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EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - QUINT MEDIA INC.exhibit31-1.htm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended: February 28, 2014

or

[   ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________________ to __________________

Commission file number: 000-52218

QUINT MEDIA INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Nevada 20-2590810
State or other jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization Identification No.)

3250 NE 1st. Ave., Suite 305, Miami, Florida 33137
(Address of principal executive offices and Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (786) 431-2174

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act

Title of Each Class Name of each Exchange on which registered
Nil N/A

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act
Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share
(Title of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes [   ]      No [X]

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
Yes [   ]      No [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes [X]      No [   ]


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes [X]      No [   ]

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act

Large accelerated filer [   ] Accelerated filer [   ]
Non-accelerated filer [   ]
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes [   ]      No [X]

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

45,258,000 shares of common stock at a price of $0.15 per share for an aggregate market value of $6,788,700.1

1 The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates is computed by reference to the closing price of shares of common stock of the registrant on August 27, 2013 of $0.15 per share.

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE REGISTRANTS

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date: 62,883,000 shares of common stock are issued and outstanding as of June 12, 2014.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Not Applicable

ii


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I 1
   
ITEM 1. BUSINESS 1
   
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 5
   
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 10
   
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 10
   
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 10
   
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 10
   
PART II 10
   
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 10
   
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA 12
   
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 12
   
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 14
   
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA 15
   
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 32
   
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 32
   
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 33
   
PART III 33
   
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE 33
   
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 36
   
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 39
   
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 39
   
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES 40
   
PART IV 41
   
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 41
   
SIGNATURES 43

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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Forward-Looking Statements

This report contains forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this report, including statements regarding our future financial position, business strategy and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward looking statements. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. Such forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements regarding our future products and statements regarding our anticipated future cash position.

We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy, and financial needs. These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks in the section entitled “Risk Factors” that may cause our company’s or our industry’s actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

Moreover, we are a new entrant to the social media business and our management cannot predict all of the risks we will face in establishing our company in this industry, nor can we assess the impact that these risk factors might have on our business or the extent to which any risk factor, or any combination of risk factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, we do not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

As used in this report and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “we”, “us”, “Quint” and “our” refer to Quint Media Inc., a Nevada corporation, and/or Exley Media Inc., a Nevada corporation, as the context may require. Unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars and all references to “common shares” refer to the common shares in Quint’s capital stock.

Corporate History

Our company was incorporated under the laws of Nevada on March 18, 2005. Effective August 7, 2013, we changed our name from “PediatRx Inc.” to “Quint Media Inc.” to better reflect our new business. We effected this name change by a merger with our wholly owned subsidiary, Quint Media Inc., which was incorporated solely to effect a change in our name.

Effective August 7, 2013, we also effected a three for one forward stock split of our authorized, and issued and outstanding shares of common stock. Our authorized common stock increased from 150,000,000 shares of common stock to 450,000,000 shares of common stock, and our issued and outstanding capital increased from 20,836,000 shares of common stock to 62,508,000 shares of common stock.

On August 20, 2013, we incorporated our wholly-owned subsidiary, Exley Media Inc., in order to own and operate Exley (www.getexley.com).

Our Business

Granisol

During the year ended February 28, 2013, we decided not to focus on the pharmaceutical industry and we are looking to divest the balance of our pharmaceutical assets. We recognized a partial impairment charge in the fourth quarter of 2013 and recognized the remaining impairment in 2014 to reduce the carrying amount of our pharmaceutical product rights to the estimated realizable value.


Exley (formerly Slickx)

On April 26, 2013, we entered into a non-binding letter of intent with Lakefield Media Holding AG to acquire the Slickx name, technology, source code, domain name and all other tangible and intangible assets relating to internet portals and platforms commonly known as “Slickx” for $50,000. The platform was subsequently developed further and rebranded to “Exley” (www.getexley.com).

Pursuant to the above letter of intent, on May 17, 2013, we entered into a Web Site Asset Purchase Agreement with Lakefield Media Holding AG and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Flawsome XLerator GmbH to acquire the internet domain name “Slickx.com”, the website and related software, intellectual property rights, accounts, contracts, goodwill and infrastructure for $50,000. On May 21, 2013, we completed the acquisition of these assets and paid $50,000 to Lakefield. Constantin Dietrich, a director of our company, is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Lakefield.

In addition, the letter of intent provided that for a period of one year, Lakefield would not enter into discussions or negotiations with respect to an acquisition of its assets or company. During this time, we may negotiate with Lakefield the terms of a sale of all of the remaining assets of Lakefield, either by way of an asset sale or through the sale of all of the outstanding securities of Lakefield, for consideration consisting of a maximum of 31,950,000 shares of our common stock. The completion of this transaction is subject to the entry into a definitive formal agreement. There is no assurance that the transaction contemplated by the letter of intent for the remaining assets of Lakefield will be completed as planned or at all. We did not exercise this purchase provision of the letter of intent.

Functions and Services

We plan to enable users to not only consume digital content from the lifestyle, fashion and entertainment industry, but also to find, create and share the content within these verticals in which they are interested. Our service will connect consumers, creators and advertisers in an environment that is both engaging and social. By building a media network that delivers curated quality content we will offer a global platform that will enable the user to find, share and connect with like-minded people and opinion-leaders. The service is planned to be available on multiple platforms including web, tablet and mobile.

Revenue Model

We plan to generate revenue from the following:

Advertisements

One of the major benefits of advertising on a social media site is that advertisers can take advantage of the users’ demographic information and target their ads appropriately. We may sell advertisement space to companies that may be interested in targeting our subscribers. We anticipate that interested advertisers will include premium brand advertisers as well as local and regional advertisers who are looking for innovative new and exciting formats to carefully target the consumer to create an experience that benefits consumers and advertisers. The focus will be to offer content with targeted advertising that reaches the right audience with the right content and the right advertising.

Subscriptions

As the service matures, we may offer paid subscription services that enhance and augment the user experience. Further, there may be a cost for the consumer to download the application.

Competition

We will face substantial competition from dominant digital media companies and websites such as gawker.com and glam.com, as well as Facebook application providers in the social media space such as Pinterest. We believe that users often utilize multiple digital and social media websites or applications, and the use of one of these website or application is not necessarily to the exclusion of others.

Achieving a critical mass of users or subscribers is crucial for digital and social websites and applications. Even though we seek to offer products and services that are unique in the industry, superior in quality, and more appealing than those of our competitors, we will need to establish a solid initial user base and critical mass.

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Although we believe that we have access to the tools and certain inherent efficiencies to attract the initial user base, we need to do that at a lower cost per visitor than certain of our traditional online competitors in order to essentially become successful. We also believe that the industry offers substantial room for growth as social networking application platforms and mobile platforms continue to expand and as the Internet especially mobile continues to become the primary source to engage with social media activities and consume, create and share news, events and other lifestyle-related content.

Marketing and Sales Strategy

The use of the Internet is continuing to evolve as a global platform for doing business. We anticipate that our major focus in the first year will be to enhance the Exley website and the cultivation of our user base. We anticipate using various online marketing methods such as Facebook’s viral channels, online marketing programs and other advertising and marketing programs in order to drive traffic to our own website. We plan to take advantage of a well balanced mix of online and offline marketing strategies.

Our primary target market is focused on Internet users who already participate in social media websites. We therefore plan to take advantage of various well-established online marketing programs and make them an integral part of our long-term strategy. Our marketing campaigns will monitor daily statistics and track information such as interests, favorite topics and most read stories in order to quickly get synchronized with our Internet audience.

We plan to participate in other marketing activities that will also aim to raise awareness of the getexley.com brand and attract users by promoting the unique content and quality of our product and services. We plan to primarily advertise through Internet and mobile advertising and will have to run extensive user acquisition campaigns at any given time, targeting various classifications of users.

We plan to use media buying and in-house tools to effectively and efficiently track, measure and optimize the success of our advertising campaigns. We plan to initiate a marketing strategy with a focus on campaigns that we believe will produce a positive return on ad-spend in the medium- to long-term.

Online Advertising

The majority of our advertising and promotional activities will be concentrated on online advertising campaigns and Search Engine Marketing (SEM). SEM is a form of internet marketing that involves the promotion of websites by increasing their visibility in search engine results pages (SERPs) like Google or Bing through optimization and advertising. SEM may use search engine optimization (SEO), that adjusts or rewrites website content to achieve a higher ranking in search engine results pages or use pay per click listings.

We have selected Google because of its success and popularity for web users wishing to find something using internet search. The Google Adwords program will allow us to customize the text of our advertisements, the frequency of each advertisement’s appearance, and the length of the advertising contract. For our purposes, we believe that this will give us the maximum amount of flexibility and allow us to closely monitor the costs of the marketing campaign.

Using this strategy will allow us also to design our own ads, and to select target locations such as a city or state and use keywords in our ads. A keyword is a word that is used by an Internet user who is performing an online search to find out information on a specific topic.

Optimizing Our Website

We plan to work with the web site development contractor to optimize our websites in terms of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a technique which helps search engines find and rank a website or –page higher than others by affecting their visibility in a search engine’s “natural” or un-paid (“organic”) search results. Its objective is getting traffic from the “free,” “organic,” “editorial” or “natural” listings on search engines such as the major search engines Google, Yahoo and Bing that have such results. In general it is believed that a result (site) that appears earlier or higher and more frequently in the search results list on SERPs will get more visitors (traffic) from that search engine. SEO may target various kinds of search, including name search, local or image search, video search or search for events and news. Based on the type of search, SERPs Web pages and other content such as videos or local listings are shown and ranked based on what the search engine considers most relevant to users. Payment is not involved, as it is with paid search ads (SEM)

As part of our internet marketing strategy, we regard SEO to consider how search engines work, what users search for, the actual search terms or keywords typed into search engines and which search engines are preferred by their targeted audience.

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Thus, SEO may involve editing our website’s and –pages’ content, HTML and associated coding to both increase its relevance to specific keywords and to remove barriers to the indexing activities of search engines. We therefore plan to work with the web site development contractor to develop a series of keywords or meta-tags for each of the pages of our web site. Meta-tags are keywords that are added to a web page to make it easier to find that specific web page through search engines, web browser software and other applications. The information is not intended to be seen by the casual Internet user. Search engines like Google and Yahoo are designed to seek out these keywords when someone is performing an Internet search for a specific topic.

Intellectual Property

We own one registered trademark for Granisol and an unregistered trade-mark “Slickx”.

We are planning to develop the Exley website and intend to protect its contents by registering for appropriate copyright and trademark protection where we deem such registration necessary or beneficial. We have not conducted any independent searches or other inquiry into patents or other intellectual property which may be owned by others and which may constrain our business plan, nor have we received independent opinions of counsel on such matters.

Governmental Regulations

We are subject to a number of foreign and domestic laws and regulations that affect companies conducting business on the Internet, many of which are still evolving and could be interpreted in ways that could harm our business. In the United States and abroad, laws relating to the liability of providers of online services for activities of their users and other third parties are currently being tested by a number of claims, including actions based on invasion of privacy and other torts, unfair competition, copyright and trademark infringement, and other theories based on the nature and content of the materials searched, the ads posted, or the content provided by users. Any court ruling or other governmental action that imposes liability on providers of online services for the activities of their users and other third parties could harm our business. In addition, rising concern about the use of social media technologies for illegal conduct, such as the unauthorized dissemination of national security information, money laundering or supporting terrorist activities may in the future produce legislation or other governmental action that could require changes to our products or services, restrict or impose additional costs upon the conduct of our business or cause users to abandon material aspects of our service.

In the area of information security and data protection, many states have passed laws requiring notification to users when there is a security breach for personal data, or requiring the adoption of minimum information security standards that are often vaguely defined and difficult to practically implement. The costs of compliance with these laws may increase in the future as a result of changes in interpretation. Furthermore, any failure on our part to comply with these laws may subject us to significant liabilities.

