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Table of Contents
ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

Table of Contents


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2014

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from            to            

Commission File Number: 001-35033

Oconee Federal Financial Corp.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

Federal
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  32-0330122
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

201 East North Second Street, Seneca, South Carolina
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

29678
(Zip Code)

(864) 882-2765
(Registrant's Telephone Number Including Area Code)

         Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class   Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share   The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC

         Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file reports), and (2) has been subject to such requirements for the past 90 days. (1) Yes ý    No o    (2) Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer", "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý

         As of September 12, 2014 there were 5,834,395 shares outstanding of the registrant's common stock. The aggregate value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of the common stock as of December 31, 2013 was $25.0 million.


DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

         1. Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. (Part III)

   


Table of Contents


Table of Contents

PART I.

 

 

       

Item 1.

 

Business

    3  

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

    40  

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

    41  

Item 2.

 

Properties

    41  

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

    41  

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

    41  

PART II.

 

 

   
 
 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

    42  

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

    44  

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    46  

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

    56  

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    57  

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures

    96  

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

    96  

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

    97  

PART III.

 

 

   
 
 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

    97  

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

    97  

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    97  

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

    98  

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

    98  

PART IV.

 

 

   
 
 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

    98  

 

Signatures

    100  

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PART I

ITEM 1.    Business

Forward Looking Statements

        This annual report contains forward-looking statements, which can be identified by the use of such words as estimate, project, believe, intend, anticipate, plan, seek, expect and similar expressions. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

    statements of our goals, intentions and expectations;

    statements regarding our business plans and prospects and growth and operating strategies;

    statements regarding the asset quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and

    estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.

        These forward-looking statements are based on our current beliefs and expectations and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change. We are under no duty to and do not take any obligation to update any forward-looking statements after the date of this Annual Report.

        The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:

    our ability to manage our operations under the current adverse economic conditions (including real estate values, loan demand, inflation, commodity prices and employment levels) nationally and in our market areas;

    adverse changes in the financial industry, securities, credit and national and local real estate markets (including real estate values);

    significant increases in our delinquencies and loan losses, including as a result of our inability to resolve classified assets, changes in the underlying cash flows of our borrowers, and management's assumptions in determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses;

    credit risks of lending activities, including changes in the level and trend of loan delinquencies and write-offs and in our allowance and provision for loan losses;

    use of estimates for determining the fair value of certain of our assets, which may prove to be incorrect and result in significant declines in valuations;

    increased competition among depository and other financial institutions;

    our ability to attract and maintain deposits, including attracting and maintaining deposits and introducing new deposit products;

    changes in interest rates generally, including changes in the relative differences between short term and long term interest rates and in deposit interest rates, that may affect our net interest margin and funding sources;

    fluctuations in the demand for loans, which may be affected by the number of unsold homes, land and other properties in our market areas and by declines in the value of real estate in our market area;

    declines in the yield on our assets resulting from the current low interest rate environment;

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    our ability to successfully implement our business strategies, including attracting and maintaining deposits and introducing new financial products;

    risks related to high concentration of loans secured by real estate located in our market areas;

    changes in the level of government support of housing finance;

    the results of examinations by our regulators, including the possibility that our regulators may, among other things, require us to increase our reserve for loan losses, write down assets, change our regulatory capital position, limit our ability to borrow funds or maintain or increase deposits, or prohibit us from paying dividends, which could adversely affect our dividends and earnings;

    our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;

    our businesses may not be combined successfully, or such combination may take longer to accomplish than expected;

    the growth opportunities and cost savings from the acquisition of Stephens Federal Bank may not be fully realized or may take longer to realize than expected;

    our ability to manage increased expenses following the acquisition of Stephens Federal Bank, including salary and employee benefit expenses and occupation expenses;

    operating costs, customer losses and business disruption following the acquisition of Stephens Federal Bank, including adverse effects of relationships with employees, may be greater than expected;

    our ability to attract and maintain deposits, including former depositors of Stephens Federal Bank;

    changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including the Dodd-Frank Act and the JOBS Act, which could result in, among other things, increased deposit insurance premiums and assessments, capital requirements (particularly the new capital regulations), regulatory fees and compliance costs and the resources we have available to address such changes;

    our reliance on a small executive staff;

    changes in our compensation and benefit plans, and our ability to retain key members of our senior management team and to address staffing needs to implement our strategic plan;

    changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;

    changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board;

    our ability to control costs and expenses, particularly those related to operating as a publicly traded company;

    other changes in our financial condition or results of operations that reduce capital available to pay dividends;

    other changes in the financial condition or future prospects of issuers of securities that we own, including our stock in the FHLB of Atlanta; and

    other economic, competitive, governmental, regulatory and operational factors affecting our operations, pricing, products and services.

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        Because of these and other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements.

Oconee Federal Financial Corp.

        Oconee Federal Financial Corp. (the "Company") is a federally-chartered corporation that was incorporated in January 2011 to be the mid-tier stock holding company for Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association in connection with the mutual-to-stock conversion of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. As of June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Financial Corp. had 5,834,395 shares outstanding and a market capitalization of approximately $105.4 million.

        The executive offices of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. are located at 201 East North Second Street, Seneca, South Carolina 29678, and the telephone number is (864) 882-2765. Our website address is www.oconeefederal.com. Information on our website should not be considered a part of this annual report. Oconee Federal Financial Corp. is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

        At June 30, 2014, we had total assets of $360.5 million, total deposits of $281.0 million and total equity of $77.0 million. We recorded net income of $3.6 million for the year ended June 30, 2014.

Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association

        Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is a federally chartered savings and loan association headquartered in Seneca, South Carolina. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association was originally chartered by the State of South Carolina in 1924 as Seneca Building and Loan Association. In 1958, it changed its name to "Oconee Savings and Loan Association," and in 1991 it converted to a federal charter under the name "Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association."

        Our principal business consists of attracting retail deposits from the general public in our market area and investing those deposits, together with funds generated from operations, in one-to-four family residential mortgage loans and, to a much lesser extent, non-residential mortgage, construction and land and other loans. We also invest in U.S. Government and federal agency securities, mortgage-backed securities and short-term deposits. We have also used borrowed funds as a source of funds, and we borrow principally from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta. We conduct our business from our main office, our executive office annex and three branch offices. All of our offices are located in Oconee County, South Carolina. Our primary market area consists of Oconee County and the nearby communities and townships in adjacent counties in South Carolina.

        Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank system.

Oconee Federal, MHC

        Oconee Federal, MHC is a federally-chartered mutual holding company formed in January 2011 to become the mutual holding company of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. in connection with the mutual-to-stock conversion of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. As a mutual non-stock holding company, Oconee Federal, MHC has as its members all holders of deposit accounts at, and certain borrowers of, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association as of October 21, 1991. As a mutual holding company, Oconee Federal, MHC is required by law to own a majority of the voting stock of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. Oconee Federal, MHC is not currently, and at no time has been, an operating company.

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Market Area

        We conduct business through our main office, our executive office annex and one branch office located in Seneca, South Carolina and one additional branch office located in each of Walhalla, South Carolina and Westminster, South Carolina. All five of our offices are located in Oconee County, which is located on the I-85 corridor between the Charlotte and Atlanta metropolitan areas, approximately 120 miles south of Charlotte and approximately 120 miles north of Atlanta. Our offices are also located approximately 40 miles south of Greenville, South Carolina, and 10 miles from Clemson, South Carolina.

        Our primary market area, which consists of Oconee County and the nearby communities and townships in adjacent counties in South Carolina, is mostly rural and suburban in nature. The Oconee County economy has historically been concentrated in manufacturing. Plant closings and layoffs in this sector, particularly in light manufacturing industries, in recent years have contributed to high unemployment in Oconee County. The regional economy is fairly diversified, with services, wholesale/retail trade, manufacturing and government providing the primary support. In addition, Oconee County and nearby counties are experiencing an increase in retiree populations. Oconee County's and South Carolina's respective June 2014 unemployment rates of 6.2% and 5.3% compare favorably to the national unemployment rate of 6.1% for June 2014.

        The largest employers in Oconee County are education and health services providers, public utilities and light manufacturing companies, including the Oconee County and Seneca City School Systems, Oconee Medical Center, Duke Energy, an electric utility and provider of nuclear and hydroelectric energy, Schneider Electric-Square D, a manufacturer of electronic components, Itron, a manufacturer of electronic measuring devices and Covidien, a manufacturer of healthcare products. Other employers include the local government, retail trade and the leisure/hospitality industry. Many residents of Oconee County are employed in nearby Greenville, South Carolina, which has major employers such as BMW Motors, Inc. and Greenville Health System, and in Pickens County, which has major employers such as Clemson University and the Pickens County school system. In addition, although we only accept deposits from existing customers and residents of Oconee County, we extend credit to residents of counties adjacent to Oconee County in order to take advantage of the additional lending market located in these areas.

Competition

        Competition for making loans and attracting deposits in our primary market area is intense, particularly in light of the relatively modest population base of Oconee County and the relatively large number of institutions that maintain a presence in the county. Financial institution competitors in our primary market area include other locally-based commercial banks, thrifts and credit unions, as well as regional and super-regional banks. We also compete with depository and lending institutions not physically located in our primary market area but capable of doing business remotely, mortgage loan originators and mortgage brokers and other companies in the financial services industry, such as investment firms, mutual funds and insurance companies. Some of our competitors offer products and services that we currently do not offer, such as trust services and private banking. To meet our competition, we seek to emphasize our community orientation, local and timely decision making and superior customer service. As of June 30, 2013 the most recent date of available data, our market share of deposits represented 26.14% of FDIC-insured deposits in Oconee County.

Lending Activities

        The principal lending activity of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is originating one-to-four family residential mortgage loans and, to a much lesser extent, home equity loans, non-residential mortgage loans, construction and land loans, and other loans. In recent years we have

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modestly expanded our non-residential mortgage loans in an effort to diversify our overall loan portfolio, increase the yield of our loans and shorten asset duration. In addition, we may modestly increase our home equity loan portfolio.

        Loan Portfolio Composition.    The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio by type of loan at the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
 
  Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Real estate loans:

                                     

One-to-four family(1)

  $ 214,735     92.55 % $ 204,397     91.61 % $ 234,125     92.82 %

Multi-family

    254     0.11     258     0.12     264     0.10  

Home equity

    227     0.10     292     0.13     395     0.16  

Nonresidential

    8,408     3.62     8,521     3.82     9,226     3.66  

Construction and land

    7,661     3.30     8,735     3.91     7,232     2.87  
                           

Total real estate loans

    231,285     99.68     222,203     99.59     251,242     99.61  

Consumer and other loans

    747     0.32     925     0.41     987     0.39  
                           

Total loans

  $ 232,032     100.00 % $ 223,128     100.00 % $ 252,229     100.00 %
                           

Net deferred loan fees

    (1,246 )         (1,214 )         (1,540 )      

Allowance for loan losses

    (855 )         (751 )         (857 )      
                                 

Loans, net

  $ 229,931         $ 221,163         $ 249,832        
                                 
                                 

 

 
  At June 30,    
   
 
 
  2011   2010    
   
 
 
  Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent    
   
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
   
   
 

Real estate loans:

                                     

One-to-four family

  $ 249,064     93.16 % $ 250,390     93.81 %            

Multi-family

    269     0.10     380     0.14              

Home equity

    466     0.17     510     0.19              

Nonresidential

    9,399     3.52     9,456     3.54              

Construction and land

    7,156     2.68     5,158     1.94              
                               

Total real estate loans

    266,354     99.63     265,894     99.62              

Consumer and other loans

    985     0.37     1,012     0.38              
                               

Total loans

  $ 267,339     100.00 % $ 266,906     100.00 %            
                               

Net deferred loan fees

    (1,677 )         (1,690 )                  

Allowance for loan losses

    (749 )         (888 )                  
                                   

Loans, net

  $ 264,913         $ 264,328                    
                                   
                                   

(1)
Includes $1.8 million and $2.0 million of loans secured by modular and manufactured homes as of June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013, respectively.

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        Contractual Maturities and Interest Rate Sensitivity.    The following table summarizes the scheduled repayments of our loan portfolio at June 30, 2014. Demand loans, loans having no stated repayment schedule or maturity, and overdraft loans are reported as being due in one year or less. Loans are presented net of loans in process.

 
  One- to
Four-
Family
  Multi-
family
  Home
Equity
  Non-
residential
  Construction
and Land
  Consumer
and Other
  Total  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Amounts due in:

                                           

One year or less

  $ 116   $   $ 1   $ 16   $   $ 504   $ 637  

More than one to two years

    144         1     23         239     407  

More than two to three years

    630                 13     4     647  

More than three to five years

    4,681         181     51     202         5,115  

More than five to ten years

    14,463         44     78     2,374         16,959  

More than ten to fifteen years

    22,387             5,920     64         28,371  

More than fifteen years

    172,314     254         2,320     5,008         179,896  
                               

Total

  $ 214,735   $ 254   $ 227   $ 8,408   $ 7,661   $ 747   $ 232,032  
                               
                               

        The following table summarizes our fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans that are due after June 30, 2015.

