Attached files

file filename
EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.Financial_Report.xls
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R8.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R7.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R9.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R2.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R1.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R6.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R4.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R5.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R20.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R13.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R14.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R24.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R27.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R19.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R34.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R29.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R15.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R32.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R22.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R11.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R23.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R17.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R35.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R38.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R28.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R39.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R30.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R12.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R21.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R16.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R18.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R36.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R25.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R40.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R10.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R26.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R33.htm
EX-31.1 - EX-31.1 - WebMD Health Corp.d506311dex311.htm
EX-99.1 - EX-99.1 - WebMD Health Corp.d506311dex991.htm
EX-32.1 - EX-32.1 - WebMD Health Corp.d506311dex321.htm
EX-32.2 - EX-32.2 - WebMD Health Corp.d506311dex322.htm
EX-31.2 - EX-31.2 - WebMD Health Corp.d506311dex312.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R3.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R31.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - WebMD Health Corp.R37.htm
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form 10-Q

 

þ QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
     OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2013

or

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
     OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission File Number: 001-35337

 

 

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   20-2783228
(State of incorporation)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
111 Eighth Avenue   10011

New York, New York

(Address of principal executive office)

  (Zip code)

(212) 624-3700

(Registrant’s telephone number including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes  þ        No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes  þ        No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   þ    Accelerated filer   ¨      Non-accelerated filer      ¨      Smaller reporting company      ¨
     (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.)

Yes  ¨        No  þ

As of May 3, 2013, the Registrant had 50,000,211 shares of Common Stock (including unvested shares of restricted Common Stock).

 

 

 


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q

For the period ended March 31, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

         Page
Number
 

Forward-Looking Statements

     iii   

PART I

  Financial Information      1   

Item 1.

  Financial Statements      1   
  Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2013 (unaudited) and December 31, 2012      1   
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months ended March  31, 2013 and 2012 (unaudited)

     2   
 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March  31, 2013 and 2012 (unaudited)

     3   
  Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements      4   

Item 2.

  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      16   

Item 3.

  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      30   

Item 4.

  Controls and Procedures      31   

PART II

  Other Information      32   

Item 1.

  Legal Proceedings      32   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      32   

Item 2.

  Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds      52   

Item 6.

  Exhibits      52   

Signatures

     53   

Exhibit Index

     E-1   

WebMD®, Medscape®, CME Circle®, Medpulse®, eMedicine®, MedicineNet®, theheart.org®, RxList® and Select Quality Care® are among the trademarks of WebMD Health Corp. or its subsidiaries.

 

ii


Table of Contents

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains both historical and forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are, or may be, forward-looking statements. For example, statements concerning projections, predictions, expectations, estimates or forecasts and statements that describe our objectives, future performance, plans or goals are, or may be, forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect management’s current expectations concerning future results and events and can generally be identified by the use of expressions such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “would,” “likely,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” “future,” “estimate,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “foresee,” and other similar words or phrases, as well as statements in the future tense.

Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be different from any future results, performance and achievements expressed or implied by these statements. The following important risks and uncertainties could affect our future results, causing those results to differ materially from those expressed in our forward-looking statements:

 

   

failure to achieve sufficient levels of usage of our public and private portals and mobile platforms;

 

   

competition in attracting consumers and healthcare professionals to our public portals and mobile platforms;

 

   

competition for advertisers and sponsors for our public portals and mobile platforms;

 

   

reductions in promotional and educational spending by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for brand name prescription drugs, including as a result of lower revenue from such products, whether resulting from the amount and timing of regulatory approvals of such products, from the amount and timing of regulatory approvals of generic products that compete with existing brand name products or from other factors affecting the relevant markets;

 

   

the inability to successfully deploy new or updated applications or services for our public portals, mobile platforms and private portals;

 

   

failure to preserve and enhance the “WebMD” brand and our other brands;

 

   

the inability to provide health coaching and condition management services that meet the needs of clients and potential clients of our private portals or the failure to do so with sufficient efficiency to make those services profitable for us;

 

   

the inability to attract and retain qualified personnel;

 

   

adverse economic conditions and disruptions in the capital markets;

 

   

adverse changes in general business or regulatory conditions affecting the healthcare, information technology and Internet industries; and

 

   

the other risks and uncertainties described in Part II, Item 1A of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

These factors are not necessarily all of the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any of our forward-looking statements. Other factors, including unknown or unpredictable ones, also could have material adverse effects on our future results.

The forward-looking statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are made only as of the date of this Quarterly Report. Except as required by law or regulation, we do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances.

 

iii


Table of Contents

PART I

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Financial Statements

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share and per share data)

 

     March 31,
2013
    December 31,
2012
 

ASSETS

     (unaudited  

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 999,221      $ 991,835   

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $1,345 at March 31, 2013 and $1,304 at December 31, 2012

     101,813        106,622   

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     14,999        13,882   

Deferred tax assets

     10,339        10,328   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     1,126,372        1,122,667   

Property and equipment, net

     62,808        66,604   

Goodwill

     202,104        202,104   

Intangible assets, net

     15,538        16,105   

Deferred tax assets

     55,436        56,039   

Other assets

     25,260        27,106   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 1,487,518      $ 1,490,625   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accrued expenses

   $ 49,107      $ 64,256   

Deferred revenue

     97,220        92,176   

Liabilities of discontinued operations

     1,506        1,506   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     147,833        157,938   

2.25% convertible notes due 2016

     400,000        400,000   

2.50% convertible notes due 2018

     400,000        400,000   

Other long-term liabilities

     22,742        22,698   

Commitments and contingencies

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, 50,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding

              

Common stock, $0.01 par value per share, 650,000,000 shares authorized; 62,437,992 shares issued at March 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012

     624        624   

Additional paid-in capital

     9,491,725        9,489,099   

Treasury stock, at cost; 13,344,144 shares at March 31, 2013 and 13,425,144 shares at December 31, 2012

     (447,587     (453,453

Accumulated deficit

     (8,527,819     (8,526,281
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity

     516,943        509,989   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

   $ 1,487,518      $ 1,490,625   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

1


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data, unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
     2013     2012  

Revenue

   $ 112,762      $ 106,947   

Cost of operations

     46,943        53,471   

Sales and marketing

     30,933        30,103   

General and administrative

     23,534        29,022   

Depreciation and amortization

     6,853        6,930   

Interest income

     21        11   

Interest expense

     5,832        5,836   

Gain on investments

            8,074   

Other expense

            1,200   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income tax provision (benefit)

     (1,312     (11,530

Income tax provision (benefit)

     226        (3,753
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (1,538   $ (7,777
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss per common share - Basic and Diluted

   $ (0.03   $ (0.14
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares outstanding - Basic and Diluted

     49,007        55,769   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

2


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands, unaudited)

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
     2013     2012  

Cash flows from operating activities:

    

Net loss

   $ (1,538   $ (7,777

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Depreciation and amortization

     6,853        6,930   

Non-cash interest, net

     1,082        1,082   

Non-cash stock-based compensation

     9,937        16,900   

Deferred income taxes

     (99     (3,971

Gain on investments

            (8,074

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

    

Accounts receivable

     4,809        23,890   

Prepaid expenses and other, net

     (193     (4,023

Accrued expenses and other long-term liabilities

     (14,850     (11,694

Deferred revenue

     5,044        2,266   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     11,045        15,529   

Cash flows from investing activities:

    

Proceeds received from ARS option

            9,269   

Purchases of property and equipment

     (2,876     (3,377
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

     (2,876     5,892   

Cash flows from financing activities:

    

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

     672        754   

Cash used for withholding taxes due on stock-based awards

     (174     (911

Purchases of treasury stock

     (1,281     (415
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (783     (572
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

     7,386        20,849   

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

     991,835        1,121,217   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 999,221      $ 1,142,066   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

3


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(In thousands, except share and per share data, unaudited)

1.    Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Background

WebMD Health Corp. (the “Company” or “WebMD”) is a Delaware corporation that was incorporated on May 3, 2005. The Company completed an initial public offering on September 28, 2005. The Company’s Common Stock trades under the symbol “WBMD” on the Nasdaq Global Select Market. From the completion of the initial public offering through the completion of the Company’s merger with HLTH Corporation (“HLTH”) on October 23, 2009 (the “Merger”), the Company was more than 80% owned by HLTH. On October 23, 2009, the Merger was completed, with HLTH merging into WebMD and WebMD continuing as the surviving corporation.

The Company provides health information services to consumers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, employers and health plans through its public and private online portals, mobile platforms and health-focused publications. The Company’s public portals for consumers enable them to obtain health and wellness information (including information on specific diseases or conditions), check symptoms, locate physicians, store individual healthcare information, receive periodic e-newsletters on topics of individual interest and participate in online communities with peers and experts. The Company’s public portals for physicians and healthcare professionals make it easier for them to access clinical reference sources, stay abreast of the latest clinical information, learn about new treatment options, earn continuing medical education (“CME”) credit and communicate with peers. The Company also provides mobile health information applications for use by consumers and physicians. The Company’s public portals generate revenue primarily through the sale of advertising and sponsorship products, including CME services. The public portals’ sponsors and advertisers include pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device and healthcare services companies, and consumer products companies whose products relate to health, wellness, diet, fitness, lifestyle, safety and illness prevention. The Company also generates revenue from advertising sold in WebMD Magazine, a consumer magazine distributed to physician office waiting rooms. In addition, the Company generates revenue from the sale of certain information and data products. The Company’s private portals enable employers and health plans to provide their employees and members with access to personalized health and benefit information and decision-support tools that help them to make more informed benefit, treatment and provider decisions and motivate them to make healthier lifestyle choices. In addition, the Company offers clients of its private portals health and condition management programs and health coaching services on a per participant basis. The Company generates revenue from its private portals through the licensing of these portals and related services to employers and health plans either directly or through distributors.

Interim Financial Statements

The unaudited consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared by management and reflect all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring adjustments) that, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation of the interim periods presented. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2013 are not necessarily indicative of the operating results to be expected for any subsequent period or for the entire year ending December 31, 2013. Certain information and note disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) have been condensed or omitted under the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and regulations.

The unaudited consolidated financial statements and notes included herein should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes for the year ended December 31, 2012, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

4


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Seasonality

The timing of the Company’s revenue is affected by seasonal factors. The Company’s public portal advertising and sponsorship revenue is seasonal, primarily due to the annual spending patterns of the advertising and sponsorship clients of the Company’s public portals. This portion of the Company’s revenue is usually the lowest in the first quarter of each calendar year, and generally increases during each consecutive quarter throughout the year. The timing of revenue in relation to the Company’s expenses, many of which do not vary directly with revenue, has an impact on cost of operations, sales and marketing, and general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenue in each calendar quarter.

Accounting Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience, current business factors, and various other assumptions that the Company believes are necessary to consider to form a basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities, the recorded amounts of revenue and expenses, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. The Company is subject to uncertainties such as the impact of future events, economic and political factors, and changes in the Company’s business environment; therefore, actual results could differ from these estimates. Accordingly, the accounting estimates used in the preparation of the Company’s financial statements will change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained and as the Company’s operating environment changes. Changes in estimates are made when circumstances warrant. Such changes in estimates and refinements in estimation methodologies are reflected in reported results of operations; if material, the effects of changes in estimates are disclosed in the notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Significant estimates and assumptions by management affect the allowance for doubtful accounts, the carrying value of long-lived assets (including goodwill and intangible assets), the amortization period of long-lived assets (excluding goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets), the carrying value, capitalization and amortization of software and Website development costs, the carrying value of investments, the provision for income taxes and related deferred tax accounts, certain accrued liabilities, revenue recognition, contingencies, litigation and related legal accruals and the value attributed to employee stock options and other stock-based awards.

Presentation of Segment Information

The Company generates its revenue through its public and private portals. Discrete financial information related to a measure of profit or loss for these two revenue streams is not available as they leverage many common expenses, and the Company does not separately allocate these common expenses in assessing the performance of its business. Accordingly, the Company views its business as one reportable operating segment.

The following table presents the revenues recognized related to the Company’s public portals and private portals during the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012:

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
         2013              2012      

Public portal revenues

   $ 93,438       $ 87,776   

Private portal revenues

     19,324         19,171   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 112,762       $ 106,947   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

5


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Loss Contingencies

The Company accounts for loss contingencies in accordance with FASB ASC No. 450, “Contingencies.” Under ASC No. 450, accruals for loss contingencies are recorded when both (i) the information available indicates that it is probable that a liability has been incurred and (ii) the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. The Company records adjustments to these accruals to reflect the status of negotiations, settlements, advice of counsel and other information and events related to an individual matter.

Net Loss Per Common Share

Basic and diluted loss per common share have been computed using the weighted-average number of shares of Common Stock outstanding during the periods presented.

The Company has excluded its convertible notes, as well as its outstanding stock options and restricted stock, from the calculation of diluted loss per common share because such securities were anti-dilutive during the periods presented. The following table presents the total weighted average number of potentially dilutive common shares that were excluded from the computation of diluted loss per common share during the periods presented (shares in thousands):

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
         2013              2012      

Options and restricted stock

     13,862         11,530   

Convertible notes

     11,629         11,477   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 
     25,491         23,007   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In July 2012, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued an update to the existing guidance for impairment testing of indefinite-lived intangible assets, other than goodwill, similar to previously issued guidance for impairment testing of goodwill. The update simplifies how a company tests indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment by allowing both public and nonpublic entities an option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not that the fair value of an indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired. If an entity elects to perform a qualitative assessment and determines that an impairment is more likely than not, the entity is then required to perform the existing two-step quantitative impairment test, otherwise no further analysis is required. An entity may also elect not to perform the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to the two-step quantitative impairment test. The amendment is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after September 15, 2012, which for the Company was the first quarter of 2013. The adoption of this amendment did not have an impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

2.    Convertible Notes

2.50% Convertible Notes due 2018

On January 11, 2011, the Company issued $400,000 aggregate principal amount of its 2.50% Convertible Notes due 2018 (the “2.50% Notes”) in a private offering. Unless previously converted, the 2.50% Notes will mature on January 31, 2018. Net proceeds from the sale of the 2.50% Notes were approximately $387,345, after deducting the related offering expenses, of which approximately $100,000 was used to repurchase

 

6


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

1,920,490 shares of the Company’s Common Stock at a price of $52.07 per share, the last reported sale price of the Company’s Common Stock on January 5, 2011, which repurchase settled on January 11, 2011. Interest on the 2.50% Notes is payable semi-annually on January 31 and July 31 of each year, commencing July 31, 2011. Under the terms of the 2.50% Notes, holders were able to surrender their 2.50% Notes for conversion into the Company’s Common Stock at an initial conversion rate of 15.1220 shares of Common Stock per thousand dollars principal amount of the 2.50% Notes. This was equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $66.13 per share of Common Stock. In the aggregate, the 2.50% Notes were convertible into 6,048,800 shares of the Company’s Common Stock. Effective April 4, 2012, after giving effect to an adjustment resulting from a tender offer for the Company’s Common Stock that the Company completed on April 3, 2012 (see Note 4 for additional discussion), the conversion rate was adjusted to 15.3223 shares of Common Stock per thousand dollars principal amount of the 2.50% Notes. This is equivalent to an adjusted conversion price of approximately $65.26 per share of Common Stock. In the aggregate, the 2.50% Notes are convertible into 6,128,920 shares of Common Stock following the April 4, 2012 adjustment.

Under the terms of the 2.50% Notes, if the Company undergoes certain change of control transactions prior to the maturity date of the 2.50% Notes, holders of the 2.50% Notes will have the right, at their option, to require the Company to repurchase some or all of their 2.50% Notes at a repurchase price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the 2.50% Notes being repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the repurchase date. At the Company’s option, and to the extent permitted by the applicable rules of the Nasdaq Global Select Market (or the applicable rules of such other exchange on which the Company’s Common Stock may be listed), instead of paying the repurchase price in cash, the Company may pay the repurchase price in shares of its Common Stock or a combination of cash and shares of its Common Stock. However, in the case of certain change of control transactions in which the Company is acquired by a public company, the Company may elect to provide for conversion of the 2.50% Notes into acquirer common stock, in which case the repurchase option would not apply.

2.25% Convertible Notes due 2016

On March 14, 2011, the Company issued $400,000 aggregate principal amount of its 2.25% Convertible Notes due 2016 (the “2.25% Notes”) in a private offering. Unless previously converted, the 2.25% Notes will mature on March 31, 2016. Net proceeds from the sale of the 2.25% Notes were approximately $387,400, after deducting the related offering expenses, of which approximately $50,000 was used to repurchase 868,507 shares of the Company’s Common Stock at a price of $57.57 per share, the last reported sale price of the Company’s Common Stock on March 8, 2011, which repurchase settled on March 14, 2011. Interest on the 2.25% Notes is payable semi-annually on March 31 and September 30 of each year, commencing September 30, 2011. Under the

terms of the 2.25% Notes, holders were able to surrender their 2.25% Notes for conversion into the Company’s Common Stock at an initial conversion rate of 13.5704 shares of Common Stock per thousand dollars principal amount of the 2.25% Notes. This was equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $73.69 per share of Common Stock. In the aggregate, the 2.25% Notes were convertible into 5,428,160 shares of the Company’s Common Stock. Effective April 4, 2012, after giving effect to an adjustment resulting from a tender offer for the Company’s Common Stock that the Company completed on April 3, 2012 (see Note 4 for additional discussion), the conversion rate was adjusted to 13.7502 shares of Common Stock per thousand dollars principal amount of the 2.25% Notes. This is equivalent to an adjusted conversion price of approximately $72.73 per share of Common Stock. In the aggregate, the 2.25% Notes are convertible into 5,500,080 shares of Common Stock following the April 4, 2012 adjustment.