We are also subject to federal, state, and foreign laws regarding privacy and protection of member data. We intend to post on our website our privacy policy and user agreement, which describe our practices concerning the use, transmission and disclosure of member data. Any failure by us to comply with our posted privacy policy or privacy related laws and regulations could result in proceedings against us by governmental authorities or others, which could harm our business. In addition, the interpretation of data protection laws, and their application to the Internet is unclear and in a state of flux. There is a risk that these laws may be interpreted and applied in conflicting ways from state to state, country to country, or region to region, and in a manner that is not consistent with our current data protection practices. Complying with these varying international requirements could cause us to incur additional costs and change our business practices. Further, any failure by us to adequately protect our members’ privacy and data could result in a loss of member confidence in our services and ultimately in a loss of members and customers, which could adversely affect our business.

In addition, because we anticipate that our services will be accessible worldwide, certain foreign jurisdictions have claimed and others may claim that we are required to comply with their laws, including in jurisdictions where we have no local entity, employees, or infrastructure.

Research and Development Activities

Expenditures attributable to research and development of Granisol over the last two fiscal years were zero.

We have plans to continue certain research and development activities related to the development of the Exley website.

Employees

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At present, we have no employees other than Constantin Dietrich, our President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and director. We intend to conduct our social media business largely through agreements with consultants and other independent third parties.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

An investment in our common stock involves a number of very significant risks. You should carefully consider the following risks and uncertainties in addition to other information in this report in evaluating our company and its business before purchasing shares of our company’s common stock. Our business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed due to any of the following risks. You could lose all or part of your investment due to any of these risks.

Risks Related to Our Company

Our independent auditors have expressed substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

During the year ended February 28, 2014, we generated net loss of $757,403. From inception through February 28, 2014, we incurred an aggregate loss of $3,324,667. We anticipate that we will continue to generate losses and will require additional funding to remain in business. On February 28, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents of $12,957. In order to fund our anticipated budget for the next 12 months, excluding any development or product acquisition costs, we believe that we will need to raise in excess of $1,260,000. This amount could increase if we encounter difficulties that we cannot anticipate at this time. We have traditionally raised our operating capital from the sale of equity securities and the placement of notes payable, but there can be no assurance that we will continue to be able to do so.

These circumstances raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, as described in the explanatory paragraph to our independent auditors’ report on our financial statements for the year ended February 28, 2014. Although our financial statements raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, they do not reflect any adjustments that might result if we are unable to continue our business. Our financial statements contain additional note disclosure describing the circumstances that lead to this disclosure by our independent auditors.

Our substantial debt and other financial obligations could impair our financial condition and our ability to fulfill our debt obligations. Any refinancing of this substantial debt could be at significantly higher interest rates.

At August 31, 2013, we entered into amendments to two previously amended unsecured promissory notes with outstanding principal amounts of $50,000 and $250,000 and originally dated June 15, 2009 and May 2, 2011, respectively. The unsecured promissory notes were due December 31, 2012 and accrued interest at a rate of 12% per annum. Effective September 1, 2013, the maturity date of the notes was extended until June 30, 2014 and the interest rate on the outstanding principal balance has been deceased from twelve percent per annum to seven percent per annum. All other terms of the promissory note remain the same. On September 24, 2013, we received proceeds of $100,000 from the issuance of an unsecured promissory note bearing interest at 7% per annum and due June 30, 2014. On February 13, 2014, we received proceeds of $50,000 from the issuance of a promissory note bearing interest at 7% per annum and due February 28, 2015. On March 31, 2014, we received proceeds of $75,000 from the issuance of a promissory note bearing interest at 7% per annum and due March 31, 2015. Our substantial indebtedness and other current financial obligations and any that we may become a party to in the future could:

  • impair our ability to obtain financing in the future for working capital, capital expenditures, partnerships, acquisitions or general corporate purposes;

  • have a material adverse effect on us if we fail to comply with financial and affirmative and restrictive covenants in debt agreements and an event of default occurs as a result of a failure that is not cured or waived;

  • require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow for interest payments on our indebtedness and other financial obligations, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital and capital expenditures;

  • limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate; and

  • place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have proportionally less debt.

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If we are unable to meet our debt service obligations and other financial obligations, we could be forced to restructure or refinance our indebtedness and other financial transactions, seek additional equity capital or sell our assets. We might then be unable to obtain such financing or capital or sell our assets on satisfactory terms, if at all. Any refinancing of our indebtedness could be at significantly higher interest rates, and/or incur significant transaction fees.

If we do not successfully divest our pharmaceutical assets, we may not have sufficient capital to pursue our new social media business.

We have decided not to focus on the pharmaceutical industry and we are looking to divest our pharmaceutical assets. If we do not successfully divest our pharmaceutical assets and we do not raise additional capital to pursue our social media projects, we will have to revisit our business strategy in an effort to determine what changes may be required in order for us to continue our operations. Further, we may need to consider raising additional capital or financing in order to continue as a going concern even if we do not pursue such projects or if the sale of our pharmaceutical assets is not completed. No assurance can be given whether we would be able to successfully raise capital or financing in such circumstances or, if so, under what terms.

Efforts to expand will place a significant strain on our management, operational, financial and other resources.

Given sufficient capital, we plan to expand our operations by marketing our Exley website, which will place a significant strain on our management, operations, technical performance and financial resources. There can be no assurance that we will be able to manage expansion effectively. Our current and planned personnel, systems, procedures, and controls may not be adequate to support and effectively manage our future operations, especially as we employ personnel in multiple geographic locations. We may not be able to hire, train, retain, motivate, and manage required personnel, which may limit our growth. If any of this were to occur, it could damage our reputation, limit our growth, negatively affect our operating results and harm our business. We do not currently have the required capital to market either of the offerings.

We are an early-stage company with a limited operating history, which may hinder our ability to successfully meet our objectives.

We are an early-stage company with a limited operating history upon which to base an evaluation of our new business. As a result, the revenue and income potential of our new business is unproven. In addition, because of our limited operating history, we have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. Errors may be made in predicting and reacting to relevant business trends and we will be subject to the risks, uncertainties and difficulties frequently encountered by early-stage companies in evolving markets. We may not be able to successfully address any or all of these risks and uncertainties. Failure to adequately do so could cause our business, results of operations and financial condition to suffer.

Our development efforts rely on external software engineers.

We will be dependent on outside software engineers to drive our development. If our management is not able to execute on our business plan, it is likely stockholders would lose their entire investment.

Risks Relating to the Social Media Business

We are a social media company in a highly competitive field with high investment costs and high risks.

We are a social media company. We must achieve a certain level of users of our website, Exley before it can be monetized and produce revenue for us. We will have to raise substantial additional capital to drive users to our website and eventually generate revenues and reach profitability, if ever. We will be dependent upon selling advertisements and finding other ways to monetize our users by selling add-on services. For a social application or site to be able to sell advertisements, it must first attract a sufficient number of users to gain the interest of advertisers in buying ads and offering products on the site or the application. It will take time, management effort and capital to attract users to our website. There can be no assurance that any users will come. These timeframes, along with the general state of development create additional uncertainty as to the potential success of our website. The application may not continue to work as we plan and even if it does, there can be no assurance that an economically viable level of users will come, that advertisers will want to advertise or that we can monetize it. Therefore, it will be costly to maintain the application and market it to attract users and advertisers.

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We are entering a very crowded social media marketplace where existing competitors have years of experience, are well financed and have the name recognition to draw consumers, none of which we possess.

Our board of directors has determined that the future direction of our company will focus on development of Exley website. This puts our business focus in a very competitive field dominated by several very large and well financed companies such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. These companies have established an online presence and community that have become destinations in and of themselves and it will be difficult to make inroads into this space. We will be dependent on a new twist to entry into this space but in the end, all social media sites have similar features and it is likely that if any part of our offering becomes compelling, the competitors will adjust their offerings to be directly competitive with us. This creates substantial uncertainty on our ability to survive in this space or to be able to attract enough users to be able to monetize our site to produce revenues.

The revenue models for our social media business require we first obtain a sufficient number of users of our website before we can sell advertisements or generate other revenue and it will take time to generate such users and to then monetize the site.

We will be dependent on selling advertisements and finding other ways to monetize our users by selling add-on services. For a social media site to be able to sell advertisements, they first must attract a sufficient number of users to gain the interest of advertisers in buying ads on the sites. It will take time and money to bring users to our site and there is no assurance any users will come. These time frames along with the general state of development create additional uncertainty as to the potential success of our company. The site may not work as we plan and even if they do there can be no assurance any users will come, that advertisers will want to advertise or that we can monetize them. Additionally, it will be costly to maintain the offerings and market them to attract users.

The security risks or perception of risks of using social media websites may discourage users from using our website.

We and other market participants must be able to transmit confidential information securely over public networks. Third parties may have the technology or know-how to breach the security of user data. Any breach could cause users to lose confidence in the security of our website and choose not use our site.

We cannot assure you that advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other events or developments will not result in a compromise or breach of the algorithms that we will use to protect user data. If any such compromise of our security were to occur, it could harm our reputation, business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. A party who is able to circumvent our security measures could misappropriate information or cause interruptions in our operations. We may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against such security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by such breaches. We cannot assure you that our security measures will prevent security breaches or that failure to prevent such security breaches will not harm our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be liable if third parties misappropriate our users’ personal information.

If third parties are able to penetrate our network security or otherwise misappropriate our users’ personal information, or if we give third parties improper access to our users’ personal information, we could be subject to liability. This liability could include claims for impersonation or other similar fraud claims. This liability could also include claims for other misuses of personal information, including unauthorized marketing purposes. These claims could result in litigation. Liability for misappropriation of this information could adversely affect our business. In addition, the Federal Trade Commission and state agencies have been investigating various Internet companies regarding their use of personal information. We could incur additional expenses if new regulations regarding the use of personal information are introduced or if government agencies investigate our privacy practices.

System and online security failures could harm our business and operating results.

Our services will depend on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of our computer and communications hardware systems. Our systems and operations will be vulnerable to damage or interruption from a number of sources, including fire, flood, power loss, telecommunications failure, break-ins, earthquakes and similar events. Our Internet host provider does not guarantee that our Internet access will be uninterrupted, error-free or secure. Our servers are also vulnerable to computer viruses, physical, electrical or electronic break-ins and similar disruptions. Any substantial interruptions could result in the loss of data and could completely impair our ability to generate revenues from our service. We do not presently have a full disaster recovery plan in effect to cover the loss of all facilities and equipment.

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We currently do not have any patents associated with our Exley website and if we are not able to develop intellectual property protection around our product offering, we may not be able to prevent competitors from recreating our product offering.

Other than certain unregistered trademarks, we do not have any intellectual property protection on the features and software behind our Exley website. We are planning to develop our website and intend to protect its contents by registering for appropriate copyright and trademark protection where our management deems such registration necessary or beneficial, but there is no assurance that we will be able to obtain such protection. We have not conducted any independent searches or other inquiry into patents or other intellectual property which may be owned by others and which may constrain our business plan, nor have we received independent opinions of counsel on such matters.

If we do not respond to rapid technological changes, our services could become obsolete and we could lose users.

To remain competitive, we will need to continually enhance and improve the functionality and features of our social media website. We may face material delays in introducing new services, products and enhancements. If this happens, our users may forgo the use of our website and use those of our competitors. The Internet and the social media industry are rapidly changing. If competitors introduce new products and services using new technologies or if new industry standards and practices emerge, our existing website and our technology and systems may become obsolete. Our failure to respond to technological change or to adequately maintain, upgrade and develop our computer network and the systems used to process users’ uses of our website could harm our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Existing or future government regulation could harm our business, results of operation and financial condition.