Interest rate terms on amounts due after one year:

                                           

Fixed-rate loans

  $ 200,115   $   $ 226   $ 8,392   $ 7,661   $ 243   $ 216,637  

Adjustable-rate loans

    14,504     254                     14,758  
                               

Total

  $ 214,619   $ 254   $ 226   $ 8,392   $ 7,661   $ 243   $ 231,395  
                               
                               

        Loan Approval Procedures and Authority.    Pursuant to federal law, the aggregate amount of loans that Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is permitted to make to any one borrower or a group of related borrowers is generally limited to 15% of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's unimpaired capital and surplus (25% if the amount in excess of 15% is secured by "readily marketable collateral" or 30% for certain residential development loans). At June 30, 2014, based on the 15% limitation, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's loans-to-one-borrower limit was approximately $11.5 million. On the same date, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association had no borrowers with outstanding balances in excess of this amount. At June 30, 2014, our largest loan relationship with one borrower was for approximately $3.1 million secured by a church building located in Seneca, South Carolina, and was performing in accordance with its terms on that date.

        Our lending is subject to written underwriting standards and origination procedures. Decisions on loan applications are made on the basis of detailed applications submitted by the prospective borrower, credit histories that we obtain, and property valuations (consistent with our appraisal policy) prepared by outside independent licensed appraisers approved by our board of directors as well as internal evaluations, where permitted by regulations. The loan applications are designed primarily to determine the borrower's ability to repay the requested loan, and the more significant items on the application are verified through use of credit reports, financial statements and tax returns.

        Under our loan policy, the loan officer processing an application is responsible for ensuring proposals and approval of any extensions of credit are in compliance with internal policies and procedures and applicable laws and regulations, and for establishing and maintaining credit files and documentation sufficient to support the loan and to perfect any collateral position. The Loan

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Committee of the board of directors reviews all loan applications, and may override the risk analysis of loan officers.

        Our lending officers do not have individual lending authority. The Loan Committee has approval authority for loans up to $250 thousand. Real estate loans over $250 thousand must be approved by the Loan Committee and ratified by the board of directors. Our board of directors must approve all loans in excess of $500 thousand. To ensure adequate liquidity, under our loan policy, aggregate loans outstanding should not exceed our total deposits and advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta.

        Generally, we require title insurance or abstracts on our mortgage loans as well as fire and extended coverage casualty insurance in amounts at least equal to the principal amount of the loan or the value of improvements on the property, depending on the type of loan.

        One-to-four Family Residential Real Estate Lending.    The cornerstone of our lending program has long been the origination of long-term loans secured by mortgages on owner-occupied one-to-four family residences. At June 30, 2014, $214.7 million, or 92.6% of our total loan portfolio, consisted of one-to-four family residential mortgage loans. At that date, our average outstanding one-to-four family residential mortgage loan balance was $116 thousand and our largest outstanding residential loan had a principal balance of $1.5 million. At June 30, 2014, our ten largest loans in our portfolio totaled $14.8 million, of which five loans totaling $5.8 million were one-to-four residential mortgages and three loans totaling $4.7 million were one-to-four residential construction mortgages. Virtually all of the residential mortgage loans we originate are secured by properties located in our market area.

        The terms of our mortgage loans are generally up to 30 years for traditional homes and up to 15 years for manufactured or modular homes. The terms of non-owner-occupied homes are generally up to 15 years for fixed-rate loans and up to 30 years for adjustable-rate loans. Due to consumer demand in the current low market interest rate environment, many of our recent originations are 15- to 30-year fixed-rate loans secured by one-to-four family residential real estate. Although we typically retain in our portfolio the loans we originate, we generally originate our fixed-rate one-to-four family residential loans in accordance with secondary market standards. At June 30, 2014, we had in our portfolio $20.0 million of residential mortgage loans with original contractual maturities of 10 years or less, $22.4 million of residential mortgage loans with original contractual maturities between 10 and 15 years and $172.3 million of residential mortgage loans with original contractual maturities in excess of 15 years.

        In order to reduce the term to repricing of our loan portfolio, we also originate one-year adjustable-rate one-to-four family residential mortgage loans. Our current adjustable-rate mortgage loans have fixed rates for the first 12 months, and then carry interest rates that adjust annually at a rate based on the change, between closing of the loan and the adjustment date, of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board's published contract interest rate, which represents the national average rate for purchases of previously occupied homes. Such loans carry terms to maturity of up to 30 years. The adjustable-rate mortgage loans currently offered by us generally provide for a 100 basis point annual interest rate change cap, a lifetime cap of 500 basis points over the initial rate and a lifetime floor of 200 basis points under the initial rate.

        Although adjustable-rate mortgage loans may reduce to an extent our vulnerability to changes in market interest rates because they periodically reprice, as interest rates increase, the required payments due from the borrower also increase (subject to rate caps), increasing the potential for default by the borrower. At the same time, the marketability of the underlying collateral may be adversely affected by higher interest rates. Upward adjustments of the contractual interest rate are also limited by the maximum periodic and lifetime rate adjustments permitted by our loan documents. At June 30, 2014, $14.5 million, or 6.8% of our one-to-four family residential loans, had adjustable rates of interest.

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During the year ended June 30, 2014, we originated 7 one-to-four family residential loans totaling $1.2 million with adjustable rates of interest.

        We evaluate both the borrower's ability to make principal, interest and escrow payments and the value of the property that will secure the loan. Our one-to-four family residential mortgage loans do not currently include prepayment penalties and do not produce negative amortization. Our one-to-four family residential mortgage loans customarily include due-on-sale clauses giving us the right to declare the loan immediately due and payable in the event that, among other things, the borrower sells the property subject to the mortgage.

        We currently originate residential mortgage loans for our portfolio with loan-to-value ratios of up to 80% for traditional owner-occupied homes. For traditional homes, we may originate loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80% if the borrower obtains mortgage insurance or provides readily marketable collateral. We may make exceptions for special loan programs that we offer. For example, we currently offer mortgages of up to $95 thousand with loan-to-value ratios of up to 95% to low- to moderate-income borrowers solely for the purchase of their primary residence. We also originate residential mortgage loans for non-owner-occupied homes with loan-to-value ratios of up to 75%.

        We also originate residential mortgage loans with loan-to-value ratios of up to 75% for manufactured or modular homes. We require lower loan-to-value ratios for manufactured and modular homes because such homes tend to depreciate over time. Manufactured or modular homes must be permanently affixed to a lot to make them more difficult to move without our permission. Such homes must be "de-titled" by the State of South Carolina so that they are taxed and must be transferred as residential homes rather than vehicles. We also obtain a mortgage on the real estate to which such homes are affixed. At June 30, 2014, the balance of loans secured by manufactured or modular homes was $1.8 million, representing 0.83% of our one-to-four family residential loans and 0.77% of our total loans.

        At June 30, 2014, we had $1.9 million of one-to-four family residential mortgage loans that were 60 days or more delinquent and $4.9 million of one-to four-family residential mortgage loans that were 30-59 days delinquent. Among delinquent loans past due more than 60 days, only one loan exceeded $250 thousand in outstanding principal, or 41.5%, of total loans in this category. For loans past due 30-59 days past due, three loans with outstanding balances greater than $300 thousand totaled $1.1 million, or 22.7%, of the total balance of loans in this category.

        Multi-family.    Multi-family real estate loans generally have a maximum term of 30 years with a five year balloon payment and are secured by properties containing five or more units in the Company's market area. These loans are generally made in amounts of up to 75% of the lesser of the appraised value or the purchase price of the property with an appropriate projected debt service coverage ratio. The Company's underwriting analysis includes considering the borrower's expertise and requires verification of the borrower's credit history, income and financial statements, banking relationships, independent appraisals, references and income projections for the property. The Company generally obtains personal guarantees on these loans.

        Multi-family real estate loans generally present a higher level of risk than loans secured by one-to-four family residences. This greater risk is due to several factors, including the concentration of principal in a limited number of loans and borrowers, the effects of general economic conditions on income-producing properties and the increased difficulty of evaluating and monitoring these types of loans. Furthermore, the repayment of loans secured by multi-family residential real estate is typically dependent upon the successful operation of the related real estate project.

        Non-Residential Real Estate Lending.    Our non-residential real estate loans are secured primarily by churches and, to a much lesser extent, office buildings, and retail and mixed-use properties located in our primary market area. We believe that focusing on loans to churches enables us to maintain our

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status as a community-oriented institution, and build our customer base as congregation members become familiar with us. At June 30, 2014, we had $8.4 million in non-residential real estate loans, representing 3.6% of our total loan portfolio.

        The non-residential real estate loans that we originate generally have maximum terms of 5 years with amortization periods of 30 years. For loans secured by church property, our loans generally have maximum terms of 20 years with amortization periods of up to 20 years. The maximum loan-to-value ratio of our non-residential real estate loans is generally 75%. At June 30, 2014, our average outstanding non-residential mortgage loan balance was $311 thousand. Our largest non-residential real estate relationship totaled $3.1 million, of which $2.9 million related to one loan. This loan is secured by a mortgage on a church building in Seneca, South Carolina, and, at June 30, 2014, this loan was performing in accordance with its terms. At June 30, 2014, of our ten largest loans in our total portfolio, two loans totaling $4.3 million were non-residential real estate loans.

        Set forth below is information regarding our non-residential real estate loans at June 30, 2014.

Type of Loan
  Number of
Loans
  Balance
(Dollars in
thousands)
 

Church

    21   $ 8,306  

Other non-residential

    5     102  
           

Total

    26   $ 8,408  
           
           

        We consider a number of factors in originating non-residential real estate loans. We evaluate the qualifications and financial condition of the borrower, including credit history, cash flows, the applicable business plan, the financial resources of the borrower, the borrower's experience in owning or managing similar property and the borrower's payment history with us and other financial institutions. In evaluating the property securing the loan, the factors we consider include the net operating income of the mortgaged property before debt service and depreciation, the ratio of the loan amount to the appraised value of the mortgaged property and the debt service coverage ratio (the ratio of net operating income to debt service). For church loans, we also consider the length of time the church has been in existence, the size and financial strength of the denomination with which it is affiliated, attendance figures and growth projections and current and pro forma operating budgets. The collateral underlying all non-residential real estate loans is appraised by outside independent appraisers approved by our board of directors. Personal guarantees may be obtained from the principals of non-residential real estate borrowers, and in the case of church loans, guarantees from the applicable denomination may be obtained.

        Loans secured by non-residential real estate generally are larger than one-to-four family residential loans and involve greater credit risk. Non-residential real estate loans often involve large loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. Repayment of these loans depends to a large degree on the results of operations and management of the properties securing the loans or the businesses conducted on such property, and may be affected to a greater extent by adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy in general, including the current adverse conditions. In addition, because a church's financial stability often depends on donations from congregation members, some of whom may not reside in our market area, rather than income from business operations, repayment may be affected by economic conditions that affect individuals located both in our market area and in other market areas with which we are not as familiar. In addition, due to the unique nature of church buildings and properties, the real estate securing church loans may be less marketable than other non-residential real estate. Accordingly, the nature of these loans makes them more difficult for management to monitor and evaluate. At June 30, 2014, all of our non-residential real estate loans were performing in accordance with their terms.

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        Construction Lending.    We make construction loans to individuals for the construction of their primary residences. These loans generally have maximum terms of eight months, and upon completion of construction convert to conventional amortizing mortgage loans. These construction loans have rates and terms comparable to one-to-four family residential mortgage loans that we originate. During the construction phase, the borrower generally pays interest only. The maximum loan-to-value ratio of our owner-occupied construction loans is 80%. Residential construction loans are generally underwritten pursuant to the same guidelines used for originating permanent residential mortgage loans.

        We also make interim construction loans for non-residential properties. In addition, we occasionally make loans for the construction of homes "on speculation," but we generally permit a borrower to have only one such loan at a time. These loans generally have a maximum term of eight months, and upon completion of construction convert to conventional amortizing non-residential real estate loans. These construction loans have rates and terms comparable to permanent loans secured by property of the type being constructed that we originate. The maximum loan-to-value ratio of these construction loans is 80%.

        We make loans secured by land to complement our construction lending activities. These loans have terms of up to 10 years, and maximum loan-to-value ratios of 75% for improved lots and 65% for unimproved land.