Under the terms of the 2.25% Notes, if the Company undergoes certain change of control transactions prior to the maturity date of the 2.25% Notes, holders of the 2.25% Notes will have the right, at their option, to require the Company to repurchase some or all of their 2.25% Notes at a repurchase price equal to 100% of the principal

 

7


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

amount of the 2.25% Notes being repurchased, plus accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the repurchase date. At the Company’s option, and to the extent permitted by the applicable rules of the Nasdaq Global Select Market (or the applicable rules of such other exchange on which the Company’s Common Stock may be listed), instead of paying the repurchase price in cash, the Company may pay the repurchase price in shares of its Common Stock or a combination of cash and shares of its Common Stock. However, in the case of certain change of control transactions in which the Company is acquired by a public company, the Company may elect to provide for conversion of the 2.25% Notes into acquirer common stock, in which case the repurchase option would not apply.

3.     Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company accounts for certain assets and liabilities at fair value, which is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Additionally, the Company uses valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. These inputs are prioritized below:

 

Level 1:    Observable inputs such as quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2:    Observable market-based inputs or unobservable inputs that are corroborated by market data.
Level 3:    Unobservable inputs for which there is little or no market data, which require the use of the reporting entity’s own assumptions.

The Company did not have any Level 2 assets during the periods presented. The following table sets forth the Company’s Level 1 financial assets that were measured and recorded at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012:

 

    Fair Value
Estimate Using:
    March 31, 2013     December 31, 2012  
      Amortized
Cost

Basis
    Fair
Value
    Gross
Unrealized
Gains
    Amortized
Cost

Basis
    Fair
Value
    Gross
Unrealized
Gains
 

Cash and cash equivalents

    Level 1      $ 999,221      $ 999,221      $      $ 991,835      $ 991,835      $   

The following table reconciles the beginning and ending balances of the Company’s Level 3 assets, which consisted of the ARS Option:

 

     Three Months Ended
March  31, 2012
 

Fair value as of the beginning of the period

   $ 1,195   

Cash proceeds received

     (9,269

Gain included in earnings

     8,074   
  

 

 

 

Fair value as of the end of the period

   $ —     
  

 

 

 

Through April 20, 2010, the Company held investments in auction rate securities (“ARS”) which had been classified as Level 3 assets. The types of ARS holdings the Company owned were backed by student loans, 97% guaranteed under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), and had credit ratings of AAA or Aaa when purchased. Historically, the fair value of the Company’s ARS holdings approximated par value due to the frequent auction periods, generally every 7 to 28 days, which provided liquidity to these investments. However, since February 2008, substantially all auctions involving these securities have been unsuccessful.

 

8


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Effective April 20, 2010, the Company entered into an agreement pursuant to which the Company sold all of its holdings of ARS for an aggregate of $286,399. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company retained an option (the “ARS Option”), for a period of two years from the date of the agreement: (a) to repurchase from the purchaser the same principal amount of any or all of the various series of ARS sold, at the agreed upon purchase prices received on April 20, 2010; and (b) to receive additional proceeds from the purchaser upon certain redemptions of the various series of ARS sold. From April 20, 2010 until March 31, 2012, the ARS Option was classified as a Level 3 asset as its valuation required substantial judgment. The historical redemption activity of the specific ARS underlying the ARS Option was the most significant assumption used to determine the estimated value of the ARS Option. The Company was required to reassess the value of the ARS Option at each reporting period and changes in value were recorded within the statement of operations. The Company recognized a gain of $8,074 and received cash proceeds of $9,269 during the three months ended March 31, 2012. In the aggregate, the Company received total cash proceeds of $41,302 through the ARS Option during the period from April 20, 2010 through March 31, 2012. As of March 31, 2012, the Company no longer had any remaining positions related to the ARS Option.

The Company also holds an investment in a privately held company which is carried at cost, and not subject to fair value measurements. However, if events or circumstances indicate that its carrying amount may not be recoverable, it would be reviewed for impairment. The total amount of this investment is $6,471 and it is included in other assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

For disclosure purposes, the Company is required to measure the outstanding value of its debt on a recurring basis. The following table presents the carrying value and estimated fair value (based on Level 1 market price data) of the Company’s convertible notes that were carried at historical cost as of March 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012:

 

     March 31, 2013      December 31, 2012  
     Carrying Amount      Fair Value      Carrying Amount      Fair Value  

2.25% Notes

   $ 400,000       $ 394,000       $ 400,000       $ 374,000   

2.50% Notes

     400,000         379,440         400,000         351,000   

4.    Stock Repurchase Program and Tender Offer

In August 2011, the Board of Directors established a stock repurchase program (the “Program”) through which the Company was authorized to use up to $75,000 to purchase shares of WebMD Common Stock, from time to time, in the open market through block trades or in private transactions, depending on market conditions and other factors. During October 2011, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized a $75,000 increase to the Program. During the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, the Company repurchased 45,166 shares and 15,600 shares, respectively, at an aggregate cost of $712 and $415, respectively, under the Program. Also during the three months ended March 31, 2013, the Company paid cash of $569 related to the repurchase of 39,857 shares in 2012, that settled in 2013. As of March 31, 2013, $61,461 remained available for repurchases under the Program. Repurchased shares are recorded under the cost method and are reflected as treasury stock in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

On March 6, 2012, the Company commenced a tender offer to repurchase up to $150,000 of its Common Stock through a modified “Dutch auction” tender offer. On April 3, 2012, the Company completed the tender offer through which it repurchased 5,769,230 shares of its Common Stock at a price of $26.00 per share for total consideration of $150,759, including costs directly attributable to the purchase.

 

9


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

5.    Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consist of the following:

 

     March 31, 2013      December 31, 2012  
      Gross
Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net      Weighted
Average
Remaining
Useful Life (a)
     Gross
Carrying
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
    Net      Weighted
Average
Remaining
Useful Life (a)
 

Content

   $ 15,954       $ (15,954   $               $ 15,954       $ (15,954   $           

Customer relationships

     34,057         (23,466     10,591         5.2         34,057         (22,943     11,114         5.5   

Technology and patents

     14,700         (14,700                     14,700         (14,700               

Trade names-definite lives

     2,530         (2,047     483         2.7         2,530         (2,003     527         3.0   

Trade names-indefinite lives

     4,464                4,464         n/a         4,464                4,464         n/a   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

Total

   $ 71,705       $ (56,167   $ 15,538          $ 71,705       $ (55,600   $ 16,105      
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

(a) The calculation of the weighted average remaining useful life is based on the net book value and the remaining amortization period of each respective intangible asset.

Amortization expense was $567 and $656 during the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Aggregate amortization expense for intangible assets is estimated to be:

 

Year Ending December 31:

  

2013 (April 1st to December 31st)

   $ 1,704   

2014

   $ 2,271   

2015

   $ 2,260   

2016

   $ 2,059   

2017

   $ 1,513   

Thereafter

   $ 1,267   

6.    Commitments and Contingencies

Legal Proceedings and Other Matters

In re WebMD Health Corp. Securities Litigation, Solomon v. Wygod, In re WebMD Health Corp. Shareholder Derivative Litigation

Six shareholder lawsuits, each of which is described below, were filed in federal and state court in New York. The lawsuits relate to certain forward-looking information made publicly available by the Company.

On August 2, 2011 and August 26, 2011, federal securities class action complaints entitled Canson v. WebMD Health Corp., et al. and Malland v. WebMD Health Corp., et al., respectively, were filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York on behalf of purchasers of the Company’s Common Stock between February 23, 2011 and July 15, 2011. On November 7, 2011, the two cases were consolidated under the caption In re WebMD Health Corp. Securities Litigation (the “Federal Securities Action”) and lead plaintiffs and lead counsel were appointed. On February 14, 2012, the lead plaintiffs filed their consolidated amended complaint (the “Complaint”), which alleges claims on behalf of purchasers of the Company’s securities between February 23, 2011 and January 10, 2012. The Complaint alleges that the

 

10


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Company, and certain of its officers, made false and misleading statements in violation of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and seeks unspecified damages and costs. The defendants moved to dismiss the Complaint and the lead plaintiffs opposed that motion. The motion was fully submitted and filed on August 2, 2012. On November 8, 2012, the Court heard oral argument on defendants’ motion to dismiss. On January 2, 2013, the Court issued an opinion and order (the “Opinion and Order”) dismissing all claims asserted in the Complaint, but granted the lead plaintiffs leave to replead within sixty days. On March 5, 2013, the Court granted the lead plaintiffs’ request for an extension of time, until April 3, 2013, to file a second amended complaint. The lead plaintiffs did not file a second amended complaint and the Opinion and Order was entered as a final judgment on April 9, 2013. The deadline for lead plaintiffs to file a notice of appeal was May 9, 2013.

On August 31, 2011, a shareholder derivative action entitled Solomon, et anno. v. Wygod, et al. was filed in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, New York County (the “State Court Derivative Action”). The State Court Derivative Action purports to assert claims on behalf of the Company, alleging breach of fiduciary duties, abuse of control, gross mismanagement, corporate waste and unjust enrichment by certain of the Company’s officers and directors. The State Court Derivative Action seeks unspecified damages, corporate governance changes, restitution, disgorgement and costs. The parties agreed to stay the State Court Derivative Action until such time as the Federal Securities Action is dismissed with prejudice or any of the named defendants in the Federal Securities Action files an answer in that action.

On September 19, 2011, September 28, 2011 and October 25, 2011, shareholder derivative actions entitled Gordon v. Wygod, et al., Wargula v. Wygod, et al. and Garber v. Wygod, et al., respectively, were filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (the “Federal Derivative Action”). The complaints in the Federal Derivative Action purport to assert claims on behalf of the Company. Two of the complaints allege violations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and all three complaints allege state law violations, including breach of fiduciary duties, corporate waste and unjust enrichment by certain of the Company’s officers and directors. The complaints sought unspecified damages, corporate governance changes, restitution, disgorgement and costs. The three actions were consolidated under the caption In re WebMD Health Corp. Shareholder Derivative Litigation. Pursuant to so ordered stipulations, the defendants were not required to respond to any complaints filed in the consolidated actions. On April 29, 2013, the plaintiffs Gordon and Wargula moved to dismiss the consolidated Federal Derivative Action without prejudice.

Coverage Dispute with Stop Loss Carrier for Health Benefit Plan

The Company sponsors and maintains a self-insured group health benefit plan (the “Health Plan”) for its eligible employees and their dependents. The Company purchases stop-loss insurance coverage to reimburse the Company for claims that exceed certain individual and/or aggregate claim amounts under the Health Plan. On May 7, 2013, the Company was advised by the former stop loss carrier for the Health Plan, Everest Reinsurance Company, that the stop loss carrier was denying payment for certain medical claims under the Health Plan. These claims were incurred in 2011 and 2012 and had previously been approved by Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey, the third party claims administrator for the Health Plan. Some of the claims had also previously been approved by the stop loss carrier. The maximum amount of claims in dispute by the stop loss carrier is approximately $4,900. The Company is unable to predict the outcome of this dispute or to reasonably estimate the possible loss, if any, arising from this dispute and accordingly, no provision has been recorded in the accompanying financial statements related to this matter.

 

11


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Other Legal Proceedings

In the normal course of business, the Company and its subsidiaries are involved in various claims and legal proceedings. While the ultimate resolution of these matters, including those discussed in Note 7 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the Company’s 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K, has yet to be determined, the Company does not believe that their outcomes will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

7.    Stock-Based Compensation

The Company has various stock-based compensation plans (collectively, the “Plans”) that provide for the grant of stock options, restricted stock awards, and other awards based on WebMD Common Stock.

The 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan (as amended, the “2005 Plan”) is the only existing plan under which future grants can be made. The maximum number of shares of the Company’s Common Stock that may be subject to awards under the 2005 Plan was 20,075,000 as of March 31, 2013, subject to adjustment in accordance with the terms of the 2005 Plan. The Company had an aggregate of 1,626,492 shares of Common Stock available for future grants under the 2005 Plan at March 31, 2013.

 

12


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Stock Options

Generally, options under the Plans vest and become exercisable ratably over periods ranging from two to five years based on their individual grant dates, subject to continued employment on the applicable vesting dates, and generally expire within ten years from the date of grant. Options are granted at prices not less than the fair market value of the Company’s Common Stock on the date of grant. The following table summarizes stock option activity for the Plans:

 

     Shares     Weighted
Average Exercise
Price Per Share
     Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (In Years)
     Aggregate
Intrinsic  Value(1)
 

Outstanding at January 1, 2013

     13,300,688      $ 26.24         

Granted

     287,000        15.75         

Exercised

     (78,816     21.35         

Cancelled

     (814,022     26.47         
  

 

 

         

Outstanding at March 31, 2013

     12,694,850      $ 26.02         7.1       $ 37,942   
  

 

 

         

Vested and exercisable at the end of the period

     6,125,368      $ 29.12         5.0       $ 7,533   
  

 

 

         

 

(1) The aggregate intrinsic value is based on the market price of the Company’s Common Stock on March 28, 2013, the last trading day in March 2013, which was $24.32, less the applicable exercise price of the underlying option. This aggregate intrinsic value represents the amount that would have been realized if all the option holders had exercised their options on March 28, 2013.

The fair value of each option granted is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model considering the weighted average assumptions noted in the following table. Expected volatility is based on implied volatility from traded options of the Company’s Common Stock combined with historical volatility of the Company’s Common Stock. The expected term represents the period of time that options are expected to be outstanding following their grant date, and was determined using historical exercise data combined with assumptions for future exercise activity. The risk-free rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve for periods equal to the expected term of the options on the grant date.

 

     Three Months Ended March 31,  
             2013                     2012          

Expected dividend yield

     0.0     0.0

Expected volatility

     0.43-0.46        0.42-0.45   

Risk-free interest rate

     0.74     0.75

Expected term (years)

     4.8        4.7   

Weighted average fair value of options granted during the period

   $ 6.67      $ 12.20   

On February 23, 2012, the Company’s directors and certain officers voluntarily surrendered a total of 960,600 non-qualified stock options with a weighted average exercise price of $46.85 per share. None of these individuals received any consideration or promise of consideration in exchange for the surrender of these stock options. These options were originally granted under the 2005 Plan, and therefore, upon their surrender, the shares underlying these options were returned to the 2005 Plan and became available for grant under such plan. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, the Company expensed the remaining unrecognized stock-based compensation expense of $8,076 related to these stock options.

 

13


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

Restricted Stock Awards

The Company’s Restricted Stock consists of shares of the Company’s Common Stock which have been awarded to employees with restrictions that cause them to be subject to substantial risk of forfeiture and restrict their sale or other transfer by the employee until they vest. Generally, the Company’s Restricted Stock awards vest ratably over periods ranging from three to five years from their individual award dates subject to continued employment on the applicable vesting dates. The following table summarizes the activity of the Company’s Restricted Stock:

 

     Shares     Weighted
Average
Grant  Date

Fair Value
 

Balance at January 1, 2013

     932,386      $ 31.69   

Granted

     127,000        21.38   

Vested

     (119,836     32.58   

Forfeited

     (89,625     23.96   
  

 

 

   

Balance at March 31, 2013

     849,925      $ 30.84   
  

 

 

   

Proceeds received from the exercise of options to purchase shares of the Company’s Common Stock were $672 and $754 during the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. Additionally, in connection with the exercise of certain stock options and the vesting of restricted stock, the Company made payments of $174 and $911 during the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, related to employee statutory withholding taxes that were satisfied by withholding shares of Common Stock of equal value from the respective employees. The proceeds and payments described above are reflected within cash flows from financing activities within the accompanying consolidated statements of cash flows.

The intrinsic value related to stock options that were exercised, combined with the fair value of shares of restricted stock that vested, aggregated $2,721 and $4,764 for the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Other

Each year, the Company issues shares of its Common Stock to each WebMD non-employee director with a value equal to their annual board and committee retainers. The Company recorded $94 and $86 of stock-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, in connection with these issuances.

Summary of Stock-Based Compensation Expense

The following table summarizes the components and classification of stock-based compensation expense:

 

     Three Months Ended
March  31,
 
     2013      2012  

Stock options

   $ 6,614       $ 13,743   

Restricted stock

     3,229         3,071   

Other

     94         86   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

   $ 9,937       $ 16,900   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Included in:

     

Cost of operations

   $ 1,870       $ 2,757   

Sales and marketing

     2,523         2,161   

General and administrative

     5,544         11,982   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

   $ 9,937       $ 16,900   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

14


Table of Contents

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)

 

As of March 31, 2013, approximately $53,300 of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to unvested awards (net of estimated forfeitures) is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of approximately 2.3 years, related to the Plans.

Tax benefits attributable to stock-based compensation represented 39% of stock-based compensation expense for all periods presented.

8.    Restructuring

On December 11, 2012, the Company announced a plan to streamline its operations, simplify its organizational structure, reduce costs and better focus its resources, which resulted in a reduction of the Company’s workforce. In connection with this reduction in workforce, the Company recorded a restructuring charge of $7,579 during the three months ended December 31, 2012 related to severance and other employee benefits that were provided to the terminated employees. The accrual related to this charge was $2,705 and $7,534 as of March 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, respectively, and is reflected within accrued expenses in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The reduction in this accrual during the three months ended March 31, 2013 was the result of payments of the severance and related employee benefits.

9.    Other expense

Other expense for the three months ended March 31, 2012 represents cash severance and related expenses due to the resignation of the Company’s former Chief Executive Officer, and the related search and recruitment of its new Chief Executive Officer during that period.

 

15


Table of Contents

ITEM 2.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

This Item 2 contains forward-looking statements with respect to possible events, outcomes or results that are, and are expected to continue to be, subject to risks, uncertainties and contingencies. See “Forward-Looking Statements” on page iii above. The results of operations for the periods reflected in this Quarterly Report are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for future periods, and our actual results may differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including but not limited to those listed under “Risk Factors” in Part II, Item 1A of this Quarterly Report, those discussed in this Item 2 and those included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report. In this Item 2, dollar amounts (other than per share amounts) are stated in thousands, unless otherwise noted.