We are subject to the same federal, state and local laws as other companies conducting business on the Internet. Today there are relatively few laws specifically directed towards conducting business on the Internet. However, due to the increasing popularity and use of the Internet, many laws and regulations relating to the Internet are being debated at the state and federal levels. These laws and regulations could cover issues such as user privacy, freedom of expression, pricing, fraud, quality of products and services, taxation, advertising, intellectual property rights and information security. Applicability to the Internet of existing laws governing issues such as property ownership, copyrights and other intellectual property issues, taxation, libel, obscenity and personal privacy could also harm our business. For example, United States and foreign laws regulate our ability to use user information and to develop, buy and sell mailing lists. The vast majority of these laws were adopted prior to the advent of the Internet and do not contemplate or address the unique issues raised thereby. Those laws that do reference the Internet are only beginning to be interpreted by the courts and their applicability and reach are therefore uncertain. These current and future laws and regulations could harm our business, results of operation and financial condition.

The content of our website could expose us to various kinds of liability, which, if prosecuted successfully, could negatively impact our business.

We will face potential liability for negligence, copyright infringement, patent infringement, trademark infringement, defamation, and/or other claims based on the nature and content of the materials our user’s post. Various claims have been brought, and sometimes successfully prosecuted, against Internet content distributors. We could be exposed to liability with respect to the unauthorized duplication of content or unauthorized use of other parties’ proprietary technology. Any imposition of liability that is not covered by insurance, or is in excess of insurance coverage, could materially adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Any claim of infringement, with or without merit, could be time consuming, result in costly litigation or require us to enter into royalty or licensing agreements. Such royalty or licensing agreements might not be available on terms acceptable to us, or at all. As a result, any such claim of infringement against us could have a material adverse effect upon our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Risks Relating to Our Common Stock

If we issue additional shares in the future, it will result in the dilution of our existing shareholders.

Our articles of incorporation authorize the issuance of up to 450,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.0001 per share. Our board of directors may choose to issue some or all of such shares to acquire one or more products and to fund our overhead and general operating requirements. The issuance of any such shares will reduce the book value per share and may contribute to a reduction in the market price of the outstanding shares of our common stock. If we issue any such additional shares, such issuance will reduce the proportionate ownership and voting power of all current shareholders. Further, such issuance may result in a change of control of our corporation.

8


Trading of our stock is restricted by the Securities Exchange Commission’s penny stock regulations, which may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our common stock.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted regulations which generally define “penny stock” to be any equity security that has a market price (as defined) less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Our securities are covered by the penny stock rules, which impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors”. The term “accredited investor” refers generally to institutions with assets in excess of $5,000,000 or individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 jointly with their spouse. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document in a form prepared by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the stock that is subject to these penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage investor interest in and limit the marketability of our common stock.

FINRA sales practice requirements may also limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (known as “FINRA”) has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares.

Our common stock is illiquid and the price of our common stock may be negatively impacted by factors which are unrelated to our operations.

Although our common stock is currently listed for quotation on the OTCQB operated by the OTC Markets Group, trading through the OTCQB is frequently thin and highly volatile. There is no assurance that a sufficient market will develop in our stock, in which case it could be difficult for shareholders to sell their stock. The market price of our common stock could fluctuate substantially due to a variety of factors, including market perception of our ability to achieve our planned growth, quarterly operating results of our competitors, trading volume in our common stock, changes in general conditions in the economy and the financial markets or other developments affecting our competitors or us. In addition, the stock market is subject to extreme price and volume fluctuations. This volatility has had a significant effect on the market price of securities issued by many companies for reasons unrelated to their operating performance and could have the same effect on our common stock.

We do not intend to pay dividends on any investment in the shares of stock of our company.

We have never paid any cash dividends and currently do not intend to pay any dividends for the foreseeable future. Because we do not intend to declare dividends, any gain on an investment in our company will need to come through an increase in the stock’s price. This may never happen and investors may lose all of their investment in our company.

9


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not Applicable.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Executive Offices

Our Chief Executive Officer and corporate headquarters are located at 3250 NE 1st. Ave., Suite 305, Miami, Florida 33137.

Intellectual Property

See “Item 1 – Business”.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We know of no material, existing or pending legal proceedings against our company, nor are we involved as a plaintiff in any material proceeding or pending litigation. There are no proceedings in which any of our directors, officers or affiliates, or any registered or beneficial shareholder, is an adverse party or has a material interest adverse to our interest.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market information

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB operated by the OTC Markets Group. Our symbol is “QUNI”, and our CUSIP number is 74874T104.

The following table shows the quarterly range of high and low bid information for our common stock over the fiscal quarters for the last two fiscal years as quoted on the OTCQB. We obtained the following high and low bid information from the OTCQB. These over-the-counter market quotations reflect inter-dealer prices without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission, and may not represent actual transactions.

Quarter Ended High Low
February 28, 2014 $0.33 $0.15
November 30, 2013 $0.40 $0.15
August 7, 2013 to August 31, 2013 $0.25 $0.15
June 1, 2013 to August 6, 20131 $0.20 $0.20
May 31, 2013 2 -- --
February 28, 2013 2 -- --
November 30, 20121 $0.20 $0.13
August 31, 20121 $0.13 $0.13
May 31, 20121 $0.30 $0.06

1 Not adjusted for a three for one forward stock split, which became effective with the OTC Markets Group on August 7, 2013;
2 There were no bids for these quarters.

On June 9, 2014, the closing price of our common stock on the OTCQB was $0.13 per share.

10


Transfer Agent

Our shares of common stock are issued in registered form. The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is Transfer Online, Inc., 512 SE Salmon Street, Portland, OR 97214.

Holders of Common Stock

As of June 10, 2014, there were 31 holders of record of our common stock. As of such date, 62,883,000 shares were issued and outstanding.

Dividends

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends or distributions on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to support operations and to finance expansion and therefore we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future.

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

Effective February 18, 2011, our board of directors adopted and approved the 2011 stock option plan. The purpose of the 2011 stock option plan is to enhance the long-term stockholder value of our company by offering opportunities to directors, key employees, officers, independent contractors and consultants of our company to acquire and maintain stock ownership in our company in order to give these persons the opportunity to participate in our company’s growth and success, and to encourage them to remain in the service of our company. A total of 6,000,000 shares of our common stock are available for issuance and during the 12 month period after the first anniversary of the adoption of the 2011 stock option plan by our board of directors, and during each 12 month period thereafter, our board of directors is authorized to increase the number of shares issuable by up to 1,500,000 shares.

The following table summarizes certain information regarding our equity compensation plan as of February 28, 2014:









Plan category



Number of securities to
be issued upon exercise
of outstanding options,
warrants and rights

(a)



Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights

(b)
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity compensation
plans (excluding
securities reflected in
column (a))

(c)
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders Nil N/A Nil
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders Nil N/A 6,000,000
Total Nil N/A 6,000,000

Recent sales of unregistered securities

Since the beginning of our fiscal year ended February 28, 2013, we have not sold any equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933 that were not previously reported in a quarterly report on Form 10-Q or in a current report on Form 8-K.

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

None.

11


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

Not applicable.

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this annual report. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include those discussed below and elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our financial condition at February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013 for the respective items are summarized below.

We have suffered recurring losses from inception. Our ability to meet our financial liabilities and commitments is primarily dependent upon the continued financial support of our directors and shareholders, the continued issuance of equity to new or existing shareholders, and our ability to achieve and maintain profitable operations.

Working Deficit

    February 28,     February 28,  
    2014     2013  
Current Assets $  17,885   $  535,119  
Current Liabilities   970,083     724,110  
Working Deficit $  (952,198 ) $  (188,991 )

From February 28, 2013 to February 28, 2014, our working deficit increased by approximately $763,207, cash on hand decreased $499,527, mainly due to the acquisition and development of the SlickX and Flawsome assets and the development of Exley, cash payments totaling $152,300 and cash used to fund our operations of approximately $372,227.

Cash Flows

    February 28,     February 28,  
    2014     2013  
Cash used in operating activities $  (372,227 ) $  (637,621 )
Cash (used in) provided by investing activities   (152,300 )   891,965  
Cash provided by financing activities   25,000     -  
             
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents $  (499,527 ) $  254,344  

Cash Used in Operating Activities

Our cash used in operating activities for the year ended February 28, 2014, compared to our cash used in operating activities for the year ended February 28, 2013, decreased $265,394, mainly due to the cessation of the pharmaceutical business that was operating in the prior year.

Cash (Used in) Provided By Investing Activities

Our cash used by financing activities for the year ended February 28, 2014 was $152,300, due to the acquisition of SlickX and Flawsome assets for cash of $50,000 and $102,300. Our cash provided in financing activities of $891,965 for the year ended February 28, 2013 was a result of the sale of an investment from discontinued operations.

12


Cash Provided By Financing Activities

Our cash provided by financing activities for the year ended February 28, 2014 was $25,000, compared to none for the year ended February 28, 2013. During the year ended February 28, 2014, we received $150,000 from the issuance of two short-term promissory notes, repaid $200,000 of short-term promissory notes and sold 375,000 shares of common stock for cash of $75,000.

Cash Requirements

We estimate our operating expenses, excluding stock based compensation and amortization expense, and working capital requirements for the next 12 months to be as follows:

Expense   Amount  
Bank charges and interest $  5,000  
Filing fees   10,000  
Investor relations   120,000  
Legal and accounting fees   220,000  
Licenses and permits   50,000  
Marketing expense   150,000  
Insurance expense   100,000  
Personnel and consulting expense   500,000  
Transfer agent fees   10,000  
Other general & administrative expense   95,000  
Total $  1,260,000  

Our management does not believe that our current capital resources will be adequate to continue operating our company and maintaining our business strategy for more than 12 months. Accordingly, we will have to raise additional capital in the near future to meet our working capital requirements. There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available to us when needed or, if available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, if and when it is needed, we will be forced to scale down or perhaps even cease the operation of our business.

Results of Operations

Operating Expenses

During the year ended February 28, 2014, we incurred operating expenses totaling $534,230 compared with $323,486 for the year ended February 28, 2013. The increase of $210,744 in operating expenses is attributable to an increase of $113,034 in professional fees, $52,093 in website operations expense, $17,440 in amortization of capitalized website development costs and $28,177 in general and administrative expenses.

Net Loss

During the year February 28, 2014, we realized net loss from continuing operations of $565,922 compared with a net loss from continuing operations of $369,314 for the year ended February 28, 2013. The $196,608 increase in net loss is attributable to a $210,744 increase in operating expenses, partially offset by a $14,112 decrease in interest expense. We realized a loss of $191,481 from discontinued operations related to the pharmaceutical business during the year ended February 28, 2014, compared to income from discontinued operations of $53,376 during the year ended February 28, 2013.

Going Concern

Our financial statements and information for the period ended February 28, 2014 have been prepared by our management on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. We have decided not to focus on the pharmaceutical industry and we are looking to divest our pharmaceutical assets. We have generated limited revenues to date and a net loss of $757,403 for the year ended February 28, 2014 and a cumulative deficit of $3,324,667 at February 28, 2014. We cannot provide any assurance that we will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive, or raise additional funds through the sale of debt and/or equity.

13


On February 28, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents of $12,957. Our management does not believe that our current capital resources will be adequate to continue operating our company and maintaining our business strategy for more than 12 months. If we are unable to raise additional capital in the near future, we expect that we will need to curtail operations, liquidate any assets that we might own, seek additional capital on less favorable terms and/or pursue other remedial measures. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

Future Financing

We will require additional financing to fund our planned operations. We currently do not have committed sources of additional financing and may not be able to obtain additional financing particularly, if the volatile conditions of the stock and financial markets, and more particularly the market for early development stage company stocks persist.

There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available to us when needed or, if available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, if and when it is needed, we will be forced to further delay or further scale down some or all of our activities or perhaps even cease the operations of the business.