 
  Number of
Loans
  Loans in
Process
  Principal
Balance
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

One-to-four family

    37   $ 10,557   $ 5,024  

Nonresidential

    1   $ 102   $ 48  

Land

    41         2,589  
               

Total construction and land loans

    79   $ 10,659   $ 7,661  
               
               

        At June 30, 2014, our largest residential construction loan was for $1.6 million, of which $0 was outstanding. This loan was performing according to its terms at June 30, 2014. At June 30, 2014, all of our construction loans were performing in accordance with their terms.

        The application process for a construction loan includes a submission to Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association of accurate plans, specifications and costs of the project to be constructed or developed, a copy of the deed or plat survey of the real estate involved in the loan and an appraisal of the proposed collateral for the loan. Our construction loan agreements generally provide that loan proceeds are disbursed in increments as construction progresses. Outside independent licensed or certified appraisers inspect the progress of the construction of the dwelling before disbursements are made.

        To the extent our construction loans are not made to owner-occupants of single-family homes, they are more vulnerable to changes in economic conditions and the concentration of credit with a limited number of borrowers. Further, the nature of these loans is such that they are more difficult to evaluate and monitor. Our risk of loss on a construction or land loan is dependent largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the property's value upon completion of the project and the estimated cost (including interest) of the project. If the estimate of value proves to be inaccurate, we may be confronted, at or prior to the maturity of the loan, with a project with a value which is insufficient to assure full repayment and/or the possibility of having to make substantial investments to complete and sell the project. Because defaults in repayment may not occur during the construction period, it may be difficult to identify problem loans at an early stage.

        Home Equity Lending.    We originate fixed-rate home equity loans secured by a lien on the borrower's primary residence, but only where we hold the first mortgage on the property. Our home

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equity loans are limited to an 80% loan-to-value ratio (including all prior liens), and have terms of up to 10 years with 10-year amortization periods. We use the same underwriting standards for home equity loans as we use for one-to-four family residential mortgage loans. Although we do not currently offer home equity lines of credit, we may offer lines of credit in the future. We expect that any lines of credit that we issue will be originated and underwritten using the same standards that we use for home equity loans and residential mortgage loans. At June 30, 2014, we had $227 thousand of home equity loans outstanding, representing 0.10% of our total loan portfolio.

        Consumer Lending.    We offer installment loans for various consumer purposes, including the purchase of automobiles, boats, appliances and recreational vehicles, and for other legitimate personal purposes. The maximum terms of consumer loans is 18 months for unsecured loans, 12 months for loans secured by marketable securities and 18-60 months for loans secured by a vehicle, depending on the age of the vehicle.

        To date, our consumer lending apart from home equity loans has been quite limited. We generally only extend consumer loans to existing customers or their immediate family members, and these loans generally have relatively low limits. At June 30, 2014, we had $747 thousand of consumer loans outstanding, representing 0.32% of our total loan portfolio. Of these loans, $719 thousand, or 96.3%, were secured by deposits at Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association.

        Consumer loans may entail greater credit risk than residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans that are unsecured or are secured by rapidly depreciable assets, such as automobiles. In addition, consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower's continuing financial stability, and thus are more likely to be affected by adverse personal circumstances. Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount which can be recovered on such loans. At June 30, 2014, all of our consumer loans were performing in accordance with their terms.

Originations, Purchases and Sales of Loans

        Lending activities are conducted solely by our salaried personnel operating at our main and branch office locations. All loans originated by us are underwritten pursuant to our policies and procedures. We originate both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate loans. Our ability to originate fixed or adjustable-rate loans is dependent upon relative customer demand for such loans, which is affected by current and expected future levels of market interest rates. We originate real estate and other loans through our salaried loan officers, marketing efforts, our customer base, walk-in customers and referrals from real estate brokers, builders and attorneys.

        We currently do not purchase whole loans or interests in loans from third parties or sell any of the loans that we originate into the secondary market. However, we may in the future elect to do so, depending on market conditions, in order to supplement our loan production or diversify our risk.

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        The following table shows our gross loan origination and principal repayment activity for loans originated for our portfolios during the periods indicated:

 
  Years Ended June 30,  
 
  2014   2013  
 
  (In thousands)
 

Total loans at beginning of period

  $ 223,128   $ 252,229  

Loans originated:

   
 
   
 
 

Real estate loans:

             

One-to-four family

    29,949     16,632  

Multi-family

         

Home equity

         

Nonresidential

    248     62  

Construction and land

    5,287     18,576  
           

Total real estate loans

    35,484     35,270  

Consumer and other loans

    353     170  
           

Total loans originated

    35,837     35,440  

Deduct:

   
 
   
 
 

Principal repayments

    (26,865 )   (63,154 )

Transfers to real estate owned

    (68 )   (1,387 )
           

Net loan activity

    8,904     (29,101 )
           

Total loans at end of period

  $ 232,032   $ 223,128  
           
           

Delinquencies and Non-Performing Assets

        Delinquency Procedures.    When a loan payment becomes 20 days past due, we contact the customer by mailing a late notice. If a loan payment becomes 30 days past due, we mail a "right to cure" letter to the borrower and any co-makers and endorsers. If a loan payment becomes 90 days past due (or a borrower misses three consecutive payments, whichever occurs first), we send a demand letter and generally cease accruing interest. It is our policy to institute legal procedures for collection or foreclosure when a loan becomes 120 days past due, unless management determines that it is in the best interest of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association to work further with the borrower to arrange a workout plan. It is our policy to not accept deeds in lieu of foreclosure.

        When we acquire real estate as a result of foreclosure, the real estate is classified as real estate owned. The real estate owned is recorded at the lower of carrying amount or fair value, less estimated costs to sell. Soon after acquisition, we order a new appraisal to determine the current market value of the property. Any excess of the recorded value of the loan satisfied over the market value of the property is charged against the allowance for loan losses, or, if the existing allowance is inadequate, charged to expense of the current period. After acquisition, all costs incurred in maintaining the property are expensed. Costs relating to the development and improvement of the property, however, are capitalized to the extent of estimated fair value less estimated costs to sell.

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        Delinquent Loans.    The following table sets forth our loan delinquencies, including non-accrual loans, by type and amount at the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013  
 
  30 - 59
Days
Past Due
  60 - 89
Days
Past Due
  90 Days
or More
Past Due
  Total
Past Due
  30 - 59
Days
Past Due
  60 - 89
Days
Past Due
  90 Days
or More
Past Due
  Total
Past Due
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Real estate loans:

                                                 

One-to-four family

  $ 4,856   $ 893   $ 1,053   $ 6,802   $ 5,932   $ 2,397   $ 1,726   $ 10,055  

Multi-family

                                 

Home equity

                    30             30  

Nonresidential

    87             87                  

Construction and land

                                 
                                   

Total real estate loans

    4,943     893     1,053     6,889     5,962     2,397     1,726     10,085  

Consumer and other loans

                    1             1  
                                   

Total

  $ 4,943   $ 893   $ 1,053   $ 6,889   $ 5,963   $ 2,397   $ 1,726   $ 10,086  
                                   
                                   

        Total delinquencies declined $3.2 million, or 31.7%, to $6.9 million at June 30, 2014 as compared with total delinquencies of $10.1 million at June 30, 2013. The decline in our delinquencies is a reflection of improving asset quality and a stronger economy in our market area during 2014 as compared with 2013. We count loans with partial payments due as delinquent.

        Classified Assets.    Federal regulations provide for the classification of loans and other assets, such as debt and equity securities considered to be of lesser quality, as "substandard," "doubtful" or "loss." An asset is considered "substandard" if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or by the collateral pledged, if any. "Substandard" assets include those characterized by the "distinct possibility" that the insured institution will sustain "some loss" if the deficiencies are not corrected. Assets classified as "doubtful" have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified "substandard," with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make "collection or liquidation in full," on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, "highly questionable and improbable." Assets classified as "loss" are those considered "uncollectible" and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss allowance is not warranted. Assets which do not currently expose the insured institution to sufficient risk to warrant classification in one of the aforementioned categories but possess weaknesses are designated as "special mention" by our management.

        When an insured institution classifies problem assets as either substandard or doubtful, it may establish general allowances in an amount deemed prudent by management to cover probable accrued losses. General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to cover probable accrued losses associated with lending activities, but which, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets. When an insured institution classifies problem assets as "loss," it is required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of that portion of the asset so classified or to charge-off such amount. An institution's determination as to the classification of its assets and the amount of its valuation allowances is subject to review by the regulatory authorities, which may require the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.

        In connection with the filing of our periodic reports to our regulators and in accordance with our classification of assets policy, we regularly review the problem loans in our portfolio to determine whether any loans require classification in accordance with applicable regulations.

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        On the basis of this review of our assets, our classified or special mention assets at the dates indicated were as set forth below. Special mention and substandard assets are presented gross of allowance, and doubtful assets are presented net of allowance.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013  
 
  (Dollars
in thousands)

 

Special mention assets

  $   $  

Substandard assets

    1,647     1,986  

Doubtful assets(1)

    744     1,047  

Loss assets

         
           

Total classified assets

  $ 2,391   $ 3,033  
           
           

(1)
Consists solely of real estate owned.

        Doubtful assets or real estate owned assets decreased by $303, thousand, or 28.9%, to $744 thousand at June 30, 2014 from $1.0 million at June 30, 2013. Our substandard assets decreased by $339 thousand, or 17.1%, to $1.6 million at June 30, 2014 from $2.0 million at June 30, 2013, and our overall classified asset totals decreased by $642 thousand, or 21.2%, to $2.4 million at June 30, 2014 from $3.0 million at June 30, 2013 due to improving credit quality in our loan portfolio.

        Non-Performing Assets.    We generally cease accruing interest on our loans when contractual payments of principal or interest have become 90 days delinquent unless the loan is well-secured and in the process of collection. Loans are placed on non-accrual or charged off at an earlier date if collection of principal or interest is considered doubtful. All interest accrued but not received for loans placed on non-accrual are reversed against interest income. Interest received on such loans is accounted for on the cash-basis or cost-recovery method, until the loans qualify for return to accrual. Generally, loans are restored to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current, and future payments are reasonably assured. Loans are moved to non-accrual status in accordance with our policy, which is typically after 90 days of non-payment.

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        The table below sets forth the amounts and categories of our non-performing assets at the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Non-accrual loans:

                               

Real estate loans:

                               

One- to four-family

  $ 1,647   $ 1,493   $ 2,157   $ 1,567   $ 3,214  

Multi-family

                     

Home equity

                     

Non-residential

                     

Construction and land

                     
                       

Total real estate loans

    1,647     1,493     2,157     1,567     3,214  

Consumer and other loans

                     
                       

Total nonaccrual loans

  $ 1,647   $ 1,493   $ 2,157   $ 1,567   $ 3,214  
                       
                       

Accruing loans past due 90 days or more:

                               

Real estate loans:

                               

One- to four-family

  $   $ 493   $ 145   $   $ 764  

Multi-family

                     

Home equity

                     

Non-residential

                     

Construction and land

                     
                       

Total real estate loans

        493     145         764  

Consumer and other loans

                     

Total accruing loans past due 90 days or more        

        493     145         764  
                       

Total of nonaccrual and 90 days or more past due loans

  $ 1,647   $ 1,986   $ 2,302   $ 1,567   $ 3,978  
                       
                       

Real estate owned:

                               

One- to four-family

  $ 744   $ 1,047   $ 854   $ 2,254   $ 751  

Multi-family

                     

Home equity

                     

Non-residential

                     

Other

                     

Other nonperforming assets

                     
                       

Total nonperforming assets

  $ 2,391   $ 3,033   $ 3,156   $ 3,821   $ 4,729  
                       
                       

Troubled debt restructurings

                     
                       

Troubled debt restructurings and total nonperforming assets

  $ 2,391   $ 3,033   $ 3,156   $ 3,821   $ 4,729  
                       
                       

Total nonperforming loans to total loans

    0.71 %   0.89 %   0.91 %   0.59 %   1.49 %

Total nonperforming assets to total assets

    0.66 %   0.82 %   0.84 %   1.02 %   1.42 %

Total nonperforming assets to loans and real estate owned

    1.03 %   1.35 %   1.25 %   1.42 %   1.77 %

        All nonperforming loans in the table above were classified as substandard. There were no other loans that are not already disclosed where there is information about possible credit problems of borrowers that caused us serious doubts about the ability of the borrowers to comply with present loan repayment terms and that may result in disclosure of such loans in the future.

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        Interest income that would have been recorded had our non-accruing loans been current in accordance with their original terms was $63 thousand for the year ended June 30, 2014. Interest of $17 thousand was recognized on these loans and is included in net income for the year ended June 30, 2014.

