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EX-4.1 - PROMISSORY NOTE - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex401.htm
EX-3.4 - AMENDED AND RESTATED CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex304.htm
EX-10.17 - STOCK PURCHASE AGREEMENT WITH DISTRESSED ASSET ACQUISITIONS, INC. - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex1017.htm
EX-21.1 - LIST OF SUBSIDIARIES - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex2101.htm
EX-10.13 - STOCK PURCHASE AGREEMENT - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex1013.htm
EX-10.18 - EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex1018.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex3201.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex3101.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex3102.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex2301.htm
EX-10.16 - FACTORING AND SECURITY AGREEMENT WITH MIDLAND AMERICAN CAPITAL - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex1016.htm
EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - URBAN AG. CORPFinancial_Report.xls
10-K - ANNUAL REPORT - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-123111.htm
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EX-10.15 - LOAN PURCHASE AND SALE AGREEMENT WITH SUMMITBRIDGE CREDIT INVESTMENTS LLC - URBAN AG. CORPurban_10k-ex1015.htm
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3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2011
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
3. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

In July 2009, the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (the "Codification") officially became the single source of authoritative nongovernmental U.S. GAAP, superseding existing FASB, American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Emerging Issues Task Force, and related accounting literature. Going forward, only one level of authoritative GAAP will exist. All other accounting literature will be considered non-authoritative.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statement and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from the estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For financial statement presentation purposes, those short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less are considered to be cash or cash equivalents.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

The Company extends credit to its customers in the normal course of business and performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers, maintaining allowances for potential credit losses which, when realized, have been within management's expectations. The allowance method is used to account for uncollectible amounts. The evaluation is inherently subjective, as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revision as more information becomes available. Allowance for doubtful accounts was $116,033 at December 31, 2011 and $49,800 at December 31, 2010, respectively.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

For financial reporting, profits on construction contracts are recognized by the Company on the percentage-of-completion method, measured by the percentage of costs incurred to date to estimate total construction costs for each contract. This method is used because contracts in process include all materials, direct labor and subcontractor costs and those indirect costs related to contract performance, such as depreciation, motor vehicles, payroll taxes, employee benefits, small tools, insurance, etc. Selling and administrative costs are charged to expense as incurred. Provisions for estimated losses on uncompleted contracts are made in the period in which such losses are determined. Changes in job performance, job conditions and estimated profitability, including those arising from contract penalty provisions and final contract settlements may result in revisions to costs and income and are recognized in the period in which the revisions are determined. An amount equal to contract costs attributable to claims is included in revenues when realization is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. Because of the inherent uncertainties in estimating costs, it is at least reasonably possible that the Company’s estimates of costs and revenues will change.

 

Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are reported at cost less accumulated depreciation. Equipment under capital leases is stated at the present value of minimum lease payments. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Lives for property, plant and equipment are as follows: leasehold improvements—Lesser of term or useful life; machinery and equipment—5 to 15 years; furniture and fixtures—3 to 10 years; computer hardware and software 3 to 7 years. Routine maintenance costs are expensed as incurred. Expenditures for renewals and betterments are capitalized. The cost and related accumulated depreciation of assets retired or sold are removed from the accounts and gains or losses are recognized in operations. For the years ending December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company recorded $98,278 and $87,580 in depreciation expense, respectively.

 

Valuation of Intangibles and Other Long Lived Assets

 

The recoverability of long-lived assets, including equipment and intangible assets, is reviewed when events or changes in circumstances occur that indicate that the carrying value of the asset may not be recoverable. The assessment of possible impairment is based on the ability to recover the carrying value of the asset from the expected future pre-tax cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) of the related operations. If these cash flows are less than the carrying value of such asset, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between estimated fair value and carrying value. The primary measure of fair value is based on discounted cash flows. The measurement of impairment requires management to make estimates of these cash flows related to long-lived assets, as well as other fair value determinations.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of December 31, 2011. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance sheet financial instruments approximated their fair values. These financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, line of credit, and accrued expenses. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for these financial instruments since they are short-term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are receivable or payable on demand.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

Stock based awards are accounted for according to the provisions of FASB ASC 718. Our primary type of share-based compensation consists of stock options. We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model in valuing options. The inputs for the valuation analysis of the options include the market value of the Company's common stock, the estimated volatility of the Company's common stock, the exercise price of the warrants and the risk free interest rate.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

FASB ASC 820 defines fair value and establishes a framework for measuring fair value and establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to the inputs to the valuation techniques. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or amount paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. A fair value measurement assumes that the transaction to sell the asset or transfer the liability occurs in the principal market for the asset or liability or, in the absence of a principal market, the most advantageous market. Valuation techniques that are consistent with the market, income or cost approach, as specified by FASB ASC 820, are used to measure fair value.