Overview

Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations, or MD&A, is provided as a supplement to the Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report and is intended to provide an understanding of our results of operations, financial condition and changes in our results of operations and financial condition. Our MD&A is organized as follows:

 

   

Introduction.    This section provides: a general description of our company and its business; background information on certain trends, transactions and other developments affecting our company; and a discussion of how seasonal factors may impact the timing of our revenue.

 

   

Critical Accounting Estimates and Policies.    This section discusses those accounting policies that are considered important to the evaluation and reporting of our financial condition and results of operations, and whose application requires us to exercise subjective and often complex judgments in making estimates and assumptions. In addition, all of our significant accounting policies, including our critical accounting policies, are summarized in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2012 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (which we refer to as the SEC).

 

   

Results of Operations and Supplemental Financial and Operating Information.    These sections provide our analysis and outlook for the significant line items on our statements of operations, as well as other information that we deem meaningful to understand our results of operations on a consolidated basis.

 

   

Liquidity and Capital Resources.    This section provides an analysis of our liquidity and cash flows, as well as a discussion of our commitments that existed as of March 31, 2013.

 

   

Recent Accounting Pronouncements.    This section provides a summary of the most recent authoritative accounting standards and guidance that have either been recently adopted by our company or may be adopted in the future.

Introduction

Our Company.    WebMD Health Corp. is a Delaware corporation that was incorporated on May 3, 2005. We completed an initial public offering on September 28, 2005. Our Common Stock trades under the symbol “WBMD” on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.

Our Business.    We are a leading provider of health information services to consumers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, employers and health plans through our public and private online portals, mobile platforms and health-focused publications.

Our public portals for consumers enable them to obtain health and wellness information (including information on specific diseases or conditions), check symptoms, locate physicians, store individual healthcare information, receive periodic e-newsletters on topics of individual interest and participate in online communities with peers and experts. Our public portals for physicians and healthcare professionals make it easier for them to access clinical reference sources, stay abreast of the latest clinical information, learn about new treatment

 

16


Table of Contents

options, earn continuing medical education (which we refer to as CME) credit and communicate with peers. We also provide mobile health information applications for use by consumers and physicians. We generate revenue from our public portals (which we refer to as The WebMD Health Network) primarily through the sale of advertising and sponsorship products, as well as CME services. Our public portals’ sponsors and advertisers include, but are not limited to, pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies, healthcare services companies, and consumer products companies whose products relate to health, wellness, diet, fitness, lifestyle, safety and illness prevention. We also generate revenue from advertising sold in WebMD Magazine, a consumer magazine distributed to physician office waiting rooms. In addition, we generate revenue from the sale of certain information products.

Our private portals enable employers and health plans to provide their employees and members with access to personalized health and benefit information and decision-support tools that help them to make more informed benefit, treatment and provider decisions and motivate them to make healthier lifestyle choices. We also provide health and condition management programs for use by our private portals clients’ employees and members to help them achieve their wellness goals. In addition, we offer clients telephonic, online and onsite health coaching services for their employees and members. We generate revenue from our private portals through the licensing of our technology and content to employers and health plans, either directly or through our distributors. We offer our health coaching services and our health and condition management programs on a per participant basis.

Background Information on Certain Trends and Developments Affecting Our Business.    Key trends and developments affecting the use of healthcare information services of the types we provide or are developing and our ability to generate revenue from those services include the following:

 

   

Use of the Internet by Consumers and Physicians.    The Internet has emerged as a major communications medium and has fundamentally changed many sectors of the economy, including the marketing and sales of financial services, travel, and entertainment, among others. The Internet is also changing the healthcare industry and has transformed how consumers and physicians find and utilize healthcare information.

 

  Healthcare consumers increasingly seek to educate themselves online about their healthcare-related issues, motivated by the desire to become better informed patients and to become more engaged healthcare consumers because of the larger share of healthcare costs they are being asked to bear due to changes in the benefit designs being offered by health plans and employers. The Internet has fundamentally changed the way consumers obtain health and wellness information, enabling them to have immediate access to searchable information and dynamic interactive content to check symptoms, understand diseases, find providers and evaluate treatment options.

 

  The Internet has become a primary source of information for physicians and other healthcare professionals seeking to improve clinical practice and to interact with their peers. The Internet has also become one of the primary means for physicians and other healthcare professionals to obtain CME and CE.

 

   

Traffic Trends.    Traffic to The WebMD Health Network reached an average of 132 million unique users per month and total traffic of 2.78 billion page views during the first quarter of 2013, increases of 23% and 10%, respectively, over the prior year period. Traffic to our online portals for physicians and other healthcare professionals averaged approximately 3.1 million physician visits per month during the first quarter of 2013, an increase of 19% over the prior year period. Consumers and healthcare professionals are increasingly using smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices to access the Internet, with physicians increasingly using mobile devices during treatment at the point of care. Accordingly, the portion of our page views from mobile devices has increased rapidly in the past several years. Approximately 34% of our page views during the March 2013 quarter were delivered on a U.S. mobile device, with approximately 20% of those mobile page views being delivered on a tablet. During the March 2012 quarter, approximately 20% of our page views were delivered on a U.S. mobile device, with approximately 20% of those mobile page views being delivered on a tablet. Additionally, during the March 2013 quarter, U.S. desktop page views were

 

17


Table of Contents
 

approximately 19% lower than the prior year period. A contributing factor to this decline was Google’s changes in its algorithms and other processes as further discussed below. Our customers have purchased programs that include advertising on tablet devices due to its form factor; however, they have not yet adopted programs to support advertising on smartphone devices in any meaningful way. We remain focused on delivering a multi-screen platform that extends the user experience beyond the desktop portal onto the mobile device. Mobile, while not yet a meaningful source of revenue for us, could be an important area of growth for the future. However, if users access our services through mobile devices as a substitute for access through personal computers, or if our page views from desktop computers decline for other reasons, and if we are unable to successfully implement monetization strategies for our mobile services, our financial results could be negatively affected. Nonetheless, we expect to have more than enough desktop and tablet page view inventory on The WebMD Health Network to meet the expected demand from advertisers and sponsors for our services in 2013. We intend to continue our efforts to increase our page views by providing quality content and tools, as well as by designing our Websites to deliver that content and tools in ways that will cause them to rank well in algorithmic search engine results (which is commonly referred to as search engine optimization or SEO). Although our overall page views increased during the first quarter of 2013, the page views on some of the consumer sites in The WebMD Health Network (other than WebMD.com, our flagship site) were significantly reduced in that quarter and we believe that this resulted from some changes by Google in its algorithms and other processes that lowered the ranking of those sites in Google search results. We believe that we can address this reduction in ranking through our SEO efforts, although it may take several months before we see an impact on our traffic. However, we cannot be certain that our SEO efforts will be successful or, if they are, how long that will continue.

 

   

Online Marketing and Education Spending for Healthcare Products.    Pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies spend large amounts each year marketing their products and educating consumers and physicians about them; however, only a small portion is currently spent on online services. We believe that these companies, which comprise the majority of the advertisers and sponsors of our public portals, are aware of the effectiveness of the Internet relative to traditional media in providing health, clinical and product-related information to consumers and physicians. In addition, in an effort to improve operating efficiencies, some pharmaceutical companies have been reducing their field sales forces in the past several years. However, notwithstanding our general expectation for increased future demand, we cannot predict the extent or the pace of any shift by pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies of their marketing expenditures to online services. In addition, as discussed under “— Recent Developments Affecting Our Business and the Demand for Our Services” below, many of these companies have been reducing their overall marketing and education spending and are expected to continue to do so. Furthermore, our advertising and sponsorship revenue may vary significantly from quarter to quarter due to a number of factors, including general economic and regulatory conditions and the following:

 

  The majority of our advertising and sponsorship contracts are for terms of approximately four to twelve months. We have relatively few longer term advertising and sponsorship contracts.

 

  The time between the date of initial contact with a potential advertiser or sponsor regarding a specific program and the execution of a contract with the advertiser or sponsor for that program, as well as the additional time period before our services are delivered, may be longer than expected, especially for medium-sized and larger contracts, and may be subject to delays over which we have little or no control, including as a result of budgetary constraints of the advertiser or sponsor or their need for internal approvals, including internal approvals relating to compliance with the laws and regulations applicable to the marketing of healthcare products. We have experienced, from time to time, a lengthening of this internal review process by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, which has resulted in delays in contracting as well as delays in recognizing expected revenue under executed contracts and which may continue to cause such delays.

Other factors that may affect the timing of contracting for specific programs with advertisers and sponsors, or receipt of revenue under such contracts, include: the timing of Food and Drug Administration

 

18


Table of Contents

(“FDA”) approval for new products or for new approved uses for existing products; the timing of FDA approval of generic products that compete with existing brand name products and any increase in the number or significance of such approvals or of withdrawals of products from the market; consolidation of companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries; the timing of roll-outs of new or enhanced services on our public portals; seasonal factors relating to the prevalence of specific health conditions and other seasonal factors that may affect the timing of promotional campaigns for specific products; and the scheduling of conferences for physicians and other healthcare professionals.

 

   

Recent Developments Affecting Our Business and the Demand for Our Services.    Some of our pharmaceutical company customers have experienced patent expirations for certain of their products in the past two years and some are expected to experience patent expirations over the next several years. In the pharmaceutical industry, patent expirations allow for competition from lower-priced generic versions of the patented drugs and generally result in the termination of marketing efforts for the drug. Although revenue for the March 2013 quarter from any products that will lose patent protection in either 2013 or 2014 was not significant, we continue to monitor the broader impact of patent expirations. We believe that patent expirations have led to, and may continue to lead to, significant overall reductions in marketing, selling and educational expenditures by some pharmaceutical companies across their entire product portfolios, as well as delays in their budgeting and purchase decisions, as companies deal with both the ongoing and anticipated impact of patent expirations across their businesses as well as greater than expected delays in new product launches. However, we believe that amounts budgeted for online advertising have increased for some of our biopharmaceutical customers in early 2013, although we cannot predict if that will continue.

In addition to pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies, our public portals advertisers and sponsors include consumer products companies, particularly for products that relate to health, wellness, diet, fitness, lifestyle, safety and illness prevention. We are in the process of implementing a redesign of our online healthy living and lifestyle content, including in the areas of beauty, diet, food and fitness, and family and pregnancy, and are developing proprietary content and tools that help individuals live a healthy lifestyle. Revenues from consumer products companies are more likely to reflect general economic conditions, and to be reduced to a greater extent during economic downturns, than revenues from pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. Accordingly, revenues from these customers may continue to decline and may be subject to significant quarter-to-quarter variations.

Our advertising and sponsorship services are subject to competition from numerous alternatives, including traditional media, Internet search engines, social media Internet sites, and general interest consumer sites. Such competition may result in smaller customer commitments or pressure to reduce prices, both of which could reduce our revenues and profit margins. In response to changes in the preferences of our advertisers and sponsors, particularly our pharmaceutical company clients, we have modified our sales and product approach to offer services that can be executed more quickly and we are simplifying our products and pricing. We believe this will enable these clients to better compare our services, and the value they provide, to other digital alternatives. We are also investing in more robust data and analytics capabilities. This includes adding new capabilities in order to improve the user experience, better differentiate during the sales process and provide our customers with new value measurements and insights through proprietary analytics tools.

 

   

Use of Health Management Applications.    In a healthcare market where a greater share of the responsibility for healthcare costs and decision-making has been shifting to consumers, use of information technology to assist consumers in making informed decisions about healthcare has also increased. We believe that, through our private portals, we are well positioned to play a role in this environment. However, our strategy depends, in part, on increasing usage of our private portal services by our employer and health plan clients’ employees and members and being able to demonstrate a sufficient return on investment and other benefits for our private portals clients from those services. Increasing

 

19


Table of Contents
 

usage of our private portal services requires us to continue to develop new and updated applications, features and services. In addition, we face competition in the area of online healthcare decision-support tools and health management applications. Many of our competitors have greater financial, technical, product development, marketing and other resources than we do, and may be better known than we are. We also expect that, for clients that have been adversely affected by general economic conditions or are seeking to reduce expenses for other reasons, we may continue to experience some reduction in contract renewals for our private portal services, as well as some reductions in the size of existing contracts.

 

   

International.    We are pursuing opportunities to expand the reach of our brands outside the United States. In certain markets outside the United States, we expect that we would accomplish this through partnerships or joint ventures with other companies having expertise in the specific country or region, while in other such markets we expect to rely primarily on our own internal resources. In October 2009, we launched our first major consumer portal outside the United States in partnership with Boots, the United Kingdom’s leading pharmacy-led health and beauty retailer. In addition, in certain markets outside of the United States, we are providing some of our online services in the local language directly to healthcare professionals and, to a lesser extent, consumers. The provision of online services in foreign languages presents additional challenges. Our company has only recently begun this activity and, therefore, has limited experience in this area.

 

   

Healthcare Reform Legislation.    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (which we refer to as the Reform Legislation), was signed into law in March 2010. The Reform Legislation makes extensive changes to the system of healthcare insurance and benefits in the United States. In general, the Reform Legislation seeks to reduce healthcare costs and decrease the number of uninsured legal United States residents by, among other things, requiring individuals to carry, and certain employers to offer, health insurance or be subject to penalties. The Reform Legislation also imposes new regulations on health insurers, including guaranteed coverage requirements, prohibitions on certain annual and all lifetime limits on amounts paid on behalf of or to plan members, increased restrictions on rescinding coverage, establishment of minimum medical loss ratio requirements, a requirement to cover certain preventive services on a first dollar basis, the establishment of state insurance exchanges and essential benefit packages, and greater limitations on how health insurers price certain of their products. The Reform Legislation also contains provisions that will affect the revenues and profits of pharmaceutical and medical device companies, including new taxes on certain sales of their products. Many of the provisions of the Reform Legislation that expand insurance coverage will not become effective until 2014, and many provisions require regulations and interpretive guidance to be issued before they will be fully implemented. Some provisions do not apply to health plans that were in place when the Reform Legislation was enacted and have not been substantially changed since. In addition, it is difficult to foresee how individuals and businesses will respond to the choices available to them under the Reform Legislation. Furthermore, the Reform Legislation will result in future state legislative and regulatory changes, which we are unable to predict at this time, in order for states to comply with certain provisions of the Reform Legislation and to participate in grants and other incentive opportunities. In addition, Congress has considered various proposals to repeal some or all of the Reform Legislation.

While we do not currently anticipate any significant adverse effects on WebMD as a direct result of the application of the Reform Legislation to our business or on our company in its capacity as an employer, we are unable to predict what the indirect impacts of the Reform Legislation will be on WebMD’s business through its effects on other healthcare industry participants, including pharmaceutical and medical device companies that are advertisers and sponsors of our public portals and employers and health plans that are clients of our private portals. Healthcare industry participants may respond to the Reform Legislation or to uncertainties created by the Reform Legislation by reducing their expenditures or postponing expenditure decisions, including expenditures for our services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. However, we believe that certain aspects of the Reform Legislation and future implementing regulations that seek to reduce healthcare costs may create opportunities for

 

20


Table of Contents

WebMD, including with respect to our personal health record applications and health and benefits decision-support tools and, more generally, with respect to our capabilities in providing health and wellness information and education. For example, the Reform Legislation encourages use of wellness programs through grants to small employers to establish such programs, permission for employers to offer larger rewards than under prior law, in the form of waivers of cost-sharing, premium discounts, or additional benefits, to employees for participating in these programs and meeting certain standards, and the inclusion of wellness services and chronic disease management among the essential health benefits that certain plans are required to provide. In addition, we believe that, as the Reform Legislation is implemented and consumers begin shopping for health insurance in the new markets that it creates, WebMD will be well positioned to provide information and decision-support tools to assist consumers in choosing an appropriate health plan for their needs. However, we cannot yet determine the scope of any such opportunities or what competition we may face in our efforts to pursue such opportunities.

The healthcare industry in the United States and relationships among healthcare payers, providers and consumers are very complicated. In addition, the Internet and the market for online and mobile services are relatively new and still evolving. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the trends identified above will continue or that the expected benefits to our business from our responses to those trends will be achieved. In addition, the market for healthcare information services is highly competitive and not only are our existing competitors seeking to benefit from these same trends, but the trends may also attract additional competitors.

Background Information on Certain Significant Developments and Transactions

Restructuring.    On December 11, 2012, we announced a plan to streamline our operations, simplify our organizational structure, reduce costs and better focus our resources. These actions will result in a reduction in annualized operating expenditures, including the impact of a workforce reduction of approximately 250 positions, or roughly 14% of our employees at that time. In connection with this reduction in workforce, we recorded a restructuring charge of $7,579 during the three months ended December 31, 2012 related to severance and other employee benefits that were provided to terminated employees.

Voluntary Surrender of Certain Option Grants.    On February 23, 2012, our directors and certain officers voluntarily surrendered certain grants of non-qualified options to purchase WebMD Common Stock made to them, one of which was made in 2007, some in 2010 and some in 2011 and all of which were out-of-the-money at the time of surrender. None of these individuals received any consideration or promise of consideration in exchange for the surrender of these stock options. These options were originally granted under our 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan (which we refer to as the 2005 Plan), and therefore, upon their surrender, the shares underlying these options were returned to the 2005 Plan and became available for grant under such plan. These surrenders of stock options were intended to allow WebMD to use the shares that became available under the 2005 Plan to attract new employees and to motivate and retain current key employees. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we recorded pre-tax stock-based compensation expense of $8,076 related to the voluntary surrender of these options, which represented the remaining unrecognized stock-based compensation amounts for such grants.