Allowance for Loan Losses

        Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Loan Losses.    Our allowance for loan losses is the amount considered necessary to reflect probable losses inherent in our loan portfolio. We evaluate the need to establish allowances against losses on loans on a quarterly basis. When additional allowances are necessary, a provision for loan losses is charged to earnings.

        Our methodology for assessing the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses consists of two key elements: (a) specific allowances for identified problem loans; and (b) a general valuation allowance on the remainder of the loan portfolio. Although we determine the amount of each element of the allowance separately, the entire allowance for loan losses is available for the entire portfolio.

        Specific Allowances for Identified Problem Loans.    We establish a specific allowance when loans are determined to be impaired. Loss is measured by determining the present value of expected future cash flows or, for collateral-dependent loans, the fair value of the collateral adjusted for market conditions and selling expenses. Factors in identifying a specific problem loan include:

    the strength of the customer's personal or business cash flows;

    the availability of other sources of repayment;

    the amount due or past due;

    the type and value of collateral;

    the strength of our collateral position;

    the estimated cost to sell the collateral; and

    the borrower's effort to cure the delinquency.

        In addition, for loans secured by real estate, we consider the extent of any past due and unpaid property taxes applicable to the property serving as collateral on the mortgage.

        General Valuation Allowance on Certain Identified Problem Loans.    Although our policy allows for a general valuation allowance on certain smaller balance, homogenous pools of loans classified as substandard, we have historically evaluated non-performing loans, regardless of size, for impairment in establishing a specific allowance.

        General Valuation Allowance on the Remainder of the Loan Portfolio.    We establish a general allowance for loans that are not otherwise specifically identified as impaired to recognize the probable incurred losses within our portfolio, but which, unlike specific allowances, has not been allocated to particular problem loans. In estimating this portion of the allowance, we apply loss factors to each category of loan. We estimate our loss factors taking into consideration both quantitative and qualitative aspects that would affect our estimation of probable incurred losses. These aspects include, but are not limited to historical charge-offs; loan delinquencies and foreclosure trends; current economic trends and demographic data within Oconee County and the surrounding areas, such as unemployment rates and population trends; current trends in real estate values within the Oconee County market area; charge-off trends of other comparable institutions; the results of any internal loan reviews; loan to value ratios; our historically conservative credit risk policy; the strength of our underwriting and ongoing credit monitoring function; and other relevant factors.

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        We evaluate our loss factors quarterly to ensure their relevance in the current real estate and economic environment, and we review the allowance for loan losses (as a percentage of total loans) maintained by us relative to other thrift institutions within our peer group, taking into consideration the other institutions' delinquency trends, charge-offs, nonperforming loans, and portfolio composition as a basis for validation for the adequacy of our overall allowance for loan loss.

        Our allowance for loan losses increased to $855 thousand at June 30, 2014 from $751 thousand at June 30, 2013. The increase reflected a slight increase in the allowance for individually impaired loans to $52 thousand at June 30, 2014 as compared with $27 thousand at June 30, 2013, and the increase also reflected an increase in our general valuation allowance due to the growth in our total loan portfolio. Our total gross loan portfolio increased $8.9 million to $232.0 million at June 30, 2014 as compared with $223.1 million at June 30, 2013. All nonperforming loans are classified as substandard and are considered to be impaired. Our total of impaired loans decreased to $1.6 million at June 30, 2014 from $2.0 million at June 30, 2013. However, the specific portion of our allowance attributable to these impaired loans increased slightly to $52 thousand from $27 thousand for the same periods ended due to slightly higher quality of underlying real estate collateral used to measure the amount of impairment in the prior year as compared with the current year. Net charge offs for the year ended June 30, 2014 were $4 thousand compared with $366 thousand for the year ended June 30, 2013. Our net charge offs in 2013 were primarily impacted by one large one-to-four family residential real estate loan charge off of $277 thousand during the third quarter of 2013, which was not reflective of our overall asset quality of our remaining portfolio of one-to-four family real estate loans. Our allowance for loan losses at June 30, 2014 and 2013 represented 0.37% and 0.34%, respectively, of total gross loans. Our allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans was 51.9% at June 30, 2014 and 37.8% at June 30, 2013.

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        Allowance for Loan Losses.    The following table sets forth activity in our allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated.

 
  Year Ended June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Allowance at beginning of period

  $ 751   $ 857   $ 749   $ 888   $ 258  

Provision for loan losses

    108     260     270     135     758  

Charge offs:

                               

Real estate loans

                               

One- to four-family

    (4 )   (366 )   (145 )   (268 )   (128 )

Multi-family

                     

Home equity

                     

Non-residential

                     

Construction and land

            (17 )        

Consumer and other loans

                (6 )    
                       

Total charge-offs

    (4 )   (366 )   (162 )   (274 )   (128 )

Recoveries:

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Real estate loans

                               

One- to four-family

                     

Multi-family

                     

Home equity

                     

Non-residential

                     

Construction and land

                     

Consumer and other loans

                     

Total recoveries

                     
                       

Net charge-offs

    (4 )   (366 )   (162 )   (274 )   (128 )
                       

Allowance at end of period

  $ 855   $ 751   $ 857   $ 749   $ 888  
                       
                       

Allowance to nonperforming loans

   
51.91

%
 
37.81

%
 
37.23

%
 
47.80

%
 
22.32

%

Allowance to total loans outstanding at the end of the period

    0.37     0.34     0.34     0.28     0.33  

Net charge-offs to average loans outstanding during the period

    0.00     0.16     0.06     0.10     0.05  

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        Allocation of Allowance for Loan Losses.    The following table sets forth the allowance for loan losses allocated by loan category, the total loan balances by category, and the percent of loans in each category to total loans at the dates indicated. The allowance for loan losses allocated to each category is not necessarily indicative of future losses in any particular category and does not restrict the use of the allowance to absorb losses in other categories.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
  % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
  Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
  % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
  Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
  % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
 

Real estate loans:

                                                       

One- to four-family

  $ 736     86.08 %   92.55 % $ 665     88.55 %   92.55 % $ 773     90.20 %   92.82 %

Multi-family

    4     0.47     0.11     4     0.53     0.11     4     0.47     0.10  

Home equity

    1     0.12     0.10     1     0.13     0.10     1     0.12     0.16  

Non-residential

    52     6.08     3.62     52     6.92     3.64     56     6.53     3.66  

Construction and land

    59     6.90     3.30     27     3.60     3.28     21     2.45     2.87  
                                       

Total real estate loans

    852     99.65     99.68     749     99.73     99.68     855     99.77     99.61  

Consumer and other loans

    3     0.35     0.32     2     0.27     0.32     2     0.23     0.39  
                                       

Total allowance for loan losses

  $ 855     100.00 %   100.00 % $ 751     100.00 %   100 % $ 857     100.00 %   100.00 %
                                       
                                       

 

 
  At June 30,    
   
   
 
 
  2011   2010    
   
   
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
   
   
   
 
(Dollars in thousands)
  Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
  % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
  Amount   % of
Allowance
to Total
Allowance
  % of
Loans in
Category
to Total
Loans
   
   
   
 

Real estate loans:

                                                       

One- to four-family

  $ 646     86.25 %   93.16 % $ 785     88.40 %   93.81 %                  

Multi-family

    4     0.53     0.10     6     0.68     0.14                    

Home equity

    1     0.13     0.17     1     0.11     0.19                    

Non-residential

    57     7.61     3.52     57     6.42     3.54                    

Construction and land

    38     5.08     2.68     35     3.94     1.93                    
                                             

Total real estate loans

    746     99.60     99.63     884     99.55     99.61                    

Consumer and other loans

    3     0.40     0.37     4     0.45     0.39                    
                                             

Total allowance for loan losses

  $ 749     100.00 %   100.00 % $ 888     100.00 %   100.00 %                  
                                             
                                             

        Although we believe that we use the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future adjustments to the allowance for loan losses may be necessary and results of operations could be adversely affected if circumstances differ substantially from the assumptions used in making the determinations. Furthermore, while we believe we have established our allowance for loan losses in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, regulators, in reviewing our loan portfolio, may request us to increase our allowance for loan losses. In addition, because future events affecting borrowers and collateral cannot be predicted with certainty, the existing allowance for loan losses may not be adequate and increases may be necessary should the quality of any loan deteriorate as a result of the factors discussed above. Any material increase in the allowance for loan losses may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

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Investment Activities

        General.    The goals of our investment policy are to provide and maintain liquidity to meet deposit withdrawal and loan funding needs, to help manage our interest rate risk, and to generate a return on idle funds within the context of our interest rate and credit risk objectives.

        Our board of directors approved and adopted our investment policy. The investment policy is reviewed annually by our board of directors and any changes to the policy are subject to the approval of our board of directors. Authority to make investments under the approved investment policy guidelines is delegated to our Investment Committee. All investment transactions are reviewed at regularly scheduled monthly meetings of our board of directors.

        Our current investment policy permits investments in securities issued by the United States government and its agencies or government sponsored enterprises. We also may invest in mortgage-backed securities and mutual funds that invest in mortgage-backed securities. Our investment policy also permits, with certain limitations, investments in bank-owned life insurance, collateralized mortgage obligations, asset-backed securities, real estate mortgage investment conduits, South Carolina revenue bonds and municipal securities. While equity investments are generally not authorized by our investment policy, such investments are permitted on a case-by-case basis provided such investments are pre-authorized by action of our board of directors.

        At June 30, 2014, we did not have an investment in the securities of any single non-government issuer that exceeded 10% of equity at that date.

        Our current investment policy does not permit investment in stripped mortgage-backed securities, complex securities and derivatives as defined in federal banking regulations and other high-risk securities. As of June 30, 2014, we held no asset-backed securities other than mortgage-backed securities. Our current policies do not permit hedging activities, such as engaging in futures, options or swap transactions, or investing in high-risk mortgage derivatives, such as collateralized mortgage obligation residual interests, real estate mortgage investment conduit residual interests or stripped mortgage backed securities. At June 30, 2014, none of the collateral underlying our securities portfolio was considered subprime or Alt-A.

        Current accounting principles require that, at the time of purchase, we designate a security as either held-to-maturity, available-for-sale, or trading, based upon our ability and intent. Securities available-for-sale and trading securities are reported at fair value and securities held-to-maturity are reported at amortized cost. A periodic review and evaluation of our available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities portfolios is conducted to determine if the fair value of any security has declined below its carrying value and whether such decline is other-than-temporary. If such decline is deemed to be other-than-temporary, the security is written down to a new cost basis and the resulting loss is charged against earnings. At June 30, 2014, the fair values of our securities are based on published or securities dealers' market values. At June 30, 2014, the amortized cost of our securities classified as available-for-sale and held-to-maturity was $104.0 million and $0, respectively, compared with $88.9 million and $8.0 million, respectively, at June 30, 2013. The fair value of the securities classified as available-for-sale was $103.8 million, and the fair value of the securities classified as held-to-maturity was $0 compared with $88.0 million and $8.2 million, respectively, at June 30, 2013. The increase in securities classified as available-for-sale is a result of moderate loan demand, resulting in excess cash liquidity. During 2014, all securities classified as held-to-maturity were transferred to available-for-sale.

        U.S. Government and Federal Agency Obligations.    We may invest in U.S. Government and federal agency securities. While these securities generally provide lower yields than other investments in our securities investment portfolio, we maintain these investments, to the extent appropriate, for liquidity purposes, as collateral for borrowings and for prepayment protection.

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Table of Contents

        Mortgage-Backed Securities.    At June 30, 2014, the amortized cost and fair value of our mortgage-backed securities portfolio totaled $60.7 million and $60.4 million, respectively. Mortgage-backed securities are securities issued in the secondary market that are collateralized by pools of mortgages. Certain types of mortgage-backed securities are commonly referred to as "pass-through" certificates because the principal and interest of the underlying loans is "passed through" to investors, net of certain costs, including servicing and guarantee fees. Mortgage-backed securities typically are collateralized by pools of one-to-four family or multifamily mortgages, although we invest primarily in mortgage-backed securities backed by one-to-four family mortgages. The issuers of such securities pool and resell the participation interests in the form of securities to investors such as the Company. The interest rate of the security is lower than the interest rates of the underlying loans to allow for payment of servicing and guaranty fees. Ginnie Mae, a United States Government agency, and government sponsored enterprises, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, either guarantee the payments or guarantee the timely payment of principal and interest to investors. Mortgage-backed securities are more liquid than individual mortgage loans since there is an active trading market for such securities. In addition, mortgage-backed securities may be used to collateralize our borrowings.

