for certain operating costs, including consulting and professional fees.
  
During the year ended December 31, 2014, we raised $203,055 in cash, net of offering costs, through the private placement of common stock and warrants.  In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2014, we received gross proceeds of $568,852 from the sale of freely tradable securities received as consideration in the private placement of our Series B Preferred Stock. During the year ended December 31, 2014, we received cash proceeds of $90,375 when various warrant holders exercised rights to purchase 180,750 shares of our common stock, with an average exercise price of $0.50 per share. During the year ended December 31, 2014, we issued promissory notes to certain accredited investors and received gross proceeds of $2,078,000. In addition, during the year ended December 31, 2014, we also received 36,300 shares of freely tradable equity securities with a fair value of $47,916 pursuant to the issuance and sale in a private placement of promissory notes.

 
At December 31, 2014, we had cash, cash equivalents and trading securities of approximately $292,075.  We continue to actively pursue various funding options, including equity offerings, to obtain additional funds to continue our product development activities beyond such date.  We will seek funds through equity or debt financings, collaborative or other arrangements with corporate sources, or through other sources. Adequate additional funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. If adequate funds are not available to us, we will be required to delay, curtail or eliminate one or more of our research and development programs.
 
Cash Flows for the Year Ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2014 was $3,321,419, which primarily reflected our net loss of $4,130,522 including a non-cash gain on revaluation of the derivative liability of $1,227,998, offset by other non-cash expenses of $775,017 and changes in the components of working capital of $1,262,084.  Net cash used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2013 was $3,331,797 which primarily reflected our net loss of $5,607,328 offset by non-cash expenses of $2,122,802, and changes in the components of working capital of $152,729.
 
Net cash provided by investing activities was $212,288 for the year ended December 31, 2014, which primarily reflected the proceeds from the sale of trading securities offset by the costs related to our new license agreement and the purchase of office equipment.  For the year ended December 31, 2013, net cash used by investing activities was $1,800,694, which primarily reflected the proceeds from the sale of trading securities offset by the purchase of office equipment. 
 
For the year ended December 31, 2014, net cash provided by financing activities was $2,218,101, which reflects net proceeds related to the issuance of notes payable, net cash received from the sale of our common stock and proceeds from cash exercise of common stock purchase warrants. For the year ended December 31, 2013, net cash provided by financing activities was $1,370,190, which reflects net cash received from the sale of Series B Preferred Stock, the issuance of promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $330,000 and the sale of common stock.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
We have no significant off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to our stockholders.
 
Item 7A.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk.

Not applicable.

Item 8.  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
 
The financial statements are included herein commencing on page F-1.
 
Item 9.  Change in and Disagreement with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

None.


Item 9A.  Controls and Procedures
 
As of the end of the period covered by this report, we conducted an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our chief executive officer and our principal financial officer of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15) and Rule 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act).  Based upon this evaluation, our chief executive officer and our principal financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Commission¹s rules and forms. There was no change in our internal controls or in other factors that could affect these controls during our last fiscal year that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures. Our management, with the participation of our CEO and our CFO, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our CEO and our CFO concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report were effective to ensure  that information required to be disclosed is made known to management and others, as appropriate, to allow timely decision regarding required disclosure and that the information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and (ii) accumulated and communicated to our management, including our CEO and CFO, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. A controls system cannot provide absolute assurance, however, that the objectives of the controls system are met, and no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected.
 
Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act). Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.
 
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives.
 
Our management evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2014. In making this assessment, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (1992). Based on this evaluation, our management, with the participation of the CEO, concluded that, as of December 31, 2014, our internal control over financial reporting was effective.

This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the SEC that permits us to provide only management’s report in this annual report.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting. There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the fourth quarter of the year ended December 31, 2014 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Item 9B.  Other Information

None.

 
Item 10.  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
 
The following persons are our executive officers and directors, and hold the positions set forth opposite their respective names.

Name
 
Age
 
Position
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
 
42
 
Chief Executive Officer, President, Chairman and Director
Tamara Rhein
 
42
 
Chief Financial Officer
Walter Witoshkin
 
69
 
Director
Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D.
 
58
 
Director
Lawrence Atinsky
 
45
 
Director
Joseph A. Pierro, M.D.
 
57
 
Director
Andrew H. Sassine
 
50
 
Director*

* Effective as of April 1, 2014.

Our directors hold office until the earlier of their death, resignation or removal or until their successors have been qualified.
 
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor has been our president, chief executive officer and a member of our Board since February 14, 2011, and has been the Chairman of our Board since June 14, 2012.  Mr. Spoor was the chief financial officer for Sunstone BioSciences from February 2010 through September 2010. From December 2008 until joining Sunstone BioSciences, he worked at Oliver Wyman as a consultant to pharmaceutical and medical device companies. Mr. Spoor was an equity research analyst at J.P. Morgan from July 2007 through October 2008 and at Credit Suisse from November 2005 through July 2007, covering the biotechnology and medical device industries. Prior to his career on Wall Street, Mr. Spoor worked in the pharmaceutical industry spending 11 years with Amersham / GE Healthcare where he worked in 7 countries in a variety of roles including setting up GMP facilities, accountability for the nuclear cardiology portfolio and most recently as the Director of New Product Opportunities leading the PET strategic plan. Mr. Spoor also sits on the board of directors of MetaStat, Inc. (MTST), AtheroNova, Inc. (AHRO) and Protea Biosciences Group, Inc.  He holds a Nuclear Pharmacy degree from the University of Toronto as well as an M.B.A. from Columbia University.  We believe that Mr. Spoor’s background in nuclear pharmacy, finance and accounting and as a healthcare research analyst, as well as his experience at both large and small healthcare companies, provides him with a broad familiarity of the range of issues confronting our company, which makes him a qualified member of our Board.
 
