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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.Financial_Report.xls
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EX-21.1 - SUBSIDIARIES OF THE REGISTRANT - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.ex21-1.htm
EX-31.2 - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.ex31-2.htm
EX-10.5 - STOCK PURCHASE AGREEMENT (SEPTEMBER 20, 2012) WITH FIRST POWER & LIGHT LLC - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.ex10-5.htm
10-K - MAINSTREAM ENTERTAINMENT, INC. FORM 10-K FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2012 - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.mainstream10k093012.htm
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EX-10.6 - FIRST ADDENDUM TO STOCK PURCHASE AGREEMENT (JANUARY 4, 2013) WITH FIRST POWER & LIGHT, LLC - Volt Solar Systems, Inc.ex10-6.htm
v2.4.0.6
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)  
Basis of Presentation

Basis of Presentation

The financial statements of the Company have been prepared utilizing the accrual basis of accounting in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Under this method, revenues are recognized when earned and expenses are recorded when liabilities are incurred.

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenue Recognition

Revenue is recognized when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, services have been provided, the price is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured. Revenue that is billed in advance such as recurring weekly or monthly services are initially deferred and recognized as revenue over the period the services are provided. As of September 30, 2012, $36,000 of revenue has been recorded.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain reported amounts and disclosures.  Accordingly, actual results could differ from those estimates.

Concentrations of Risk

Concentrations of Risk

The rental of professional recording studios and provision of related services is highly competitive, with over a dozen studios operating in the metropolitan Orlando area.  Major factors that contribute to success are quality, convenience, service and price.  The cost of providing high quality service includes the acquisition of technologically current equipment in an environment that is built to provide good acoustics, which makes it difficult to compete with price.  There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to compete against the established studios, particularly in the current economic environment in which there is downward price pressure.  This competition may adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

The Company’s performance will be substantially dependent on the performance of its executive officer and engineer, Justin Martin and Charles Camorata.  The loss of the services of its executive officer or key employee, particularly in the early stages of operation and development, could have a material effect on its business, results of operations or financial condition.  The Company does not maintain key man life insurance covering either of them.

 

The Company’s financing of cash flows is dependent on loans from its principal shareholder.  The loss of this funding could have a material effect on its business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

The Company’s executive officers and key shareholders control approximately 94% of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock.  Accordingly, the Company’s executive officers and several key shareholders hold significant influence over the Company on matters submitted to the stockholders for approval, including the election of directors, mergers, consolidations, the sale of all or substantially all of its assets, and also the power to prevent or cause a change in control.

    

The Company’s growth and continued operations could be impaired by limitations on access to capital markets.  If the market for securities were to weaken for an extended period of time, the Company’s ability to raise capital will be substantially reduced.  Even if the market for securities were not to weaken, there is no assurance that a market for the Company’s stock will exist in the future.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and Cash Equivalents

For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, the Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. As of September 30, 2012 and September 30, 2011, there were no cash equivalents.

Capitalized Production Costs

Capitalized Production Costs

Capitalized production costs include capitalizable direct costs such as materials and labor as well as direct overhead expense necessary to produce a finished product. Capitalized production costs are expensed based on the ratio of the current period’s gross revenues to the remaining total gross revenue expected from the sale of a specific product.

Prepaid Expenses

Prepaid Expenses

Prepaid expenses are advance payments for products or services that will be used in operations during the next twelve months.

Subscription Payable

Subscription Payable

During the year, the Company entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement to acquire $50,000 of capital. As of September 30, 2012, the Company had received $37,522, and the remaining balance of $12,478 is expected to be collected in the next fiscal year. This balance was recorded as a subscription payable at September 30, 2012.

Development Stage Company

Development Stage Company

The Company complies with FASB Pronouncements for its characterization of the Company as development stage.

Property, Equipment, and Improvements

Property, Equipment, and Improvements

Property and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and valuation adjustments. Major additions and improvements are capitalized, and routine expenditures for repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred. Fully depreciated assets are carried on the books until the date of disposal. Property sold or retired, and the related gain or loss, if any, is taken into income currently. Property that costs less than $500 is expensed as incurred.

Depreciations and Amortizations

Depreciation and Amortization

Impairment of Long Lived Assets

Impairment of Long Lived Assets

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment in accordance with the applicable FASB standard, "Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long- lived Assets". Under the standard, long-lived assets are tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. An impairment charge is recognized for the amount, if any, which the carrying value of the asset exceeds the fair value.

Fair Value Measurements

Fair Value Measurements

On January 1, 2008, the Company adopted ASC No. 820-10 (ASC 820-10), Fair Value Measurements.  ASC 820-10 relates to financial assets and financial liabilities.

 

ASC 820-10 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. The provisions of this standard apply to other accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements and are to be applied prospectively with limited exceptions.

    

ASC 820-10 defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. This standard is now the single source in GAAP for the definition of fair value, except for the fair value of leased property. ASC 820-10 establishes a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between (1) market participant assumptions developed based on market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs) and (2) an entity’s own assumptions, about market participant assumptions, that are developed based on the best information available in the circumstances (unobservable inputs). The fair value hierarchy consists of three broad levels, which gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under ASC 820-10 are described below:

 

• Level 1. Observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets;

 

• Level 2. Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly; and

 

• Level 3. Unobservable inputs in which there is little or no market data, which require the reporting entity to develop its own assumptions.

 

The Company values its fixed assets at their fair value if impairment is identified in accordance with the applicable FASB standard. The inputs that are used in determining the fair value of these assets are Level 3 inputs. These inputs consist of but are not limited to the following: estimates of prices for similar assets according to web markets such as ebay, estimates of the condition of the property, estimates of the costs to get the assets ready for sale. At September 30 2009, the Company recognized impairment on its Studio Equipment to adjust the carrying value down to the fair value of $21,550. There were no impairment indicators as of September 30, 2012.  No assets were re-valued at fair value on a recurring or non-recurring basis as of September 30, 2012.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes

The Company accounts for income taxes under the applicable Financial Accounting Standards Board of Financial Accounting Standard, "Accounting for Income Taxes". Under the standard, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax base. Current income tax provisions are made based on taxable income reported to federal and state taxing authorities. Deferred tax assets, including tax loss and credit carryforwards, and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. As of September 30, 2012 and September 30, 2011, there were no current or deferred income tax expense or benefits.

 

For income tax reporting purposes, the Company uses accounting methods that recognize depreciation sooner than for financial statement reporting. As a result, the basis of property and equipment for financial reporting exceeds its tax basis by the cumulative amount that accelerated depreciation exceeds straight-line depreciation. Deferred income taxes have been recorded for the excess, which will be taxable in future periods through reduced depreciation deductions for tax purposes.  A full valuation allowance has been taken on the deferred tax assets based on the Company’s determination that they are unlikely to pay income taxes in the future.

 

Cash paid for income taxes for the twelve month periods ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively and from inception was $0.

Basic and Diluted Net Income Per Common Share

Basic and Diluted Net Income Per Common Share

Basic and diluted net loss per share calculations are calculated on the basis of the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the year. The per share amounts include the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents in years with net income. Basic and diluted loss per share is the same due to the anti-dilutive nature of potential common stock equivalents.  The Company had no common stock equivalents from inception through September 30, 2012.

 

On July 4, 2012 the Company executed a letter of intent and on September 20, 2012 the Company entered into a common stock Stock Purchase Agreement, which was subsequently modified and clarified by a First Addendum to Stock Purchase Agreement entered into on January 4, 2013, whereby it agreed to issue 50,000,000 shares at $0.01 per share, or $50,000.  These shares were not issued until October 26, 2012.  First Power and the Company have not formally closed the transactions contemplated by the letter of intent and Stock Purchase Agreement, as not all of the closing conditions required to occur prior to such closing have occurred to date.  As such, the shares are currently being held in escrow by the Company pending the closing of the transaction and such shares have not been included in the number of issued and outstanding shares disclosed throughout this report.  In the event the closing of the transaction does not occur, the Company plans to cancel the 50,000,000 shares and refund the $50,000 paid pursuant to the Stock Purchase Agreement.

    

As of September 30, 2012, there were no other potentially dilutive securities outstanding.

Stock Based Compensation

Stock Based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based employee compensation arrangements and for stock options issued to non-employees using the fair value method in accordance with the provisions of the applicable FASB standards.

 

The Company did not grant any stock options from inception through September 30, 2012.

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising costs are generally expensed as incurred. Total advertising cost for the twelve month periods ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, and from inception was $0, $0, and $4,440, respectively.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-11, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities,” which introduces new disclosure requirements for companies in order to provide information to help reconcile differences in the offsetting requirements. The new disclosure requirements mandate that entities disclose both gross and net information about instruments and transactions eligible for offset in the statement of financial position as well as instruments and transactions subject to an agreement similar to a master netting arrangement. In addition, the standard requires disclosure of collateral received and posted in connection with master netting agreements or similar arrangements. The ASU will be effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013, and interim periods within those annual periods, and must be shown for all periods presented on the balance sheet (i.e., applied retrospectively).  This ASU is not expected to have any material impact to our financial statements.

 

In May 2011, the FASB ASU No. 2011-04, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs”.  The new standards retain the traditional fair value hierarchy already laid out in Topic 820 of FASB’s Accounting Standards Codification. The hierarchy identifies three levels of assets and liabilities, with the level of required disclosures essentially increasing as the associated valuations become less reliable: Level 1 assets and liabilities are valued according to a quoted price in an active market, generally without any adjustments; Level 2 assets and liabilities are valued based on “observable inputs” other than quoted active market prices, including quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in inactive markets, and interest rates and yield curves; Level 3 assets and liabilities are valued based on “unobservable inputs,” such as a company’s own estimates and pricing models. These risky and illiquid assets and liabilities are subject to the most expansive disclosure requirements.  The new standards provide three critical clarifications of how to apply the existing FV measurement and disclosure requirements: 1. Highest and best use. FV assumes that an asset is put to its “highest and best use.” 2. Instruments classified in shareholders’ equity. A company might classify certain instruments — such as equity instruments issued as part of a merger or acquisition — in its shareholders’ equity. 3. Disclosures about FV measurements. The new standards make clear that a company must disclose quantitative information about the unobservable inputs used in FV measurements of Level 3 items. Companies will be required to disclose how they measure the value of assets that are difficult to value because they can’t easily be sold in active markets. This could require the disclosure of information like the average weighted cost of capital, as well as a description of how the value could change if an unobservable input changes.  Companies must prospectively apply the standards set forth in ASU 2011-04. The standards take effect for public companies during the interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011.  This ASU did not have any material impact on our financial statements.