Since inception we have funded our operations primarily through equity and debt financings and we expect that we will continue to fund our operations through the equity and debt financing, either alone or through strategic alliances. If we are able to raise additional financing by issuing equity securities, our existing stockholders’ ownership will be diluted. Obtaining commercial or other loans, assuming those loans would be available, will increase our liabilities and future cash commitments.

There is no assurance that we will be able to maintain operations at a level sufficient for an investor to obtain a return on his, her, or its investment in our common stock. Further, we may continue to be unprofitable.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to our stockholders.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Not Applicable

14


ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

 

 

15


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors
Quint Media, Inc.
(formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Miami, Florida

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of Quint Media, Inc. (formerly PediatRx Inc.) (a development stage company) (the “Company”) as of February 28, 2014 and the related statement of operations, stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatements. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of February 28, 2014 and the related results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We also have audited the adjustments to the fiscal 2013 financial statements to retrospectively report discontinued operations, as described in Note 5. In our opinion, such adjustments are appropriate and have been properly applied. We were not engaged to audit, review, or apply any procedures to the fiscal 2013 financial statements of the Company other than with respect to the adjustments and, accordingly, we do not express an opinion or any other form of assurance on the 2013 financial statements taken as a whole.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred losses from operation since inception. This factor raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to this matter are described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

/s/ MaloneBailey, LLP
www.malone-bailey.com
Houston, Texas
June 12, 2014

16


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders
PediatRx, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying balance sheet of PediatRx, Inc. (a development stage company) (the "Company") as of February 28, 2013 and the related statements of operations, stockholders' equity and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. 

Except as discussed in the following paragraph, we conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.  The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting.  Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting.  Accordingly, we express no such opinion.  An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

We were not engaged to audit the retroactive restatement of the Company’s 2013 financial statements and related disclosures for the discontinuance of its pharmaceutical operations, as discussed in Note 5 to the financial statements.

In our opinion, except for effects of such adjustments, if any, as might have been determined to be necessary had we been engaged to audit the Company’s restatement of discontinued operations, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of February 28, 2013, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations and is in the development stage of its operations. This raises substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

/s/ HORNE LLP

Ridgeland, Mississippi
June 28, 2013

17


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Balance Sheets

    February 28,  
    2014     2013  
Assets            
             
Current Assets            
Cash and cash equivalents $  12,957   $  512,484  
Prepaid expenses       4,928     22,635  
       Total Current Assets   17,885     535,119  
             
Website and website development cost, net of amortization of $17,440 and $0,            
respectively   331,360     -  
Assets from discontinued operations   -     250,556  
             
       Total Assets   349,245   $  785,675  
             
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)            
             
Current Liabilities            
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $  106,046   $  104,728  
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities, related party   304,588     -  
Short-term notes payable   450,000     500,000  
Liabilities from discontinued operations   109,449     119,382  
             
       Total Liabilities   970,083     724,110  
             
             
Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)            
             
Common stock, 450,000,000 shares authorized, par value $0.0001, 62,883,000 and 62,508,000 shares issued and outstanding at February, 28, 2014 and 2013, respectively   6,288     6,251  
Additional paid-in capital   2,697,541     2,622,578  
Deficit accumulated during the development stage   (3,324,667 )   (2,567,264 )
             
       Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)   (620,838 )   61,565  
             
       Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity (Deficit) $  349,245   $  785,675  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

18


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Operations

                For the Period  
                From Inception  
                March 18, 2005  
    For the Years Ended     Through  
    February 28,     February 28,  
                2014  
    2014     2013     (Unaudited)  
Net Revenues $  24   $  -   $  24  
                   
Expenses                  
Website operations and maintenance   52,093     -     52,093  
Website amortization   17,440     -     17,440  
Professional fees   266,610     153,576     266,610  
General and administrative   198,087     169,910     198,087  
                   
Total Expenses   534,230     323,486     534,230  
                   
Other Expenses                  
Interest Expense   (31,716 )   (45,828 )   (31,716 )
                   
Net Loss From Continuing Operations   (565,922 )   (369,314 )   (565,922 )
                   
Income (Loss) From Discontinued Operations   (191,481 )   53,376     (2,758,745 )
                   
Net Loss $  (757,403 ) $  (315,938 ) $  (3,324,667 )
                   
Basic and diluted loss per common share from continuing operations $  (0.01 ) $  (0.01 )    
                   
Basic and diluted income (loss) per common share from discontinued operations $  (0.00 ) $  0.00      
                   
Basic and diluted income (loss) per common share $  (0.01 ) $  (0.01 )      
                   
Weighted average number of common shares   62,605,603     62,508,508        

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

19


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

                      Deficit,        
                      Accumulated     Total  
                Additional     During the     Stockholders’  
    Common Stock     Paid-in     Development     Equity  
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Stage     (Deficit)  
Balance as of March 18, 2005 (inception)   -   $  -   $  -   $  -   $ -  
Restricted common shares issued for cash – September 2005   30,000,000     3,000     2,000     -     5,000  
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     600     -     600  
Net loss for the period   -     -     -     (21,237 )   (21,237 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2006 (Unaudited)   30,000,000     3,000     2,600     (21,237 )   (15,637 )
Common shares issued for cash ($0.005 per share) – May 2006   30,000,000     3,000     47,000     -     50,000  
Common shares issued for services ($0.005 per share) – August 2006 and February 2007   18,000     2     28     -     30  
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     11,400     -     11,400  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (50,890 )   (50,890 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2007 (Unaudited)   60,018,000     6,002     61,028     (72,127 )   (5,097 )
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     14,400     -     14,400  
Common shares returned and cancelled for cash April 2007   (3,000,000 )   (300 )   (4,700 )   -     (5,000 )
Common shares issued for cash – May 2007   3,000,000     300     4,700     -     5,000  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (65,411 )   (65,411 )
                               
Balance as of February 29, 2008 (Unaudited)   60,018,000     6,002     75,428     (137,538 )   (56,108 )
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     14,400     -     14,400  
Contributions to capital by related parties – loan forgiveness   -     -     38,950     -     38,950  
Common shares issued for cash – November 2008   1,500,000     150     49,850     -     50,000  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (53,957 )   (53,957 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2009 (Unaudited)   61,518,000     6,152     178,628     (191,495 )   (6,715 )
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     14,399     -     14,399  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (58,201 )   (58,201 )
Balance as of February 28, 2010   61,518,000   $  6,152   $  193,027   $  (249,696 ) $ (50,517 )

20


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) (Continued)

                      Deficit,        
                      Accumulated     Total  
                Additional     During the     Stockholders’  
    Common Stock     Paid-in     Development     Equity  
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Stage     (Deficit)  
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2010 (Unaudited)   61,518,000   $ 6,152   $  193,027   $  (249,696 ) $  (50,517 )
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     3,600     -     3,600  
Common shares issued for cash – June 2010   4,500,000     450     299,550     -     300,000  
Common shares issued for cash – July 2010   4,500,000     450     749,550     -     750,000  
Common shares issued for cash – November 2010   2,475,000     248     824,752     -     825,000  
Common shares returned and cancelled – November 2010   (11,100,000 )   (1,110 )   1,110     -     -  
Common shares issued for debt cancellation – November 2010   615,000     61     204,939     -     205,000  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (1,049,087 )   (1,049,087 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2011 (Unaudited)   62,508,000     6,251     2,276,528     (1,298,783 )   983,996  
                               
Stock based compensation   -     -     213,912     -     213,912  
Net loss for the year   -     -     -     (952,543 )   (952,543 )
                               
Balance as of February 29, 2012 (Unaudited)   62,508,000     6,251     2,490,440     (2,251,326 )   245,365  
                               
Stock based compensation   -     -     132,138     -     132,138  
Net loss for the period   -     -     -     (315,938 )   (315,938 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2013   62,508,000     6,251     2,622,578     (2,567,264 )   61,565  
                               
Common shares issued for cash – November 2013   375,000     37     74,963     -     75,000  
Net loss for the period   -     -     -     (757,403 )   (757,403 )
                               
Balance as of February 28, 2014   62,883,000   $ 6,288   $  2,697,541   $  (3,324,667 ) $  (620,838 )

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

21


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc.)
(A Development Stage Company)
Statements of Cash Flows

                For the Period from  
                Inception on  
                March 18, 2005  
    For the Years Ended     Through  
    February 28,     February 28, 2014  
    2014     2013     (Unaudited)  
Cash Flows From Operating Activities                  
Net loss $  (757,403 ) $  (315,938 ) $  (3,324,667 )
Items to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:            
Amortization   17,440     -     17,440  
Contributions to capital by related parties – expenses   -     -     58,799  
Contributions to capital by related party – forgiveness of debt   -     -     38,950  
Common shares issued for services   -     -     30  
Stock based compensation   -     132,138     346,050  
(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses and deposits   17,707     (4,294 )   (4,928 )
Increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities, related party   108,088     -     108,088  
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and accrued liabilities   1,318     (158,850 )   222,961  
Net cash used in continuing operations   (612,850 )   (346,944 )   (2,537,277 )
Net cash provided by (used in) discontinued operations   240,623     (290,677 )   45,669  
Net cash used in operating activities   (372,227 )   (637,621 )   (2,491,608 )
                   
Cash Flows From Investing Activities                  
Acquisition of SlickX and Flawsome   (50,000 )   -     (50,000 )
Capitalized website and website development costs   (102,300 )   -     (102,300 )
Net cash used in continuing investing activities   (152,300 )   -     (152,300 )
Net cash provided (used) in discontinued investing activities   -     891,965     (53,135 )
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities   (152,300 )   891,965     (205,435 )
                   
Cash Flows From Financing Activities                  
Proceeds from issuance of promissory notes   150,000     -     855,000  
Principal payments on promissory notes   (200,000 )   -     (200,000 )
Common shares returned to treasury   -     -     (5,000 )
Proceeds from issuance of common stock   75,000     -     2,060,000  
Cash provided by (used in) financing activities   25,000     -     2,710,000  
                   
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents   (499,527 )   254,344     12,957  
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period   512,484     258,140     -  
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period $  12,957   $  512,484   $  12,957  
                   
Noncash investing activity                  
Capitalized website and website development costs $  196,500   $  -   $  196,500  
Apricus Biosciences, Inc. common stock received in consideration for termination of merger agreement $  -   $  1,000,000   $  1,000,000  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

22


Quint Media, Inc.
(Formerly PediatRx Inc. )

(A Development Stage Company)
Notes to the Unaudited Financial Statements

1.

Nature of Operations and Continuance of Business

   

Quint Media, Inc. (formerly PediatRx Inc.) (the “Company” or “Quint”) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on March 18, 2005. The Company originally intended to engage in the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties. From the date of its acquisition of Granisol® (granisetron #C1) oral solution (“Granisol”), on July 23, 2010, until early fiscal year 2014, Quint engaged in the pharmaceutical business. During the fiscal year ending February 28, 2014, Quint decided to divest itself of the balance of its pharmaceutical assets and engage in the digital media business.

   

Quint is in the process of transitioning to its new operating business, digital media. The digital media business encompasses entrance into the social discovery aspects of the internet, primarily through the development of an engagement website with mobile and tablet applications. Quint capitalizes costs of licenses for the use of Internet domain names or Universal Resource Locators, website development costs, other information technology licenses and marketing and technology related intangibles. All such assets are capitalized at their original cost and upon substantial completion, are amortized over their estimated useful lives.

   

PediatRx Inc. was incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on March 18, 2005. The Company originally intended to engage in the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties.