Tamara Rhein has been our chief financial officer since August 16, 2012 and served as our financial controller since July 2011. From November 2008 until  joining us, Ms. Rhein was controller for Manhattan Pharmaceuticals, where she was responsible for a wide range of activities, including financial statement preparation, footnote disclosures for SEC filings, stock option accounting and quarterly and year-end audits.  From 2005 until 2008, Ms. Rhein was with Vyteris, where her primary role was to manage the SEC accounting and reporting department. Ms. Rhein received a Bachelor's of Science degree in accounting from California State University at Northridge and is also a certified public accountant.
 
Walter Witoshkin has been a member of our Board since February 14, 2011. Mr. Witoshkin was the chairman and chief executive officer of QuantRx Biomedical Corporation, a medical technology company from April 2005 through August 2010.  Mr. Witoshkin has held executive positions in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries including senior financial positions at Wyeth Labs (American Cyanimade), VP Business Development and chief financial officer positions at SmithKline Beecham (now Glaxo SmithKline) and Menley & James Laboratories, Inc.  He is a founding partner of the Trident Group, a global consultancy to the pharmaceutical industry.   We believe that Mr. Witoshkin’s industry specific extensive management experience provides him with a broad and deep understanding of our business and our competitors’ efforts, which is an invaluable resource to our Board.


Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D. has been a member of our Board since February 14, 2011.  Dr. Conti is a tenured Professor of Radiology, Pharmacy and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Southern California, as well as Director of the USC Positron Imaging Science Center and Clinic since its inception in 1991.  He is also the Director of the Molecular Imaging Laboratory at USC.  Dr. Conti received his medical and doctoral degrees from Cornell University, and completed his residency in Diagnostic Radiology and Fellowship in Nuclear Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.  Dr. Conti is Board Certified in both Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine.  He is a Fellow of the American College of Radiology and of the American College of Nuclear Medicine Physicians. Dr. Conti is a past President of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), and continues to serve on a number of committees for the Society, including those involving government and regulatory affairs related to the development of Molecular Imaging technology and its applications in medicine.   We believe that Dr. Conti’s broad range of experience in medicine, academia, and administration enable him to provide a unique and valuable perspective to our Board.

Lawrence Atinsky has been a member of our Board January 3, 2011.  During the past seven years, Mr. Atinsky has been a partner at Ascent Biomedical Ventures, or ABV, a venture capital firm investing in seed and early-stage biomedical technology companies developing medical devices, biopharmaceuticals, healthcare services, and information technology.  Prior to joining ABV, Mr. Atinsky was a corporate attorney at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in New York, where he was involved in structuring and negotiating numerous private and public merger and acquisition transactions. Mr. Atinsky has also been the General Counsel of several private companies in the healthcare industry and has been a founder and investor in early-stage medical technology companies. Mr. Atinsky earned a J.D. from New York University School of Law and B.A. degrees in Political Science and Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  We believe that Mr. Atinsky’s experience as a corporate attorney and background in venture capital focusing on biomedical technology companies enable him to provide a valuable perspective to our Board.
 
Joseph A. Pierro, M.D. has been a member of our Board since April 15, 2013.  Since July 2012, Dr. Pierro has been the Chief Medical Officer at Biomedical Systems, a provider of diagnostic services for clinical trials, where he is responsible for leadings its Scientific Affairs groups which provide medical and regulatory guidance with respect to clinical studies. From April of 2009 until May of 2012, Dr. Pierro served as Vice President, Head of Medical Science at Covidien, a healthcare products company, and from July of 2005 until April of 2009, Dr. Pierro served as the Vice President, Clinical Affairs at Covidien, where he was responsible for providing strategic medical direction and operation regulatory and clinical support for new product development. From April 2001 until July 2005, Dr. Pierro served in various medical and clinical roles at General Electric Health Care. Dr. Pierro earned his M.D. at the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and his undergraduate degree from Canisius College. We believe that Dr. Pierro’s experience and background in clinical trials and regulatory guidance enable him to provide a valuable perspective to our Board.

Andrew H. Sassine has been appointed a member of our Board effective April 1, 2014.  Mr. Sassine was employed by Fidelity Investments from 1999 until February 2012. During his tenure, Mr. Sassine managed the Fidelity Small Cap Stock Fund, the Fidelity International Small Cap Opportunities Fund and the Fidelity Advisor International Small Cap Opportunities Fund.  Mr. Sassine began his career at Fidelity as a high yield research analyst covering the telecommunications, satellite, technology, defense and aerospace and restaurant industries and in 2001 joined the international group as a research analyst covering small and mid-cap international stocks. Mr. Sassine has been a member of the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa Board of Advisors since 2009 and is on the Board of Trustees at the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech. Mr. Sassine currently serves on the boards of directors of  MD Revolution Inc., a privately-held personalized medicine practice management and advisory company focused on leveraging genomics and mobile health technology to improve health; CNS Response, Inc. (CNSO.OB), a clinical decision support company providing reference data and analytical tools for clinicians and researchers in psychiatry; and Freedom Meditech, Inc., a privately held growth-stage medical device company focused on ophthalmic medical devices. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Iowa in 1987 and an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1993.  We believe that Mr. Sassine’s experience and background in the investment world enable him to provide a valuable perspective to our Board.
 


Director Independence
 
Walter Witoshkin, Lawrence Atinsky, Peter Conti, Andrew Sassine and Joseph Pierro are independent directors, as the term “independent” is defined by the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market.
 
Board Leadership Structure and Role in Oversight
 
Our Board is primarily responsible for overseeing our risk management processes. The Board receives and reviews periodic reports from management, auditors, legal counsel, and others, as considered appropriate regarding our  assessment of risks. The Board focuses on the most significant risks facing our company and our general risk management strategy, and also ensures that risks undertaken by us are consistent with the Board’s appetite for risk. While the Board oversees our company, our  management is responsible for day-to-day risk management processes. We believe this division of responsibilities is the most effective

Board Committees
 
Audit Committee
 
Walter Witoshkin and Lawrence Atinsky serve on the audit committee of the Board with Mr. Witoshkin serving as the Chairman. The audit committee operates under a charter approved by the Board. The functions of the audit committee include, among other things:
 
evaluating the performance, independence and qualifications of our independent auditors and determining whether to retain our existing independent auditors or engage new independent auditors;
 
reviewing and approving the engagement of our independent auditors to perform audit services and any permissible non- audit services;
 
reviewing our annual and quarterly financial statements and reports and discussing the statements and reports with our independent auditors and management;
 
reviewing with our independent auditors and management significant issues that arise regarding accounting principles and financial statement presentation, and matters concerning the scope, adequacy and effectiveness of our financial controls;
 
preparing the report that the SEC will require in our annual proxy statement; and
 
reviewing and providing oversight with respect to any related party transactions and monitoring compliance with our Code of Ethics; and
 
Our Board has determined that each member of the audit committee meets the financial literacy requirements under NASDAQ Stock Market rules and that Mr. Witoshkin’s employment experience qualifies him as an audit committee financial expert within the meaning of SEC rules and regulations.
 

