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XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCR27.htm
EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCFinancial_Report.xls
10-Q - FORM 10-Q - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCv326054_10q.htm
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EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCv326054_ex32-1.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCv326054_ex31-1.htm
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EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - RADIANT LOGISTICS, INCv326054_ex31-2.htm
v2.4.0.6
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Use of Estimates, Policy [Policy Text Block]
a) Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Such estimates include revenue recognition, accruals for the cost of purchased transportation, the fair value of acquired assets and liabilities, changes in contingent consideration, accounting for the issuance of shares and share-based compensation, the assessment of the recoverability of long-lived assets and goodwill, and the establishment of an allowance for doubtful accounts. Estimates and assumptions are reviewed periodically and the effects of revisions are reflected in the period that they are determined to be necessary. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Fair Value Measurement Policy [Policy Text Block]
b) Fair Value Measurements

 

In general, fair values determined by Level 1 inputs utilize quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Fair values determined by Level 2 inputs utilize observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the related assets or liabilities. Fair values determined by Level 3 inputs are unobservable data points for the asset or liability, and include situations where there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments, Policy [Policy Text Block]
c) Fair Value of Financial Instruments


 

The fair values of the Company’s receivables, accounts payable and accrued transportation costs, commissions payable, other accrued costs, income taxes payable and amounts due to former shareholders of acquired operations approximate the carrying values due to the relatively short maturities of these instruments. The fair value of the Company’s credit facility, DBA notes payable, and other long-term liabilities would not differ significantly from the recorded amount if recalculated based on current interest rates. The fair value of the subordinated Caltius notes payable is not practicable to determine given the complex terms associated with this instrument. Contingent consideration attributable to the Company's recent acquisitions of ISLA and ALBS are reported at fair value.

Cash and Cash Equivalents, Policy [Policy Text Block]
d) Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

For purposes of the statements of cash flows, cash equivalents include all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are not securing any corporate obligations.

Concentration Risk Credit Risk [Policy Text Block]
e) Concentrations

 

The Company maintains its cash in bank deposit accounts, which, at times, may exceed federally-insured limits. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts.

Receivables, Policy [Policy Text Block]
f) Accounts Receivable

 

The Company’s receivables are recorded when billed and represent claims against third parties that will be settled in cash. The carrying value of the Company’s receivables, net of the allowance for doubtful accounts, represents their estimated net realizable value. The Company evaluates the collectability of accounts receivable on a customer-by-customer basis. The Company records a reserve for bad debts against amounts due to reduce the net recognized receivable to an amount the Company believes will be reasonably collected. The reserve is a discretionary amount determined from the analysis of the aging of the accounts receivable, historical experience and knowledge of specific customers.

  

The Company derives a substantial portion of its revenue through independently-owned agent offices operating under the various Company brands. Each individual agent office is responsible for some or all of the bad debt expense related to the underlying customers being serviced by the office. To facilitate this arrangement, each office is required to maintain a security deposit with the Company that is recognized as a liability in the Company’s financial statements. The Company charges each individual office’s bad debt reserve account for any accounts receivable aged beyond 90 days. The bad debt reserve account is continually replenished with a portion (typically 5% - 10%) of the office’s weekly commission check being directed to fund this account. However, the bad debt reserve account may carry a deficit balance when amounts charged to this reserve exceed amounts otherwise available in the bad debt reserve account. In these circumstances, deficit bad debt reserve accounts are recognized as a receivable in the Company’s financial statements. Further, the agency agreements provide that the Company may withhold all or a portion of future commission checks payable to the individual office in satisfaction of any deficit balance. As of the date of this report, a number of the Company’s agency offices have a deficit balance in their bad debt reserve account. The Company expects to replenish these funds through the future business operations of these offices. However, to the extent any of these offices were to cease operations or otherwise be unable to replenish these deficit accounts, the Company would be at risk of loss for any such amount. The Company is currently in collection proceedings against two customers who owe the Company approximately $1.5 million. The Company has expensed its portion of these amounts. While there can be no assurance as to the amount that may be recovered in the future, the Company does not believe its exposure to these customers will be material based upon, among others: (i) the Company’s historic collection experience; (ii) the portion of the bad debt recoverable from the individual agency location responsible for the account; and (iii) the anticipated recovery likely from these customers.