        Investments in mortgage-backed securities involve a risk that actual payments will be greater or less than the prepayment rate estimated at the time of purchase, which may require adjustments to the amortization of any premium or accretion of any discount relating to such interests, thereby affecting the net yield on our securities. Current prepayment speeds determine whether prepayment estimates require modification that could cause amortization or accretion adjustments. Also, in September 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency placed Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae into conservatorship. The U.S. Treasury Department has established financing agreements to ensure that Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae meet their obligations to holders of mortgage-backed securities that they have issued or guaranteed. These actions have not affected the markets for mortgage-backed securities issued by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae. Both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae remain in conservatorship with the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

        All of our mortgage-backed securities are issued by government agencies or government-sponsored entities.

        Restricted Equity Securities.    We invest in the common stock of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta. The common stock is carried at cost and classified as restricted equity securities. We periodically evaluate these shares of common stock for impairment based on ultimate recovery of par value.

        Bank-Owned Life Insurance.    We invest in bank-owned life insurance to provide us with a funding source for deferred compensation agreements. Bank-owned life insurance also generally provides us non-interest income that is non-taxable. Federal regulations generally limit our investment in bank-owned life insurance to 25% of our Tier 1 capital plus our allowance for loan losses. At June 30, 2014 and 2013, we had $8.8 and $8.5 million, respectively, invested in bank-owned life insurance.

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Table of Contents

        Securities Portfolio Composition.    The following table sets forth the composition of our securities portfolio at the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
 
  Amortized
Cost
  Fair
Value
  Amortized
Cost
  Fair
Value
  Amortized
Cost
  Fair
Value
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Securities available-for-sale:

                                     

FHLMC common stock

  $ 20   $ 314   $ 20   $ 110   $ 20   $ 20  

Preferred stock

    271     298     271     297     272     272  

Certificates of deposit

    7,221     7,237                  

Municipal securities

    5,846     5,809                  

U.S. Government agency mortgage-backed securities        

    60,742     60,440     50,209     49,527     31,205     31,658  

U.S. government agencies

    29,946     29,708     38,387     38,051     32,081     32,590  
                           

Total available-for-sale

  $ 104,046   $ 103,806   $ 88,887   $ 87,985   $ 63,578   $ 64,540  
                           
                           

Securities held-to-maturity:

                                     

Certificates of deposit

  $   $   $ 3,985   $ 3,990   $ 1,992   $ 2,000  

U.S. Government agency mortgage-backed securities          

            4,054     4,233     6,741     7,147  
                           

Total held-to-maturity

            8,039     8,223     8,733     9,147  
                           

Total

  $ 104,046   $ 103,806   $ 96,926   $ 96,208   $ 72,311   $ 73,687  
                           
                           

        Securities Portfolio Maturities and Yields.    The following table sets forth the contractual maturities and weighted average yields of our securities portfolio at June 30, 2014. Mortgage-backed securities are anticipated to be repaid in advance of their contractual maturities as a result of projected mortgage loan prepayments. The weighted average life of the mortgage-backed securities in our portfolio at June 30, 2014 was 4.2 years.

 
  One Year or Less   More than One Year
to Five Years
  More than Five Years
to Ten Years
 
 
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Securities available-for-sale:

                                     

FHLMC common stock

  $     % $     % $     %

Preferred stock

                         

Certificates of deposit

    1,992     1.19     3,735     1.12     1,494     1.68  

Municipal securities

                    2,847     1.96  

U.S. Government agency mortgage-backed securities

            53,271     1.81     7,471     1.71  

U.S. Government agency bonds

    2,010     1.48     14,982     1.52     8,954     1.46  
                           

Total available-for-sale

  $ 4,002     1.33 % $ 71,988     1.71 % $ 20,766     1.64 %
                           
                           

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Table of Contents


 
  More than Ten Years   Total    
   
 
 
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
  Amortized
Cost
  Weighted
Average
Yield
   
   
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
   
   
 

Securities available-for-sale:

                                     

FHLMC common stock

  $ 20     % $ 20     %            

Preferred stock

    271     6.64     271     6.64              

Certificates of deposit

            7,221     1.25              

Municipal securities

    2,998     2.15     5,846     2.06              

U.S. Government agency mortgage-backed securities

            60,742     1.80              

U.S. Government agency bonds

    4,000     1.44     29,946     1.49              
                               

Total available-for-sale

  $ 7,289     1.92 % $ 104,046     1.70 %            
                               
                               

Sources of Funds

        General.    Deposits have traditionally been our primary source of funds for use in lending and investment activities. We also may use borrowings, primarily Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta advances, to supplement cash flow needs, lengthen the maturities of liabilities for interest rate risk purposes and to manage the cost of funds. In addition, we receive funds from scheduled loan payments, investment maturities, loan prepayments, retained earnings and income on earning assets. While scheduled loan payments and income on earning assets are relatively stable sources of funds, deposit inflows and outflows can vary widely and are influenced by prevailing interest rates, market conditions and levels of competition.

        Deposits.    Our deposits are solely from residents of Oconee County, South Carolina and from persons outside Oconee County with whom we have an existing banking relationship. We offer a selection of deposit accounts, including demand accounts, NOW accounts, money market accounts, savings accounts, certificates of deposit and individual retirement accounts ("IRAs"). Deposit account terms vary, with the principal differences being the minimum balance required, the amount of time the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate. We do not accept brokered deposits, although we have the authority to do so. We very rarely accept certificates of deposit in excess of $250 thousand or other deposits in excess of applicable FDIC insurance coverage, which is currently $250 thousand per depositor.

        Interest rates paid, maturity terms, service fees and withdrawal penalties are established on a periodic basis. Deposit rates and terms are based primarily on current operating strategies and market rates, liquidity requirements, rates paid by competitors and growth goals. We rely upon personalized customer service, long-standing relationships with customers, and the favorable image of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association in the community to attract and retain deposits. We also offer a fully functional electronic banking platform, including on-line bill pay, as a service to our deposit customers.

        The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, changes in interest rates and competition. Our ability to gather deposits is affected by the competitive market in which we operate, which includes numerous financial institutions of varying sizes offering a wide range of products.

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Table of Contents

        The following table sets forth the distribution of total deposits by account type, at the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
 
  Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent   Amount   Percent  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

NOW and demand deposits(1)

  $ 26,334     9.37 % $ 23,410     8.01 % $ 20,456     6.97 %

Money market deposits

    12,459     4.43     12,238     4.19     11,988     4.09  

Regular savings and other deposits

    41,945     14.93     38,823     13.28     35,152     11.98  

Certificates of deposit—IRA

    54,646     19.45     57,054     19.51     58,873     20.07  

Certificates of deposit—other

    145,631     51.82     160,897     55.01     166,899     56.89  
                           

Total

  $ 281,015     100.00 % $ 292,422     100.00 % $ 293,368     100.00 %
                           
                           

(1)
Includes non-interest bearing deposits of $4.1 million and $4.9 million at June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

        As of June 30, 2014, the aggregate amount of our outstanding certificates of deposit in amounts greater than or equal to $100 thousand was approximately $64.5 million. The following table sets forth the maturity of these certificates of deposit as of June 30, 2014.

 
  June 30, 2014
Certificates of Deposit
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Maturity Period:

       

Three months or less

  $ 13,479  

Over three through six months

    12,215  

Over six through twelve months

    21,850  

Over twelve months

    16,941  
       

Total

  $ 64,485  
       
       

        The following table sets forth the amount and maturities of our time certificates of deposit at June 30, 2014.

 
  Period to Maturity  
 
  Less Than
One Year
  Over One
Year to
Two Years
  Over Two
Years to
Three
Years
  Over Three
Years
  Total   Percentage
of Total
Certificate
Accounts
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Interest Rate:

                                     

Less than 1.00%

  $ 149,694   $ 32,526   $ 4,354   $ 984   $ 187,558     93.65 %

1.00% - 1.99%

    7,789     2,439     327         10,555     5.27  

2.00% - 2.99%

    2,164                 2,164     1.08  

3.00% and above

                         
                           

Total

  $ 159,647   $ 34,965   $ 4,681   $ 984   $ 200,277     100.00 %
                           
                           

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Table of Contents

        The following table sets forth our certificates of deposit classified by interest rate as of the dates indicated.

 
  At June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Interest Rate:

                   

Less than 1.00%

  $ 187,558   $ 164,791   $ 92,714  

1.00% - 1.99%

    10,555     49,099     122,638  

2.00% - 2.99%

    2,164     4,061     10,352  

3.00% and above

            68  
               

Total

  $ 200,277   $ 217,951   $ 225,772  
               
               

        Borrowings.    We may obtain advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta by pledging as security our capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta and certain of our mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities. Such advances may be made pursuant to several different credit programs, each of which has its own interest rate and range of maturities. To the extent such borrowings have different repricing terms from our deposits, borrowings can change our interest rate risk profile.

        We had no borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta at June 30, 2014 and June 30, 2013. At June 30, 2014, we had access to Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta advances of up to $39.5 million. It is possible that we may use Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta advances or other short-term borrowings to fund loan demand or to purchase securities in the future.

Subsidiary and Other Activities

        Oconee Federal Financial Corp. has no subsidiaries other than Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, and Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association has no subsidiaries.

Personnel

        As of June 30, 2014, we had 45 full-time employees and no part-time employees. Our employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group. Management believes that we have good relations with our employees.


FEDERAL AND STATE TAXATION

Expense and Tax Allocation

        Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association has entered into an agreement with Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC to provide them with certain administrative support services for compensation not less than the fair market value of the services provided. In addition, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association and Oconee Federal Financial Corp. have entered into an agreement to establish a method for allocating and for reimbursing the payment of their consolidated tax liability.

Federal Taxation

        General.    Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association are subject to federal income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below. The following discussion of federal taxation is intended only to summarize certain pertinent federal income tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to Oconee Federal Financial Corp. or Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association.

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        Method of Accounting.    For federal income tax purposes, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association currently reports its income and expenses on the accrual method of accounting and uses a tax year ending June 30 for filing its federal income tax returns.

        Bad Debt Reserves.    Prior to the Small Business Protection Act of 1996 (the "1996 Act"), Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association and similar savings institutions were permitted to establish reserves for bad debts and to make annual additions to the reserve using several methods. For taxable years beginning after 1995, savings institutions are permitted to compute their bad debt deductions only to the same extent that banks are permitted. Accordingly, "small" savings institutions with less than $500 million in assets may maintain a reserve using the experience method, and "large" savings institutions with more than $500 million in assets are required to use the specific charge-off method. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association currently has less than $500 million in assets and uses the experience method to determine its annual additions to its tax bad debt reserves. Under the experience method, a savings institution is allowed a deduction for amounts that it adds to its bad debt reserve in accordance with Internal Revenue Code Section 585. Instead of taking a direct deduction when a debt becomes worthless, the savings institution charges off the debt against its reserve. The determination of whether and when a debt becomes worthless is made in the same manner as under the specific charge-off method. The savings institution calculates its addition to its bad debt reserve at the end of each year.

        These additions are, within specified formula limits, deducted in arriving at taxable income. Pursuant to the 1996 Act, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association was required to recapture into taxable income a portion of its bad debt reserve. Savings institutions were required to recapture any reserves in excess of the amounts allowed except for reserves established after the end of the base year. For Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, the reserve balance as of June 30, 1987 is preserved and is referred to as the base year reserve. The experience method authorizes a savings institution to add to its reserve at least the amount required to maintain the reserve balance as it existed at the end of its base year, even if this addition causes the reserve to exceed the permissible level computed using the experience method alone.

        Taxable Distributions and Recapture.    Prior to the 1996 Act, federal tax bad debt reserves created prior to January 1, 1988 were subject to recapture into taxable income if the thrift institution failed to meet certain thrift asset and definitional tests. Federal legislation has eliminated these thrift-related recapture rules.

        At June 30, 2014, our total federal and South Carolina pre-1988 base year tax bad debt reserve was approximately $5.3 million. Under current law, pre-1988 federal base year reserves remain subject to recapture if a thrift institution makes certain non-dividend distributions, certain repurchases any of its stock, pays dividends in excess of tax earnings and profits, or ceases to maintain a thrift or bank charter.

        Alternative Minimum Tax.    The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended imposes an alternative minimum tax ("AMT") at a rate of 20% on a base of regular taxable income plus certain tax preferences ("alternative minimum taxable income" or "AMTI"). The AMT is payable to the extent such AMTI is in excess of an exemption amount and the AMT exceeds the regular income tax. Net operating losses can offset no more than 90% of AMTI. Certain payments of AMT may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years. Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association have not been subject to the AMT and have no such amounts available as credits for carryover.

        Net Operating Loss Carryovers.    A financial institution may carry back net operating losses to the preceding two taxable years and forward to the succeeding 20 taxable years. At June 30, 2014, Oconee

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Federal Savings and Loan Association had no net operating loss carryforwards for federal and state income tax purposes.