 
Compensation Committee
 
Walter Witoshkin, Lawrence Atinsky and Peter Conti serve on the compensation committee of the Board, with Mr. Atinsky serving as the Chairman. The compensation committee operates under a charter approved by our Board. The functions of the compensation committee include, among other things:
 
reviewing our corporate goals and objectives relevant to our executives’ compensation, evaluating the executives’ performance in light of such goals and objectives and determining executive compensation levels based on such evaluations;
 
reviewing and making recommendations to the Board with respect to non-executive officer compensation and independent director compensation;
 
administering our incentive compensation and equity-based plans; and
 
preparing the report that the SEC will require in our annual proxy statement and Form 10-K.
 
Nominating Committee
 
We do not presently have a nominating committee. Our Board currently acts as our nominating committee.
 
Code of Ethics
 
We adopted a Code of Ethics on July 22, 2011 that applies to all directors, officers and employees.  Our Code of Ethics is available on our website at http://www.fluoropharma.com. A copy of our code of ethics will also be provided to any person without charge, upon written request sent to us at our offices located at 8 Hillside Avenue, Suite 207, Montclair, NJ 07042.

Compensation Discussion and Analysis
 
Overview
 
During 2013 and 2014, Mr. Spoor continued as our chief executive officer, with compensation packages structured to reflect our current level of operations and resources. This compensation discussion describes the material elements of compensation awarded to, earned by, or paid to each of our executive officers who served as named executive officers during the year ended December 31, 2014. This compensation discussion focuses on the information contained in the following tables and related footnotes and narrative for primarily the last completed fiscal year; however, we also describe compensation actions taken before or after the last completed fiscal year to the extent it enhances the understanding of our executive compensation disclosure.
 
Compensation Program Objectives and Philosophy
 
Our compensation committee currently oversees the design and administration of our executive compensation program. It reviews and approves all elements of compensation for each of our named executive officers taking into consideration recommendations from our chief executive officer (for compensation other than his own), as well as competitive market guidance. We define our competitive markets for executive talent to be the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in the tri-state area. To date, we have utilized Equilar Executive Compensation Survey, a third party market specific compensation survey, and, when applicable, other independent third-party compensation consultants, to benchmark our executive compensation.


The principal elements of our executive compensation program have historically been base salary, annual cash incentives, long-term equity incentives in the form of stock options, other benefits and perquisites, post-termination severance and acceleration of stock option vesting for certain named executive officers upon termination and/or a change in control. Our other benefits and perquisites have consisted of life, health and disability insurance benefits, and a qualified 401(k) savings plan. Our philosophy has been to position the aggregate of these elements at a level that is competitive within the industry and commensurate with our size and performance. During 2014, our compensation philosophy has continued to evolve to accommodate our changing circumstances, operational needs and limited financial resources during this period.
 
Base Salaries
 
For the year ended December 31, 2014, the base salary of our named executives was reflective of the availability of resources and level of continuing operations. Effective October 1, 2013, Mr. Spoor’s annual salary was increased to $305,000.  On August 16, 2012, we appointed Ms. Rhein as chief financial officer.  For the year ended December 31, 2012, Ms. Rhein received an annual salary of $100,000, which increased to $130,000 effective as of January 1, 2014. See “Employment Agreements” below
 
As we continue to evaluate our future human resource requirements, our compensation committee will continue to review appropriate base salaries for our executive officers. In making its determination, the compensation committee will consider the time commitment necessary and the roles our executives will play in implementing our plans.
 
Long-term Equity Incentives
 
We provide the opportunity for our named executive officers and other executives to earn a long-term equity incentive award. Long-term incentive awards provide employees with the incentive to stay with us for longer periods of time, which in turn, provides us with greater stability. Equity awards also are less costly to us in the short term than cash compensation. We review long-term equity incentives for our named executive officers and other executives annually.

Historically, for our named executive officers, our stock option grants were of a size and term determined and approved by the compensation committee. We have traditionally used stock options as our form of equity compensation because stock options provide a relatively straightforward incentive for our executives and result in less immediate dilution of existing shareholders’ interests. Generally, all grants of stock options to our employees were granted with exercise prices equal to or greater than the fair market value of our common stock on the respective grant dates. For a discussion of the determination of the fair market value of these grants, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and the Use of Estimates.”
 
We do not time stock option grants to executives in coordination with the release of material non-public information. Our stock option grants have a 10-year contractual exercise term.  The compensation committee may provide that, in the event of a change in control, any outstanding awards that are unexercisable or otherwise unvested will become fully vested and immediately exercisable.  If there is a termination of employment, the applicable termination provisions regarding exercise term will apply.
 
The vesting of certain of our named executive officers’ stock options is accelerated pursuant to the terms of their employment agreements in certain change in control or other material events.

 
In December 2010, Mr. Spoor was granted 600,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.50.  150,000 of these options vested immediately and the remaining options will vest based on milestones related to the completion of our clinical trials. During 2011, Mr. Spoor was granted an additional 600,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.50.  These options vest equally over a four-year period.  During 2012, Mr. Spoor was granted an additional 600,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.84.  These options vest equally over a three-year period.  During 2012, Ms. Rhein was granted 80,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.83 which vest based on milestones related to the completion of our clinical trials.  During 2013, Ms. Rhein was granted 100,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.83.  These options vest equally over a three-year period. During 2014, Ms. Rhein was granted 50,000 common stock options with an exercise price of $0.51. These options vest based on milestones related to the completion of our clinical trials.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation
 
Members of our compensation committee of the board of directors were Lawrence Atinsky, Walter Witoshkin and Peter Conti. No member of our compensation committee was, or has been, our officer or employee.
 