   

On June 17, 2010, the Company entered into a letter of intent with Cypress Pharmaceutical, Inc. ("Cypress") to acquire all of the assets associated with Granisol® (granisetron HC1) oral solution ("Granisol"). First approved in 2008, Granisol is an oral, liquid granisetron solution, formerly distributed by Hawthorn Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Cypress. The Food and Drug Administration has approved Granisol's use in cancer care to treat nausea and vomiting associated with cancer therapy. On June 18, 2010, the Company caused PediatRx Inc. ("PediatRx") to be incorporated as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Striker Energy Corp. ("Striker") under the laws of the state of Nevada. On July 23, 2010, the Company concluded a definitive agreement to acquire Granisol from Cypress and turned its focus to the pharmaceutical industry and terminated its interest in oil and natural gas exploration.

   

On December 28, 2010 the Company completed a merger of PediatRx into Striker Energy Corp. and changed the name of Striker Energy Corp. to PediatRx Inc.

   

On September 12, 2011 the Company entered into a co-promotion agreement with Bi-Coastal Pharmaceutical Corp. ("Bi- Coastal"). Pursuant to the co-promotion agreement, Bi-Coastal granted the Company the non- exclusive right to promote Aquoral™ within the United States of America. Aquoral, another oncology supportive care product, is an FDA-cleared treatment for xerostomia (the medical term for dry mouth due to a lack of saliva). Xerostomia is especially prevalent in patients undergoing various treatments for cancer and those with Sjogren's syndrome. The Company was required to include Aquoral in no less than 85% of its sales calls. In return for its promotional efforts, the Company would receive compensation for each unit sold. The agreement with Bi-Coastal was for an initial term of two years and would automatically renew for one year terms unless either party provides notice of non-renewal at least six months prior to the expiration of the then- current term. The agreement was terminable at any time, by either party, upon six months prior written notice to the other party and is also terminable for cause.

   

On January 26, 2012, the Company entered into a binding term sheet (the "Term Sheet") with Apricus Biosciences, Inc. ("Apricus") for (1) a Co-Promotion Agreement in the United States for Granisol (the "Co- Promotion Agreement"), (2) the assignment of its Co-Promotion Agreement with Bi-Coastal for Aquoral™ to Apricus (the "Assignment Agreement”) and (3) a Sale Agreement for Granisol outside of the United States (the "Asset Purchase Agreement"). Also in the Term Sheet, the Company entered into a non-binding arrangement (the "Arrangement") for the sale of the Company to Apricus in a proposed merger transaction (the "Acquisition").

   

In February 21, 2012 the Company entered into three definitive agreements and one side letter with Apricus which include the Co-Promotion Agreement, the Assignment Agreement and the Asset Purchase Agreement. Pursuant to the Co- Promotion Agreement, the Company granted to Apricus the exclusive right to commercialize Granisol in six U.S. states and the non-exclusive right to commercialize Granisol in all other U.S. States, in addition to the right to manufacture Granisol. In addition, the Company agreed that, for a period of five years from the effective date of the Co-Promotion Agreement, it would not license any co-promotion rights in the non-exclusive states to any third party. The Company retained the right to commercialize Granisol in the non-exclusive states. The Company recognizes sales in the non-exclusive states that it generates through its own promotional efforts. Each party has agreed to cooperate with the other in respect of promotional materials and efforts on terms specified in the Co-Promotion Agreement.

23


The initial term of the Co-Promotion Agreement was for a period of ten years from the effective date, though it may be terminated prior to expiration under certain conditions. If the Co-Promotion Agreement was terminated by the Company prior to the end of the initial term, the Company would be required to pay to Apricus an amount based upon a varying percentage of its net operating income related to Granisol for a period subsequent to termination depending upon when the termination occurs.

Pursuant to the Assignment Agreement, the Company assigned all of its rights and responsibilities under the Co-Promotion agreement with Bi-Coastal for Aquoral, and Apricus assumed all rights and responsibilities under the Co-Promotion Agreement as of the effective date. Bi-Coastal consented to the assignment of the co-promotion agreement.

Pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement, the Company sold to Apricus all of its rights related to Granisol in all countries and territories outside of the United States. The Company agreed that it and its officers and directors would not compete in the field of anti-emetic products in certain areas outside of the United States.

As consideration for entering into these three Agreements the Company received an initial payment of $325,000 from Apricus. The agreements also provided for the payment to the Company of a royalty that would be calculated based upon Apricus' United States generated net operating income related to Granisol. On the effective date of the Agreements, the Company recognized revenues of $260,000 associated with the exclusive rights for Apricus to commercialize Granisol in six U.S. states. In addition, the Company has recognized a gain from sale of product rights totaling $65,000 associated with the Asset Purchase Agreement.

The binding term sheet between the Company and Apricus contemplated, in addition to the transactions reflected in the three agreements described above, a non-binding expression of interest in the merger of the Company with Apricus. The non-binding portion of the term sheet contemplated that the Company would be acquired by Apricus in a merger in exchange for $4,000,000, to be paid in the common stock of Apricus, with $3,600,000 distributed to the shareholders of the Company immediately and $400,000 held back from shares that would be distributed to the Company's Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer for a period of six months as an indemnity for breaches by the Company of its representations and warranties. Additionally, it contemplates that Apricus would assume certain debt and liabilities of the Company up to $675,000. The side letter referred to above refines the timing with respect to the parties' agreement that Apricus will pay to the Company a 'break-up fee" (in the form of restricted stock of Apricus having a value of $1,000,000) if the two companies did not merge by June 1, 2012, (or such other date as may be mutually agreed to by the Parties) unless, prior to that date, the Company files for bankruptcy or the Granisol asset is materially impaired.

On June 27, 2012, the Company entered into a Termination Agreement (the “Termination Agreement”) with Apricus Biosciences, Inc. (“Apricus”) pursuant to which the parties acknowledged that they formally terminated discussions regarding the proposed merger of the two companies.

Pursuant to the Termination Agreement, Apricus issued and delivered to us 373,134 shares of its common stock in full satisfaction of its obligation to pay us $1,000,000 in common stock as a break-up fee. The Company has recognized other income of $1,000,000 related to the break-up fee.

In addition, pursuant to the Termination Agreement, on July 16, 2012, Apricus filed a Registration Statement on Form S-3 registering these shares for resale, which the Registration Statement was declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 3, 2012. The Company has agreed that if it proposes to sell any of the shares on a public market or quotation service, it will only be permitted to sell on any given trading day, such number of shares as does not exceed 5% of the average daily volume of the Apricus’ common stock traded in the previous five trading days. Due to the sales restrictions, the Company determined the fair value using quoted prices for similar assets in active markets that are directly observable and thus represent a Level 2 fair value measurement. The fair value of the investment in Apricus was $1,000,000 at the effective date. The Company has sold all of its shares of Apricus stock.

24



Effective August 7, 2013, Quint affected a three-for-one forward stock split of our authorized, and issued and outstanding shares of common stock. Authorized common stock increased from 150,000,000 shares of common stock to 450,000,000 shares of common stock, and issued and outstanding capital increased from 20,836,000 shares of common stock to 62,508,000 shares of common stock. All references to Quint common stock have been retroactively restated to reflect the effect of the forward split.

   

The Company is a development stage enterprise, as defined in Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 915, Development Stage Entities. Quint is in the process of transitioning to its new operating business, primarily development of its engagement website with mobile and tablet application.

   
2.

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

a.              Basis of Presentation and Accounting Methods

The financial statements and related notes are presented in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States using the accrual method of accounting. The Company’s fiscal year-end is February 28.

b.              Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions related to deferred income tax asset valuation allowances. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

c.              Reclassification

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

d.              Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid instruments with maturity of three months or less at the time of issuance to be cash equivalents. As of February 28, 2014 and 2013, the Company had no cash equivalents.

e.              Intangible Assets

Acquired intangible assets other than goodwill are amortized over their useful lives unless the lives are determined to be indefinite. Acquired intangible assets are carried at cost, less accumulated amortization. For intangible assets purchased in a business combination or received in a non-monetary exchange, the estimated fair values of the assets received (or, for non-monetary exchanges, the estimated fair values of the assets transferred if more clearly evident) are used to establish the cost bases, except when neither of the values of the assets received or the assets transferred in non-monetary exchanges are determinable within reasonable limits. Valuation techniques consistent with the market approach, income approach and/or cost approach are used to measure fair value. Amortization of finite-lived intangible assets is computed over the useful lives of the respective assets.

f.              Impairment of Intangible assets

Intangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. We evaluate intangible assets to determine potential impairment by comparing the carrying amount to the undiscounted estimated future cash flows of the related assets. The Company wrote-off the remaining approximately $200,000 in Granisol product rights during the year ended February 28, 2014. The impairment is presented in discontinued operations.

25


g.              Basic and Diluted Net Loss Per Share

The Company computes net loss per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings Per Share, which requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (EPS) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net loss available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and convertible preferred stock using the if-converted method. In computing diluted EPS, the average stock price for the period is used in determining the number of shares assumed to be purchased from the exercise of stock options or warrants. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive. The Company had net losses as of February 28, 2014 and 2013, so the diluted EPS excluded all dilutive potential shares in the diluted EPS because there effect is anti-dilutive.

h.              Financial Instruments

ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements (ASC 820) and ASC 825, Financial Instruments (ASC 825), requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. It establishes a fair value hierarchy based on the level of independent, objective evidence surrounding the inputs used to measure fair value. A financial instrument’s categorization within the fair value hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. It prioritizes the inputs into three levels that may be used to measure fair value:

Level 1 - Level 1 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2 - Level 2 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in markets with insufficient volume or infrequent transactions (less active markets); or model-derived valuations in which significant inputs are observable or can be derived principally from, or corroborated by, observable market data.

Level 3 - Level 3 applies to assets or liabilities for which there are unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

The Company’s financial instruments consist principally of cash, accounts payable, and accrued liabilities. Pursuant to ASC 820 and 825, the fair value of cash is determined based on “Level 1” inputs, which consist of quoted prices in active markets for identical assets. The recorded values of all other financial instruments approximate their current fair values because of their nature and respective maturity dates or durations.

The Company did not have any financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on February 28, 2014 and 2013.

i.              Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with ASC 605, Revenue Recognition. Revenue is recognized only when the price is fixed or determinable, persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the service is provided, and collectability is assured. The Company has had minimal revenue from continuing operations for the years ended February 28, 2014 and none during the year ended February 28, 2013.

j.              Recent Accounting Pronouncements

The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.

k.              Income Taxes

26


The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability approach. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amounts expected to be realized.

A reconciliation between the income tax expense recognized in the Company's statements of operations and the income tax expense (benefit) computed by applying the domestic federal statutory income tax rate to the net loss for the period for fiscal years 2013 and 2012 is as follows:

      February 28,  
      2014     2013  
  Income tax benefit at federal statutory rate (34%) $  (258,956 ) $  (107,419 )
  State income tax benefit   -     (10,918 )
  Non-deductible stock based compensation   -     52,855  
  Impairment expense   68,000     -  
  Change in valuation allowance   190,956     67,000  
  Other   -     (1,518 )
       Total income tax expense $  -   $  -  

      As of  
      February 28,  
      2014     2013  
  Net operating loss carry-forward $  734,000   $  545,000  
  Other   299,000     299,000  
  Less: Valuation allowance   (1,033,000 )   (844,000 )
  Net deferred tax asset $  -   $  -  

The Company had net operating losses of approximately $736,000 that expire in years through 2025. Due to the change in ownership provisions of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, net operating loss carryforwards for Federal income tax reporting purposes are subject to annual limitations. Should a change in ownership occur, net operating loss carryforwards may be limited as to use in future years.

l.              Share-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for share-based compensation to employees in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification subtopic 718-10, Stock Compensation (“ASC 718-10”) and share-based compensation to non-employees in accordance with ASC 505. These require the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all share-based payment awards, including stock options based on the estimated fair values.

m.              Going Concern

Quint’s financial statements as of February 28, 2014 have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. Quint has a net loss of $757,403 for the year ended February 28, 2014 and a cumulative deficit $3,247,667 at February 28, 2014. The losses from operations of Quint raise substantial doubt about Quint’s ability to continue as a going concern.