        Corporate Dividends-Received Deduction.    Oconee Federal Financial Corp. may exclude from its income 100% of dividends received from Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association as a member of the same affiliated group of corporations. The corporate dividends-received deduction is generally 80% in the case of dividends received from 20%-or-more-owned domestic corporations and 70% in the case of dividends received from less-than-20%-owned domestic corporations.

State and Local Taxation

        South Carolina State Taxation.    Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association are required to file South Carolina income tax returns and pay tax at a stated tax rate of 5% and 6%, respectively, of South Carolina taxable income. For these purposes, South Carolina taxable income generally means federal taxable income subject to certain modifications, primarily the exclusion of interest income on United States obligations, state income tax deductions, and adjustments for bonus depreciation deductions.


SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

General

        As a federal savings association, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is subject to examination and regulation by the OCC, and is also subject to examination by the FDIC. The federal system of regulation and supervision establishes a comprehensive framework of activities in which Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association may engage and is intended primarily for the protection of depositors and the FDIC's Deposit Insurance Fund, and not for the protection of security holders. Under this system of federal regulation, financial institutions are periodically examined to ensure that they satisfy applicable standards with respect to their capital adequacy, assets, management, earnings, liquidity and sensitivity to market interest rates. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association also is regulated to a lesser extent by the Federal Reserve Board, which governs the reserves to be maintained against deposits and other matters. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association must comply with consumer protection regulations issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association also is a member of and owns stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta, which is one of the twelve regional banks in the Federal Home Loan Bank System. The OCC examines Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association and prepares reports for the consideration of its Board of Directors on any operating deficiencies. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's relationship with its depositors and borrowers also is regulated to a great extent by federal law and, to a much lesser extent, state law, especially in matters concerning the ownership of deposit accounts, the form and content of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's loan documents and certain consumer protection matters.

        As savings and loan holding companies, Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC are subject to examination and supervision by, and be required to file certain reports with, the Federal Reserve Board.

        Set forth below are certain material regulatory requirements that are applicable to Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC. This description of statutes and regulations is not intended to be a complete description of such statutes and regulations and their effects on us. Any change in these laws or regulations, whether by Congress or the applicable regulatory agencies, could have a material adverse impact on us and our operations.

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Federal Legislation

        The Dodd-Frank Act made significant changes to the regulatory structure for depository institutions and their holding companies. However, the Dodd-Frank Act's changes go well beyond that and affect the lending, investments and other operations of all depository institutions. The Dodd-Frank Act required the Federal Reserve Board to set minimum capital levels for both bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies that are as stringent as those required for the insured depository subsidiaries, and the components of Tier 1 capital for holding companies were restricted to capital instruments that were then currently considered to be Tier 1 capital for insured depository institutions. The legislation also established a floor for capital of insured depository institutions that cannot be lower than the standards in effect upon passage, and directed the federal banking regulators to implement new leverage and capital requirements that take into account off-balance sheet activities and other risks, including risks relating to securitized products and derivatives.

        The Dodd-Frank Act created a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks and savings institutions such as Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, including the authority to prohibit "unfair, deceptive or abusive" acts and practices. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has examination and enforcement authority over all banks and savings institutions with more than $10 billion in assets. Banks and savings institutions with $10 billion or less in assets are still examined for compliance by their applicable bank regulators. The new legislation also weakened the federal preemption available for national banks and federal savings associations, and gave state attorneys general the ability to enforce applicable federal consumer protection laws.

        The Dodd-Frank Act broadened the base for FDIC insurance assessments. Assessments are now based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a financial institution, rather than on total deposits. The legislation also permanently increased the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor, retroactive to January 1, 2008, and noninterest-bearing transaction accounts had unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2013. The Dodd-Frank Act increased stockholder influence over boards of directors by requiring companies to give stockholders a non-binding vote on executive compensation and so-called "golden parachute" payments. The legislation also directs the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate rules prohibiting excessive compensation paid to bank holding company executives, regardless of whether the company is publicly traded or not. Further, the legislation requires that originators of securitized loans retain a percentage of the risk for transferred loans, directs the Federal Reserve Board to regulate pricing of certain debit card interchange fees and contains a number of reforms related to mortgage origination.

        Many provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act involve delayed effective dates and/or require implementing regulations or have not been issued in final form. Their impact on our operations cannot yet fully be assessed. However, there is a significant possibility that the Dodd-Frank Act will result in an increased regulatory burden and compliance, operating and interest expense for Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association and Oconee Federal Financial Corp.

Federal Banking Regulation

        Business Activities.    A federal savings and loan association derives its lending and investment powers from the Home Owners' Loan Act, as amended, and the federal regulations thereunder. Under these laws and regulations, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association may invest in mortgage loans secured by residential and commercial real estate, commercial business and consumer loans, certain types of debt securities and certain other assets, subject to applicable limits. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association also may establish subsidiaries that may engage in certain activities not otherwise

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permissible for Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, including real estate investment and securities and insurance brokerage. The Dodd-Frank Act authorized banks and savings and loan associations to pay interest on business checking accounts, effective July 21, 2011.

        Capital Requirements.    Federal regulations require savings and loan associations to meet three minimum capital standards: a 1.5% tangible capital ratio, a 4% leverage ratio (3% for institutions receiving the highest rating on the CAMELS rating system) and an 8% risk-based capital ratio. The prompt corrective action standards discussed below, in effect, establish a minimum 2% tangible capital standard. At June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's capital exceeded all applicable requirements.

        The risk-based capital standard for savings and loan associations requires the maintenance of Tier 1 (core) and total capital (which is defined as core capital and supplementary capital) to risk-weighted assets of at least 4% and 8%, respectively. In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets, all assets, including certain off-balance sheet assets, are multiplied by a risk-weight factor of 0% to 100%, assigned by the regulators, based on the risks believed inherent in the type of asset. Core capital is defined as common stockholders' equity (including retained earnings), certain noncumulative perpetual preferred stock and related surplus and minority interests in equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries, less intangibles other than certain mortgage servicing rights and credit card relationships. The components of supplementary capital currently include cumulative preferred stock, long-term perpetual preferred stock, mandatory convertible securities, subordinated debt and intermediate preferred stock, the allowance for loan and lease losses limited to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets and up to 45% of net unrealized gains on available-for-sale equity securities with readily determinable fair market values. Overall, the amount of supplementary capital included as part of total capital cannot exceed 100% of core capital. Additionally, a savings and loan association that retains credit risk in connection with an asset sale may be required to maintain additional regulatory capital because of the recourse back to the savings and loan association. In assessing capital adequacy, the regulators consider not only ratios, but also qualitative factors. The regulators have the authority to establish individual minimum capital requirements on a case-by-case basis.

        New Capital Rule.    On July 9, 2013, the OCC and the other federal bank regulatory agencies issued a final rule that will revise their risk-based capital requirements and the method for calculating risk-weighted assets to make them consistent with agreements that were reached by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and certain provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act. The final rule applies to all depository institutions, top-tier bank holding companies with total consolidated assets of $500 million or more and top-tier savings and loan holding companies.

        The rule establishes a new common equity Tier 1 minimum capital requirement (4.5% of risk-weighted assets), increases the minimum Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets requirement (from 4.0% to 6.0% of risk-weighted assets) and assigns a higher risk weight (150%) to exposures that are more than 90 days past due or are on nonaccrual status and to certain commercial real estate facilities that finance the acquisition, development or construction of real property.

        The rule also includes changes in what constitutes regulatory capital, some of which are subject to a two-year transition period. These changes include the phasing-out of certain instruments as qualifying capital. In addition, Tier 2 capital is no longer limited to the amount of Tier 1 capital included in total capital. Mortgage servicing rights, certain deferred tax assets and investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries over designated percentages of common stock will be required to be deducted from capital, subject to a two-year transition period. Finally, Tier 1 capital will include accumulated other comprehensive income (which includes all unrealized gains and losses on available for sale debt and equity securities), subject to a two-year transition period. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association has the one-time option in the first quarter of 2015 to permanently opt out of the inclusion of accumulated other comprehensive income in its capital calculation. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan

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Association is considering whether to opt out in order to reduce the impact of market volatility on its regulatory capital levels.

        The new capital requirements also include changes in the risk-weights of assets to better reflect credit risk and other risk exposures. These include a 150% risk weight (up from 100%) for certain high volatility commercial real estate acquisition, development and construction loans and non-residential mortgage loans that are 90 day past due or otherwise on non-accrual status; a 20% (up from 0%) credit conversion factor for the unused portion of a commitment with an original maturity of one year or less that is not unconditionally cancellable; a 250% risk weight (up from 100%) for mortgage servicing and deferred tax assets that are not deducted from capital; and increased risk-weights (from 0% to up to 600%) for equity exposures.

        Finally, the rule limits capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if the banking organization does not hold a "capital conservation buffer" consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets in addition to the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements.

        The final rule becomes effective for Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association and Oconee Federal Financial Corp. on January 1, 2015. The capital conservation buffer requirement will be phased in beginning January 1, 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019.

        We have conducted a pro forma analysis of the application of these new capital requirements as of June 30, 2014. We have determined that we meet all of these new requirements, including the full 2.5% capital conservation buffer, as if these new requirements had been in effect on that date.

        Loans-to-One Borrower.    Generally, a federal savings and loan association may not make a loan or extend credit to a single or related group of borrowers in excess of 15% of unimpaired capital and surplus. An additional amount may be loaned, equal to 10% of unimpaired capital and surplus, if the loan is secured by readily marketable collateral, which generally does not include real estate. As of June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's largest lending relationship with a single or related group of borrowers totaled $3.1 million, which represented 3.9% of unimpaired capital and surplus; therefore, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association was in compliance with the loans-to-one borrower limitations.

        Qualified Thrift Lender Test.    As a federal savings and loan association, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is subject to a qualified thrift lender, or "QTL" test. Under the QTL test, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association must maintain at least 65% of its "portfolio assets" in "qualified thrift investments" in at least nine months of the most recent 12-month period. "Portfolio assets" generally means total assets of a savings institution, less the sum of specified liquid assets up to 20% of total assets, goodwill and other intangible assets, and the value of property used in the conduct of the savings and loan association's business.

        "Qualified thrift investments" includes various types of loans made for residential and housing purposes, investments related to such purposes, including certain mortgage-backed and related securities, and loans for personal, family, household and certain other purposes up to a limit of 20% of portfolio assets. "Qualified thrift investments" also include 100% of an institution's credit card loans, education loans and small business loans. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association also may satisfy the QTL test by qualifying as a "domestic building and loan association" as defined in the Internal Revenue Code.

        A savings and loan association that fails the qualified thrift lender test must operate under specified restrictions set forth in the Home Owners' Loan Act. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act made non-compliance with the QTL test subject to agency enforcement action for a violation of law. At

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June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association maintained approximately 94.54% of its portfolio assets in qualified thrift investments and, therefore, satisfied the QTL test.

        Capital Distributions.    Federal regulations govern capital distributions by a federal savings and loan association, which include cash dividends, stock repurchases and other transactions charged to the savings and loan association's capital account. A federal savings association must file an application with the OCC for approval of a capital distribution if:

    the total capital distributions for the applicable calendar year exceed the sum of the association's net income for that year to date plus the association's retained net income for the preceding two years;

    the association would not be at least adequately capitalized following the distribution;

    the distribution would violate any applicable statute, regulation, agreement or regulatory-imposed condition; or

    the association is not eligible for expedited treatment of its application or notice filings.

        Even if an application is not otherwise required, every savings association that is a subsidiary of a holding company must still file a notice with the Federal Reserve Board at least 30 days before our board of directors declares a dividend or approves a capital distribution.

        A notice or application for a capital distribution may be disapproved if:

    the association would be undercapitalized following the distribution;

    the proposed capital distribution raises safety and soundness concerns; or

    the capital distribution would violate a prohibition contained in any statute, regulation or agreement.

        In addition, the Federal Deposit Insurance Act provides that an insured depository institution shall not make any capital distribution, if after making such distribution, the institution would fail to meet any regulatory capital requirement. A federal savings association also may not make a capital distribution that would reduce its regulatory capital below the amount required for the liquidation account established in connection with its conversion to stock form. In addition, beginning in 2016, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's ability to pay dividends will be limited if Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association does not have the capital conservation buffer required by the new capital rules, which may limit the ability of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. to pay dividends to its stockholders. See "—New Capital Rule."

        Liquidity.    A federal savings and loan association is required to maintain a sufficient amount of liquid assets to ensure its safe and sound operation. We seek to maintain a ratio of liquid assets not subject to pledge as a percentage of deposits and borrowings of 4.0% or greater of highly liquid assets. At June 30, 2014, this ratio was 4.2%. Total cash and cash equivalents and investments was 33.4% at June 30, 2014.