No member of the compensation committee has a relationship that would constitute an interlocking relationship with our executive officers or directors or another entity.

Item 11.  Executive Compensation
 
The following table sets forth the annual and long-term compensation paid to our chief executive officer and the other executive officers who earned more than $100,000 per year at the end of the last three completed fiscal years. We refer to all of these officers collectively as our “named executive officers.”
 
Summary Compensation Table
 
 
Year
 
Salary ($)
   
Bonus ($)
   
Stock Awards ($)
   
Option Awards ($)
 
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation($)
 
All Other Compensation ($)
 
Total ($)
 
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
2014
   
     305,000
(1)    
   -
                       
305,000
 
 
2013
   
 293,750
     
   50,000
     
 
     
 
           
343,750
 
 
2012
   
  232,500
     
    30,000 
     
50,000 
     
324,535
           
637,035 
 
                                                 
Tamara Rhein
2014
   
130,000
     
-
             
15,169
           
145,169
 
 
2013
   
100,000
     
10,000
     
10,000
     
45,610
 
-
 
-
   
165,610
 
 
2012
   
    85,000
 
   
10,000
     
10,000
     
41,260
 
-
 
-
   
146,260
 
 
 (1) Of this amount, $63,542 of Mr. Spoor’s salary has been accrued for at December 31, 2014.

 
Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End
 
The following table sets forth information with respect to grants of options to purchase our common stock to the named executive officers at December 31, 2014.

   
Options awards
 
Stock awards
Name
 
Number of securities underlying unexercised options (#) exercisable
   
Number of securities underlying unexercised options (#) unexercisable
 
Equity incentive plan awards: Number of securities underlying unexercised unearned options (#)
 
Option exercise price ($)
 
Option expiration date
 
Number of shares or units of stock that have not vested (#)
Market value of shares or units of stock that have not vested ($)
Equity incentive plan awards: Number of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested (#)
Equity incentive plan awards: Market or payout value of unearned shares, units or other rights that have not vested ($)
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
   
450,000
     
150,000
     
$
0.50
 
12/03/2020
 
          -
         -
        -
      -
     
450,000
     
150,000
     
$
0.50
 
5/01/2021
         
     
400,000
     
200,000
     
$
0.84
 
9/19/2022
         
                                       
Tamara Rhein
   
10,500
             
$
1.05
 
12/05/2021
         
     
40,000
     
40,000
     
$
0.83
 
6/25/2022
         
     
33,334
     
66,666
     
$
0.83
 
01/02/2023
         
     
25,000
     
25,000
     
$
0.51
 
02/13/2024
         

Employment Agreements with Executive Officers
 
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor:
 
On July 30, 2012, we entered into a three-year employment agreement with Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor to continue to serve as our chief executive officer.  Under the agreement, Mr. Spoor will receive a base salary at an annual rate of $305,000, and is entitled to an annual bonus if we meet or exceed criteria adopted by the Board. Mr. Spoor is eligible for grants of awards under our 2011 Incentive Plan based upon completion of performance milestones as the Board may determine from time to time with an aggregate target amount of 350,000 shares of common stock.
 
Upon termination of Mr. Spoor’s employment prior to expiration of his employment period, he shall be entitled to receive $550,000 payable in either 12 equal monthly installment payments or in a single lump sum, at our discretion, together with the value of any accrued but unused vacation time, the amount of all accrued but previously unpaid base salary through the date of such termination, any expenses incurred. In addition, we have agreed to provide him with all benefits to which he is entitled for 18 months or the full unexpired term of the agreement, whichever is longer, unless Mr. Spoor’s employment is terminated for cause.  Additionally, in the event we complete a sales transaction, as defined in the agreement, 100% of Mr. Spoor’s then outstanding options will vest immediately.  This agreement contains standard non-competition, non-solicitation, and confidentiality clauses.

 
Tamara Rhein:
 
Effective as of August 22, 2012, we entered into an employment agreement with Ms. Rhein pursuant to which Ms. Rhein serves as our chief financial officer.  The agreement is for an initial one year term that shall automatically renew for successive one year increments unless otherwise terminated.  Under the agreement, Ms. Rhein will receive a base salary at an annual rate of $130,000, and is entitled to an annual bonus as determined by our Board or compensation committee.  Ms. Rhein is also eligible for grants of awards under our 2011 Incentive Plan as the compensation committee may determine from time to time. Upon termination of Ms. Rhein’s employment prior to expiration of her employment period without cause Ms. Rhein shall be entitled to receive (i) all unpaid but due base salary, unpaid bonus and unused vacation days, (ii) benefits received immediately prior to termination for an additional period of six months following termination, (iii) reimbursement of expenses, and (iv) base salary immediately prior to termination for an additional period of six months following termination.  The employment agreement contains standard non-competition, non-solicitation, and confidentiality clauses.

 Director Compensation

The following table sets forth certain information concerning compensation paid or accrued to our non-executive directors during the year ended December 31, 2014.

Name
 
Fees Earned or Paid in Cash ($)
   
Stock Awards ($)
   
Option Awards ($)
   
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation ($)
   
Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings
   
All Other Compensation ($)
   
Total ($)
 
Walter Witoshkin
 
$
30,000
(1)
         
$
-
     
-
     
-
   
$
     118,000
(2)  
$
148,000
 
Peter S. Conti
 
$
30,000
(3)
   
-
   
$
-
     
-
     
-
   
1,500
   
$
31,500
 
Lawrence Atinsky
 
$
30,000
(4)
   
-
   
$
-
     
-
     
-
   
$
-
   
$
30,000
 
Joseph Pierro
 
$
30,000
(5)
   
-
   
$
-
     
-
     
-
   
$
-
   
$
30,000
 
Andrew Sassine
 
$
22,500
(6)
   
-
   
$
-
     
-
     
-
   
$
-
   
$
22,500
 

  (1) $15,000 accrued.
  (2) $28,000 accrued.
  (3) $15,000 accrued.
  (4) $15,000 accrued; 15,000 converted into bridge notes.
  (5) $15,000 accrued.
  (6) $15,000 accrued; $7,500 converted into bridge notes.