Management cannot provide assurance that Quint will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive, or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. Management believes that Quint’s capital resources are not currently adequate to continue operating and maintaining its business strategy for the fiscal year ending February 28, 2015. Quint will seek to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund its operations in the future. Although Quint has historically raised capital from sales of equity and from the issuance of promissory notes, there is no assurance that it will be able to continue to do so. If Quint is unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future, management expects that Quint will need to curtail or cease operations. These financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should Quint be unable to continue as a going concern.

27



Quint is in the process of transitioning to its new operating business and expects to incur operating losses for the next twelve months as it moves forward. This new operating business encompasses entrance into the social discovery aspects of the internet; primarily development of an engagement website with mobile and tablet application.

   
3.

Related Party Transactions

   

On March 8, 2013, the Company entered into a Business Development/Advisory Services Agreement with Phys Pharma LLC, a company of which Dr. Durrant is a principal, pursuant to which Phys Pharma agreed to provide the Company a list of select biopharmaceutical companies which might have an interest in acquiring Granisol and assist the Company in marketing and selling Granisol to the prospective purchasers. If the Company sells Granisol to the prospective purchaser introduced by Phys Pharma, the Company agreed to pay Phys Pharma a fee in an amount equal to 20% of the net proceeds received by the Company at closing.

   

On April 5, 2013, and pursuant to a purchase and sale agreement dated for reference March 5, 2013, Dr. Cameron Durrant, our former President, Chief Executive Officer and director, sold to Constantin Dietrich, a director of our company, 12,750,000 shares of our common stock for total consideration of $51,000. Mr. Dietrich paid the $51,000 purchase price for these shares using cash on hand. In addition, Mr. Dietrich assumed all of Dr. Durrant’s obligations under the Lock-Up Agreement between Dr. Durrant and our company dated February 9, 2011, pursuant to which 8,499,999 of the 12,750,000 shares sold by Dr. Durrant remain “locked up”. Our company has consented to the transfer of the shares and to the assignment and assumption of the obligations under the Lock-Up Agreement. Also on April 5, 2013, and pursuant to a purchase and sale agreement dated for reference March 8, 2013, David Tousley, our former Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and director, sold to Joseph Carusone, our Vice President, Investor Relations and a member of our Board of Directors, 1,200,000 shares of our common stock for total consideration of $9,600. Mr. Carusone paid the $9,600 purchase price for these shares using cash on hand. In addition, Mr. Carusone assumed all of Mr. Tousley’s obligations under the Lock-Up Agreement between Mr. Tousley and our company dated February 9, 2011, pursuant to which 799,998 of the 1,200,000 shares sold by Mr. Tousley remain “locked up”. Our company has consented to the transfer of the shares and to the assignment and assumption of the obligations under the Lock-Up Agreement.

   

On May 17, 2013, the Company entered into a definitive Web Site Asset Purchase Agreement (the “Agreement”) with Lakefield Media Holding AG and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Flawsome XLerator GmbH (Flawsome). Constantin Dietrich, our current president and director of our company, is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Lakefield Media Holding AG, which wholly-owns Flawsome.Pursuant to the Agreement, the Company acquired the internet domain name “Slickx.com”, the website and related software, intellectual property rights, accounts, contracts, goodwill and infrastructure for $50,000. This transaction was completed on May 21, 2013.

   

On May 29, 2013 the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Flawsome, whereby Flawsome agreed to provide certain services, including general management, product management, requirements engineering, quality management, project management, design creation, development team lead, deployment management, content management, reporting services, web development, mobile development, basic content creation, server hosting and monitoring and update services. The agreement expired December 31, 2013, but is continuing on a month-to-month basis. During the year ended February 28, 2014, the Company capitalized $298,800 in development costs contracted through Flawsome related to the “Slickx.com” website and expensed $52,093 in website management expenses. As of February 28, 2014, the Company owes $196,500 to Flawsome.

   

As of February 28, 2014, the Company owes $30,000 for consulting services to a director and $70,500 to a Company whose shareholder is a director of the Company. Additionally, the Company owes $7,588 to an officer for expenses paid on behalf of the Company. The payables does not bear interest.

   
4.

Short-Term Notes Payable


      February 28, 2014     February 28, 2013  
  Issued on June 15, 2009, this unsecured promissory note, originally bearing interest at five percent (5%) per annum on the principal balance of $50,000, was originally due on June 15, 2011. Effective May 18, 2011 this promissory note was amended whereby the maturity date of the note was extended until February 28, 2013. The promissory note is now past due and the principal amount or such portion thereof as shall remain outstanding from time to time shall accrue simple interest, calculated monthly in arrears, at a rate of 12% per annum commencing on the date of the promissory note and payable at maturity. Effective September 1, 2013, this promissory note was amended whereby the maturity date of the note was extended until June 30, 2014 and the interest rate was reduced to 7%. $  50,000   $  50,000  

28



  Issued on July 26, 2010, this unsecured promissory note, bearing interest at five percent (5%) per annum on the principal balance of $200,000, was originally due on July 26, 2011. Effective May 23, 2011 this promissory note was amended whereby the maturity date of the note was extended until February 28, 2013. The promissory note was paid in full in March 2013.   -0-     200,000  
               
  Issued on May 6, 2011, this unsecured promissory note, originally bearing interest at five percent (5%) per annum on the principal balance of $250,000, was originally due on February 28, 2013. The promissory note is past due and the principal amount or such portion thereof as shall remain outstanding from time to time shall accrue simple interest, calculated monthly in arrears, at a rate of 12% per annum commencing on the date of the promissory note and payable at maturity. Effective September 1, 2013, this promissory note was amended whereby the maturity date of the note was extended until June 30, 2014 and the interest rate was reduced to 7%.   250,000     250,000  
               
  Issued on September 24, 2013, this unsecured promissory note, bears interest at seven percent (7%) per annum on the principal balance of $100,000 and is due on June 30, 2014.   100,000     -  
               
  Issued on February 13, 2014, this unsecured promissory note, bears interest at seven percent (7%) per annum on the principal balance of $50,000 and is due on February 13, 2015.   50,000     -  
               
  Total Promissory Notes $  450,000   $  500,000  

Quint entered into an amendment of a previously amended unsecured promissory note originally dated June 15, 2009 in the principal amount of $50,000. Effective September 1, 2013, the maturity date of the note was extended from December 31, 2012 until June 30, 2014 and the interest rate on the outstanding principal balance was decreased from twelve percent per annum to seven percent per annum. All other terms of the promissory note remain the same.

In addition, as of February 28, 2014, we entered into an amendment of a previously amended unsecured promissory note originally dated May 6, 2011 in the principal amount of $250,000. Effective September 1, 2013, the maturity date of the note was been extended from December 31, 2012 until June 30, 2014 and the interest rate on the outstanding principal balance was decreased from twelve percent per annum to seven percent per annum. All other terms of the promissory note remain the same.

The Company determined that concessions granted in the form of extensions of the due dates and reductions in interest rates on these above mentioned promissory notes are considered debt modifications as defined under Accounting Standards Codification 470-60, “Troubled Debt Restructurings by Debtors”.

Accrued interest on promissory notes payable totaled $76,330 and $78,698 at February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013, respectively.

29



5.

Discontinued Operations

   

During the period ended February 28, 2014, the Company’s management elected to discontinue the operations of its pharmaceutical business, divest itself of the balance of its pharmaceutical assets and engage in the digital media business. As such, all assets, liabilities and expenses of the pharmaceutical business have been presented as discontinued operations in the consolidated financial statements. A summary of those assets and liabilities as of February 28, 2014 and February 28, 2013 and revenues and expenses as of February 28, 2014 and 2012 and from Inception March 18, 2005 through February 28, 2014:


    February 28,  
    2014     2013  
Assets from Discontinued Operations            
Accounts receivable, net of reserves $  -   $  50,556  
Intangible assets, net (available for sale)   -     200,000  
             
   Total Assets $  -   $  250,556  
             
Liabilities from Discontinued Operations            
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $  109,449   $  119,382  

                  For the Period  
                  From Inception  
                  March 18, 2005  
                  Through  
      For the Years Ended     February 28,  
      February 28,     2014  
      2014     2013     (Unaudited)  
                     
  Net Revenues $  1,893   $  77,938   $  1,127,689  
                     
  Expenses                  
  Cost of goods sold   1,886     52,359     359,246  
  Amortization expense   -     86,486     226,266  
  Consulting fees   1,619     3,333     622,069  
  Marketing   2,311     33,144     629,348  
  Write down of mineral property acquisition costs   -     -     5,000  
  Mineral property expenses   -     -     15,124  
  Impairment of product rights   200,000     456,554     656,554  
  General and administrative   -     284,651     2,342,134  
  Total Expenses   205,816     916,527     4,855,741  
                     
                     
  Other Income                  
  Gain on sale of product rights   -     -     64,900  
  Other income   12,442     891,965     904,407  
                     
  Net Income (Loss) From Discontinued Operations $  (191,481 ) $  53,376   $  (2,758,745 )

6.         Common Stock and Common Stock Warrants

On November 3, 2010, 1,200,000 units were issued at a purchase price of approximately $0.34 per unit for total cash proceeds of $400,000. Each unit consisted of one share of common stock of the Company and one-half of one share non-detachable purchase warrant. Each whole warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of common stock at a purchase price of $0.58 per share until November 3, 2012.

30


On November 30, 2010, 1,275,000 units were issued at a purchase price of approximately $0.34 per unit for total cash proceeds of $425,000. Each unit consisted of one share of common stock of the Company and one-half of one share non-detachable purchase warrant. Each whole warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of common stock at a purchase price of $0.58 per share until November 30, 2012.

On November 30, 2010, 615,000 units were issued at a purchase price of approximately $0.33 per unit for cancellation of a promissory note in the principal amount of $200,000 plus accrued interest of $5,000. Each unit consisted of one share of common stock of the Company and one-half of one share non-detachable purchase warrant. Each whole warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of common stock at a purchase price of $0.58 per share until November 30, 2012.

On November 25, 2013, the Company sold 375,000 units of our securities at a price of $0.20 per unit for gross proceeds of $75,000. Each unit consists of one share of common stock and one non-transferable common stock purchase warrant, with each common stock purchase warrant entitling the holder to acquire one additional share of our common stock at a price of $0.50 per share for a period of 60 months.

The following table summarizes the outstanding warrants and associated activity for the years ended February 28, 2014 and 2013:

                  Weighted  
                  Average  
      Number of           Remaining  
      Warrants     Weighted     Contractual  
      Outstanding     Average Price     Life  
  Balance, February 29, 2012   -     -     -  
  Granted   -     -     -  
  Exercised   -     -     -  
  Expired   -     -     -  
  Balance, February 28, 2013   -     -     -  
  Granted   375,000     0.50     6.00  
  Exercised   -     -     -  
  Expired   -     -     -  
  Balance, February 28, 2014   375,000   $  0.50     4.74  

The aggregate intrinsic value of outstanding warrants was $78,713 and $0 as of February 28, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

   
7.

Stock Options

   

Effective February 18, 2011, the Board of Directors adopted and approved the 2011 stock option plan. The purpose of the 2011 stock option plan is to enhance the long-term stockholder value of the Company by offering opportunities to directors, key employees, officers, independent contractors and consultants of the company to acquire and maintain stock ownership in the company in order to give these persons the opportunity to participate in the company's growth and success, and to encourage them to remain in the service of the company. A total of 6,000,000 shares of our common stock are available for issuance and during the twelve-month period after the first anniversary of the adoption of the 2011 stock option plan by the Board of Directors. During each twelve-month period thereafter, the Board of Directors is authorized to increase the number of shares issuable by up to 1,500,000 shares.