        Community Reinvestment Act and Fair Lending Laws.    All federal savings and loan associations have a responsibility under the Community Reinvestment Act and related regulations to help meet the credit needs of their communities, including low- and moderate-income borrowers. An association's record of compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act is assessed in regulatory examinations. In addition, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act prohibit lenders from discriminating in their lending practices on the basis of characteristics specified in those statutes. An association's failure to comply with the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act could, at a minimum, result in denial of certain corporate applications, such as branches or mergers, or in restrictions on its activities. The failure to comply with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act could result in enforcement actions by regulators and the Department of Justice. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association received a "satisfactory" Community Reinvestment Act rating in its most recent federal examination.

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        Transactions with Related Parties.    A federal savings and loan association's authority to engage in transactions with its "affiliates" is limited by OCC regulations and by Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and its implementing Regulation W. The term "affiliate" for these purposes generally means any company that controls, is controlled by, or is under common control with an insured depository institution such as Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC are affiliates of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. In general, transactions with affiliates must be on terms that are as favorable to the savings and loan association as comparable transactions with non-affiliates and are subject to certain quantitative limits and collateral requirements. In addition, savings and loan associations are prohibited from lending to any affiliates that are engaged in activities that are not permissible for bank holding companies and from purchasing the securities of any affiliate, other than a subsidiary. Transactions with affiliates also must be consistent with safe and sound banking practices, not involve low-quality assets and be on terms that are as favorable to the institution as comparable transactions with non-affiliates. Savings and loan associations are required to maintain detailed records of all transactions with affiliates.

        Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's authority to extend credit to its directors, executive officers and 10% shareholders, as well as to entities controlled by such persons, is currently governed by the requirements of Sections 22(g) and 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation O of the Federal Reserve Board. Among other things, those provisions require that extensions of credit to insiders:

    be made on terms that are substantially the same as, and follow credit underwriting procedures that are not less stringent than, those prevailing for comparable transactions with unaffiliated persons and that do not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features (subject to certain exemptions for lending programs that are available to all employees); and

    not exceed certain limitations on the amount of credit extended to such persons, individually and in the aggregate, which limits are based, in part, on the amount of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's capital.

        In addition, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's board of directors must approve extensions of credit in excess of certain limits.

        Enforcement.    The OCC has primary enforcement responsibility over federal savings and loan associations, including the authority to bring enforcement action against all "institution-affiliated parties," including stockholders, and attorneys, appraisers and accountants who knowingly or recklessly participate in wrongful action likely to have an adverse effect on an insured institution. Formal enforcement action may range from the issuance of a capital directive or cease and desist order, to removal of officers and/or directors of the institution, receivership, conservatorship or the termination of deposit insurance. Civil penalties cover a wide range of violations and actions, and range up to $25 thousand per day, unless a finding of reckless disregard is made, in which case penalties may be as high as $1.0 million per day. The FDIC also has the authority to terminate deposit insurance or to recommend to the OCC that enforcement action be taken with respect to a particular savings institution. If the regulator does not take action, the FDIC has authority to take action under specified circumstances.

        Standards for Safety and Soundness.    Federal law requires each federal banking agency to prescribe certain standards for all insured depository institutions. These standards relate to, among other things, internal controls, information systems and audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate risk exposure, asset growth, compensation, and other operational and managerial standards as the agency deems appropriate. The federal banking agencies adopted Interagency Guidelines Prescribing Standards for Safety and Soundness to implement the safety and soundness standards

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required under federal law. The guidelines set forth the safety and soundness standards that the federal banking agencies use to identify and address problems at insured depository institutions before capital becomes impaired. The guidelines address internal controls and information systems, internal audit systems, credit underwriting, loan documentation, interest rate risk exposure, asset growth, compensation, fees and benefits. If the appropriate federal banking agency determines that an institution fails to meet any standard prescribed by the guidelines, the agency may require the institution to submit to the agency an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the standard. If an institution fails to meet these standards, the appropriate federal banking agency may require the institution to implement an acceptable compliance plan.

        Prompt Corrective Action Regulations.    Under the prompt corrective action regulations, the regulators are authorized and, under certain circumstances, required to take supervisory actions against undercapitalized savings and loan associations. For this purpose, a savings and loan association is placed in one of the following five categories based on the association's capital:

    well-capitalized (at least 5% leverage capital, 6% Tier 1 risk-based capital and 10% total risk-based capital);

    adequately capitalized (at least 4% leverage capital, 4% Tier 1 risk-based capital and 8% total risk-based capital);

    undercapitalized (less than 8% total risk-based capital, 4% Tier 1 risk-based capital or 3% leverage capital);

    significantly undercapitalized (less than 6% total risk-based capital, 3% Tier 1 risk-based capital or 3% leverage capital); and

    critically undercapitalized (less than 2% tangible capital).

        Generally, a receiver or conservator for a savings and loan association that is "critically undercapitalized" must be appointed within specific time frames. The regulations also provide that a capital restoration plan must be filed within 45 days of the date a savings and loan association receives notice that it is "undercapitalized," "significantly undercapitalized" or "critically undercapitalized." Any holding company for the savings and loan association required to submit a capital restoration plan must guarantee the lesser of (i) an amount equal to 5% of the association's assets at the time it was notified or deemed to be undercapitalized by regulator, or (ii) the amount necessary to restore the savings and loan association to adequately capitalized status. This guarantee remains in place until the association is notified that it has maintained adequately capitalized status for each of four consecutive calendar quarters. Additional measures with respect to undercapitalized institutions include a prohibition on capital distributions, growth limits and restrictions on activities. A number of discretionary supervisory actions may also be taken against undercapitalized associations, including the issuance of a capital directive and the replacement of senior executive officers and directors.

        At June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association met the criteria for being considered "well-capitalized."

        In addition, the final capital rule adopted in July 2013 revises the prompt corrective action categories to incorporate the revised minimum capital requirements of that rule when it becomes effective. The OCC's prompt corrective action standards will change when these new capital ratios become effective. Under the new standards, in order to be considered well-capitalized, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association would have to have a common equity Tier 1 ratio of 6.5% (new), a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% (increased from 6.0%), a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% (unchanged), and a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 5.0% (unchanged). Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association has conducted a pro forma analysis of the application of these new capital requirements as of June 30, 2014. We have determined that Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is

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well-capitalized under these new standards, as if these new requirements had been in effect on that date. See "—New Capital Rule."

        Insurance of Deposit Accounts.    Deposit accounts in Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association are insured by the FDIC's Deposit Insurance Fund, generally up to a maximum of $250 thousand per separately insured depositor and up to a maximum of $250 thousand for self-directed retirement accounts. The FDIC assesses insured depository institutions to maintain the Deposit Insurance Fund. No institution may pay a dividend if in default of its deposit insurance assessment.

        Under the FDIC's risk-based assessment system, insured institutions are assigned to a risk category based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and other factors. An institution's assessment rate depends upon the category to which it is assigned and certain adjustments specified by the FDIC, with less risky institutions paying lower assessments. Until recently, assessment rates ranged from seven to 77.5 basis points of assessable deposits.

        In February 2011, the FDIC published a final rule under the Dodd-Frank Act to reform the deposit insurance assessment system. The rule redefined the assessment base used for calculating deposit insurance assessments effective April 1, 2011. Under the new rule, assessments are based on an institution's average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity instead of total deposits. The proposed rule revised the assessment rate schedule to establish assessments ranging from 2.5 to 45 basis points.

        The FDIC has the authority to increase insurance assessments. A material increase would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. Management cannot predict what insurance assessment rates will be in the future.

        In addition to the FDIC assessments, the Financing Corporation ("FICO") is authorized to impose and collect, with the approval of the FDIC, assessments for anticipated payments, issuance costs and custodial fees on bonds issued by the FICO in the 1980s to recapitalize the former Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. For the quarter ended June 30, 2014, the annualized FICO assessment rate equaled 0.64 basis points of total assets less tier 1 capital. The bonds issued by the FICO are due to mature in 2017 through 2019.

        Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that an institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC. We do not currently know of any practice, condition or violation that may lead to termination of our deposit insurance.

        Prohibitions Against Tying Arrangements.    Federal savings and loan associations are prohibited, subject to some exceptions, from extending credit to or offering any other service, or fixing or varying the consideration for such extension of credit or service, on the condition that the customer obtain some additional service from the institution or its affiliates or not obtain services of a competitor of the institution.

        Federal Home Loan Bank System.    Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, which consists of twelve regional Federal Home Loan Banks. The Federal Home Loan Bank System provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions as well as other entities involved in home mortgage lending. As a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank. As of June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association was in compliance with this requirement.

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Federal Reserve System

        Federal Reserve Board regulations require savings and loan associations to maintain noninterest-earning reserves against their transaction accounts, such as negotiable order of withdrawal and regular checking accounts. At June 30, 2014, Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association was in compliance.

Other Regulations

        Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association's operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

    Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

    Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, requiring that borrowers for mortgage loans for one-to-four family residential real estate receive various disclosures, including good faith estimates of settlement costs, lender servicing and escrow account practices, and prohibiting certain practices that increase the cost of settlement services;

    Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

    Fair Credit Reporting Act, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

    Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies;

    Truth in Savings Act; and

    rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

      In addition, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issues regulations and standards under these federal consumer protection laws that affect our consumer businesses. These include regulations setting "ability to repay" and "qualified mortgage" standards for residential mortgage loans and mortgage loan servicing and originator compensation standards. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is evaluating recent regulations and proposals, and devotes significant compliance, legal and operational resources to compliance with consumer protection regulations and standards.

        The operations of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association also are subject to the:

    Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

    Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers' rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services;

    Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as "Check 21"), which gives "substitute checks," such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check;

    The USA PATRIOT Act, which requires savings and loan associations to, among other things, establish broadened anti-money laundering compliance programs, and due diligence policies and

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      controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering. Such required compliance programs are intended to supplement existing compliance requirements that also apply to financial institutions under the Bank Secrecy Act and the Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations; and

    The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which places limitations on the sharing of consumer financial information by financial institutions with unaffiliated third parties. Specifically, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act requires all financial institutions offering financial products or services to retail customers to provide such customers with the financial institution's privacy policy and provide such customers the opportunity to "opt out" of the sharing of certain personal financial information with unaffiliated third parties.

Holding Company Regulation

        General.    Oconee Federal, MHC and Oconee Federal Financial Corp. are non-diversified savings and loan holding companies within the meaning of the Home Owners' Loan Act. As such, Oconee Federal, MHC and Oconee Federal Financial Corp. are registered savings and loan holding companies and are subject to regulations, examinations, supervision and reporting requirements. In addition, holding company regulators have enforcement authority over Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC, and their non-savings institution subsidiaries. Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Board to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a serious risk to Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association.

        Permitted Activities.    Pursuant to federal law, regulations and policy, a mutual holding company, such as Oconee Federal, MHC, and a federally chartered mid-tier holding company such as Oconee Federal Financial Corp. generally may engage in the following activities: (i) investing in the stock of a savings association; (ii) acquiring a mutual association through the merger of such association into a savings association subsidiary of such holding company or an interim savings association subsidiary of such holding company; (iii) merging with or acquiring another holding company, one of whose subsidiaries is a savings association; (iv) investing in a corporation, the capital stock of which is available for purchase by a savings association under federal law or under the law of any state where the subsidiary savings association or associations share their home offices; (v) furnishing or performing management services for a savings association subsidiary of such company; (vi) holding, managing or liquidating assets owned or acquired from a savings subsidiary of such company; (vii) holding or managing properties used or occupied by a savings association subsidiary of such company; (viii) acting as trustee under deeds of trust; (ix) any other activity (A) that the Federal Reserve Board, by regulation, has determined to be permissible for bank holding companies under Section 4(c) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956; or (B) in which multiple savings and loan holding companies were authorized (by regulation) to directly engage on March 5, 1987; and (x) any activity permissible for financial holding companies under Section 4(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act, including securities and insurance underwriting.

        Federal law prohibits a savings and loan holding company, including Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC, directly or indirectly, or through one or more subsidiaries, from acquiring another savings institution or holding company thereof, without prior regulatory approval. It also prohibits the acquisition or retention of, with certain exceptions, more than 5% of a nonsubsidiary savings institution, a nonsubsidiary holding company, or a nonsubsidiary company engaged in activities other than those permitted for a savings and loan holding company; or acquiring or retaining control of an institution that is not federally insured. In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings institutions, the financial and managerial resources, future prospects of the company and institution involved, the effect of the acquisition on the risk to the insurance fund, the convenience and needs of the community, and competitive factors must be considered by the regulators.