We pay the non-executive directors a quarterly stipend of $7,500 to compensate them for their time, attendance at board meetings and for phone calls as required.


Equity Incentive Plan
 
On February 14, 2011, our Board and stockholders adopted the 2011 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”). Under the Plan, awards may take the form of options intended to qualify as incentive stock options under Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”), non-statutory options or restricted stock. The purpose of the Plan is to attract and retain the best available personnel in order to promote the success of our business and to encourage the sense of proprietorship and to stimulate the active interest of such persons in our development and financial success.
 
The Plan initially reserved 6,475,750 shares of common stock for issuance, of which a maximum of 161,250 could be issued as restricted stock. The 2011 Plan provides that on January 1 of each year, commencing on January 1, 2013, the aggregate number of shares available for issuance under the Plan shall be automatically increased so that the number of shares then available for issuance under the Plan will equal the greater of (i) the aggregate number of shares subject to the Plan as of the preceding December 31 and (ii) seven percent (7%) of our total outstanding shares. There are currently 1,831,322 shares reserved for issuance under the Plan. As of December 31, 2014, there were outstanding under the Plan options to purchase 4,644,428 shares and 161,250 shares of restricted stock.
 
Administration
 
The Plan is administered by our Board or a committee designated by our Board. With respect to grants of awards to our officers or directors, the Plan is administered by our Board or a committee in a manner that permits such grants to be exempt from Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act. Grants of awards to covered employees as defined under Section 162(m) of the Code, will be made only by a committee comprised solely of two or more directors eligible to serve on a committee making awards. The Board or the committee has the full authority to select recipients of the grants, determine the terms and conditions of any awards, interpret the Plan, and to take any other action deemed appropriate, consistent with the terms of the Plan.
 
Eligibility
 
Under the Plan, awards may be granted to employees, officers and directors of, and consultants and advisors to, our company and any subsidiary.
 
Terms of Options
 
The term of each option granted under the Plan shall be contained in a stock option agreement with the optionee and such terms shall be determined by the administrator consistent with the provisions of the Plan, including the following:
 
Purchase Price. The purchase price of the common stock subject to each incentive stock option shall not be less than the fair market value (as set forth in the Plan), or in the case of the grant of an incentive stock option to a principal stockholder, not less than 110% of fair market value of such common stock at the time such option is granted.
 
Vesting. The dates on which each option (or portion thereof) shall be exercisable and the conditions precedent to such exercise, if any, shall be fixed by the administrator, in its discretion, at the time such option is granted. Unless otherwise provided in the grant agreement, in the event of a change of control (as set forth in the Plan ) the administrator may, in its sole discretion, accelerate the vesting of outstanding options, in whole or in part.
 
Expiration. Any option granted to an employee shall become exercisable over a period of no longer than five years. No option shall in any event be exercisable after 10 years from, and no incentive stock option granted to a 10% stockholder shall become exercisable after the expiration of five years from, the date of the option.
 
 
Transferability. Options are not transferable and may be exercised solely by the optionee during his or her lifetime or, following death, by the person entitled by will or the laws of descent and distribution; provided, however, that the administrator may, in its sole discretion, permit limited transfers of non-statutory options.

Terms of Restricted Stock
 
A stock award consists of the transfer by us to a participant of shares of common stock. The consideration for the shares to be issued shall be determined by the administrator. Shares of restricted stock are forfeitable until the terms of grant are satisfied and are not transferable until all restrictions have lapsed. Unless otherwise provided by the administrator, any distributions in respect of a restricted stock award will be subject to the same restrictions as the award.
 
Termination, Modification and Amendment
 
The Board may, in so far as permitted by law, from time to time, suspend or terminate the Plan or revise or amend it in any respect whatsoever, except that without the approval of our stockholders, no such revision or amendment shall (i) materially increase the number of shares subject to the Plan, (ii) decrease the price at which grants may be granted, (iii) materially increase the benefits to participants, (iv) materially modify the eligibility requirements for participation in the Plan, (v) effect a repricing, including through cancellations and regrants of awards, or (v) alter or impair the rights and obligations under any outstanding award without the written consent of the participant thereunder.
 
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
The following tables set forth certain information as of March 10, 2015 regarding the beneficial ownership of our common stock, by (i) each person or entity who, to our knowledge, owns more than 5% of our common stock; (ii) our executive officers; (iii) each director; and (iv) all of our executive officers and directors as a group. Unless otherwise indicated in the footnotes to the following table, each person named in the table has sole voting and investment power and that person’s address is c/o FluoroPharma Medical, Inc., 8 Hillside Avenue, Suite 108, Montclair, N.J. 07042. Shares of common stock subject to options, warrants, or other rights currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of March 10, 2015, are deemed to be beneficially owned and outstanding for computing the share ownership and percentage of the stockholder holding such options, warrants or other rights, but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage of any other stockholder.

 
 
 
Name and Address of Beneficial Owner (1)
 
Number of
Shares Beneficially Owned
 
Percentage Beneficially
Owned (2)
 
Johan (Thijs) Spoor (3)
   
1,739,643
 
5.9
%
Tamara Rhein (4)
   
175,573
 
0.6
%
Walter Witoshkin (5)
   
243,345
 
0.8
%
Peter S. Conti (6)
   
534,083
 
1.8
%
Lawrence Atinsky (7)
   
205,444
 
0.7
%
Joseph A. Pierro (8)
   
100,000
 
0.3
%
Andrew H. Sassine (9)
   
1,225,000
 
    4.1
%
Platinum Long Term Growth VII LLC (10)
   
1,815,193
 
6.2
%
All executive officers and directors as a group (7 persons)
   
4,223,268
 
14.4
%
 
(1)
Unless otherwise indicated in the footnotes to the following table, each person named in the table has sole voting and investment power and that person’s address is c/o FluoroPharma Medical, Inc., 8 Hillside Avenue, Suite 108, Montclair, N.J. 07042
 
(2)
Based upon 29,197,497 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding.
 