Tender Offer.    On April 3, 2012, we completed a tender offer (which we refer to as the Tender Offer) for our Common Stock and repurchased 5,769,230 shares at a price of $26.00 per share for a total cost of $150,759, which includes $759 of costs directly attributable to the purchase. The Tender Offer represented an opportunity for WebMD to return capital to stockholders who elected to tender their shares of WebMD Common Stock, while stockholders who chose not to participate in the Tender Offer automatically increased their relative percentage interest in our company at no additional cost to them.

Stock Repurchase Program.    During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we repurchased 15,600 shares at an aggregate cost of $415 through our stock repurchase programs. During the three months

 

21


Table of Contents

ended March 31, 2013, we repurchased 45,166 shares at an aggregate cost of $712 through our stock repurchase program.

Auction Rate Securities.    Effective April 20, 2010, we entered into an agreement pursuant to which we sold our holdings of auction rate securities (which we refer to as ARS), for an aggregate of $286,399. Under the terms of the agreement, we retained an option (which we refer to as the ARS Option), for a period of two years from the date of the agreement: (a) to repurchase from the purchaser the same principal amount of any or all of the various series of ARS sold, at the agreed upon purchase prices received on April 20, 2010; and (b) to receive from the purchaser additional proceeds upon certain redemptions of the various series of ARS sold. We received cash proceeds of $9,269 and recorded a pre-tax gain of $8,074 related to the ARS Option during the three months ended March 31, 2012. As of March 31, 2012, we no longer had any remaining positions related to the ARS Option and will receive no further cash proceeds.

Seasonality

The timing of our revenue is affected by seasonal factors. Our public portal advertising and sponsorship revenue is seasonal, primarily due to the annual spending patterns of the advertising and sponsorship clients of our public portals. This portion of our revenue is usually the lowest in the first quarter of each calendar year, and generally increases during each consecutive quarter throughout the year. The timing of revenue in relation to our expenses, many of which do not vary directly with revenue, has an impact on cost of operations, sales and marketing, and general and administrative expenses as a percentage of revenue in each calendar quarter.

Critical Accounting Estimates and Policies

Critical Accounting Estimates

Our MD&A is based upon our Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, which were prepared in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes. We base our estimates on historical experience, current business factors, and various other assumptions that we believe are necessary to consider to form a basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities, the recorded amounts of revenue and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We are subject to uncertainties such as the impact of future events, economic and political factors, and changes in our business environment; therefore, actual results could differ from these estimates. Accordingly, the accounting estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements will change as new events occur, as more experience is acquired, as additional information is obtained and as our operating environment changes. Changes in estimates are made when circumstances warrant. Such changes in estimates and refinements in estimation methodologies are reflected in reported results of operations; if material, the effects of changes in estimates are disclosed in the notes to our Consolidated Financial Statements.

We evaluate our estimates on an ongoing basis, including those related to revenue recognition, the allowance for doubtful accounts, the carrying value of long-lived assets (including goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets), the amortization period of long-lived assets (excluding goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets), the carrying value, capitalization and amortization of software and Website development costs, the carrying value of investments, the provision for income taxes and related deferred tax accounts, certain accrued expenses, contingencies, litigation and related legal accruals and the value attributed to employee stock options and other stock-based awards.

 

22


Table of Contents

Critical Accounting Policies

We believe the following reflects our critical accounting policies and our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our Consolidated Financial Statements:

 

   

Revenue Recognition.    Revenue from advertising is recognized as advertisements are delivered or as publications are distributed. Revenue from sponsorship arrangements, content syndication and distribution arrangements, information services and licenses of healthcare management tools and private portals as well as related health coaching services are recognized ratably over the term of the applicable agreement. Revenue from the sponsorship of CME is recognized over the period we substantially complete our contractual deliverables as determined by the applicable agreements.

Contracts that contain multiple deliverables that were entered into subsequent to January 1, 2011 are subject to Accounting Standards Update No. 2009-13 Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements (“ASU 2009-13”). ASU 2009-13 requires the allocation of revenue to each deliverable of multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements, based on the relative selling price of each deliverable. It also changes the level of evidence of selling price required to separate deliverables by allowing a company to make its best estimate of the selling price of deliverables when more objective evidence of selling price is not available.

We adopted ASU 2009-13 on a prospective basis for arrangements entered into or materially modified on or subsequent to January 1, 2011. Beginning January 1, 2011, pursuant to the guidance of ASU 2009-13, when a sales arrangement contains multiple deliverables, we allocate revenue to each deliverable based on relative selling price. The selling price for a deliverable is based on vendor specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) if available, third-party evidence (“TPE”) if VSOE is not available, or best estimate of selling price if neither VSOE nor TPE is available. We then recognize revenue on each deliverable in accordance with our revenue recognition policies over the period that delivery occurs. VSOE of selling price is based on the price charged when the deliverable is sold separately. In determining VSOE, we require that a substantial majority of the selling prices fall within a reasonable range based on historical pricing trends for specific products and services. TPE is based on competitor prices of similar deliverables when sold separately. We are generally not able to determine TPE of selling price as we are unable to reliably determine what competitors’ selling prices are for comparable services, combined with the fact that our services often contain unique features and customizations such that comparable services do not exist. The determination of best estimate of selling price is a judgmental process that considers multiple factors including, but not limited to, recent selling prices and related discounting practices for each service, market conditions, customer classes, sales channels and other factors.

For contracts that contained multiple deliverables that were entered into prior to January 1, 2011, revenue was allocated to each deliverable based on its relative fair value, which was determined using VSOE. In certain instances where fair value did not exist for all the elements, the amount of revenue allocated to the delivered elements equaled the total consideration less the fair value of the undelivered elements to the extent VSOE existed for the undelivered elements. In instances where fair value did not exist for the undelivered elements, the entire consideration was recognized over the period that the last element was delivered.

The adoption of ASU 2009-13 did not have a material impact to our consolidated financial statements.

 

   

Long-Lived Assets.    Our long-lived assets consist of property and equipment, goodwill and other intangible assets. Goodwill and other intangible assets arise from the acquisitions we have made. The amount assigned to intangible assets is subjective and based on fair value using exit price and market participant view, such as discounted cash flow and replacement cost models. Our long-lived assets, excluding goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets, are amortized over their estimated useful lives, which we determine based on the consideration of several factors including the period of time the asset is expected to remain in service. We evaluate the carrying value and remaining useful lives of long-lived

 

23


Table of Contents
 

assets, excluding goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets, whenever indicators of impairment are present. We evaluate the carrying value of goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets annually, or whenever indicators of impairment are present. We test goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level only when, after completing a qualitative analysis, it is determined that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value. Long-lived assets held for sale are reported at the lower of cost or fair value less cost to sell. There was no impairment of goodwill or indefinite-lived intangible assets noted as a result of our impairment testing in 2012.

 

   

Fair Value of Investments in Auction Rate Securities.    Through April 20, 2010, we held investments in ARS which were backed by student loans, 97% guaranteed under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP), and had credit ratings of AAA or Aaa when purchased. Historically, the fair value of these ARS holdings approximated par value due to the frequent auction periods, generally every 7 to 28 days, which provided liquidity to these investments. However, since February 2008, substantially all auctions involving these securities have been unsuccessful.

Effective April 20, 2010, we entered into an agreement pursuant to which we sold all of our holdings of ARS for an aggregate of $286,399. Under the terms of the agreement, we retained the ARS Option for a period of two years from the date of the agreement: (a) to repurchase from the purchaser the same principal amount of any or all of the various series of ARS sold, at the agreed upon purchase prices received on April 20, 2010; and (b) to receive additional proceeds from the purchaser upon certain redemptions of the various series of ARS sold. From April 20, 2010 until March 31, 2012, the ARS Option was classified as a Level 3 asset as its valuation required substantial judgment. The historical redemption activity of the specific ARS underlying the ARS Option was the most significant assumption used to determine the estimated value of the ARS Option. We were required to reassess the value of the ARS Option at each reporting period and changes in value were recorded within the statement of operations. During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we recognized a gain of $8,074, and received cash proceeds of $9,269 related to the ARS Option. In the aggregate, we received total cash proceeds of $41,302 through the ARS Option during the period from April 20, 2010 through March 31, 2012. As of March 31, 2012, we no longer had any remaining positions related to the ARS Option.

 

   

Stock-Based Compensation.    Stock-based compensation expense for all share-based payment awards granted is determined based on the grant date fair value. The grant date fair value for stock options is estimated using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model. We recognize these compensation costs net of an estimated forfeiture rate on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award, which is generally the vesting term of the share-based payment awards. As of March 31, 2013, there was approximately $53,300 of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense (net of estimated forfeitures) related to unvested stock options and restricted stock awards held by employees, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of approximately 2.3 years, related to our stock-based compensation plans.

 

   

Deferred Taxes.    Our deferred tax assets are comprised primarily of net operating loss carryforwards and federal tax credits. These net operating loss carryforwards and federal tax credits may be used to offset taxable income in future periods, reducing the amount of taxes we might otherwise be required to pay. A significant portion of our net deferred tax assets, including the portion related to excess tax benefits of stock-based awards, are reserved for by a valuation allowance as required by relevant accounting literature. The remaining portion of our net deferred tax assets are no longer reserved for by a valuation allowance. Management determines the need for a valuation allowance by assessing the probability of realizing deferred tax assets, taking into consideration factors including historical operating results, expectations of future earnings and taxable income. Management will continue to evaluate the need for a valuation allowance in the future.

 

   

Tax Contingencies.    Our tax contingencies are recorded to address potential exposures involving tax positions we have taken that could be challenged by tax authorities. These potential exposures result from

 

24


Table of Contents
 

applications of various statutes, rules, regulations and interpretations. Our estimates of tax contingencies reflect assumptions and judgments about potential actions by taxing jurisdictions. We believe that these assumptions and judgments are reasonable. However, our accruals may change in the future due to new developments in each matter and the ultimate resolution of these matters may be greater or less than the amount that we have accrued. Consistent with our historical financial reporting, we have elected to reflect interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions as part of the income tax provision (benefit).

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth our consolidated statements of operations data and expresses that data as a percentage of revenue for the periods presented:

 

     Three Months Ended March 31,  
     2013     2012  
     $     %(a)     $     %(a)  

Revenue

   $ 112,762        100.0      $ 106,947        100.0   

Cost of operations

     46,943        41.6        53,471        50.0   

Sales and marketing

     30,933        27.4        30,103        28.1   

General and administrative

     23,534        20.9        29,022        27.1   

Depreciation and amortization

     6,853        6.1        6,930        6.5   

Interest income

     21               11          

Interest expense

     5,832        5.2        5,836        5.5   

Gain on investments

                   8,074        7.5   

Other expense

                   1,200        1.1   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss before income tax provision (benefit)

     (1,312     (1.2     (11,530     (10.8

Income tax provision (benefit)

     226        0.2        (3,753     (3.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (1,538     (1.4   $ (7,777     (7.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(a) Amounts may not add due to rounding.

Revenue from our public portal advertising and sponsorship is derived from the sale of online advertising and sponsorship products, online CME services, information and data services and other print services (including advertisements in WebMD Magazine). Revenue from our private portal services is derived from licensing our private online portals to employers, healthcare payers and others, along with related services including health and condition management programs and personalized health coaching services. Our customers include pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device and consumer products companies, as well as employers and health plans.

Cost of operations consists of salaries and related expenses, and non-cash stock-based compensation expense related to providing and distributing services and products we provide to customers and costs associated with the operation and maintenance of our public and private portals. Cost of operations also consists of editorial and production costs, Website operations costs, non-capitalized Website development costs, costs we pay to our distribution partners, costs associated with our health and condition management programs and personalized health coaching services, and costs related to the production and distribution of our publications, including costs related to creating and licensing content, telecommunications, leased properties and printing and distribution.

Sales and marketing expense consists primarily of salaries and related expenses, and non-cash stock-based compensation for account executives, account management and marketing personnel, as well as costs and expenses for marketing programs, and fees for professional marketing and advertising services.

 

25


Table of Contents

General and administrative expense consists primarily of salaries and related expenses, and non-cash stock-based compensation expense for administrative, finance, legal, information technology, human resources and executive personnel. Also included in general and administrative expense are costs of general insurance and professional services expenses.

Our discussions throughout this MD&A make reference to certain non-cash expenses. Our principal non-cash expenses are related to the awards of all share-based payments to employees and non-employee directors, such as grants of employee stock options and restricted stock. Non-cash stock-based compensation expense is reflected in the same expense captions as the related salary cost of the respective employee.

The following table is a summary of our non-cash expenses included in the respective statements of operations captions:

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
     2013      2012  

Stock-based compensation expense included in:

     

Cost of operations

   $ 1,870       $ 2,757   

Sales and marketing

     2,523         2,161   

General and administrative

     5,544         11,982   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

   $ 9,937       $ 16,900   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2013 and 2012

The following discussion is a comparison of our results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012.

Revenue

Our total revenue increased 5.4% to $112,762 from $106,947 in the prior year period. This increase is primarily due to higher revenue from our public portals. A more detailed discussion regarding changes in revenue is included below under “— Supplemental Financial and Operating Information.”

Costs and Expenses

Cost of Operations.    Cost of operations decreased to $46,943 for the three months ended March 31, 2013 from $53,471 in the prior year period. As a percentage of revenue, cost of operations was 41.6% for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to 50.0% for the prior year period. Included in cost of operations in the three months ended March 31, 2013 was non-cash expense related to stock-based compensation of $1,870 compared to $2,757 in the prior year period. Cost of operations excluding such non-cash expense was $45,073 or 40.0% of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to $50,714 or 47.4% of revenue for the prior year period. The decrease in absolute dollars and as a percentage of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013 compared to the prior year was due to our ability to deliver the 5.4% increase in revenue with a reduced cost structure resulting from the restructuring actions taken in December 2012.

Sales and Marketing.    Sales and marketing expense increased to $30,933 for the three months ended March 31, 2013 from $30,103 in the prior year period. As a percentage of revenue, sales and marketing expense was 27.4% in the first quarter of 2013, compared to 28.1% in the first quarter of 2012. Included in sales and marketing expense was non-cash expense related to stock-based compensation of $2,523 and $2,161 in the first quarters of 2013 and 2012, respectively. Sales and marketing expense, excluding such non-cash expenses, was $28,410 or 25.2% of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to $27,942 or 26.1% of revenue for the

 

26


Table of Contents

prior year period. The increase in absolute dollars was primarily attributable to an increase in marketing expenses and an increase in certain compensation related costs attributable to the higher revenue in the first quarter of 2013 compared to the prior year period. The decrease as a percentage of revenue, excluding the non-cash expenses discussed above, for 2013 compared to 2012 was primarily due to the increase in our revenue of 5.4% without a commensurate increase in our sales and marketing expenses as certain of these expenses are fixed in nature.

General and Administrative.    General and administrative expense decreased to $23,534 for the three months ended March 31, 2013, from $29,022 in the prior year period. As a percentage of revenue, general and administrative expense was 20.9% in the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to 27.1% in the prior year period. Included in general and administrative expense in the first quarters of 2013 and 2012 was non-cash stock-based compensation expense of $5,544 and $11,982, respectively. The decrease in non-cash stock-based compensation expense was primarily due to the voluntary surrender of stock options by certain of our officers and directors during the three months ended March 31, 2012 and the related acceleration of the unrecognized stock-based compensation expense associated with those options in the prior year period for which there was no comparable expense during the three months ended March 31, 2013. General and administrative expense, excluding such non-cash expense, was comparable to the prior year period as a percentage of revenue at $17,990 or 16.0% of revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to $17,040 or 15.9% of revenue for the prior year period.

Depreciation and Amortization.    Depreciation and amortization expense was $6,853 for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to $6,930 in the same period last year.

Interest Income.    Interest income increased to $21 for the three months ended March 31, 2013 from $11 in the same period last year.

Interest Expense.    Interest expense was $5,832 for the three months ended March 31, 2013, which was consistent with $5,836 in the same period last year. Interest expense for both the 2013 and 2012 quarters included non-cash interest expense of $1,082 related to the amortization of issuance costs.

Gain on Investments.    During the three months ended March 31, 2012, we recorded a gain on investments of $8,074 related to adjustments in the value of our ARS Option. See “— Introduction — Background Information on Certain Significant Developments and Transactions — Auction Rate Securities” for additional information.

Other Expense.    Other expense was $1,200 for the three months ended March 31, 2012 and represents cash severance and related expenses due to the resignation of our former Chief Executive Officer, and the related search and recruitment of our new Chief Executive Officer, during that period.

Income Tax Provision (Benefit).    The income tax provision was $226 for the three months ended March 31, 2013, compared to an income tax benefit of $3,753 for the three months ended March 31, 2012. The income tax provision of $226 during the three months ended March 31, 2013, based on a pre-tax loss of $1,312 during this period, was primarily the result of certain expenses that are not deductible for tax purposes.

 

27


Table of Contents

Supplemental Financial and Operating Information

The following table and the discussion that follows presents information for groups of revenue based on similar services we provide, as well as information related to a non-GAAP performance measure that we use to monitor the performance of our business and which we refer to as “Earnings before interest, taxes, non-cash and other items” or “Adjusted EBITDA.” Due to the fact that Adjusted EBITDA is a non-GAAP measure, we have also included a reconciliation from Adjusted EBITDA to net loss.

 

     Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
     2013     2012  

Revenue

    

Public portal advertising and sponsorship

   $ 93,438      $ 87,776   

Private portal services

     19,324        19,171   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 112,762      $ 106,947   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings before interest, taxes, non-cash and other items (Adjusted EBITDA)

   $ 21,289      $ 11,251   

Interest, taxes, non-cash and other items

    

Interest income

     21        11   

Interest expense

     (5,832     (5,836

Income tax (provision) benefit

     (226     3,753   

Depreciation and amortization

     (6,853     (6,930

Non-cash stock-based compensation

     (9,937     (16,900

Gain on investments

            8,074   

Other expense

            (1,200
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (1,538   $ (7,777
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following discussion is a comparison of the results of operations for our two groups of revenue and our Adjusted EBITDA for the three months ended March 31, 2013 and 2012.