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

FASB ASC 820 specifies a hierarchy of valuation techniques based upon whether the inputs to those valuation techniques reflect assumptions other market participants would use based upon market data obtained from independent sources (observable inputs), or reflect the Company's own assumptions of market participant valuation (unobservable inputs). In accordance with FASB ASC 820, these two types of inputs have created the following fair value hierarchy:

 

Level 1 - Quoted prices in active markets that are unadjusted and accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2 - Quoted prices for identical assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or financial instruments for which significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly.

 

Level 3 - Prices or valuations that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

 

FASB ASC 820 requires the use of observable market data if such data is available without undue cost and effort.

 

The Company measures fair value as an exit price using the procedures described for all assets and liabilities measured at fair value. When available, the Company uses unadjusted quoted market prices to measure fair value and classifies such items within Level 1. If quoted market prices are not available, fair value is based upon internally developed models that use, where possible, current market-based or independently-sourced market parameters such as interest rates and currency rates. Items valued using internally generated models are classified according to the lowest level input or value driver that is significant to the valuation. Thus, an item may be classified in Level 3 even though there may be inputs that are readily observable. If quoted market prices are not available, the valuation model used generally depends on the specific asset or liability being valued. The determination of fair value considers various factors including interest rate yield curves and time value underlying the financial instruments.

 

Income Taxes

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for temporary differences between the financial reporting basis and the tax basis of our assets and liabilities. Deferred taxes are recognized for the estimated taxes ultimately payable or recoverable based on enacted tax laws. Allowances are recorded if recovery is uncertain.

 

Earnings per Common Share

 

Basic net loss per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Basic and diluted earnings per share are the same as outstanding options are antidilutive. Dilutive common equivalent shares consist of options to purchase common stock (only if those options are exercisable and at prices below the average share price for the period) and shares issuable upon the conversion of the Company's securities.

 

Impairment

 

Intangible assets with estimable lives and other long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset or asset group may not be recoverable. Recoverability of intangible assets with estimable lives and other long-lived assets is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset or asset group to future net undiscounted pretax cash flows expected to be generated by the asset or asset group. If these comparisons indicate that an asset is not recoverable, the impairment loss recognized is the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset or asset group exceeds the related estimated fair value. Estimated fair value is based on either discounted future pretax operating cash flows or appraised values, depending on the nature of the asset. Judgment is required to estimate future operating cash flows.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

ASU 2010-29. In December 2010, the FASB issued clarification of the accounting guidance related to disclosure of pro forma information for business combinations that occur in the current reporting period. The guidance requires companies to present pro forma information in their comparative financial statements as if the acquisition date for any business combination that occurred in the current reporting period had occurred at the beginning of the prior year reporting period. The Company adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2011. ASU 2010-29 is a disclosure only clarification and its adoption had no impact on the Company’s financial condition or results of operation. The Company has included the disclosures required pursuant to this guidance in this Report.

 

ASU 2011-04. In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, which amends ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, to achieve common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements under GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”). This standard gives clarification for the highest and best use valuation concepts. The ASU also provides guidance on fair value measurements relating to instruments classified in stockholders’ equity and instruments managed within a portfolio. Further, ASU 2011-04 clarifies disclosures for financial instruments categorized within level 3 of the fair value hierarchy that require companies to provide quantitative information about unobservable inputs used, the sensitivity of the measurement to changes in those inputs, and the valuation processes used by the reporting entity. The Company is currently evaluating the newly prescribed disclosures but does not expect they will have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

 

ASU 2011-05. In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, which amends the guidance in Topic 220, “Comprehensive Income,” by eliminating the option to present components of other comprehensive income (“OCI”) in the statement of stockholders’ equity. Instead, the guidance now requires entities to present all non-owner changes in stockholders’ equity either as a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or as two separate but consecutive statements of income and comprehensive income. The components of OCI have not changed nor has the guidance on when OCI items are reclassified to net income. Similarly, ASU 2011-05 does not change the guidance to disclose OCI components gross or net of the effect of income taxes, provided that the tax effects are presented on the face of the statement in which OCI is presented, or disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. The Company adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2012. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

ASU 2011-8. In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-8, which amends ASC 350, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other. The amendments in this ASU give companies the option to first perform a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not (a likelihood of more than 50.0%) that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If a company concludes that this is the case, it must perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. Otherwise, a company is not required to perform this two-step test. Under the amendments in this ASU, an entity has the option to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit in any period and proceed directly to performing the first step of the two-step goodwill impairment test. The Company adopted this guidance effective January 1, 2012. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

ASU 2011-11. In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-11. The amendments in this ASU require companies to disclose information about offsetting and related arrangements to enable users of its financial statements to understand the effect of those arrangements on its financial position. The ASU is required to be applied retrospectively for all prior periods presented and is effective for annual periods for fiscal years beginning on or after January 1, 2013, and interim periods within those annual fiscal years. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.