(3)
Includes 200,398 shares of common stock, 30,000 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of Series B Preferred, 59,245 shares of common stock underlying warrants, 1,050,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.50 per share and 400,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.84 per share.  Does not include 150,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.50 per share and 200,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.84 per share which are held by Mr. Spoor but not currently exercisable nor exercisable within 60 days of March 10, 2015.
 
(4)
Includes 10,000 shares of common stock, 12,875 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of Series B Preferred, 10,711 shares of common stock underlying warrants, 10,500 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $1.05 per share, 106,667 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.83 per share and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.51.  Does not include 73,333 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.83 per share and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.51 per share which are held by Ms. Rhein but not currently exercisable nor exercisable within 60 days of March 10, 2015.
 
(5)
Does not include 161,250 restricted shares that vest upon the earlier of (i) the occurrence of a Change of Control, as defined in the 2011 Equity Incentive Plan; (ii) the successful completion of a Phase II clinical trial for any of the Company’s products; or (ii) the determination by the Board to provide for immediate vesting. Does include 75,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.95 per share, 17,857 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $1.40 per share, 125,488 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.83 per share, and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $$0.53 per share.
 
(6)
Includes 35,738 shares of common stock, 45,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.95 per share, 285,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.16 per share, 17,857 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $1.40 per share, 125,488 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.83 per share, and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.53 per share.
 

 
(7)
Includes 30,000 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of Series B Preferred, 24,956 shares of common stock underlying warrants, 125,488 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.83 per share and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.53 per share.
 
 
(8)
Includes 75,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options a $0.83 per share and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options at $0.53 per share.
 
 
(9)
Includes 600,000 shares of common stock, 600,000 shares of common stock underlying warrants and 25,000 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of options at $0.53 per share.
 
     
(10)
Includes 1,815,193 shares of common stock. The number of shares beneficially owned by Platinum Long Term Growth VII LLC does not include 4,523,076 shares of common stock underlying 4,523,076 shares of Series B Preferred and 6,020,214 shares of common stock underlying warrants, exercisable at $0.53 per share, beneficially owned by Platinum-Montaur Life Sciences, LLC. The terms of such Series B Preferred and warrants provide that the holder may not convert or exercise such securities to the extent such conversion or exercise could result in the holder beneficially owning more than 4.99% of our outstanding common stock, unless waived by the holder on at least 61 days notice and subject to the terms of such securities. Assuming such blocker provisions were waived and the full conversion and exercise of the Series B Preferred and warrants held by Platinum-Montaur Life Sciences, LLC, such holder would beneficially own, together with Platinum Long Term Growth Fund VII LLC, approximately 47% of our issued and outstanding common stock. Michael Goldberg has the voting and dispositive power over the securities held for the account of this beneficial owner. The address of Platinum Long Term Growth VII LLC is 152 West 57th Street, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10019.
 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transaction, and Director Independence

During the last fiscal year, there have been no transactions, whether directly or indirectly, between us and any of our officers, directors or their family members.
  
Director independence

Walter Witoshkin, Lawrence Atinsky, Peter Conti, Andrew Sassine and Joseph Pierro are independent directors, as the term “independent” is defined by the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market. 

Item 14.  Principal Accounting Fees and Services
 
The following table sets forth fees billed to us by our independent auditors for the years ended 2014 and 2013 for (i) services rendered for the audit of our annual financial statements and the review of our quarterly financial statements, (ii) services rendered that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements that are not reported as Audit Fees, and (iii) services rendered in connection with tax preparation, compliance, advice and assistance.

SERVICES
 
2014
   
2013
 
Audit fees
 
$
72,500
   
$
67,500
 
Audit-related fees
   
21,500
     
8,500
 
Tax fees
   
-
     
-
 
All other fees
   
-
     
-
 
                 
Total fees
 
$
94,000
   
$
76,000
 

Our audit committee is responsible for the pre-approval of all audit and permissible non-audit services provided by our principal accountants on a case-by-case basis. Our audit committee has established a policy regarding approval of all audit and permissible non-audit services provided by our principal accountants. Our audit committee pre-approves these services by category and service. Our audit committee has pre-approved all of the services provided by our principal accountants.
 

Item 15.  Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
 
Exhibit No.
Description
2.1
Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of May 16, 2011, by and among FluoroPharma Medical, Inc., FPI Merger Corporation and FluoroPharma, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K/A filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 12, 2011).
 
2.2
Certificate of Merger, dated May 16, 2011 merging FPI Merger Corporation with and into FluoroPharma, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
3.1
Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form SB-2 filed on November 7, 2007).
 
3.2
Bylaws (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form SB-2 filed on November 7, 2007).
 
3.3
Certificate of Designation of the Relative Rights and Preferences of the Series A Preferred Stock, filed with the Secretary of State of Nevada on May 13, 2011 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
3.4
Certificate of Designation of the Relative Rights and Preferences of the Series B Preferred Stock, filed with the Secretary of State of Nevada on September 18, 2013 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 19, 2013).
 
4.1
Form of 2012 Warrant (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on November 21, 2012).
 
4.2
Form of 2011 Warrant (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
4.3
Form of Warrant (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 19, 2013).
 
4.4
Form of Warrant (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 7, 2014).
 
4.5
Form of Promissory Note dated July 22, 2014 (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 25, 2014).
 
10.1+
License Agreement (Number A220395) dated as of June 1, 2014 between the Company and The General Hospital Corporation, d/b/a Massachusetts General Hospital (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 1, 2014).
 
10.2+
License Agreement (Number A220396) dated as of June 1, 2014 between the Company and The General Hospital Corporation, d/b/a Massachusetts General Hospital (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 1, 2014).
 