Public Portal Advertising and Sponsorship.    Public portal advertising and sponsorship revenue was $93,438 in the three months ended March 31, 2013, an increase of $5,662 or 6.5% from the three months ended March 31, 2012. This increase was attributable to an increase in advertising of certain of our customers, particularly our biopharmaceutical advertisers. For a more detailed discussion, see “Introduction — Background Information on Certain Trends and Developments Affecting Our Business — Recent Developments Affecting Our Business and the Demand for Our Services.” Although there were changes made to simplify our pricing structure, any actual changes to prices did not have a significant impact on the increase in revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2013.

Private Portal Services.    Private portal services revenue was $19,324 in the three months ended March 31, 2013, an increase of $153 from the three months ended March 31, 2012. In general, pricing remained relatively stable for our private portal services and was not a significant source of the revenue increase. The number of customers using our private portal platform at March 31, 2013 was 106 compared to 118 customers using our private portal platform at March 31, 2012.

Adjusted EBITDA.    Adjusted EBITDA increased to $21,289 or 18.9% of revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2013 from $11,251 or 10.5% of revenue in the prior year period. This increase as a percentage of revenue was primarily due to the higher revenue in 2013, combined with lower operating expenses as a result of the restructuring activities that took place in December 2012.

Explanatory Note Regarding Adjusted EBITDA.    Adjusted EBITDA is a non-GAAP financial measure and should be viewed as supplemental to, and not as an alternative for, net income or loss calculated in accordance

 

28


Table of Contents

with GAAP. Our management uses Adjusted EBITDA as an additional measure of performance for purposes of business decision-making, including developing budgets, managing expenditures, and evaluating potential acquisitions or divestitures. Period-to-period comparisons of Adjusted EBITDA help our management identify additional trends in financial results that may not be shown solely by period-to-period comparisons of net income or loss. We believe that the presentation of Adjusted EBITDA is useful to investors in their analysis of our results for reasons similar to the reasons why our management finds it useful and because it helps facilitate investor understanding of decisions made by our management in light of the performance metrics used in making those decisions. In addition, we believe that providing Adjusted EBITDA, together with a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA to net income or loss, helps investors make comparisons between us and other companies that may have different capital structures, different effective income tax rates and tax attributes, different capitalized asset values and/or different forms of employee compensation. Please see the “Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Information” filed as Exhibit 99.1 to this Quarterly Report for additional background information regarding our use of Adjusted EBITDA. Exhibit 99.1 is incorporated in this MD&A by reference.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of March 31, 2013, we had $999,221 of cash and cash equivalents, and working capital of $978,539. Our cash and cash equivalents and working capital are affected by the timing of each period end in relation to items such as payments received from customers, payments made to vendors, the timing of interest payments related to our convertible debt, and internal payroll and billing cycles, as well as the seasonality within our business. Accordingly, our working capital, and its impact on cash flow from operations, can fluctuate materially from period to period.

Cash provided by operating activities in the first quarter of 2013 was $11,045, which related to a net loss of $1,538, adjusted for the non-cash income tax benefit of $99 related to deferred income taxes, and other non-cash expenses of $17,872, which include depreciation and amortization expense, non-cash interest expense and non-cash stock-based compensation expense. Additionally, changes in operating assets and liabilities resulted in a decrease in cash of $5,190, primarily due to cash used as a result of a decrease in accrued liabilities of $14,850 and an increase in prepaid and other assets of $193 offset by cash provided by a decrease in accounts receivable of $4,809 and an increase in deferred revenue of $5,044.

Cash provided by operating activities in the first quarter of 2012 was $15,529, which related to a net loss of $7,777, adjusted for the gain on investments of $8,074, the non-cash income tax benefit of $3,971 related to deferred income taxes, and other non-cash expenses of $24,912, which include depreciation and amortization expense, non-cash interest expense and non-cash stock-based compensation expense. Additionally, changes in operating assets and liabilities resulted in an increase in cash of $10,439, primarily due to cash provided by a decrease in accounts receivable of $23,890 and an increase in deferred revenue of $2,266 offset by cash used as a result of a decrease in accrued liabilities of $11,694 and an increase in prepaid and other assets of $4,023.

Cash used in investing activities was $2,876 in the first quarter of 2013, compared to cash provided by investing activities of $5,892 in the first quarter of 2012. We used $2,876 in connection with purchases of property and equipment in the first quarter of 2013 compared to $3,377 of purchases of property and equipment in the prior year period. In the first quarter of 2012, we also received $9,269 related to our ARS Option.

Cash used in financing activities was $783 in the first quarter of 2013, compared to cash used in financing activities of $572 in the first quarter of 2012. Cash used in financing activities in the first quarter of 2013 related to $1,281 used for the repurchase of our Common Stock and $174 used for withholding taxes on stock-based awards. Cash used in financing activities in the first quarter of 2012 related to $911 used for withholding taxes on stock-based awards and $415 used for the repurchase of our Common Stock. Cash provided by financing activities in the first quarter of 2013 included $672 of proceeds received from the exercise of stock options compared to $754 in the first quarter of 2012.

 

29


Table of Contents

Potential future uses of cash include repurchases of our Common Stock and our anticipated capital expenditure requirements for 2013, which we currently estimate to be approximately $25,000 and which relate to improvements that will be deployed across our public and private portal Websites in order to enable us to service future growth in unique users and page views, as well as to create new sponsorship areas for our customers, and to improve the systems used to provide our private portal applications.

Based on our plans and expectations, we believe that our available cash resources and future cash flow from operations will provide sufficient cash resources to meet the cash commitments of our convertible notes and to fund our currently anticipated working capital and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next twenty-four months. Our future liquidity and capital requirements will depend upon numerous factors, including retention of customers at current volume and revenue levels, implementation of new or updated application and service offerings, competing technological and market developments and potential future acquisitions. In addition, our ability to generate cash flow is subject to numerous factors beyond our control, including general economic, regulatory and other matters affecting us and our customers. We plan to continue to enhance our online services and to continue to invest in acquisitions, strategic relationships, facilities and technological infrastructure and product development. We intend to grow each of our existing businesses and enter into complementary ones through both internal investments and acquisitions. We may need to raise additional funds to support expansion, develop new or enhanced applications and services, respond to competitive pressures, acquire complementary businesses or technologies or take advantage of unanticipated opportunities. If required, we may raise such additional funds through public or private debt or equity financing, strategic relationships or other arrangements. We cannot assure that such financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at all, or that such financing will not be dilutive to our stockholders. Future indebtedness may impose various restrictions and covenants on us that could limit our ability to respond to market conditions, to provide for unanticipated capital investments or to take advantage of business opportunities.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In July 2012, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued an update to the existing guidance for impairment testing of indefinite-lived intangible assets, other than goodwill, similar to previously issued guidance for impairment testing of goodwill. The update simplifies how a company tests indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment by allowing both public and nonpublic entities an option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not that the fair value of an indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired. If an entity elects to perform a qualitative assessment and determines that an impairment is more likely than not, the entity is then required to perform the existing two-step quantitative impairment test, otherwise no further analysis is required. An entity may also elect not to perform the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to the two-step quantitative impairment test. The amendment is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after September 15, 2012, which for the Company was the first quarter of 2013. The adoption of this amendment did not have an impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

ITEM 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Interest Rate Sensitivity

The primary objective of our investment activities is to preserve principal and maintain adequate liquidity.

Our cash and money market investments, which were approximately $999 million at March 31, 2013, are not subject to changes in interest rates.

The 2.50% Notes and the 2.25% Notes have fixed interest rates; therefore, changes in interest rates will not impact our results of operations or financial position.

 

30


Table of Contents
ITEM 4. Controls and Procedures

As required by Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(b), WebMD management, including the Interim Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of WebMD’s disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e), as of March 31, 2013. Based on that evaluation, the Interim Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer concluded that WebMD’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of March 31, 2013.

In connection with the evaluation required by Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(d), WebMD management, including the Interim Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, concluded that there were no changes in WebMD’s internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f), during the first quarter of 2013 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, WebMD’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

31


Table of Contents

PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1.    Legal Proceedings

The information relating to legal proceedings contained in Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report is incorporated herein by this reference.

ITEM 1A.    Risk Factors

This section describes circumstances or events that could have a negative effect on our financial results or operations or that could change, for the worse, existing trends in some or all of our businesses. The occurrence of one or more of the circumstances or events described below could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows or on the trading prices of our Common Stock and Convertible Notes or of securities that we may issue in the future. The risks and uncertainties described in this Quarterly Report are not the only ones facing us. Additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known to us, or that we currently believe are immaterial, may also adversely affect our business and operations.

 

 

Risks Related to Our Operations and the Healthcare Content We Provide

If we are unable to provide content and services that attract users to The WebMD Health Network on a consistent basis, our advertising and sponsorship revenue could be reduced

Users of The WebMD Health Network have numerous other online and offline sources of healthcare information and related services. Our ability to compete for user traffic on our public portals depends upon our ability to make available a variety of health, wellness and medical content, decision-support applications and other services that meet the needs of a variety of types of users, including consumers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, with a variety of reasons for seeking information. Our ability to do so depends, in turn, on:

 

   

our ability to hire and retain qualified authors, journalists and independent writers;

 

   

our ability to license quality content from third parties; and

 

   

our ability to monitor and respond to increases and decreases in user interest in specific topics.

If consumers and healthcare professionals do not perceive our content, applications and tools to be useful, reliable and trustworthy, we may not be able to attract or retain users or otherwise maintain or increase the frequency and duration of their engagement with our health information services. We cannot assure you that we will be able to continue to develop or acquire needed content, applications and tools at a reasonable cost. In addition, since consumer users of our public portals may be attracted to The WebMD Health Network as a result of a specific condition or for a specific purpose, it is difficult for us to predict the rate at which they will return to our public portals. Because we generate revenue by, among other things, selling sponsorships of specific pages, sections or events on The WebMD Health Network, a decline in user traffic levels or a reduction in the number of pages viewed by users could cause our revenue to decrease and could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

A significant portion of the traffic to The WebMD Health Network is directed to us through algorithmic search results on Internet search engines and, if we are listed less prominently in search result listings, our business and operating results could be harmed

A significant portion of the traffic to The WebMD Health Network is directed to us through the algorithmic search results on Internet search engines such as Google. Algorithms are used by search engines to determine the listings, and the order of such listings, displayed in response to specific searches. Accordingly, in addition to providing quality content and tools, we seek to design our Websites to deliver that content and tools in ways that

 

32


Table of Contents

will cause them to rank well in algorithmic search engine results, which makes it more likely that search engine users will visit our Websites. This is commonly referred to as search engine optimization, or SEO. However, there can be no assurance that our SEO efforts will succeed in improving the ranking of our content or, even if they do result in such improvement, that the improved ranking will result in increased numbers of users and page views for our Websites. In addition, search engines frequently change the criteria that determine site rankings in their search results and our SEO efforts will not be successful if we do not respond to those changes appropriately and on a timely basis. Although our overall page views increased during the first quarter of 2013, the page views on some of the consumer sites in The WebMD Health Network (other than WebMD.com, our flagship site) were significantly reduced in that quarter and we believe that this resulted from some changes by Google in its algorithms and other processes that lowered the ranking of those sites in Google search results. Search engine providers may also prioritize search results generated by certain types of queries, including health-related queries, based on criteria they select or may otherwise intermediate in the search results generated, which could, in some circumstances, reduce the ranking that would otherwise be provided to our Websites and increase the ranking of other sites. If we are unable to respond effectively to changes made by search engine providers in their algorithms and other processes, a substantial decrease in traffic to The WebMD Health Network could occur, which could cause our revenue to decrease and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Increasingly, individuals are using mobile devices to access online content and services and, if we fail to capture a significant share of this portion of the market for online health information services or fail to generate revenue from it, our business could be adversely affected

The number of people who access online content and services through smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices has increased dramatically in the past few years, including the number of physicians and other healthcare professionals who do so. Accordingly, the portion of our page views from mobile devices has increased rapidly and is expected to continue to increase. In addition, during 2012 and the first quarter of 2013, we experienced a decline in page views from desktop computers as the usage from mobile devices has increased. New devices and new platforms continue to be developed and released. To compete in this area, we must develop health information services for mobile devices that users find engaging, that work with a variety of mobile operating systems and networks, and that achieve a high level of market acceptance. If we fail to capture a significant share of this increasingly important portion of the market for online health information services (including the market for information services for physicians and other healthcare professionals), it could adversely affect our business. It is difficult to predict the problems we may encounter in developing and maintaining mobile services and we may need to devote significant resources to their creation, maintenance and support.

We do not currently generate meaningful revenue from our mobile health information services, and our ability to do so successfully is unproven. Even if demand for our mobile applications exists and we achieve a significant share of the market for mobile health information services, we cannot assure you that we will be able to achieve significant revenue or profits from these services. If users access our services through mobile devices as a substitute for access through personal computers, and if we are unable to successfully implement monetization strategies for our mobile services, our revenue and financial results may be negatively affected.

We face significant competition for our healthcare information products and services

The markets for healthcare information products and services are intensely competitive, continually evolving and, in some cases, subject to rapid change.

 

   

Our public portals and mobile applications face competition from numerous other companies, both in attracting users and in generating revenue from advertisers and sponsors. We compete for users with online services and Websites that provide health-related information, including both commercial sites and not-for-profit sites. We compete for advertisers and sponsors with: health-related Websites; general interest consumer Websites that offer specialized health sub-channels or functions; other high-traffic Websites that include both healthcare-related and non-healthcare-related content and services, including social media Websites; search engines that provide specialized health search; and advertising networks that aggregate traffic from multiple sites. Our public portals also face competition from offline publications and information services.

 

33


Table of Contents
   

Our private portals compete with: providers of healthcare decision-support tools and online health management applications, including personal health records; wellness and disease management vendors; and health information services and health management offerings of healthcare benefits companies and their affiliates.

Many of our competitors have greater financial, technical, product development, marketing and other resources than we do. These organizations may be better known than we are and have more customers or users than we do. We cannot provide assurance that we will be able to compete successfully against these organizations. In addition, we expect that competitors will continue to enter these markets. The competition we face for our services may result in fewer or smaller customer commitments or pressure to reduce prices, which could reduce our profit margins.

Failure to effectively identify, assess and pursue strategic changes and new business initiatives could adversely affect our company and its prospects

During the second half of 2012, in response to the challenges facing our business, we conducted a strategic review of, among other things, our product and service offerings and how we market them. Based on that review, we are working to strengthen our portfolio of services, taking steps to diversify our client base and prioritizing resources to key areas of future growth. Some of the opportunities we are working on have challenges that are different than those associated with our existing products and services and could strain our financial, operational and management resources. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that the potential revenue streams from any investments that we may make in pursuing strategic change or new business opportunities will justify the amounts spent. Failure to effectively identify, assess and pursue strategic changes and new business initiatives may adversely affect our company and its prospects.

Developing and implementing new and updated features and services for our public and private portals and our mobile applications may be more difficult than expected, may take longer and cost more than expected, and may not result in sufficient increases in revenue to justify the costs

Attracting and retaining users of our public portals and our mobile applications and clients for our private portals requires us to continue to improve the technology underlying those portals and applications and to continue to develop new and updated features and services for those portals and applications. If we are unable to do so on a timely basis or if we are unable to implement new features and services without disruption to our existing ones, we may lose potential users and clients.

We rely on a combination of internal development, strategic relationships, licensing and acquisitions to develop our portals, mobile applications and related features and services. Our development and/or implementation of new technologies, features and services may cost more than expected, may take longer than originally expected, may require more testing than originally anticipated and may require the acquisition of additional personnel and other resources. There can be no assurance that the revenue opportunities from any new or updated technologies, applications, features or services will justify the amounts spent.

Failure to enhance the analytic capabilities we use to demonstrate the value of our services to advertisers and sponsors could adversely affect our ability to market our services

We are working to enhance the analytic capabilities we use to demonstrate to advertisers and sponsors how promotional strategies implemented through WebMD impact physician and consumer behaviors and preferences. Our ability to demonstrate the value of advertising and sponsorship on The WebMD Health Network will depend, in part, on the accuracy of our analytics and measurement capabilities, on our ability to develop reporting tools using the capabilities and our ability to further improve such capabilities and tools. If we are unable to enhance our analytic capabilities, it could adversely affect our ability to market our services and we may lose business to competitors even if our advertising and sponsorship services are superior to theirs.

 

34


Table of Contents

Restrictions on our ability to access or use various forms and sources of data could adversely impact our business

We are increasingly using data analytics based on information that we collect regarding usage of our public portals, as well as other third party sources of data. Our use of data regarding users of our public portals is governed by the privacy policies posted on those sites and is designed to comply with applicable laws and regulations, including HIPAA, as is our use of any third party data. In addition, we sell certain information products on a standalone basis utilizing de-identified data that we license from a third party source. Changes to our ability to access or use data could adversely affect our ability to implement improved analytics or to offer information products on a standalone basis. Accordingly, our business could be adversely impacted if, for any reason (including, but not limited to, changes in applicable laws and regulations) the data we use becomes unavailable or the conditions on its availability are not commercially reasonable or are inconsistent with our planned usage. In addition, the quality of our data analytics depends on the reliability of the information that we are able to obtain. If the information we use contains errors or is otherwise unreliable, analyses we create and actions we take based on those analyses could be wrong, which could hurt our reputation and business.

