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v2.4.0.6
Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
Nature of Operations and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Gencor Industries, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company”) is a diversified, heavy machinery manufacturer for the production of highway construction materials, synthetic fuels and environmental control machinery and equipment.

These consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Gencor Industries, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

New Accounting Pronouncements and Policies

No new accounting pronouncements issued or effective during the fiscal year have had or are expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Earnings per Share (“EPS”)

The consolidated financial statements include basic and diluted earnings per share information. Basic earnings per share are based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding. Diluted earnings per share are based on the sum of the weighted average number of shares outstanding plus common stock equivalents. As of September 30, 2012 and 2011, there were no common stock equivalents included in the diluted earnings per share calculations, as to do so would have been anti-dilutive.

The following presents the calculation of the basic and diluted income per share for the years ended September 30, 2012 and 2011 (in thousands, except per share data):

 

                                                 
    2012     2011  
    Net
Income
    Shares     EPS     Net
Income
    Shares     EPS  

Basic EPS

  $ 4,472       9,518     $ 0.47     $ 224       9,518     $ 0.02  

Diluted EPS

  $ 4,472       9,518     $ 0.47     $ 224       9,518     $ 0.02  

Cash Equivalents

Cash equivalents consist of short-term certificates of deposit and deposits in money market accounts with original maturities of three months or less.

 

Marketable Securities

Marketable debt and equity securities are categorized as trading securities and are thus marked to market and stated at fair value. Fair value is determined using the quoted closing or latest bid prices for Level 1 investments and market standard valuation methodologies for Level 2 investments. Realized gains and losses on investment transactions are determined by specific identification and are recognized as incurred in the consolidated statements of operations. Net unrealized gains and losses are reported in the consolidated statements of operations in the current period and represent the change in the fair value of investment holdings during the period.

Fair Value Measurements

The fair value of financial instruments is presented based upon a hierarchy of levels that prioritizes the inputs of valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The fair value of marketable equity securities and mutual funds are substantially based on quoted market prices (Level 1). Corporate and municipal bonds are valued using market standard valuation methodologies, including: discounted cash flow methodologies, and matrix pricing or other similar techniques. The inputs to these market standard valuation methodologies include, but are not limited to: interest rates, credit standing of the issuer or counterparty, industry sector of the issuer, coupon rate, call provisions, maturity, estimated duration and assumptions regarding liquidity and estimated future cash flows. In addition to bond characteristics, the valuation methodologies incorporate market data, such as actual trades completed, bids and actual dealer quotes, where such information is available. Accordingly, the estimated fair values are based on available market information and judgments about financial instruments (Level 2). Fair values of the Level 2 investments are provided by the Company’s professional investment management firm.

The following tables set forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Company’s assets measured at fair value as of September 30, 2012:

 

                                 
    Fair Value Measurements  
    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Total  

Equities

  $ 13,912,000     $ —       $ —       $ 13,912,000  

Mutual Funds

    18,588,000       —         —         18,588,000  

Corporate Bonds

    —         14,178,000       —         14,178,000  

Municipal Bonds

    —         28,513,000       —         28,513,000  

Government Securities

    6,000,000       —         —         6,000,000  

Cash and Money Funds

    184,000       —         —         184,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 38,684,000     $ 42,691,000     $ —       $ 81,375,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net unrealized gains as of September 30, 2012, were $807,000. Estimated interest accrued on the corporate and municipal bond portfolio was $545,000 at September 30, 2012. There were no transfers of investments between Level 1 and Level 2 during the year ended September 30, 2012.

The following tables set forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, the Company’s assets measured at fair value as of September 30, 2011:

 

                                 
    Fair Value Measurements  
    Level 1     Level 2     Level 3     Total  

Equities

  $ 24,213,000     $ —       $ —       $ 24,213,000  

Mutual Funds

    2,566,000       —         —         2,566,000  

Corporate Bonds

    —         7,845,000       —         7,845,000  

Municipal Bonds

    —         35,844,000       —         35,844,000  

Cash and Money Funds

    2,018,000       —         —         2,018,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 28,797,000     $ 43,689,000     $ —       $ 72,486,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized losses as of September 30, 2011, were $3,789,000. Estimated interest accrued on the corporate and municipal bond portfolio was $568,000 at September 30, 2011.

The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and accounts payable approximate fair value because of the short-term nature of these items.

Foreign Currency Transactions

Gains and losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in income.

Risk Management

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, and accounts receivable. The Company maintains its cash accounts in various domestic financial institutions. Operating cash is retained overnight in non-interest bearing accounts which allow for offsets to treasury service charges. The marketable securities are invested in money funds, stocks and corporate and municipal bonds through a professional investment advisor. Investment securities are exposed to various risks, such as interest rate, market and credit risks. The Company’s customers are not concentrated in any specific geographic region, but are concentrated in the road and highway construction industry. The Company extends limited credit to its customers based upon their creditworthiness and generally requires a significant up-front deposit before beginning construction and full payment subject to hold-back provisions prior to shipment on complete asphalt plant and component orders. The Company establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts based upon the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends and other pertinent information.

Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market, with cost being determined principally by using the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) method and market defined as replacement cost for raw materials and net realizable value for work in process and finished goods (see Note 2). Appropriate consideration is given to obsolescence, excessive levels, deterioration, possible alternative uses and other factors in determining net realizable value. The cost of work in process and finished goods includes materials, direct labor, variable costs and overhead. The Company evaluates the need to record inventory adjustments on all inventories, including raw material, work in process, finished goods, spare parts and used equipment. Used equipment acquired by the Company on trade-in from customers is carried at estimated net realizable value. Unless specific circumstances warrant different treatment regarding inventory obsolescence, the cost basis of inventories three to four years old are reduced by 50%, while the cost basis of inventories four to five years old are reduced by 75%, and the cost basis of inventories greater than five years old are reduced to zero. Inventory is typically reviewed for obsolescence on an annual basis computed as of September 30th , the Company’s fiscal year end. If significant known changes in trends, technology or other specific circumstances that warrant consideration occur during the year, then the impact on obsolescence is considered at that time.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are stated at cost (see Note 4). Depreciation of property and equipment is computed using straight-line and accelerated methods over the estimated useful lives of the related assets, as follows:

 

     
    Years

Land improvements

  5

Buildings and improvements

  6-40

Equipment

  2-10

 

Impairments

Property and equipment and intangible assets subject to amortization are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset (or asset group) may not be recoverable. An impairment loss would be recognized when the carrying amount of an asset exceeds the estimated undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. The amount of the impairment loss to be recorded is calculated by the excess over its fair value of the asset’s carrying value. Fair value is generally determined using a discounted cash flow analysis.

Revenues and Expenses

Revenues from contracts for the design, manufacture and sale of asphalt plants are recognized under the percentage-of-completion method. The percentage-of-completion method of accounting for these contracts recognizes revenue, net of any promotional discounts, and costs in proportion to actual labor costs incurred, as compared with total estimated labor costs expected to be incurred during the entire contract. Pre-contract costs are expensed as incurred. Changes to total estimated contract costs or losses, if any, are recognized in the period in which they are determined. Revenue recognized in excess of amounts billed is classified as current assets under “costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings.” The Company anticipates that all incurred costs associated with these contracts at September 30, 2011, will be billed and collected within one year.

Revenues from all other contracts for the design and manufacture of custom equipment, for service and for parts sales, net of any discounts and return allowances, are recorded when the following four revenue recognition criteria are met: product is delivered or service is performed, persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the selling price is fixed or determinable, and collectability is reasonably assured.

The Company’s customers may qualify for certain cash rebates generally based on the level of sales attained during a twelve-month period. Provisions for these rebates, as well as estimated returns and allowances and other adjustments are provided for in the same period the related sales are recorded. Return allowances, which reduce product revenue, are estimated using historical experience.

Product warranty costs are estimated using historical experience and known issues and are charged to production costs as revenue is recognized.

All product engineering and development costs, and selling, general and administrative expenses are charged to operations as incurred. Provision is made for any anticipated contract losses in the period that the loss becomes evident.

The allowance for doubtful accounts is determined by performing a specific review of all account balances greater than 90 days past due and other higher risk amounts to determine collectability and also adjusting for any known customer payment issues with account balances in the less-than-90-day past due aging category. Account balances are charged off against the allowance for doubtful accounts when they are determined to be uncollectable. Any recoveries of account balances previously considered in the allowance for doubtful accounts reduce future additions to the allowance for doubtful accounts.

Shipping and Handling Costs

Shipping and handling costs are included in production costs in the consolidated statements of operations.

Income Taxes

Income taxes are provided for the tax effects of transactions reported in the consolidated financial statements and consist primarily of taxes currently due, plus deferred taxes (see Note 6).

The Company recognizes deferred tax liabilities and assets for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the consolidated financial statements or tax returns using current tax rates. The Company and its domestic subsidiaries file a consolidated federal income tax return. Undistributed earnings of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries were intended to be indefinitely reinvested. No deferred taxes were provided on these earnings.

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse and the credits are expected to be used. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of the change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. All available evidence, both positive and negative, is considered to determine whether, based on the weight of that evidence, a valuation allowance is needed for some portion or all of a deferred tax asset. No such valuation allowances were recorded as of September 30, 2012 and 2011.

Comprehensive Income

For the years ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, other comprehensive income is equal to net income.

Reporting Segments

Information concerning principal geographic areas is as follows:

 

                                 
    2012     2011  
    Revenues     Long-Term
Assets
    Revenues     Long-Term
Assets
 

United States

  $ 63,182,000     $ 7,978,000     $ 59,692,000     $ 8,703,000  

United Kingdom

    —         244,000       —         248,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $ 63,182,000     $ 8,222,000     $ 59,692,000     $ 8,951,000  
   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Revenues are attributed to geographic areas based on the location of the assets producing the revenues.

Customers with 10% (or greater) of Net Revenues

As a result of timing and production schedules of a very large contract and resultant revenue recognition, approximately 21% of total net revenue in the quarter ended September 30, 2012 and 7% of total net revenue for the quarter ended September 30, 2011 was from one or more separate U.S. corporate entities ultimately affiliated with a foreign-based global company. For the years ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, this company represented 26% and 7% of total net revenue, respectively.