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        No acquisition that would result in a multiple savings and loan holding company controlling savings institutions in more than one state may be approved, subject to two exceptions: (i) the approval of interstate supervisory acquisitions by savings and loan holding companies, and (ii) the acquisition of a savings institution in another state if the laws of the state of the target savings institution specifically permit such acquisitions. The states vary in the extent to which they permit interstate savings and loan holding company acquisitions.

        Waivers of Dividends by Oconee Federal, MHC.    Oconee Federal Financial Corp. may pay dividends on its common stock to public shareholders. If it does, it is also required to pay dividends to Oconee Federal, MHC, unless Oconee Federal, MHC elects to waive the receipt of dividends. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, Oconee Federal, MHC must receive the approval of the Federal Reserve Board before it may waive the receipt of any dividends from Oconee Federal Financial Corp. The Federal Reserve Board has issued an interim final rule providing that it will not object to dividend waivers under certain circumstances, including circumstances where the waiver is not detrimental to the safe and sound operation of the savings association and a majority of the mutual holding company's members have approved the waiver of dividends by the mutual holding company within the previous six months. To date, the Federal Reserve Board has not generally permitted dividend waivers by mutual holding companies and there can be no assurance that a dividend waiver request would be approved by the Federal Reserve Board. In addition, any dividends waived by Oconee Federal, MHC must be considered in determining an appropriate exchange ratio in the event of a conversion of the mutual holding company to stock form.

        Conversion of Mutual Holding Company to Stock Form.    Federal regulations permit a mutual holding company to convert from the mutual form of organization to the capital stock form of organization (a "Conversion Transaction"). In a Conversion Transaction a new holding company would be formed as the successor to Oconee Federal Financial Corp. (the "New Holding Company"), Oconee Federal, MHC's corporate existence would end, and certain depositors of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association would receive the right to subscribe for additional shares of the New Holding Company. There are no current plans for a conversion transaction and there can be no assurance that such a conversion transaction will occur.

        Capital.    Savings and loan holding companies historically have not been subject to consolidated regulatory capital requirements. The Dodd-Frank Act, however, requires the Federal Reserve Board to establish for all depository institution holding companies minimum consolidated capital requirements that are as stringent as those required for the insured depository subsidiaries. Under regulations recently enacted by the Federal Reserve Board, Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and Oconee Federal, MHC are subject to regulatory capital requirements that generally are the same as the new capital requirements for Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association. These new capital requirements include provisions that might limit the ability of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. to pay dividends to its stockholders or repurchase its shares. See "—Federal Banking Regulation—New Capital Rule." Oconee Federal Financial Corp. has conducted a pro forma analysis of the application of these new capital requirements as of June 30, 2014, and has determined that it will meet all of these new requirements, including the full 2.5% capital conservation buffer, and will remain well-capitalized, as if these new requirements had been in effect on that date.

        Source of Strength.    The Dodd-Frank Act extended the "source of strength" doctrine to savings and loan holding companies. The Federal Reserve Board has issued regulations requiring that all savings and loan holding companies serve as a source of managerial and financial strength to their subsidiary savings associations by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

        Dividends.    The Federal Reserve Board has issued a policy statement regarding the payment of dividends and the repurchase of shares of common stock by bank holding companies and savings and

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loan holding companies. In general, the policy provides that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if the prospective rate of earnings retention by the holding company appears consistent with the organization's capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition. Regulatory guidance provides for prior regulatory consultation with respect to capital distributions in certain circumstances such as where the company's net income for the past four quarters, net of dividends previously paid over that period, is insufficient to fully fund the dividend or the company's overall rate or earnings retention is inconsistent with the company's capital needs and overall financial condition. The ability of a savings and loan holding company to pay dividends may be restricted if a subsidiary savings association becomes undercapitalized. The policy statement also states that a savings and loan holding company should inform the Federal Reserve Board supervisory staff prior to redeeming or repurchasing common stock or perpetual preferred stock if the savings and loan holding company is experiencing financial weaknesses or if the repurchase or redemption would result in a net reduction, as of the end of a quarter, in the amount of such equity instruments outstanding compared with the beginning of the quarter in which the redemption or repurchase occurred. These regulatory policies may affect the ability of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. to pay dividends, repurchase shares of common stock or otherwise engage in capital distributions.

        Acquisition.    Under the Federal Change in Bank Control Act, a notice must be submitted to the Federal Reserve Board if any person (including a company), or group acting in concert, seeks to acquire direct or indirect "control" of a savings and loan holding company. Under certain circumstances, a change of control may occur, and prior notice is required, upon the acquisition of 10% or more of the company's outstanding voting stock, unless the Federal Reserve Board has found that the acquisition will not result in control of the company. A change in control definitively occurs upon the acquisition of 25% or more of the company's outstanding voting stock. Under the Change in Bank Control Act, the Federal Reserve Board generally has 60 days from the filing of a complete notice to act, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the competitive effects of the acquisition.

Federal Securities Laws

        Oconee Federal Financial Corp.'s common stock is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Oconee Federal Financial Corp. is subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

        The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 addresses, among other issues, corporate governance, auditing and accounting, executive compensation, and enhanced and timely disclosure of corporate information. As directed by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer will be required to certify that our quarterly and annual reports do not contain any untrue statement of a material fact. The rules adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act have several requirements, including having these officers certify that: they are responsible for establishing, maintaining and regularly evaluating the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting; they have made certain disclosures to our auditors and the audit committee of the Board of Directors about our internal control over financial reporting; and they have included information in our quarterly and annual reports about their evaluation and whether there have been changes in our internal control over financial reporting or in other factors that could materially affect internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 1A.    Risk Factors

        Disclosures of risk factors are not required by smaller reporting companies, such as the Company.

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ITEM 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments

        None.

ITEM 2.    Properties

        As of June 30, 2014, the net book value of our properties was $2.8 million. The following is a list of our offices:

Location
   
  Year Acquired
or Leased
  Square
Footage
  Net Book Value
of Real
Property
 
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Main Office:

                       

115 E. North 2nd St. 

  Owned     1966     7,000   $ 953  

Seneca, South Carolina

                       

Main Office Annex:

 

 

   
 
   
 
   
 
 

201 E. North 2nd St. 

  Owned     1996     7,500     674  

Seneca, South Carolina

                       

Branch Offices:

 

 

   
 
   
 
   
 
 

813 123 By-Pass

  Owned     1985     5,250     513  

Seneca, South Carolina

                       

204 W. North Broad St. 

  Owned     1973     3,100     409  

Walhalla, South Carolina

                       

111 W. Windsor St. 

  Owned     1972     3,200     291  

Westminster, South Carolina

                       
                       

                  $ 2,840  
                       
                       

        We believe that current facilities are adequate to meet our present and foreseeable needs, subject to possible future expansion.

ITEM 3.    Legal Proceedings

        We are not involved in any pending legal proceedings other than routine legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business. Periodically, there have been claims involving Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, such as claims to enforce liens, condemnation proceedings on properties in which we hold a security interest, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans and other issues incidental to our business.

        At June 30, 2014, we were not involved in any legal proceedings the outcome of which would be material to our financial condition or results of operations.

ITEM 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures

        Not applicable.

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PART II

ITEM 5.    Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

        Market.    Our common stock is listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol "OFED." The approximate number of holders of record of our common stock as of September 26, 2014 was 325. Certain shares of our common stock are held in "nominee" or "street" name and accordingly, the number of beneficial owners of such shares is not known or included in the foregoing number.

        The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low sales prices per share for the common stock as reported on the Nasdaq Capital Market and the cash dividends declared per common share, for the periods shown.

 
  High   Low   Dividends  

Quarter ended June 30, 2014

  $ 20.50   $ 16.95   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended March 31, 2014

  $ 17.75   $ 16.73   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended December 31, 2013

  $ 17.75   $ 16.48   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended September 30, 2013

  $ 17.49   $ 14.69   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended June 30, 2013

  $ 15.78   $ 13.73   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended March 31, 2013

  $ 16.49   $ 14.42   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended December 31, 2012

  $ 18.30   $ 14.36   $ 0.10  

Quarter ended September 30, 2012

  $ 15.70   $ 12.28   $ 0.10  

        Dividends.    We are generally permitted to pay dividends on our common stock if, after giving effect to the distribution, we would be able to pay its indebtedness as the indebtedness comes due in the usual course of business and our total assets exceed the sum of its liabilities and the amount needed, if we were to be dissolved at the time of the distribution, to satisfy the preferential rights upon dissolution of any holders of capital stock who have a preference in the event of dissolution. The holders of our common stock will be entitled to receive and share equally in dividends as may be declared by our board of directors out of funds legally available therefore. If we issue shares of preferred stock, the holders thereof may have a priority over the holders of our common stock with respect to dividends. We currently intend to continue to declare and pay a quarterly cash dividend on the common stock equal to $0.10 per share following our board of directors' periodic review of our financial condition and results of operations for each fiscal quarter. The dividend rate and the continued payment of dividends will depend upon our board of directors' consideration of a number of factors, including investment opportunities available to us, capital requirements, our financial condition and results of operations, and statutory and regulatory limitations, tax considerations and general economic conditions. There can be no assurance that our quarterly cash dividend will not be reduced or eliminated in future periods.

        Dividend payments by Oconee Federal Financial Corp. are dependent primarily on dividends it receives from Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, because Oconee Federal Financial Corp. will have no source of income other than dividends from Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association, earnings from the investments by Oconee Federal Financial Corp. and interest payments with respect to our loan to the Employee Stock Ownership Plan. Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association is not permitted to make a capital distribution if, after making such distribution, it would be undercapitalized. In addition, a newly adopted capital rule limits capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments if a banking organization does not hold a "capital conservation buffer" consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets in addition to the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements. The capital conservation buffer requirement will be phased in beginning January 1, 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets increasing each year until fill implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019. For information concerning additional

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federal laws and regulations regarding the ability of Oconee Federal Savings and Loan Association to make capital distributions, including the payment of dividends to Oconee Federal Financial Corp., see "Supervision and Regulation—Federal Banking Regulation" and "—Holding Company Regulation."

        When Oconee Federal Financial Corp. pays dividends on its common stock to public shareholders, it will also be required to pay dividends to Oconee Federal, MHC, unless Oconee Federal, MHC elects to, and is permitted to, waive the receipt of dividends. To date, the Federal Reserve Board generally has not permitted dividend waivers by mutual holding companies and there can be no assurance that a dividend waiver request would be approved by the Federal Reserve Board.

        Equity Compensation Plans.    At June 30, 2014, there were no compensation plans under which equity securities of Oconee Federal Financial Corp. were authorized for issuance other than the Employee Stock Ownership Plan and the Equity Incentive Plan.

        Issuer Repurchases.    The following table sets forth information in connection with repurchases of the Company's common stock for the period April 1, 2014 through June 30, 2014. On June 19, 2013, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 150,000 shares of the Company's common stock. The repurchase authorization has no expiration date. In connection with this repurchase authorization, the Company has purchased a total of 101,500 shares of its common stock.

 
  Total
Number of
Shares
Purchased
  Average
Price
Paid Per
Share
  Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plan
  Approximate
Maximum Dollar
Value or
Number of Shares
That May Yet be
Purchased Under
Publicly
Announced Plan
 

April 1 - April 30, 2014

      $         50,000  

May 1 - May 31, 2014

    1,500     17.70     1,500 (1)   48,500  

June 1 - June 30, 2014

                48,500 (2)
                     

Total

    1,500   $ 17.70     1,500        
                     
                     

(1)
All shares were purchased pursuant to a publicly announced repurchase program that was approved by the Board of Directors on June 19, 2013.

(2)
Represents the maximum number of shares available for repurchase under the June 19, 2013 plan at June 30, 2014.

        Sales of Unregistered Securities.    During the year ended June 30, 2014, we did not offer or sell any unregistered securities.

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ITEM 6.    Selected Financial Data

 
  At or For the Year Ended June 30,  
 
  2014   2013   2012   2011   2010  
 
  (Dollars in thousands)
 

Financial condition data:

                               

Total assets

  $ 360,501   $ 370,095   $ 377,753   $ 374,277   $ 333,546  

Investment securities

    103,806     96,024     73,273     39,666     12,150  

Loans receivable, net

    229,931     221,163     249,832     264,913     264,328  

Deposits

    281,015     292,422     293,368     292,469     272,606  

Total equity(1)

    76,981     76,162     82,984     80,211     59,661  

Operating data:

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Interest and dividend income

  $ 12,976   $ 13,992   $ 15,269   $ 15,242   $ 15,084  

Interest expense

    1,480     2,174     3,202     4,947     5,980  
                       

Net interest income

    11,496     11,818     12,067     10,295     9,104  

Provision for loan losses

    108     260