   

A summary of the status of the Company's outstanding stock option activity for the twelve months ended February 28, 2013 and 2014 is as follows:


            Weighted  
            Average  
      Number of     Exercise  
      Options     Price  
  Balance, February 29, 2012   2,662,500   $  0.38  
  Issued   -     -  
  Cancelled   (2,662,500 )   0.38  
  Balance, February 28, 2013   -     -  
  Issued   -     -  
  Cancelled   -     -  
  Balance, February 28, 2014   -   $ -  

31



As of February 28, 2013, unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested stock option awards totaled $306,189. During the year ended February 28, 2013, unrecognized compensation costs was reduced by approximately $178,000 for estimated forfeitures of unvested stock options as a result of notice provided to Mr. Tousley of termination of his employment agreement effective October 31, 2012. On May 23, 2012, the Company agreed with all option holders to cancel any and all options outstanding as of that date. As a result, the Company expensed all unrecognized compensation costs as of the cancelation date. Total stock-based compensation expense for the year ended February 28, 2013 was $132,138.

   
8.

Subsequent Events

   

On March 31, 2014, the Company accepted a subscription from one non-US investor and issued a promissory note in the amount of $75,000. The promissory note is payable in full at maturity on March 31, 2015, and the principal amount or such portion thereof as shall remain outstanding from time to time accrues simple interest, calculated monthly, at a rate of 7% per annum commencing on the date of the promissory note.

32


ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

On August 1, 2013, Horne LLP resigned as our independent registered public accounting firm. The resignation of Horne LLP was accepted by our board of directors.

Horne LLP’s report on our company’s financial statements for the fiscal years ended February 28, 2013 and February 29, 2012 did not contain an adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion, or qualification or modification as to uncertainty, audit scope, or accounting principles, except that such report on our company’s financial statements contained an explanatory paragraph in respect to the substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

During our company’s fiscal years ended February 28, 2013 and February 29, 2012 and in the subsequent interim period through the date of the resignation, there were no disagreements, resolved or not, with Horne LLP on any matter of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure, or audit scope and procedures, which disagreement, if not resolved to the satisfaction of Horne LLP, would have caused Horne LLP to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement in connection with its report.

On September 16, 2013, we appointed MaloneBailey, LLP as our independent registered public accounting firm. The appointment of MaloneBailey, LLP was approved by our board of directors.

Except as disclosed below, during our company’s fiscal years ended February 28, 2013 and February 29, 2012 and in the subsequent interim period through the date of the resignation, there were no reportable events as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

In connection of the audit of our financial statements as of and for the year ended February 28, 2013 and the review of our financial statements as of and for the three month period ended May 31, 2013, Horne LLP advised us that it had identified following control deficiency to be a material weakness:

  • Our company has limited Securities and Exchange Commission reporting and financial reporting experience. Due to its development stage, our company has decided not to remedy this staffing deficiency at this time.

We agreed with Horne LLP on these matters.

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure controls and procedures

We maintain “disclosure controls and procedures”, as that term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e), promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our company’s reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. As required by paragraph (b) of Rules 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated our company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that as of February 28, 2014, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective. The ineffectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures was due to material weaknesses, which we identified, in our internal control over financial reporting.

33


Internal control over financial reporting

Management’s annual report on internal control over financial reporting

Our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Our management, with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of February 28, 2014. Our management’s evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting was based on the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, our management concluded that as of February 28, 2014, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective.

The ineffectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting was due to the following material weaknesses which we identified in our internal control over financial reporting: (1) the lack of multiples levels of management review on complex accounting and financial reporting issues, and (2) a lack of adequate segregation of duties and necessary corporate accounting resources in our financial reporting process and accounting function as a result of our limited financial resources to support hiring of personnel and implementation of accounting systems. Until such time as we expand our staff to include additional accounting personnel and hire a full time chief financial officer, it is likely we will continue to report material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

A material weakness is a deficiency or a combination of control deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls

Our principal executive officer and principal financial officer do not expect that our disclosure controls or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within our company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of a simple error or mistake. Additional controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

Changes in internal control over financial reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of our fiscal year ended February 28, 2014 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

None.

PART III

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Directors and Executive Officers

Our directors and executive officers, their age, positions held, and duration of such, are as follows:


Name
Position Held with
our Company

Age
Date First Elected
or Appointed
Constantin Dietrich Director 44 February 15, 2013
President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial August 7, 2013

34



  Officer, Secretary and Treasurer    
Joseph Carusone Director 49 August 18, 2008
Vice President, Investor Relations November 17, 2010
Joseph Arcuri Director 50 February 15, 2013

Business Experience

The following is a brief account of the education and business experience of directors and executive officers during at least the past five years, indicating their principal occupation during the period, and the name and principal business of the organization by which they were employed:

Constantin Dietrich

Mr. Dietrich has over 20 years of experience in private equity, investing, marketing, media and executive/management leadership. Since March 2012, he has acted as the Chief Executive Officer of Lakefield Media Holding AG, a company that he founded to acquire and leverage established digital and social media properties, located in Switzerland. Mr. Dietrich has expertise in social networks and social discovery. Mr. Dietrich holds a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from UC of Syracuse University.

We believe Mr. Dietrich is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his education and business experiences as described above.

Joseph Carusone

Mr. Carusone was appointed as Vice President, Investor Relations of our company on November 17, 2010 and as a director of our company on August 18, 2008. He also served as president, secretary and treasurer of our company from August 18, 2008 until November 17, 2010. For more than 10 years, Mr. Carusone has been involved in the founding of and management of private companies and partnerships including those in the oil and gas industry. His experience as a liaison between management and shareholders is extensive. He has been the president of Opex Energy Corp. since its inception on August 22, 2007. Since 2001, Mr. Carusone has been founder and president of the investor relations firm Primoris Group Inc. Between 1999 and 2001, Mr. Carusone was vice-president of operations of StockHouse Media Corporation. For eight years following his graduation from the University of Toronto with a degree in Engineering and Applied Science (1987), Mr. Carusone managed research activities in University of Toronto’s Institute for Aerospace Studies’ Space Robotics Group.

We believe Mr. Carusone is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his knowledge of our company’s history and current operations, which he gained from working for our company as described above, in addition to his education and business experiences as described above.

Joseph Arcuri

Mr. Arcuri has 20 years of executive and entrepreneurial experience in corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions, business restructuring, and technology. He has acted as Chief Financial Officer of GlassBox Television Inc., a media company located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada from April 2010 to October 2012. From April 2007 to March 2010, he was President of AOL Canada Inc., a Canadian company. In 1999 he co-founded Bird on a Wire Networks Inc. one of Canada’s first managed IT service companies. Mr. Arcuri also served as interim Chief Financial Officer of Biosyent Inc. from September 2002 to April 2004, a life sciences technology company. He is a chartered accountant within Canada.

We believe Mr. Arcuri is qualified to serve on our board of directors because of his education and business experiences as described above.

Family Relationships

There are no family relationships between any director or executive officer.

35


Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

Our directors and executive officers have not been involved in any of the following events during the past ten years:

  1.

any bankruptcy petition filed by or against any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time;

     
  2.

any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

     
  3.

being subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities;

     
  4.

being found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;

     
  5.

being the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of: (i) any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation; or (ii) any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease- and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order; or (iii) any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or

     
  6.

being the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self- regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock, to file reports regarding ownership of, and transactions in, our securities with the Securities and Exchange Commission and to provide us with copies of those filings. Based solely on our review of the copies of such forms received by us, or written representations from certain reporting persons we believe that during year ended February 28, 2014 all filing requirements applicable to our executive officers and directors, and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock were complied with.

Code of Ethics

We have not adopted a code of ethics because our board of directors believes that our small size does not merit the expense of preparing, adopting and administering a code of ethics. Our board of directors intends to adopt a code of ethics when circumstances warrant.

Corporate Governance

Term of Office

Each director of our company is to serve for a term of one year ending on the date of subsequent annual meeting of stockholders following the annual meeting at which such director was elected. Notwithstanding the foregoing, each director is to serve until his successor is elected and qualified or until his death, resignation or removal. Our board of directors is to elect our officers and each officer is to serve until his successor is elected and qualified or until his death, resignation or removal.

Committees of the Board

Our board of directors held no formal meetings during the year ended February 28, 2014. All proceedings of our board of directors were conducted by resolutions consented to in writing by all the directors and filed with the minutes of the proceedings of the directors. Such resolutions consented to in writing by the directors entitled to vote on that resolution at a meeting of the directors are, according to the corporate laws of the State of Nevada and our By-laws, as valid and effective as if they had been passed at a meeting of our directors duly called and held.

36


We currently do not have nominating or compensation committees or committees performing similar functions nor do we have a written nominating or compensation committee charter. Our board of directors does not believe that it is necessary to have such committees because it believes that the functions of such committees can be adequately performed by our board of directors.

We do not have any defined policy or procedure requirements for shareholders to submit recommendations or nominations for directors. We do not currently have any specific or minimum criteria for the election of nominees to our board of directors and we do not have any specific process or procedure for evaluating such nominees. Our board of directors assesses all candidates, whether submitted by management or shareholders, and makes recommendations for election or appointment.

A shareholder who wishes to communicate with our board of directors may do so by directing a written request to the address appearing on the first page of this annual report.

Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert

We do not have a standing audit committee at the present time. Our board of directors has determined that we do not have a board member that qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined in Item 407(d)(5)(ii) of Regulation S-K, but we have one board member (Joseph Arcuri) that qualifies as “independent” as the term is used by NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5605(a)(2).

We believe that our board of directors is capable of analyzing and evaluating our financial statements and understanding internal controls and procedures for financial reporting. The board of directors of our company does not believe that it is necessary to have an audit committee because we believe that the functions of an audit committee can be adequately performed by the board of directors. In addition, we believe that retaining an independent director who would qualify as an “audit committee financial expert” would be overly costly and burdensome and is not warranted in our circumstances given the early stages of our development.

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Summary Compensation

The particulars of compensation paid to the following persons:

  (a)

our principal executive officers;

     
  (b)

each of our two most highly compensated executive officers who were serving as executive officers at the end of the year ended February 28, 2014; and

     
  (c)

up to two additional individuals for whom disclosure would have been provided under (b) but for the fact that the individual was not serving as our executive officer at the end of the most recently completed financial year,

who we will collectively refer to as the named executive officers, for our fiscal years ended February 28, 2014 and 2013, are set out in the following summary compensation table:

37


SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE





Name and
Principal
Position





Fiscal
Year





Salary
($)





Bonus
($)




Stock
Awards
($)




Option
Awards
($)
Non-
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensa
tion
($)
Nonquali
fied
Deferred
Compens
ation
Earnings
($)
All
Other
Compensation
($)





Total
($)
Constantin Dietrich (1)
President, CEO, CFO,
Treasurer, Secretary &
Director
2014
2013

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Nil
N/A

Joseph Carusone
VP, Investor Relations
and Director
2014
2013
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Nil
Dr. Cameron Durrant(2)
former President, CEO,
CFO, Treasurer,
Secretary & Director
2014
2013

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil

Nil
Nil


(1)

Constantine Dietrich was appointed to the board of directors on February 15, 2014 and President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary and director on August 7, 2013.

   
(2)

Dr. Cameron Durrant was appointed as our President, Chief Executive Officer and a director on November 17, 2010 then appointed Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary on October 31, 2012. He resigned as a director and officer of our company on August 7, 2013

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

The following table sets forth for each named executive officer certain information concerning the outstanding equity awards as of February 28, 2014.

