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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - CORECOMM SOLUTIONS INC.Financial_Report.xls
10-K - FORM 10-K - CORECOMM SOLUTIONS INC.venzagold_10k-103112.htm
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EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32 - CORECOMM SOLUTIONS INC.ex32.htm
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EX-99.1 - EXHIBIT 99.1 - CORECOMM SOLUTIONS INC.ex99-1.htm
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Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Oct. 31, 2012
Significant Accounting Policies [Text Block]
NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Presentation

These financial statements and related notes are presented in accordance with US GAAP, and are presented in United States dollars. The Company has not produced revenues from its principal business and is an exploration stage company as defined by “Accounting and Reporting by Development Stage Enterprises.”

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain of the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the year. The Company regularly evaluates estimates and assumptions. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. Significant areas of estimate include the carrying value of the mineral property and deferred income tax obligations. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from the Company’s estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

Asset Retirement Obligations

The Company records the fair value of an asset retirement obligation as a liability in the period in which it incurs an obligation associated with the retirement of tangible long-lived assets that result from the acquisition, construction, development and/or normal use of the assets. The estimated fair value of the asset retirement obligation is based on the current cost escalated at an inflation rate and discounted at a credit adjusted risk-free rate. This liability is capitalized as part of the cost of the related asset and amortized over its useful life.  The liability accretes until the Company settles the obligation.  To date the Company has not incurred any measurable asset retirement obligations.

Impairment or Disposal of Long Lived Assets

The carrying value of intangible assets and other long-lived assets is reviewed on a regular basis for the existence of facts or circumstances that may suggest impairment. The Company recognizes impairment when the sum of the expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. Impairment losses, if any, are measured as the excess of the carrying amount of the asset over its estimated fair value.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received upon sale of an asset or paid upon transfer of a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date and in the principal or most advantageous market for that asset or liability. The fair value should be calculated based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, not on assumptions specific to the entity. In addition, the fair value of liabilities should include consideration of non-performance risk including the entity’s own credit risk.

A fair value hierarchy for valuation inputs is established. The hierarchy prioritizes the inputs into three levels based on the extent to which inputs used in measuring fair value are observable in the market. Each fair value measurement is reported in one of the three levels and which is determined by the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement in its entirety.

These levels are:

Level 1 – inputs are based upon unadjusted quoted prices for identical instruments traded in active markets.

Level 2 – inputs are based upon quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-based valuation techniques for which all significant assumptions are observable in the market or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

Level 3 – inputs are generally unobservable and typically reflect management’s estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. The fair values are therefore determined using model-based techniques that include option pricing models, discounted cash flow models, and similar techniques.

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash, notes receivable, accounts payable and amounts due from related parties. The carrying value of these financial instruments approximates their fair value based on their liquidity, their short-term nature or application of appropriate risk based discount rates to determine fair value. These financial assets and liabilities are valued using Level 3 inputs, except for cash which is at Level 1. The Company is not exposed to significant interest, exchange or credit risk arising from these financial instruments.

Foreign Currency Translation and Transaction

The Company’s functional currency is the Canadian dollar and reporting currency is the United States dollar. The Company translates assets and liabilities to US dollars using year-end exchange rates, translates unproved mineral properties using historical exchange rates, and translates revenues and expenses using average exchange rates during the period. Gains and losses arising on settlement of foreign currency denominated transactions or balances are included in the other comprehensive income. The Company has not to the date of these financial statements, entered into derivative instruments to offset the impact of foreign currency fluctuations.

Income Taxes

Income taxes are determined using the liability method.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled.  The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes that date of enactment.  In addition, a valuation allowance is established to reduce any deferred tax asset for which it is determined that it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

The Company accounts for uncertainty in income taxes by applying a two-step method. First, it evaluates whether a tax position has met a more likely than not recognition threshold, and second, it measures that tax position to determine the amount of benefit, if any, to be recognized in the financial statements. The application of this method did not have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

Loss per Share

The Company presents both basic and diluted loss per share (“LPS”) on the face of the statements of operations. Basic LPS is computed by dividing net loss available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the year. Diluted LPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period including convertible debt, stock options, and warrants, using the treasury stock method. Diluted LPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive.

Mineral Properties

The Company classifies its mineral rights as tangible assets and accordingly acquisition costs are capitalized as mineral property costs. Mineral exploration costs are expensed as incurred until commercially mineable deposits are determined to exist within a particular property.

When it has been determined that a mineral property can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and probable reserves, the costs then incurred to develop such property, are capitalized. Such costs will be amortized using the units-of-production method over the estimated life of the probable reserves. If mineral properties are subsequently abandoned or impaired, any capitalized costs will be charged to operations.

Recently Adopted Accounting Guidance

The Company has reviewed recently issued accounting pronouncements and plans to adopt those that are applicable to it. It does not expect the adoption of these pronouncements to have a material impact on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows.