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Nature of Operations, Accounting Policies of Consolidated Financial Statements
6 Months Ended
Nov. 30, 2012
Nature of Operations, Accounting Policies of Consolidated Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Nature of Operations, Accounting Policies of Consolidated Financial Statements

NOTE 1 Nature of Operations, Accounting Policies of Consolidated Financial Statements

The accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments (consisting of only normal recurring adjustments) necessary to present fairly the consolidated financial position as of November 30, 2012, in addition to the consolidated results of operations and consolidated cash flows for the three-month and six-month periods ended November 30, 2012 and 2011. Due to the seasonal nature of the Corporation’s business, interim results are not necessarily indicative of results for the entire year.

The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements included herein have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations for reporting on Form 10-Q. Accordingly, certain information and footnote disclosures normally accompanying the annual consolidated financial statements have been omitted. The audited consolidated balance sheet as of May 31, 2012 and the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Corporation’s latest annual report on Form 10-K.

The following is a summary of the accounting policies that have a significant effect on the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Investments — The Corporation invests in United States Government securities, which are typically held until maturity and are therefore classified as held-to-maturity and carried at amortized cost.

Accounts Receivable — Trade receivables are based on the amounts billed to dealers and communities. The Corporation does not accrue interest on any of its trade receivables, nor does it have an allowance for credit losses due to favorable collections experience. If a loss occurs, the Corporation’s policy is to recognize it in the period when collectability cannot be reasonably assured.

Inventories — Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined under the first-in, first-out method. Physical inventory counts are taken at the end of each reporting quarter.

Note Receivable — The Corporation’s note receivable represents the amount owed for the sale of two idle recreational vehicle facilities in Hemet, California; less cash received on the date of closing. Interest is accrued on a monthly basis. In addition, no allowance for credit losses exist due to the recent recording of the receivable, and there being no expected loss at this time. The Corporation’s management evaluates the credit quality of the note on a monthly basis. The Corporation’s policy is to recognize a loss in the period when collectability cannot be reasonably assured.

Property, Plant and Equipment — Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is computed over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the straight-line method for financial statement reporting and accelerated methods for income tax reporting purposes. Estimated useful lives for significant classes of property, plant and equipment, including idle property, are as follows: Building and improvements 10 to 30 years; machinery and equipment 5 to 8 years.

At November 30, 2012, Idle property, net of accumulated depreciation consisted of manufacturing facilities in the following locations: Ocala, Florida; Elkhart, Indiana; Halstead, Kansas; Mocksville, North Carolina and Fair Haven, Vermont. At May, 31, 2012, Idle property, net of accumulated depreciation consisted of manufacturing facilities in the following locations: Hemet, California; Ocala, Florida; Elkhart, Indiana; Halstead, Kansas; Mocksville, North Carolina and Fair Haven, Vermont.

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable from projected future cash flows. If the carrying value of a long-lived asset is impaired, an impairment charge is recorded for the amount by which the carrying value of the long-lived asset exceeds its fair value. The Company believes no impairment of long-lived assets exists at November 30, 2012.

Warranty — The Corporation provides the retail purchaser of its homes with a full fifteen-month warranty against defects in design, materials and workmanship. Recreational vehicles are covered by a one-year warranty. The warranties are backed by service departments located at the Corporation’s manufacturing facilities and an extensive field service system. Estimated warranty costs are accrued at the time of sale based upon current sales, historical experience and management’s judgment regarding anticipated rates of warranty claims. The adequacy of the recorded warranty liability is periodically assessed and the amount is adjusted as necessary.

Income Taxes — The Corporation recognizes deferred tax assets based on differences between the carrying values of assets for financial and tax reporting purposes. The realization of the deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of sufficient future taxable income. Generally accepted accounting principles require that an entity consider both negative and positive evidence in determining whether a valuation allowance is warranted. In comparing negative and positive evidence, continual losses in recent years is considered significant, negative, objective evidence that deferred tax assets may not be realized in the future, and generally is assigned more weight than subjective positive evidence of the realizability of deferred tax assets.

As a result of its extensive evaluation of both positive and negative evidence, management maintains a full valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets. The Corporation reports a liability, if any, for unrecognized tax benefits resulting from uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The Corporation recognizes interest and penalties, if any, related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense.

Management’s Plan The Corporation’s management is actively pursuing strategies to increase sales and decrease costs. These strategies include but are not limited to:

 

   

Increasing efforts to increase sales of modular homes and park models in both the United States and Canada

 

   

Improving the process of developing homes and recreational vehicles to better meet ever changing preferences of consumers

 

   

Increasing the number of display models at housing facilities in order to provide dealers, communities and consumers with examples of newly designed product

 

   

Redesigning the Corporation’s website and utilizing social media to improve product exposure to customers and to better connect dealers to potential customers

 

   

Selling non-strategic assets

 

   

Working with current and potential vendors to decrease costs

 

   

Analyzing staffing needs and making reductions when appropriate.

By implementing these strategies, and having a significant position of its working capital in cash and U.S. Treasury Bills, the Corporation continues to remain diligent for any challenges that may occur.