Failure to maintain and enhance the “WebMD” brand could have a material adverse effect on our business

We believe that the “WebMD” brand identity that we have developed has contributed to the success of our business and has helped us achieve recognition as a trusted source of health and wellness information. We also believe that maintaining and enhancing that brand is important to expanding the user base for our public portals, to our relationships with sponsors and advertisers, and to our ability to gain additional employer and healthcare payer clients for our private portals. We have expended considerable resources on establishing and enhancing the “WebMD” brand and our other brands, and we have developed policies and procedures designed to preserve and enhance our brands, including editorial procedures designed to provide quality control of the information we publish. We expect to continue to devote resources and efforts to maintain and enhance our brands. However, we may not be able to successfully maintain or enhance our brands, and events outside of our control may have a negative effect on our brands. If we are unable to maintain or enhance our brands, and do so in a cost-effective manner, our business could be adversely affected.

We have a limited operating history

We have a limited operating history and participate in relatively new markets. These markets, and our business, have undergone significant changes during their short history and can be expected to continue to change. Many companies with business plans based on providing healthcare information and related services through the Internet have failed to be profitable and some have filed for bankruptcy or ceased operations. Even if demand from users exists, we cannot assure you that our business will be profitable.

Our failure to attract and retain qualified executives and employees may have a material adverse effect on our business

Our business depends largely on the skills, experience and performance of key members of our management team and other key employees. We also depend, in part, on our ability to attract and retain qualified writers and editors, software developers and other technical personnel and sales and marketing personnel. Competition for qualified personnel in the healthcare information services and Internet industries is intense. We cannot assure you that we will be able to hire or retain a sufficient number of qualified personnel to meet our requirements, or that we will be able to do so at costs that are acceptable to us. Failure to do so may have an adverse effect on our business.

Our advertising and sponsorship revenue may vary significantly from quarter to quarter and its amount and timing may be subject to factors beyond our control, including regulatory changes

Our advertising and sponsorship revenue may vary significantly from quarter to quarter due to a number of factors, many of which are not within our control, and some of which may be difficult to forecast accurately, including potential effects on demand for our services as a result of regulatory changes affecting advertising and

 

35


Table of Contents

promotion of drugs and medical devices and general economic conditions. The majority of our advertising and sponsorship programs are for terms of approximately four to twelve months. We have relatively few longer term advertising and sponsorship programs. We cannot assure you that our current advertisers and sponsors will continue to use our services beyond the terms of their existing contracts or that they will enter into any additional contracts.

The time between the date of initial contact with a potential advertiser or sponsor regarding a specific program and the execution of a contract with the advertiser or sponsor for that program, as well as the additional time period before our services are delivered, may be longer than expected, especially for medium-sized and larger contracts, and may be subject to delays over which we have little or no control, including as a result of budgetary constraints of the advertiser or sponsor or their need for internal approvals, including internal approvals relating to compliance with the laws and regulations applicable to the marketing of healthcare products. We have experienced, from time to time, a lengthening of this internal review process by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, which has resulted in delays in contracting as well as delays in recognizing expected revenue under executed contracts and which may continue to cause such delays. Other factors that could affect the timing of contracting for specific programs with advertisers and sponsors, or receipt of revenue under such contracts, include:

 

   

the timing of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for new products or for new approved uses for existing products;

 

   

the timing of FDA approval of generic products that compete with existing brand name products and any increase in the number or significance of such approvals;

 

   

the timing of withdrawals of products from the market;

 

   

consolidation of companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries;

 

   

the timing of rollouts of new or enhanced services on our public portals;

 

   

seasonal factors relating to the prevalence of specific health conditions and other seasonal factors that may affect the timing of promotional campaigns for specific products; and

 

   

the scheduling of conferences for physicians and other healthcare professionals.

Some of our pharmaceutical company customers have experienced patent expirations for certain of their products in the past two years and some are expected to experience patent expirations over the next several years. In the pharmaceutical industry, patent expirations allow for competition from lower-priced generic versions of the patented drugs and generally result in the termination of marketing efforts for the drug. In addition, we believe that these patent expirations have led to, and may continue to lead to, significant overall reductions in marketing, selling and educational expenditures by some of these pharmaceutical companies across their entire product portfolios, as well as delays in their budgeting and purchase decisions, as companies deal with both the ongoing and anticipated impact of patent expirations across their businesses as well as greater than expected delays in new product launches.

We may be unsuccessful in our efforts to generate advertising and sponsorship revenue from consumer products companies

Much of our advertising and sponsorship revenue has, in the past, come from pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. We also seek to generate advertising and sponsorship revenue from consumer products companies that are interested in communicating health-related or safety-related information about their products to our audience. However, while many consumer products companies are increasing the portion of their promotional spending used on the Internet, we cannot assure you that these advertisers and sponsors will find our consumer Websites to be as effective for promoting their products and services as competing channels, which include traditional media, Internet search engines, social media Internet sites, general interest consumer sites, and numerous other alternatives. Competition for this business may also result in smaller customer commitments or pressure to reduce prices, both of which could reduce our profit margins even if we are able to generate revenue.

 

36


Table of Contents

In addition, revenues from consumer products companies are more likely to reflect general economic conditions, and to be reduced to a greater extent during economic downturns, than revenues from pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. Accordingly, revenues from this portion of our business may be subject to significant quarter-to-quarter variations and we may be unsuccessful in our efforts to develop this portion of our business or maintain its profitability.

Lengthy sales and implementation cycles for our private online portals make it difficult to forecast our revenues from these applications and may have an adverse impact on our business

The period from our initial contact with a potential client for a private online portal and the first purchase of our solution by the client is difficult to predict. In the past, this period has generally ranged from six to twelve months, but in some cases has been longer. Potential sales may be subject to delays or cancellations due to a client’s internal procedures for approving large expenditures and other factors beyond our control, including the effect of general economic conditions on the willingness of potential clients to commit to licensing our private portals. The time it takes to implement a private online portal is also difficult to predict and has lasted as long as six months from contract execution to the commencement of live operation. Implementation may be subject to delays based on the availability of the internal resources of the client that are needed and other factors outside of our control. As a result, we have limited ability to forecast the timing of revenue from new clients. This, in turn, makes it more difficult to forecast our financial performance for future periods. In addition, some of our client contracts may permit termination, by the client, prior to the end of the stated contract term, which can also make it more difficult to forecast our future financial performance.

During the sales cycle and the implementation period, we may expend substantial time, effort and money preparing contract proposals, negotiating contracts and implementing the private online portal without receiving any related revenue. In addition, many of the expenses related to providing private online portals are relatively fixed in the short term, including personnel costs and technology and infrastructure costs. If our private portal revenue is lower than expected, we may not be able to reduce related short-term spending in response. Any shortfall in such revenue would have a direct impact on our results of operations.

Our ability to renew existing agreements with employers and health plans will depend, in part, on our ability to continue to increase usage of our private portal services by their employees and plan members

In a healthcare market where a greater share of the responsibility for healthcare costs and decision-making has been shifting to consumers, use of information technology (including personal health records) to assist consumers in making informed decisions about healthcare has also increased. We believe that through our WebMD Behavior Change Platform, including our personal health record application, we are well positioned to play a role in this environment. However, our strategy depends, in part, on increasing usage of our private portal services by our employer and health plan clients’ employees and members and being able to demonstrate a sufficient return on investment and other benefits for our private portals clients from those services. Increasing usage of our private portal services requires us to continue to develop new and updated applications, features and services. In addition, we face competition in the area of healthcare decision-support tools and online health management applications and health information services. Many of our competitors have greater financial, technical, product development, marketing and other resources than we do, and may be better known than we are. We cannot provide assurance that we will be able to meet our development and implementation goals or that we will be able to compete successfully against other vendors offering competitive services and, if we are unable to do so, we may experience static or diminished usage for our private portal services and possible non-renewals of our customer agreements.

We are beginning to provide condition management services to clients of our private portals, which will involve additional risks and challenges and which may not be profitable

We have recently begun to provide condition management services to private portal clients and plan to expand that portion of our business. Our initial offerings include programs targeting individuals struggling with obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Our condition management programs

 

37


Table of Contents

include ongoing, intensive one-on-one coaching by condition specialists, along with targeted online resources and progress tracking tools. Providing condition management services involves new risks and challenges for us, including: the need to obtain and retain necessary licenses, permits and regulatory clearances and approvals related to these services; difficulty in quantifying the costs savings and other benefits for our clients from these services; and difficulty in differentiating our condition management services from those of competitors, some of whom may be able to provide such services at a lower cost. We cannot predict the demand among our existing private portals clients and other potential clients for our condition management services and cannot provide assurance that the revenue opportunities from providing these services will justify the costs involved in developing the required capabilities and delivering the services to clients.

Contractual relationships with governmental customers may impose special burdens on us and provide special benefits to those customers, including the right to change or terminate the contract in response to budgetary constraints or policy changes

A portion of our revenues come from customers that are governmental agencies or vendors to such agencies. Government contracts and subcontracts may be subject to some or all of the following:

 

   

termination when appropriated funding for the current fiscal year is exhausted or becomes unavailable;

 

   

termination for the governmental customer’s convenience, subject to a negotiated settlement for costs incurred and profit on work completed, along with the right to place contracts out for bid before the full contract term, as well as the right to make unilateral changes in contract requirements, subject to negotiated price adjustments;

 

   

“most-favored” pricing disclosure requirements that are designed to ensure that the government can negotiate and receive pricing akin to that offered commercially and requirements to submit proprietary cost or pricing data to ensure that government contract pricing is fair and reasonable;

 

   

commercial customer price tracking requirements that require contractors to monitor pricing offered to a specified class of customers and to extend price reductions offered to that class of customers to the government;

 

   

reporting and compliance requirements related to, among other things: equal employment opportunity, affirmative action for veterans and for workers with disabilities, and accessibility for the disabled;

 

   

broader audit rights than we would usually grant to non-governmental customers; and

 

   

specialized remedies for breach and default or failure to meet service level commitments, including setoff rights, retroactive price adjustments, and civil or criminal fraud penalties, as well as mandatory administrative dispute resolution procedures instead of state contract law remedies.

In addition, certain violations of federal law may subject government contractors to having their contracts terminated and, under certain circumstances, suspension and/or debarment from future government contracts.

Expansion to markets outside the United States will subject us to additional risks

One element of our growth strategy is to seek to expand our online services to markets outside the United States. In certain markets outside the United States, we expect to accomplish this through partnerships or joint ventures with other companies having expertise in the specific country or region, while in other such markets we expect to rely primarily on our own internal resources. For example, in certain markets outside of the United States, we are providing some of our online services in the local language directly to healthcare professionals and, to a lesser extent, consumers. The provision of online services in foreign languages presents additional challenges. Our company has only recently begun this activity and, therefore, has limited experience in this area. Our participation in international markets is subject to certain other risks beyond those applicable to our operations in the United States, such as:

 

   

challenges caused by cultural differences;

 

38


Table of Contents
   

difficulties in staffing and managing operations from a distance;

 

   

uncertainty regarding liability for services and content;

 

   

burdens of complying with a wide variety of legal, regulatory and market requirements;

 

   

variability of economic and political conditions, including the extent of the impact of adverse economic conditions in markets outside the United States;

 

   

tariffs or other trade barriers;

 

   

fluctuations in currency exchange rates;

 

   

potentially adverse tax consequences, including restrictions on repatriation of earnings; and

 

   

difficulties in protecting intellectual property.

 

 

Risks Related to the Internet and Our Technological Infrastructure

Any service interruption or failure in the systems that we use to provide online services could harm our business

Our online services are designed to operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week, without interruption. However, we have experienced and expect that we will in the future experience interruptions and delays in services and availability from time to time. We rely on internal systems as well as third-party vendors, including data center providers, bandwidth providers and mobile carriers, to provide our online services. We may not maintain redundant systems or facilities for some of these services. In the event of a catastrophic event with respect to one or more of these systems or facilities, we may experience an extended period of system unavailability, which could negatively impact our relationship with users. In addition, system failures may result in loss of data, including user registration data, business intelligence data, content, and other data critical to the operation of our online services, which could cause significant harm to our business and our reputation.

To operate without interruption or loss of data, both we and our service providers must guard against:

 

   

damage from fire, power loss and other natural disasters;

 

   

communications failures;

 

   

software and hardware errors, failures and crashes;

 

   

security breaches, computer viruses, distributed denial-of-service (DDOS) attacks and similar disruptive problems; and

 

   

other potential service interruptions.

Any disruption in the network access or co-location services provided by third-party providers to us or any failure by these third-party providers or our own systems to handle current or higher volume of use could significantly harm our business. We exercise little control over these third-party vendors, which increases our vulnerability to problems with services they provide.

Any errors, failures, interruptions or delays experienced in connection with these third-party technologies and information services or our own systems could negatively impact our relationships with users and adversely affect our brand and our business and could expose us to liabilities to third parties. Although we maintain insurance for our business, the coverage under our policies may not be adequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur. In addition, we cannot provide assurance that we will continue to be able to obtain adequate insurance coverage at an acceptable cost.

 

39


Table of Contents

Implementation of additions to or changes in hardware and software platforms used to deliver our online services may result in performance problems and may not provide the additional functionality that was expected

From time to time, we implement additions to or changes in the hardware and software platforms we use for providing our online services. During and after the implementation of additions or changes, a platform may not perform as expected, which could result in interruptions in operations, an increase in response time or an inability to track performance metrics. In addition, in connection with integrating acquired businesses, we may move their operations to our hardware and software platforms or make other changes, any of which could result in interruptions in those operations. Any significant interruption in our ability to operate any of our online services could have an adverse effect on our relationships with users and clients and, as a result, on our financial results. We rely on a combination of purchasing, licensing, internal development, and acquisitions to develop our hardware and software platforms. Our implementation of additions to or changes in these platforms may cost more than originally expected, may take longer than originally expected, and may require more testing than originally anticipated. In addition, we cannot provide assurance that additions to or changes in these platforms will provide the additional functionality and other benefits that were originally expected.

If the systems we use to provide online portals experience security breaches or are otherwise perceived to be insecure, our business could suffer

We retain and transmit confidential information, including personal health records, in the processing centers and other facilities we use to provide online services. It is critical that these facilities and infrastructure remain secure and be perceived by the marketplace as secure. A security breach could damage our reputation or result in liability. We may be required to expend significant capital and other resources to protect against security breaches and hackers or to alleviate problems caused by breaches. Despite the implementation of security measures, this infrastructure or other systems that we interface with, including the Internet and related systems, may be vulnerable to physical break-ins, hackers, improper employee or contractor access, computer viruses, programming errors, denial-of-service attacks or other attacks by third parties or similar disruptive problems. Any compromise of our security, whether as a result of our own systems or the systems that they interface with, could reduce demand for our services and could subject us to legal claims from our clients and users, including for breach of contract or breach of warranty.

Our online services are dependent on the development and maintenance of the Internet infrastructure

Our ability to deliver our online services is dependent on the development and maintenance of the infrastructure of the Internet by third parties. The Internet has experienced a variety of outages and other delays as a result of damages to portions of its infrastructure, and it could face outages and delays in the future. The Internet has also experienced, and is likely to continue to experience, significant growth in the number of users and the amount of traffic. If the Internet continues to experience increased usage, the Internet infrastructure may be unable to support the demands placed on it. In addition, the reliability and performance of the Internet may be harmed by increased usage or by denial-of-service attacks. Any resulting interruptions in our services or increases in response time could, if significant, result in a loss of potential or existing users of and advertisers and sponsors on our Websites and, if sustained or repeated, could reduce the attractiveness of our services.

Customers who utilize our online services depend on Internet service providers and other Website operators for access to our Websites. All of these providers have experienced significant outages in the past and could experience outages, delays and other difficulties in the future due to system failures unrelated to our systems. Any such outages or other failures on their part could reduce traffic to our Websites.

Third parties may challenge the enforceability of our online agreements

The law governing the validity and enforceability of online agreements and other electronic transactions is evolving. We could be subject to claims by third parties that the online terms and conditions for use of our Websites, including disclaimers or limitations of liability, are unenforceable. A finding by a court that these terms and conditions or other online agreements are invalid could harm our business.

 

40


Table of Contents

We could be subject to breach of warranty or other claims by clients of our online portals if the software and systems we use to provide them contain errors or experience failures

Errors in the software and systems we use could cause serious problems for clients of our online portals. We may fail to meet contractual performance standards or client expectations. Clients of our online portals may seek compensation from us or may seek to terminate their agreements with us, withhold payments due to us, seek refunds from us of part or all of the fees charged under those agreements or initiate litigation or other dispute resolution procedures. In addition, we could face breach of warranty or other claims by clients or additional development costs. Our software and systems are inherently complex and, despite testing and quality control, we cannot be certain that they will perform as planned.

We attempt to limit, by contract, our liability to our clients for damages arising from our negligence, errors or mistakes. However, contractual limitations on liability may not be enforceable in certain circumstances or may otherwise not provide sufficient protection to us from liability for damages. We maintain liability insurance coverage, including coverage for errors and omissions. However, it is possible that claims could exceed the amount of our applicable insurance coverage, if any, or that this coverage may not continue to be available on acceptable terms or in sufficient amounts. Even if these claims do not result in liability to us, investigating and defending against them would be expensive and time consuming and could divert management’s attention away from our operations. In addition, negative publicity caused by these events may delay or hinder market acceptance of our services, including unrelated services.

 

 

Risks Related to the Healthcare Industry, Healthcare Regulation and Internet Regulation

Developments in the healthcare industry could adversely affect our business

Most of our revenue is derived from the healthcare industry and could be affected by changes affecting healthcare spending. We are particularly dependent on pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies for our advertising and sponsorship revenue. General reductions in expenditures by healthcare industry participants could result from, among other things:

 

   

government regulation or private initiatives that affect the manner in which healthcare providers interact with patients, payers or other healthcare industry participants, including changes in pricing or means of delivery of healthcare products and services;

 

   

consolidation of healthcare industry participants;

 

   

reductions in governmental funding for healthcare; and

 

   

adverse changes in business or economic conditions affecting healthcare payers or providers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or medical device companies or other healthcare industry participants.

Federal and state legislatures and agencies periodically consider reforming aspects of the United States healthcare system. Significant federal healthcare reform legislation was enacted in March 2010, as discussed in the next risk factor.