10.3
Securities Purchase Agreement dated November 19, 2012 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 21, 2012).
 
10.4
Registration Rights Agreement dated November 19, 2012 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 21, 2012).
 
10.5
Form of 2011 Subscription Agreement - Lead Investor (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
10.6
Form of 2011 Registration Rights Agreement (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
10.7
Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated September 18, 2013 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 19, 2013).
 
10.8
Form of Registration Rights Agreement dated September 18, 2013 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 19, 2013).
 
10.9
Form of Securities Purchase Agreement dated December 31, 2013 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 7, 2014).
 
10.10
Form of Registration Rights Agreement dated December 31, 2013 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 7, 2014).
 
10.11
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. 2011 Incentive Plan (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
10.12
Lease Agreement between Hillside Square, LLC and FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. dated as of September 8, 2011 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 14, 2011).
 
10.13*
Second Amendment to Lease Agreement between Hillside Square, LLC and FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. dated as of February 2015.
 
10.14
Employment Agreement dated July 30, 2012 between the Company and Johan (Thijs) Spoor (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 1, 2012).
 
10.15
Employment Agreement dated August 22, 2012 between the Company and Tamara Rhein (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 22, 2012).
 
10.16
Consulting Agreement dated March 24, 2014 between the Company and Del Mar Consulting Group, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 25, 2014).
 
10.17
Form of Note Purchase Agreement dated July 22, 2014 (Incorporated by reference to the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 25, 2014).
 
14.1
Code of Ethics adopted by the Board of Directors (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 16, 2012).
 
21
List of Subsidiaries (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 16, 2011).
 
23.1*
Consent of Wolf & Company, P.C.
 
31.1*
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
31.2*
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
32.1*
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 1350.
 
32.2*
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 1350.
 
101.INS*
XBRL Instance Document.
 
101.SCH*
XBRL Schema Document.
 
101.CAL*
XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document.
 
101.LAB*
XBRL Label Linkbase Document.
 
101.PRE*
XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document.
 
101.DEF*
XBRL Definition Linkbase Document.
_______________
* Filed herewith.
+ Confidential treatment has been granted with respect to portions of these exhibits.


 
SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
 
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc.
 
       
March 31, 2015
By:
/s/ Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
 
   
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
 
   
President and Chief Executive Officer
 
   
(Principal Executive Officer)
 
 
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
 
/s/ Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
March 31, 2015
Johan M. (Thijs) Spoor
 
President, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman & Director
(Principal Executive Officer)
 
   
/s/ Tamara Rhein
March 31, 2015
Tamara Rhein
 
Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Accounting Officer)
 
   
/s/ Peter S. Conti
March 31, 2015
Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D.
 
Director
 
   
 
March 31, 2015
Lawrence Atinsky
 
Director
 
   
/s/ Walter Witoshkin
March 31, 2015
Walter Witoshkin
 
Director
 

/s/ Joseph Pierro
March 31, 2015
Joseph Pierro, M.D.
 
Director
 

/s/ Andrew H. Sassine
March 31, 2015
Andrew Sassine
 
Director
 

 
FluoroPharma Medical, Inc.

Index to Financial Statements
 
   
Page Number
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
F-2
 
Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
F-3
 
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
F-4
 
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity (Deficit) for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
F-5
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013
 
F-6
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
F-7
 



 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
To the Board of Directors of FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary as of December 31, 2014 and 2013 and the related statements of operations, stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the years then ended.  These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of FluoroPharma Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations, has a significant accumulated deficit and, at December 31, 2014, the Company did not have sufficient capital to fund its operations.  This raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.  Management’s plans in regards to these matters are described in Note 1.  The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.  

 
/s/ Wolf & Company, P.C.

Boston, Massachusetts
March 31, 2015
 


FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC. and Subsidiary
       
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
           
               
ASSETS
   
December 31, 2014
   
December 31, 2013
 
               
Current Assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 252,145     $ 1,143,175  
Investment in trading securities
    39,930       634,826  
Prepaid expenses & other
    158,849       52,959  
Total Current Assets
      450,924       1,830,960  
                   
Property and equipment, net
    11,727       35,429  
Intangible assets, net
    357,540       49,339  
                   
Total Assets
    $ 820,191     $ 1,915,728  
                   
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT
`
               
                   
Current Liabilities:
               
Convertible notes payable - short term (see Note 8)
  $ 2,123,416     $ -  
Accounts payable
    1,064,480       183,298  
Derivative warrant liability
    1,354,319       2,549,196  
Accrued expenses and other
    1,074,611       239,673  
Total Current Liabilities
      5,616,826       2,972,167  
                   
Commitments & Contingencies
               
                   
Stockholders’ Deficit:
               
Preferred stock Series A; $0.001 par value, 3,500,000 shares designated 949,477 and 2,350,196 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively  (preference in liquidation of $788,066 at December 31, 2014)
    951       2,352  
Preferred stock Series B; $0.001 par value, 12,000,000 shares designated 5,694,571 and 5,725,821 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively  (preference in liquidation of $5,132,152 at December 31, 2014)
    5,695       5,726  
Common stock - Class A - $0.001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized, 29,197,497 and 25,675,013 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively
    29,199       25,676  
Additional paid-in capital
    24,034,203       23,084,429  
Accumulated deficit
    (28,866,683 )     (24,174,622 )
Total Stockholders’ Deficit
      (4,796,635 )     (1,056,439 )
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit     $ 820,191     $ 1,915,728  
                   
See the report of independent registered public accounting firm and the accompanying notes to these consolidated financial statements.
 


 FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC. and Subsidiary
           
 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
           
             
   
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2014
   
2013
 
             
             
Operating Expenses:
           
 General and administrative
  $ 3,415,340     $ 3,049,591  
 Research and development
    1,753,500       1,312,507  
 Total Operating Expenses
    5,168,840       4,362,098  
                 
 Loss from Operations
    (5,168,840 )     (4,362,098 )
                 
 Other Income (Expense):
               
 Interest income
    18       211  
 Other income
    6,864       70,525  
 Loss on disposition of intangible/fixed assets
    (29,596 )     -  
 Gain on settlement of accounts payable
    11,126       6,594  
 Loss on sale of trading securities
    (302,116 )     (818,365 )
 Change in unrealized gain (loss) on trading securities
    228,156       (236,143 )
 Gain (loss) on revaluation and modification of  derivative warrant liability
    1,227,998       (216,701 )
 Interest and other expense
    (104,132 )     (51,351 )
 Total Other Income (Expense), net
    1,038,318       (1,245,230 )
                 
 Loss Before Provision for Income Taxes
    (4,130,522 )     (5,607,328 )
                 
 Provision for Income Taxes
    -       -  
                 
 Net Loss
  $ (4,130,522 )   $ (5,607,328 )
                 
 Preferred Stock Dividends
    (561,539 )     (1,676,754 )
                 
 Net Loss Attributable to Common Stockholders
  $ (4,692,061 )   $ (7,284,082 )
                 
 Net Loss per Common Share - Basic and Diluted
  $ (0.16 )   $ (0.30 )
                 
 Weighted Average Shares Used in
               
 per Share Calculation - Basic and Diluted:
    28,641,197       24,373,970  
                 
See the report of independent registered public accounting firm and the accompanying notes to these consolidated financial statements.
 

 
FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC. and Subsidiary
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

   
Preferred Stock -
Series A
   
Preferred Stock -
Series B
   
Common Stock
   
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
   
Accumulated
Deficit
   
Total
Stockholders'
Equity
(Deficit)
 
   
Number of
shares
   
Amount
   
Number of
shares
   
Amount
   
Number of
shares
   
Amount
             
BALANCE, December 31, 2012
    2,126,574     2,127       -     -       24,330,013     24,331     18,242,109     (16,890,540 )   1,378,027  
                                                                         
Share Based Compensation
    -       -       -       -       -       -       632,413       -       632,413  
Preferred Stock Dividend - Series A
    223,622       225                                       185,381       (185,606 )     -  
Fair value of common stock issued for consulting services
                                    60,000       60       45,490       -       45,550  
Common Stock issued for cash, net of offering costs of $68,276
                                    1,285,000       1,285       572,939               574,224  
Preferred Stock issued for cash, investments held for sale and conversion of bridge notes, net of offering costs of $81,534 and warrant liability
                    5,725,821       5,726       -               2,121,932               2,127,658  
Deemed dividend related to beneficial conversion feature on Series B issuance
                                                    1,368,272       (1,368,272 )     -  
Preferred Stock Dividend Accrued - Series B
                                                            (122,876 )     (122,876 )
Warrant modification and reclassification to derivative liability
                                                    (84,107 )             (84,107 )
Net loss
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (5,607,328 )     (5,607,328 )
BALANCE, December 31, 2013
    2,350,196       2,352       5,725,821       5,726       25,675,013       25,676       23,084,429       (24,174,622 )     (1,056,439 )
                                                                         
Share Based Compensation
                                                    417,569               417,569  
Fair value of common stock issued for consulting services
   
 
                      304,888       305       177,855               178,160  
Preferred Stock Dividend - Series A
    93,257       93                       34,339       34       94,446       (94,573 )     -  
Common Stock issued for cash, net of offering costs of $31,445
   
 
                      470,000       470       202,585               203,055  
Conversion of Series A Preferred to Common Stock
    (1,493,976 )     (1,494 )                     2,480,000       2,480       (986 )             -  
Conversion of Series B Preferred to Common Stock
 
 
              (31,250 )     (31 )     50,000       50       (19 )             -  
Preferred Stock Dividend Accrued - Series B
                                                          (466,966 )     (466,966 )
Warrant modification and reclassification to derivative liability
                                            (33,121 )             (33,121 )
Common Stock issued in lieu of accumulated dividend on Series B
                            2,507       3       1,251               1,254  
Exercise of Warrants
                                    180,750       181       90,194               90,375  
Net loss
                                                            (4,130,522 )     (4,130,522 )
BALANCE, December 31, 2014
    949,477     $ 951       5,694,571     $ 5,695       29,197,497     $ 29,199     $ 24,034,203     $ (28,866,683 )   $ (4,796,635 )
 
See the report of independent registered public accounting firm and the accompanying notes to these consolidated financial statements.


FLUOROPHARMA MEDICAL, INC. and Subsidiary
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
   
For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   
2014
   
2013
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
           
             
Net loss
  $ (4,130,522 )   $ (5,607,328 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities
               
Depreciation and amortization
    42,470       24,479  
Amortization of issuance costs
    44,388       -  
Fair value of common stock issued for consulting
    178,160       45,550  
Share-based compensation related to stock options
    417,569       632,413  
Loss on fixed/intangible asset dispositions
    29,596       128,245  
Non-cash interest expense on beneficial conversion
    -       27,500  
Gain on accounts payable settlement
    (11,126 )     (6,594 )
Net loss on sale of trading securities
    302,116       818,365  
Change in unrealized gain (loss) on trading securities
    (228,156 )     236,143  
Gain (loss) on revaluation and modification of derivative warrant liability
    (1,227,998 )     216,701  
(Increase) decrease in:
               
Prepaid expenses & other
    (21,949 )     24,351  
Increase (decrease) in:
               
Accounts payable
    914,808       52,112  
Accrued expenses and other
    369,225       76,266  
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities
    (3,321,419 )     (3,331,797 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
               
Proceeds from sale of investments
    568,852       1,806,050  
Cash paid for intangible assets
    (350,000 )     -  
Cash paid for purchase of property and equipment
    (6,564 )     (5,356 )
Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities
    212,288       1,800,694  
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
               
Proceeds from issuance of convertible notes payable - short term
    2,078,000       330,000  
Issuance costs related to notes payable
    (128,329 )     -  
Repayment of notes payable
    (25,000 )     (55,000 )
Proceeds from the exercise of stock warrants
    90,375       -  
Proceeds from sale of common stock, net
    203,055