38



  Option Awards Stock Awards















Name










Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options
Exercisable










Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options
Unexercisable






Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Unearned
Options













Option
Exercise
Price













Option
Expiration
Date







Number
of
Shares
or Units
of Stock
that
Have
Not
Vested




Market
Value
of
Shares
or
Units
of
Stock
that
Have
Not
Vested


Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number
of
Unearned
Shares,
Units or
Other
Rights
that
Have Not
Vested
Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Market
or
Payout
Value of
Unearned
Shares,
Units or
Other
Rights
that
Have Not
Vested
Constantine
Dietrich
Nil
Nil
Nil
N/A
N/A
Nil
N/A
Nil
N/A
Joseph
Carusone
Nil
Nil
Nil
N/A
N/A
Nil
N/A
Nil
N/A
Dr.
Cameron
Durrant
Nil

Nil

Nil

N/A

N/A

Nil

N/A

Nil

N/A

Compensation of Directors

Our board of directors has received no compensation to date and there are no plans to compensate them in the near future, unless and until we become profitable in our business operations. We may issue options in the future as we retain the services of independent directors.

The table below shows the compensation of our directors for their services as directors for our last completed fiscal year ended February 28, 2014:





Name
Fees
earned or
paid in
cash
($)


Stock
awards
($)


Option
awards
($)
Non-equity
incentive
plan
compensation
($)
Nonqualified
deferred
compensation
earnings
($)


All other
compensation
($)



Total
($)
Joseph Arcuri                    Nil                Nil                Nil Nil Nil Nil            Nil

Long-Term Incentive Plans, Retirement or Similar Benefit Plans

There are currently no arrangements or plans in which we provide pension, retirement or similar benefits for directors or executive officers, except that we may reimburse our executive employees for up to 70% of their health insurance premiums under their individual policies. We may provide employee benefit plans to our employees in the future.

Our directors, executive officers and employees may receive stock options at the discretion of our board of directors.

Resignation, Retirement, Other Termination, or Change in Control Arrangements

We do not have arrangements in respect of remuneration received or that may be received by our executive officers to compensate such officers in the event of termination of employment (as a result of resignation, retirement, change of control) or a change of responsibilities following a change of control.

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ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

In the following table, we have determined the number and percentage of shares beneficially owned in accordance with Rule 13d-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 based on information provided to us by our controlling shareholders, named executive officers and current directors, and this information does not necessarily indicate beneficial ownership for any other purpose. In determining the number of shares of our common stock beneficially owned by a person and the percentage ownership of that person, we include any shares as to which the person has sole or shared voting power or investment power, as well as any shares subject to warrants or options held by that person that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days.


Title of class
Name and address of
beneficial owner
Amount and nature of
beneficial ownership
Percent of
class 1
Common Stock

Constantin Dietrich
3250 NE 1st. Ave., Suite 305,
Miami, Florida 33137
300,000 Indirect 2
12,750,000 Direct
20.75%

Common Stock


Joseph Carusone
Suite 602
160 Eglinton Avenue East,
Toronto, ON M4P 3B5
4,200,000 Direct


6.68%


Common Stock


Joseph Arcuri
Suite 602
160 Eglinton Avenue East,
Toronto, ON M4P 3B5
Nil


Nil


Common Stock

Cameron Durrant
90 Fairmount Road West
Califon, NJ 07830-3330
Nil

Nil


Directors & Executive Officers
as a group (3 persons)
17,250,000
27.43%

1 Percentage of ownership is based on 62,883,000 common shares issued and outstanding as of June 12, 2014. Except as otherwise indicated, we believe that the beneficial owners of the common stock listed above, based on information furnished by such owners, have sole investment and voting power with respect to such shares, subject to community property laws where applicable. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock subject to options or warrants currently exercisable, or exercisable within 60 days, are deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of the person holding such option or warrants, but are not deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of any other person.

2 The shares are held indirectly by 3cl Holding GmbH, a limited liability company, based in Germany and 100% owned by Mr. Dietrich’s family. Mr. Dietrich and his wife together own about 70% of this company, while Mr. Dietrich’s in-laws own the rest. One of Mr. Dietrich’s in-laws is the only managing director of this company.

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

Transactions with related persons

Except as disclosed below, since March 1, 2012, there have been no transactions, or currently proposed transactions, in which we were or are to be a participant and the amount involved exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any of the following persons had or will have a direct or indirect material interest:

  (i)

Any director or executive officer of our company;

     
  (ii)

Any person who beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, shares carrying more than 5% of the voting rights attached to our outstanding shares of common stock;

     
  (iii)

Any of our promoters and control persons; and

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  (iv)

Any member of the immediate family (including spouse, parents, children, siblings and in- laws) of any of the foregoing persons.

On May 17, 2013, we entered into a Web Site Asset Purchase Agreement with Lakefield Media Holding AG and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Flawsome XLerator GmbH to acquire the internet domain name “Slickx.com”, the website and related software, intellectual property rights, accounts, contracts, goodwill and infrastructure for $50,000. On May 21, 2013, we completed the acquisition of these assets and paid $50,000 to Lakefield. Constantin Dietrich, a director and executive officer of our company, is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Lakefield.

Dr. Cameron Durrant

On March 8, 2013, we entered into a Business Development/Advisory Services Agreement with Phys Pharma LLC, a company of which Dr. Cameron Durrant, former President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary and a director of our company, is a principal, pursuant to which Phys Pharma agreed to provide us a list of select biopharmaceutical companies which might have an interest in acquiring Granisol and assist us in marketing and selling Granisol to the prospective purchasers. If we sell Granisol to the prospective purchaser introduced by Phys Pharma, we agreed to pay Phys Pharma a fee in an amount equal to 20% of the net proceeds received by us at closing.

David Tousley

On September 14, 2010, with retroactive effect to July 1, 2010, we entered into an employment agreement with Mr. David Tousley, former Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary of our company. Pursuant to the employment agreement, Mr. Tousley agreed to perform such duties as are regularly and customarily performed by the Chief Financial Officer of a corporation in consideration for, among other things, $200,000 per annum.

Pursuant to the terms of the employment agreement with Mr. Tousley, if the agreement is terminated for other than just cause by us then we agreed to continue to pay Mr. Tousley his base salary for the Termination Notice Period (defined as the period of six months plus two months per year of engagement of Mr. Tousley up to a maximum of twelve months) or, at our discretion to pay a lump sum amount equal to Mr. Tousley’s base monthly salary times the number of months in the Termination Notice Period.

Effective March 1, 2012, we gave notice to Mr. Tousley that we will be terminating his employment agreement pursuant to Section 6.3(b) of the agreement. As a result, Mr. Tousley’s employment agreement ceased effective October 31, 2012. Mr. Tousley also resigned as an officer on October 31, 2012 and as a director on November 16, 2012.

Compensation for Executive Officers and Directors

For information regarding compensation for our named executive officers and directors, see Item 11 –”Executive Compensation”.

Director Independence

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB operated by the OTC Markets Group, which does not impose any director independence requirements. Under NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5605(a)(2), a director is not considered to be independent if he is also an executive officer or employee of the company. Because Constantine Dietrich and Joseph Carusone serve in executive capacities, we determined that Joseph Arcuri is an “independent directors” as that term is defined by NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5605(a)(2).

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

Audit Fees

The following table sets forth the fees billed to our company for the year ended February 28, 2014 for professional services rendered by MaloneBailey, LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm since September 16, 2013:

Fees   2014  
Audit Fees $  25,000  
Audit Related Fees   -  

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Tax Fees   -  
Other Fees   -  
Total Fees $  25,000  

The following table sets forth the fees billed by our company for the year ended February 28, 2014 and 2013 for professional services rendered by Horne LLP, our prior independent registered public accounting firm:

Fees   2014     2013  
Audit Fees $  -   $  36,000  
Audit Related Fees   -     -  
Tax Fees   -     4,700  
Other Fees   -     -  
Total Fees $  -   $  40,700  

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

Our entire board of directors, which acts as our audit committee, pre-approves all services provided by our independent auditors. All of the above services and fees were reviewed and approved by our board of directors before the respective services were rendered.

Our board of directors has considered the nature and amount of fees billed by MaloneBailey, LLP and Horne LLP and believe that the provision of services for activities unrelated to the audit is compatible with maintaining their respective independence.

PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

Exhibits required by Item 601 of Regulation S-K:

No.

Description

3.1

Articles of Incorporation (attached as an exhibit to our registration statement on Form 10-SB filed on September 8, 2006)

3.2

Certificate of Change (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on September 15, 2008)

3.3

Articles of Merger (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on December 28, 2010)

3.4

Certificate of Change dated effective August 7, 2013 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on August 8, 2013)

3.5

Articles of Merger dated effective August 7, 2013 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on August 8, 2013)

3.6

Amended and Restated Bylaws (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on November 1, 2013)

10.1

Form of promissory note dated June 15, 2009 (attached as an exhibit to our quarterly report on Form 10-Q filed on June 16, 2009)

10.2

Form of Promissory Note dated July 26, 2010 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on July 29, 2010)

10.3

Form of Promissory Note dated September 16, 2010 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on September 28, 2010)

10.4

2011 Stock Option Plan (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on February 22, 2011)

10.5

Form of Promissory Note Amendment dated May 18, 2011 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8- K filed on May 18, 2011)

10.6

Form of Promissory Note Amendment dated May 23, 2011 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8- K filed on May 23, 2011)

10.7

Form of $50,000 Promissory Note Amendment dated April 19, 2012 (attached as an exhibit to our annual report on Form 10-K filed on May 18, 2012)

10.8

Form of $250,000 Promissory Note Amendment dated April 19, 2012 (attached as an exhibit to our annual report on Form 10-K filed on May 18, 2012)

10.9

Termination Agreement dated June 27, 2012 with Apricus Biosciences, Inc. (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on June 28, 2012)

42



No.

Description

10.10

Form of $200,000 Promissory Note Amendment dated July 25, 2012 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on July 27, 2012)

10.11

Form of $50,000 Promissory Note Amendment dated July 25, 2012 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on July 31, 2012)

10.12

Form of $250,000 Promissory Note Amendment dated July 25, 2012 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on July 31, 2012)

10.13

Business Development/Advisory Services Agreement dated March 8, 2013 with Phys Pharma LLC (attached as an exhibit to our annual report on Form 10-K filed on June 28, 2013)

10.14

Web Site Asset Purchase Agreement dated May 17, 2013 between Lakefield Media Holding AG, Flawsome XLerator GmBH and Pediatrix Inc. (attached as an exhibit to our annual report on Form 10-K filed on June 28, 2013)

10.15

Consulting Agreement dated May 29, 2013 with Flawsome XLerator GmBH (attached as an exhibit to our annual report on Form 10-K filed on June 28, 2013)

10.16

Form of Private Placement Subscription Agreement including Form of Promissory Note (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on September 26, 2013)

10.17

Form of Promissory Note Amendment dated August 31, 2013 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on September 26, 2013)

10.18

Form of Promissory Note Amendment dated August 31, 2013 (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on September 26, 2013)

10.19

Form of Private Placement Subscription Agreement (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on December 2, 2013)

10.20

Form of Warrant Certificate (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on December 2, 2013)

10.21

Form of subscription agreement with promissory note attached (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on February 18, 2014)

10.22

Form of subscription agreement with promissory note attached (attached as an exhibit to our current report on Form 8-K filed on April 4, 2014)

21.1

Subsidiary of Quint Media Inc.: Exley Media Inc., a Nevada corporation

31.1*

Certification of Constantin Dietrich Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act Of 2002

32.1*

Certification of Constantin Dietrich Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act Of 2002

101.INS*

XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT

101.SCH*

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA

101.CAL*

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE

101.DEF*

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE

101.LAB*

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE

101.PRE*

XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

* Filed herewith.

43


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

QUINT MEDIA INC.

 

/s/ Constantin Dietrich     
Constantin Dietrich
President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)
Date: June 13, 2014

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

/s/Constantin Dietrich     
Constantin Dietrich
President, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)
Date: June 13, 2014

/s/Joseph Carusone    
Joseph Carusone
Vice President, Investor Relations and Director
Date: June 13, 2014

/s/ Joseph Arcuri      
Joseph Arcuri
Director
Date: June 13, 2014

44