Even if general expenditures by industry participants remain the same or increase, developments in the healthcare industry may result in reduced spending in some or all of the specific market segments that we serve or are planning to serve. For example, use of our products and services could be affected by:

 

   

changes in the design of health insurance plans;

 

   

the timing of FDA approvals of generic products that compete with existing brand name products and any increase in the number or significance of such approvals or of withdrawals of brand name products from the market;

 

41


Table of Contents
   

the timing of FDA approvals for new products or few new approved uses for existing products and any decrease in the number or significance of new drugs or medical devices coming to market or new approved uses for existing such products; and

 

   

decreases in marketing expenditures by pharmaceutical or medical device companies, including as a result of governmental regulation or private initiatives that discourage or prohibit advertising, sponsorship or educational activities by pharmaceutical or medical device companies or that discourage or prohibit their use of online services for some or all such activities.

In addition, our customers’ expectations regarding pending or potential industry developments may also affect their budgeting processes and spending plans with respect to products and services of the types we provide.

The healthcare industry has changed significantly in recent years, and we expect that significant changes will continue to occur. However, the timing and impact of developments in the healthcare industry are difficult to predict. We cannot assure you that the markets for our products and services will continue to exist at current levels or that we will have adequate technical, financial and marketing resources to react to changes in those markets.

Federal health care reform legislation enacted in 2010 could adversely affect our healthcare industry customers and clients, causing them to reduce expenditures, including expenditures for our services

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (which we refer to as the Reform Legislation), was signed into law in March 2010. The Reform Legislation makes extensive changes to the system of healthcare insurance and benefits in the U.S. In general, the Reform Legislation seeks to reduce healthcare costs and decrease the number of uninsured legal U.S. residents by, among other things, requiring individuals to carry, and certain employers to offer, health insurance or be subject to penalties. The Reform Legislation also imposes new regulations on health insurers, including guaranteed coverage requirements, prohibitions on certain annual and all lifetime limits on amounts paid on behalf of or to plan members, increased restrictions on rescinding coverage, establishment of minimum medical loss ratio requirements, a requirement to cover certain preventive services on a first dollar basis, the establishment of state insurance exchanges and essential benefit packages, and greater limitations on how health insurers price certain of their products. The Reform Legislation also contains provisions that will affect the revenues and profits of pharmaceutical and medical device companies, including new taxes on certain sales of their products.

Many of the provisions of the Reform Legislation that expand insurance coverage will not become effective until 2014, and many provisions require regulations and interpretive guidance to be issued before they will be fully implemented. Some provisions do not apply to health plans that were in place when the Reform Legislation was enacted and have not been substantially changed since. In addition, it is difficult to foresee how individuals and businesses will respond to the choices available to them under the Reform Legislation. Furthermore, the Reform Legislation will result in future state legislative and regulatory changes, which we are unable to predict at this time, in order for states to comply with certain provisions of the Reform Legislation and to participate in grants and other incentive opportunities. In addition, Congress has considered various proposals to repeal some or all of the Reform Legislation. Accordingly, while we do not currently anticipate any significant adverse effects on WebMD as a direct result of application of the Reform Legislation to our business or on our company in its capacity as an employer, we are unable to predict what the indirect impacts of the Reform Legislation will be on WebMD’s business through its effects on other healthcare industry participants, including pharmaceutical and medical device companies that are advertisers and sponsors of our public portals and employers and health plans that are clients of our private portals. Healthcare industry participants may respond to the Reform Legislation or to uncertainties created by the Reform Legislation by reducing their expenditures or postponing expenditure decisions, including expenditures for our services, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

42


Table of Contents

Government regulation of healthcare creates risks and challenges with respect to our compliance efforts and our business strategies

The healthcare industry is highly regulated and is subject to changing political, legislative, regulatory and other influences. Existing and new laws and regulations affecting the healthcare industry could create unexpected liabilities for us, could cause us to incur additional costs and could restrict our operations. Many healthcare laws are complex, and their application to specific products and services may not be clear. In particular, many existing healthcare laws and regulations, when enacted, did not anticipate the healthcare information services that we provide. However, these laws and regulations may nonetheless be applied to our products and services. Our failure to accurately anticipate the application of these laws and regulations, or other failure to comply, could create liability for us, result in adverse publicity and negatively affect our business. Even in areas where we are not subject to healthcare regulation directly, we may become involved in governmental actions or investigations through our relationships with customers that are regulated, and participation in such actions or investigations, even if we are not a party and not the subject of an investigation, may cause us to incur significant expenses. Some of the risks we face from healthcare regulation are as follows:

 

   

Regulation of Drug and Medical Device Advertising and Promotion.    The WebMD Health Network provides services involving advertising and promotion of prescription and over-the-counter drugs and medical devices and claims of nutritional supplements. If the FDA or the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) finds that any of our products and services or any information on The WebMD Health Network, in our mobile applications, or in WebMD Magazine violates applicable regulations, they may take regulatory or judicial action against us and/or the advertiser or sponsor of that information. State attorneys general may take similar action based on their state’s consumer protection statutes. Any increase or change in regulation of drug or medical device advertising and promotion could make it more difficult for us to contract for sponsorships and advertising. The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) directs the FDA to issue guidance, no later than July 9, 2014, regarding the use of the Internet to promote FDA-regulated medical products. We cannot predict what the FDA’s policy towards Internet promotion will be, or what actions the FDA or industry participants may take in the future. Recent private industry initiatives have resulted in voluntary restrictions, which advertisers and sponsors have agreed to follow. Advertising restrictions apply not only to our business in the United States but also to our operations in Europe. Our European Websites belonging to The WebMD Health Network must comply with the national laws of the respective countries whose physicians they address. Under these European laws, there are several restrictions regarding advertising of drugs or medical devices. There are, in particular, broad prohibitions on the advertising of prescription or reimbursed drugs to the general public, the use of indirect or disguised marketing, and the offering and providing of gifts or benefits with promotional purpose which are not only of minor value. If the relevant European national competent authorities find that any of our products and services, or any information on our Websites or in our mobile applications, violated applicable regulations, they may take regulatory or judicial action against us and/or the advertisers or sponsors of that information. Moreover, our competitors, or even competitors of advertisers and sponsors, may take actions against us and/or advertisers or sponsors of the information. Our advertising and sponsorship revenue could be materially reduced by additional restrictions on the advertising of prescription drugs and medical devices to consumers, whether imposed by law or regulation or required under policies adopted by industry members.

 

   

Anti-kickback Laws.    There are federal and state laws that govern patient referrals, physician financial relationships and inducements to healthcare providers and patients. The federal healthcare programs anti-kickback law prohibits any person or entity from offering, paying, soliciting or receiving anything of value, directly or indirectly, for the referral of patients covered by Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs or the leasing, purchasing, ordering or arranging for or recommending the lease, purchase or order of any item, good, facility or service covered by these programs. Many states and European countries also have similar anti-kickback laws that are not necessarily limited to items or services for which payment is made by a federal healthcare program. These laws are applicable to manufacturers and distributors and, therefore, may restrict how we and some of our customers market products to healthcare providers, including e-details. Any determination by a state, federal, or foreign

 

43


Table of Contents
 

regulatory agency that any of our practices violate any of these laws could subject us to civil or criminal penalties and require us to change or terminate some portions of our business and could have an adverse effect on our business. Even an unsuccessful challenge by regulatory authorities to our practices could result in adverse publicity and be costly for us to respond to.

 

   

False Claims Laws.    The Federal False Claims Act imposes liability on any person or entity who, among other things, knowingly presents, or causes to be presented, a false or fraudulent claim for payment by a Federal healthcare program. In addition, various states and European countries have enacted false claim laws analogous to the Federal False Claims Act, and many of these laws apply where a claim is submitted to any third-party payor and not merely a federal healthcare program. When an entity is determined to have violated the Federal False Claims Act, it may be required to pay up to three times the actual damages sustained by the government plus civil penalties. In recent years an increasing number of Federal False Claims Act cases have been brought against drug manufacturers and resulted in significant monetary settlements and imposition of federally supervised corporate integrity agreements in circumstances that include allegations that company-sponsored CME was unlawful off-label promotion. Any action against us for violation of these laws could cause us to incur significant legal expenses and may adversely affect our ability to operate our business. Similarly, False Claims Act actions and resulting Corporate Integrity Agreements involving our customers may influence their willingness to continue to use our services.

 

   

Medical Professional Regulation.    The practice of most healthcare professions requires licensing under applicable state law as well as under applicable national law of most of the European countries. In addition, the laws in some states and European countries prohibit business entities from practicing medicine. If a state determines that some portion of our business violates these laws, it may seek to have us discontinue those portions or subject us to penalties or licensure requirements. Any determination that we are a healthcare provider and have acted improperly as a healthcare provider may result in liability to us.

 

   

GINA.    The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) prohibits discrimination based on genetic information in employment and in health insurance coverage. The law applies to our private portal customers, including both employers and group health plans. WebMD’s Health Risk Assessment (or HRA), HealthQuotient, is typically offered to employees as a voluntary component of their employer-sponsored wellness program. Title I of GINA can have significant implications for wellness programs offered by group health plans in that it prohibits the collection of genetic information, which includes an individual’s family medical history, prior to or in connection with enrollment or for underwriting purposes. Underwriting purposes include providing incentives or rewards for completion of an HRA that requests genetic information. Title II of GINA prohibits employment discrimination based on genetic information as well as the request or purchase of genetic information of employees or their family members with limited exceptions, including a limited exception for voluntary wellness programs. WebMD may face challenges as a result of varying interpretations of the law by our customers and by the multiple enforcing agencies including the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS), Labor and Treasury and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Interpretations of the law have required us to modify the HealthQuotient product, and we could experience increases in operational costs or decreases in demand for our products. State legislation, such as recent legislation in California prohibiting any form of discrimination by businesses based on genetic information, including in housing, public accommodation, and the provision of emergency services, could have additional implications for service we provide in those states. Similar restrictions may also apply in European countries.

We believe that none of our existing online services and mobile applications are subject to regulation as a medical device under applicable FDA regulations. However, it is possible that products or services that we may offer in the future could subject us to such regulation or that current rules could change or be interpreted to apply to some of our existing online services or mobile applications. Complying with such regulations could be burdensome and expensive and could delay our introduction of new services or applications.

 

44


Table of Contents

We may be subject to claims brought against us as a result of content we provide

Consumers access health-related information through our online services, including information regarding particular medical conditions and possible adverse reactions or side effects from medications. Physicians and other healthcare professionals use our services to access clinical reference sources, commentary from leading medical experts, medical news, and coverage of professional meetings and conferences. If our content, or content we obtain from third parties, contains inaccuracies, it is possible that physicians, consumers, employees, health plan members or others may sue us for various causes of action. Although our Websites and mobile applications contain terms and conditions, including disclaimers of liability, that are intended to reduce or eliminate our liability, the law governing the validity and enforceability of online agreements and other electronic transactions is evolving. We could be subject to claims by third parties that our online agreements with consumers and physicians that provide the terms and conditions for use of our public or private portals or mobile applications are unenforceable. A finding by a court that these agreements are invalid and that we are subject to liability could harm our business and require costly changes to our business.

We have editorial procedures in place to provide quality control of the information that we publish or provide. However, we cannot assure you that our editorial and other quality control procedures will be sufficient to ensure that there are no errors or omissions in particular content. Even if potential claims do not result in liability to us, investigating and defending against these claims could be expensive and time-consuming and could divert management’s attention away from our operations. In addition, our business is based on establishing the reputation of our portals as trustworthy and dependable sources of healthcare information. Allegations of impropriety or inaccuracy, even if unfounded, could harm our reputation and business.

Government regulation of the Internet could adversely affect our business

The Internet and its associated technologies are subject to government regulation. However, whether and how existing laws and regulations in various jurisdictions, including privacy and consumer protection laws, apply to the Internet is still uncertain. Our failure, or the failure of our business partners or third-party service providers, to accurately anticipate the application of these laws and regulations to our products and services and the manner in which we deliver them, or any other failure to comply with such laws and regulations, could create liability for us, result in adverse publicity and negatively affect our business. In addition, new laws and regulations, or new interpretations of existing laws and regulations, may be adopted with respect to the Internet and online services, including in areas such as user privacy, confidentiality, consumer protection, marketing, pricing, content, copyrights and patents, and characteristics and quality of products and services. We cannot predict how these laws or regulations will affect our business.

In Europe, the respective healthcare advertising laws stipulate several restrictions on advertising of drugs and medical devices to the public. In particular, in several countries, the advertising of prescription drugs to the general public is not allowed. Thus, these European countries require access restrictions for Websites that contain such advertisements, which are only allowed to be addressed to healthcare professionals. This means these Websites of The WebMD Health Network that are addressed to physicians in specific European countries (such as the Medscape Germany or France Websites) must be accessible only to healthcare professionals by an appropriate access check. If the respective European competent authority does not acknowledge the respective Website to have appropriate access controls, the authority may require us and/or our European entity to establish stricter access controls or ultimately may take action against us and/or our European entity.

Internet user privacy, personal data security and the use of consumer information to track online activities are major issues both in the United States and abroad. For example, in February 2009, the FTC published Self-Regulatory Principles to govern the tracking of consumers’ activities online in order to deliver advertising targeted to the interests of individual consumers (sometimes referred to as behavioral advertising). These principles serve as guidelines to the industry. In December 2010, following a series of workshops, the FTC issued a preliminary staff report containing a proposed framework for businesses and policymakers for online consumer privacy issues and, in March 2012, the FTC issued a final report setting forth its current views on best practices, to protect the privacy of consumers, to be implemented by companies that collect and use consumer

 

45


Table of Contents

data. Also in March 2012, the White House released a Privacy White Paper that outlined the Obama Administration’s proposal for a new American privacy framework based on a Consumer Bill of Privacy Rights and which called for the development of industry-specific voluntary, enforceable privacy codes of conduct through a collaborative multi-stakeholder process. Both the FTC and the White House called for Congress to develop baseline privacy legislation and the FTC also called on industry to accelerate the pace of self-regulation. The FTC has otherwise been active in investigating and entering into consent decrees under its current unfair or deceptive trade practices authority with companies because of their online privacy and data security practices. There is a possibility of legislation, regulation and increased enforcement activities relating to privacy and behavioral advertising. For example, the FTC issued revised Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) rules in late 2012 that broaden the scope of the regulations. In addition, some bills have been introduced in Congress, and more are expected, that, if passed, could impose substantial new regulations on online behavioral advertising activities.

In Europe, Directive 2009/136/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council requires the user’s full information and consent prior to the installation and use of any so-called “cookie” on a user’s computer. This Directive has been implemented differently, if at all, in member states of the European Union and national requirements to remain compliant with the respective law may vary. Nevertheless, the provisions of this directive, whether effectively implemented in national laws, are now applicable in all the member states of the European Union and enforcement actions are now being considered by local data protection authorities. In addition, in January 2012, the European Commission published a draft General Data Protection Regulation on data protection for the revision of the currently applicable data protection framework. The potential resulting new framework sets out additional requirements for users’ consent for offline and online marketing. If enacted, this instrument will further strengthen the already very densely regulated area of Internet privacy in Europe. In addition, this revised European legislation, if adopted, would increase the likelihood of applicability of European law to entities established outside the European Union but processing data of European data subjects.

We have privacy policies posted on our Websites that we believe comply with existing applicable laws requiring notice to users about our information collection, use and disclosure practices. We also notify users about our information collection, use and disclosure practices relating to data we receive through offline means such as paper health risk assessments. Moreover, we take steps to reasonably protect certain sensitive personal information we hold. We cannot assure you that the privacy policies and other statements we provide to users of our products and services, or our practices, will be found sufficient to protect us from liability or adverse publicity in this area. A determination by a state or federal agency or court, or European data protection authority or competent court, that any of our practices do not meet applicable standards, or the implementation of new standards or requirements, could adversely affect our business.

Failure to comply with laws relating to privacy and security of personal information, including personal health information, could result in liability to us and concerns about privacy-related issues could damage our reputation and our business

Privacy and security of personal information stored or transmitted electronically, including personal health information, is a major issue in the United States and abroad. While we strive to comply with all applicable privacy and security laws and regulations, as well as our own posted privacy policies, any failure or perceived failure to comply may result in proceedings or actions against us by government entities or others, or could cause us to lose users and customers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. There has been an increase in the number of private privacy-related lawsuits filed against companies in recent months. In addition, we are unable to predict what additional legislation or regulation in the area of privacy of personal information, including personal health information, could be enacted and what effect that could have on our operations and business. Concerns about our practices with regard to the collection, use, disclosure, or security of personal information or other privacy-related matters, even if unfounded and even if we are in compliance with applicable laws, could damage our reputation and harm our business.

 

46


Table of Contents

The Privacy Standards and Security Standards under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (or HIPAA) establish a set of national privacy and security standards for the protection of individually identifiable health information by health plans, healthcare clearinghouses and healthcare providers (referred to as covered entities) and their business associates. Previously, only covered entities were directly subject to potential civil and criminal liability under these Standards. However, the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, which was enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), amended the HIPAA Privacy Standards and Security Standards and made certain provisions applicable to those portions of our business, such as those managing employee or plan member health information for employers or health plans, that are business associates of covered entities. Currently, we are bound by certain contracts and agreements to use and disclose protected health information in a manner consistent with the Privacy Standards and Security Standards. Beginning on February 17, 2010, some provisions of the HIPAA Privacy Standards and Security Standards began to apply directly to us. For periods prior to that, depending on the facts and circumstances, we could potentially be subject to criminal liability for aiding and abetting or conspiring with a covered entity to violate the Privacy Standards or Security Standards. As of February 17, 2010, we became directly subject to HIPAA’s criminal and civil penalties. HITECH increased civil penalty amounts for violations of HIPAA and significantly strengthens enforcement by requiring HHS to conduct periodic audits to confirm compliance and authorizing state attorneys general to bring civil actions seeking either injunctions or damages in response to violations of HIPAA Privacy Standards and Security Standards that threaten the privacy of state residents. In January 2013, HHS issued a final HITECH omnibus rule implementing significant changes to the HIPAA Standards, including the obligations of business associates and their potential liability for violating the regulations. Compliance with most of the new requirements will be required by September 23, 2013. We cannot assure you that we will adequately address the risks created by these amended HIPAA Privacy Standards and Security Standards. In addition, we are unable to predict what changes to these Standards might be made in the future or how those changes, or other changes in applicable laws and regulations, could affect our business.

In Europe, the current national implementations of the existing general data protection Directive 95/46/EC and of the e-Privacy Directive 2002/58/EC provide for criminal and administrative sanctions in case of violations, even though criminal sanctions are very rarely imposed. For example, France and Germany provide for administrative fines of up to 300,000 Euros (approximately 360,000 USD) in case of illegal collection or processing of personal identifiable information. Under the new draft General Data Protection Regulation on data protection proposed by the European Commission in January 2012, fines of up to 1,000,000 Euros (approximately 1,200,000 USD) or up to 2% of the global turnover of the infringer could be imposed.

Failure to maintain CME accreditation could adversely affect Medscape, LLC’s ability to provide online CME offerings

Medscape, LLC’s continuing medical education (or CME) activities are planned and implemented in accordance with the current Essential Areas and Elements and the Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (or ACCME), which oversees providers of CME credit, and other applicable accreditation standards. ACCME’s standards for commercial support of CME are intended to assure, among other things, that CME activities of ACCME-accredited providers, such as Medscape, LLC, are independent of “commercial interests,” which are defined as entities that produce, market, re-sell or distribute healthcare goods and services, excluding certain organizations. “Commercial interests,” and entities owned or controlled by “commercial interests,” are ineligible for accreditation by the ACCME.

From time to time, the ACCME revises its standards for commercial support of CME. As a result of certain past ACCME revisions, we adjusted our corporate structure and made changes to our management and operations intended to allow Medscape, LLC to provide CME activities that are developed independently from programs developed by its sister companies, which may not be independent of “commercial interests.” We believe that these changes allow Medscape, LLC to satisfy the applicable standards.

 

47


Table of Contents

Medscape, LLC’s current ACCME accreditation expires in 2016. In order for Medscape, LLC to renew its accreditation, it will be required to demonstrate to the ACCME that it continues to meet ACCME requirements. If Medscape, LLC fails to maintain its status as an accredited ACCME provider (whether at the time of such renewal or at an earlier time as a result of a failure to comply with existing or additional ACCME standards), it will not be permitted to accredit CME activities for physicians and other healthcare professionals. Instead, Medscape, LLC would be required to use third parties to provide such CME-related services. That, in turn, could discourage potential supporters from engaging Medscape, LLC to develop CME or education-related activities, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

This will also apply in other countries. For example, under German law, every CME program must be approved by the State Medical Chamber. Additionally, German CME-related services must be free of commercial/business interests and the provider of CME services must be compliant with German laws and regulations. In France, a new regulatory framework which restricts the organization of CME activities is being completed. These or similar restrictions in other countries may restrict our ability to carry out activities related to CME programs and/or refer to drugs or medical devices in such CME programs. Moreover, if we are not able to demonstrate compliance with these regulations, applicable approvals may not be obtained from governmental authorities, which may impact our ability to provide CME-related services and which could have an adverse effect on our business.

Government regulation and industry initiatives could adversely affect the volume of sponsored online CME programs implemented through our Websites or require changes to how Medscape, LLC offers CME

CME activities may be subject to government oversight or regulation by Congress, the FDA, HHS, and state regulatory agencies. Medscape, LLC and/or the sponsors of the CME activities that Medscape, LLC accredits may be subject to enforcement actions if any of these CME activities are deemed improperly promotional, potentially leading to the termination of sponsorships. Medscape, LLC and/or the sponsors of the CME activities that Medscape, LLC accredits also could be affected by industry initiatives regarding funding for CME.

During the past several years, educational activities, including CME, directed at physicians have been subject to increased governmental scrutiny to ensure that sponsors do not influence or control the content of the activities. In response, pharmaceutical and medical device companies have developed and implemented internal controls and procedures that promote adherence to applicable regulations and requirements. In implementing these controls and procedures, supporters of CME may interpret the regulations and requirements differently and may implement varying procedures or requirements. These controls and procedures:

 

   

may discourage pharmaceutical companies from providing grants for independent educational activities;

 

   

may slow their internal approval for such grants;

 

   

may reduce the volume of sponsored educational programs that Medscape, LLC produces to levels that are lower than in the past, thereby reducing revenue; and

 

   

may require Medscape, LLC to make changes to how it offers or provides educational programs, including CME.

In June 2011, the American Medical Association’s House of Delegates approved a report entitled “Financial Relationships with Industry in Continuing Medical Education” that largely adopts the CME ethical principles already espoused by other industry and accreditation organizations, including ACCME, PhRMA, and AdvaMed. Although the report recognizes that industry support of CME may help make CME more accessible and affordable, the report proposes that CME should, when possible, be provided without commercial support and without the participation of individuals who have financial interest in the educational subject matter. It is possible that the recommendations contained in this report, or other voluntary industry guidelines, could negatively influence the availability of commercial support for Medscape CME programs and/or physician participation in Medscape CME programs funded by commercial support.

 

48


Table of Contents

Future changes to laws, regulations or accreditation standards, or to the internal compliance programs of supporters or potential supporters, may further discourage, significantly limit, or prohibit supporters or potential supporters from engaging in educational activities with Medscape, LLC, or may require Medscape, LLC to make further changes in the way it offers or provides educational activities.

Failure to comply with applicable anti-corruption laws could subject us to penalties and other adverse consequences

The United States and other countries have adopted anti-corruption laws that generally prohibit directly or indirectly giving, offering or promising inducements to public officials to elicit an improper commercial advantage. Under applicable U.S., German, and most European law, this prohibition has been interpreted to apply to doctors and other medical professionals who work in state-run hospitals and state-run healthcare systems outside the United States. Some of these laws also prohibit directly or indirectly giving, offering or promising (and, in some cases, accepting or soliciting) inducements to (or from) private parties to elicit (or grant) an improper commercial advantage. During 2012, the U.S. government brought enforcement actions that resulted in significant monetary penalties against several companies operating in the global healthcare industry for violations of anti-corruption laws resulting from illegal payments made to non-U.S. medical professionals.

As our business expands outside the United States, we (and others acting on our behalf) increasingly interact with non-U.S. doctors and other medical professionals, at least some of whom work in state-run hospitals or healthcare systems. Such interactions inherently increase the risk of violating applicable anti-corruption laws. While we believe that we have appropriate compliance policies and procedures in place to mitigate such risk, our personnel and others acting on our behalf might engage in conduct that violates such laws, for which we might be held responsible. Under such circumstances, we could be subject to civil and/or criminal penalties and other consequences that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our brand and reputation, our sales activities and the price of our Common Stock and other securities could be adversely affected if we were to become the target of any resulting negative publicity.

 

 

Other Risks Applicable to Our Company and to Ownership of Our Securities

Recent and pending management changes may disrupt our operations and our ability to recruit and retain other personnel

The Chief Executive Officer position at our company is currently held by an Interim Chief Executive Officer, while our Board conducts a search for a new Chief Executive Officer. Changes in senior management and uncertainty regarding pending changes may disrupt our operations and may impair our ability to recruit and retain other needed personnel. Any such disruption or impairment may have an adverse effect on our business.

Our Stockholder Rights Plan, provisions in our organizational documents and Delaware law may inhibit a takeover, which could adversely affect the value of our Common Stock

Our Board of Directors has adopted a Stockholder Rights Plan, which could prevent or delay a takeover of WebMD by causing substantial dilution to a potential acquirer that attempts to acquire beneficial ownership of more than 12% of the outstanding shares of WebMD Common Stock on terms not approved by our Board of Directors. In addition, our Restated Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws, as well as Delaware corporate law, contain provisions that could delay or prevent a change of control or changes in our management and board of directors that holders of our Common Stock might consider favorable and may prevent them from receiving a takeover premium for their shares. These provisions include, for example, our classified board structure and the authorization of our board of directors to issue up to 50 million shares of preferred stock without a stockholder vote. In addition, our Restated Certificate of Incorporation provides that stockholders may not act by written consent and may not call special meetings. These provisions apply even if an offer to purchase our company may be considered beneficial by some of our stockholders. If a change of control or change in management is delayed or prevented, the market price of our Common Stock could decline.

 

49


Table of Contents

If certain transactions occur with respect to our capital stock, limitations may be imposed on our ability to utilize net operating loss carryforwards and tax credits to reduce our income taxes

WebMD has substantial accumulated net operating loss (NOL) carryforwards and tax credits available to offset taxable income in future tax periods. If certain transactions occur with respect to WebMD’s capital stock (including issuances, redemptions, recapitalizations, exercises of options, conversions of convertible debt, purchases or sales by 5%-or-greater shareholders and similar transactions) that result in a cumulative change of more than 50% of the ownership of capital stock over a three-year period (as determined under rules prescribed by Section 382 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code and applicable Treasury regulations), an annual limitation would be imposed with respect to the ability to utilize WebMD’s NOL carryforwards and federal tax credits that existed at the time of the ownership change.

In November 2008, HLTH repurchased shares of its Common Stock in a tender offer. The tender offer resulted in a cumulative change of more than 50% of the ownership of HLTH’s capital, as determined under rules prescribed by Section 382 of the Code and applicable Treasury regulations. As a result of this ownership change, there is an annual limitation imposed on the amount of the NOL carryforwards and federal tax credits existing at the time of the ownership change that we may use to offset income in each tax year following the ownership change.

On April 3, 2012, WebMD completed a modified “Dutch Auction” tender offer through which we purchased $150 million of WebMD Common Stock at a price of $26.00 per share (the “Dutch Auction Tender Offer”). Completion of the Dutch Auction Tender Offer may increase the possibility of another ownership change and corresponding annual limitation, which could decrease the existing annual limitation and would apply to all NOL carryforwards and tax credits generated prior to this potential new ownership change.

We may not be successful in protecting our intellectual property and proprietary rights

Our intellectual property and proprietary rights are important to our businesses. The steps that we take to protect our intellectual property, proprietary information and trade secrets may prove to be inadequate and, whether or not adequate, may be expensive. We rely on a combination of trade secret, patent and other intellectual property laws and confidentiality procedures and non-disclosure contractual provisions to protect our intellectual property. We cannot assure you that we will be able to detect potential or actual misappropriation or infringement of our intellectual property, proprietary information or trade secrets. Even if we detect misappropriation or infringement by a third party, we cannot assure you that we will be able to enforce our rights at a reasonable cost, or at all. In addition, our rights to intellectual property, proprietary information and trade secrets may not prevent independent third-party development and commercialization of competing products or services.

Third parties may claim that we are infringing their intellectual property, and we could suffer significant litigation or licensing expenses or be prevented from providing certain services, which may harm our business

We have been, and may continue to be, subject to claims that we are misappropriating or infringing intellectual property or other proprietary rights of others. These claims, even if not meritorious, may be expensive to defend and divert management’s attention from our operations. If we become liable to third parties for infringing these rights, we could be required to pay a substantial damage award and to develop non-infringing technology, obtain a license or cease selling the products or services that use or contain the infringing intellectual property. We may be unable to develop non-infringing products or services or obtain a license on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. We may also be required to indemnify our customers if they become subject to third-party claims relating to intellectual property that we license or otherwise provide to them, which could be costly.

 

50


Table of Contents

Acquisitions, business combinations and other transactions may be difficult to complete and, if completed, may have negative consequences for our business and our security holders

WebMD has been built, in part, through acquisitions. We intend to continue to seek to acquire or to engage in business combinations with companies engaged in complementary businesses. In addition, we may enter into joint ventures, strategic alliances or similar arrangements with third parties. These transactions may result in changes in the nature and scope of our operations and changes in our financial condition. Our success in completing these types of transactions will depend on, among other things, our ability to locate suitable candidates and negotiate mutually acceptable terms with them, and to obtain adequate financing. Significant competition for these opportunities exists, which may increase the cost of and decrease the opportunities for these types of transactions. Financing for these transactions may come from several sources, including:

 

   

cash and cash equivalents on hand and marketable securities;

 

   

proceeds from the incurrence of indebtedness; and

 

   

proceeds from the issuance of common stock, preferred stock, convertible debt or of other securities.

The issuance of additional equity or debt securities could:

 

   

cause substantial dilution of the percentage ownership of our stockholders at the time of the issuance;

 

   

cause substantial dilution of our earnings per share;

 

   

subject us to the risks associated with increased leverage, including a reduction in our ability to obtain financing or an increase in the cost of any financing we obtain;

 

   

subject us to restrictive covenants that could limit our flexibility in conducting future business activities; and

 

   

adversely affect the prevailing market price for our outstanding securities.

We do not intend to seek security holder approval for any such acquisition or security issuance unless required by applicable law, regulation or the terms of then-existing securities.

Our business will suffer if we fail to successfully integrate acquired businesses and technologies or to assess the risks in particular transactions

We have in the past acquired, and may in the future acquire, businesses, technologies, services, product lines and other assets. The successful integration of the acquired businesses and assets into our operations, on a cost-effective basis, can be critical to our future performance. The amount and timing of the expected benefits of any acquisition, including potential synergies between our company and the acquired business, are subject to significant risks and uncertainties. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those relating to:

 

   

our ability to maintain relationships with the customers of the acquired business;

 

   

our ability to retain or replace key personnel of the acquired business;

 

   

potential conflicts in sponsor or advertising relationships or in relationships with strategic partners;

 

   

our ability to coordinate organizations that are geographically diverse and may have different business cultures; and

 

   

compliance with regulatory requirements.

We cannot guarantee that any acquired businesses will be successfully integrated with our operations in a timely or cost-effective manner, or at all. Failure to successfully integrate acquired businesses or to achieve anticipated operating synergies, revenue enhancements or cost savings could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

51


Table of Contents

Although our management attempts to evaluate the risks inherent in each transaction and to value acquisition candidates appropriately, we cannot assure you that we will properly ascertain all such risks or that acquired businesses and assets will perform as we expect or enhance the value of our company as a whole. In addition, acquired companies or businesses may have larger than expected liabilities that are not covered by the indemnification, if any, that we are able to obtain from the sellers.

We may not be able to raise additional funds when needed for our business or to exploit opportunities

Our future liquidity and capital requirements will depend upon numerous factors, including the success of our service offerings, market developments, and repurchases of our Common Stock. We may need to raise additional funds to support expansion, develop new or enhanced applications and services, respond to competitive pressures, acquire complementary businesses or technologies or take advantage of unanticipated opportunities. If required, we may raise such additional funds through public or private debt or equity financing, strategic relationships or other arrangements. There can be no assurance that such financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at all, or that such financing will not be dilutive to our stockholders.

ITEM 2.    Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

(c) The following table provides information about purchases by WebMD during the three months ended March 31, 2013 of equity securities that are registered by us pursuant to Section 12 of the Exchange Act:

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

Period

   Total Number
of Shares
Purchased(1)
     Average
Price Paid
per Share
     Total Number of Shares
Purchased as Part of
Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs(2)
     Approximate Dollar Value of
Shares that May Yet Be
Purchased Under the Plans
or Programs(2)
 

1/1/13 - 1/31/13

     51,138       $ 15.86         45,166       $ 61,460,556   

2/1/13 - 2/28/13

     1,815       $ 17.22               $ 61,460,556   

3/1/13 - 3/31/13

     29,417       $ 24.30               $ 61,460,556   
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

     82,370       $ 18.90         45,166      
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

(1) Includes the following number of shares withheld from WebMD Restricted Common Stock that vested during the respective periods in order to satisfy withholding tax requirements related to the vesting of the awards: 5,972 in January, 1,815 in February and 29,417 in March. The value of these shares was determined based on the closing price of WebMD Common Stock on the date of vesting.

 

(2) In August 2011, a stock repurchase program (the “Program”) was established through which WebMD was authorized to use up to $75,000,000 to purchase shares of its Common Stock. During October 2011, WebMD’s Board of Directors authorized a $75,000,000 increase to the Program. For additional information see Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Quarterly Report.

ITEM 6.    Exhibits

The exhibits listed in the accompanying Exhibit Index on page E-1 are filed or furnished as part of this Quarterly Report.

 

52


Table of Contents

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

WEBMD HEALTH CORP.

By:

 

/s/    PETER ANEVSKI

 

Peter Anevski

  Executive Vice President and
  Chief Financial Officer

Date: May 10, 2013

 

53


Table of Contents

EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit No.

  

Description

    3.1    Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed on October 23, 2009 (Reg. No. 333-162651))
    3.2    Amended and Restated By-laws of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed on October 23, 2009 (Reg. No. 333-162651))
    3.3    Certificate of Designations for Series A Junior Preferred Stock (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on November 3, 2011, as amended on November 7, 2011)
  10.1    Letter Amendment, dated as of March 5, 2013, between the Registrant and William Pence (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.73 to Amendment No. 1, filed April 30, 2013, to the Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2012)*
  10.2    Letter Amendment, dated as of March 5, 2013, between the Registrant and Steven Zatz, M.D. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.74 to Amendment No. 1, filed April 30, 2013, to the Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2012)*
  31.1    Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Executive Officer of Registrant
  31.2    Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Registrant
  32.1    Section 1350 Certification of Chief Executive Officer of Registrant
  32.2    Section 1350 Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Registrant
  99.1    Explanation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures
100.INS    XBRL Instance Document
100.SCH    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
100.CAL    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
100.LAB    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
100.PRE    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
100.DEF    XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

 

* Agreement relates to executive compensation.

 

E-1