Property, Plant and Equipment, Policy [Policy Text Block]
g) Furniture and Equipment

 

Technology (computer software, hardware, and communications), furniture, and equipment are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets. Depreciation is computed using five to seven year lives for vehicles, communication, office, furniture, and computer equipment using the straight line method of depreciation. Computer software is depreciated over a three year life using the straight line method of depreciation. For leasehold improvements, the cost is depreciated over the shorter of the lease term or useful life on a straight line basis. Upon retirement or other disposition of these assets, the cost and related accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and the resulting gain or loss, if any, is reflected in other income or expense. Expenditures for maintenance, repairs and renewals of minor items are charged to expense as incurred. Major renewals and improvements are capitalized.

Goodwill and Intangible Assets, Goodwill, Policy [Policy Text Block]
h) Goodwill

 

The Company typically performs its annual goodwill impairment test effective as of April 1 of each year, unless events or circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred before that time. The Company assesses qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. After assessing qualitative factors, the Company determined that no further testing was necessary. If further testing was necessary, the Company would have performed a two-step impairment test for goodwill. The first step requires the Company to determine the fair value of each reporting unit, and compare the fair value to the reporting unit's carrying amount. The Company has only one reporting unit. To the extent a reporting unit's carrying amount exceeds its fair value, an indication exists that the reporting unit's goodwill may be impaired and the Company must perform a second more detailed impairment assessment. The second impairment assessment involves allocating the reporting unit’s fair value to all of its recognized and unrecognized assets and liabilities in order to determine the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill as of the assessment date. The implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is then compared to the carrying amount of goodwill to quantify an impairment charge as of the assessment date. As of September 30, 2012, management believes there are no indications of impairment.

Impairment Or Disposal Of Long Lived Assets Including Intangible Assets Policy [Policy Text Block]
i) Long-Lived Assets

 

Acquired intangibles consist of customer related intangibles and non-compete agreements arising from the Company’s acquisitions. Customer related intangibles are amortized using accelerated methods over approximately five years and non-compete agreements are amortized using the straight line method over the term of the underlying agreements.

 

The Company reviews long-lived assets to be held-and-used for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable. If the sum of the undiscounted expected future cash flows over the remaining useful life of a long-lived asset is less than its carrying amount, the asset is considered to be impaired. Impairment losses are measured as the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. When fair values are not available, the Company estimates fair value using the expected future cash flows discounted at a rate commensurate with the risks associated with the recovery of the asset. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell. Management has performed a review of all long-lived assets and has determined no impairment of the respective carrying value has occurred as of September 30, 2012.

Business Combinations Policy [Policy Text Block]
j) Business Combinations

 

The Company accounts for business combinations using the purchase method of accounting and allocates the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and the liabilities assumed based upon their estimated fair values at the acquisition date. The difference between the purchase price and the fair value of the net assets acquired is recorded as goodwill. While the Company uses its best estimates and assumptions to accurately value assets acquired and liabilities assumed at the acquisition date, the estimates are inherently uncertain and subject to refinement. As a result, during the measurement period, which may be up to one year from the acquisition date, the Company records adjustments to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed with the corresponding offset to goodwill. Upon the conclusion of the measurement period or final determination of the values of assets acquired or liabilities assumed, whichever comes first, any subsequent adjustments are recorded in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

The fair values of intangible assets acquired are estimated using a discounted cash flow approach with Level 3 inputs. Under this method, an intangible asset’s fair value is equal to the present value of the incremental after-tax cash flows (excess earnings) attributable solely to the intangible asset over its remaining useful life. To calculate fair value, the Company uses risk-adjusted cash flows discounted at rates considered appropriate given the inherent risks associated with each type of asset. The Company believes the level and timing of cash flows appropriately reflects market participant assumptions.

 

The Company determines the acquisition date fair value of the contingent consideration payable based on the likelihood of paying the contingent consideration as part of the consideration transferred. The fair value is estimated using projected future operating results and the corresponding future earn-out payments that can be earned upon the achievement of specified operating objectives and financial results by acquired companies using Level 3 inputs and the amounts are then discounted to present value. These liabilities are measured quarterly at fair value, and any change in the contingent liability is included in the consolidated statement of operations. For the three months ended September 30, 2012, the Company recorded an increase to contingent consideration of $50,000.

Commitments and Contingencies, Policy [Policy Text Block]
k) Commitments

 

The Company has operating lease commitments for equipment rentals, office space, and warehouse space under non-cancelable operating leases expiring at various dates through May 2021. As of September 30, 2012, minimum future lease payments under these non-cancelable operating leases for the next five fiscal years ending June 30 and thereafter are as follows:

 

2013 (remaining portion)   $ 1,609,874  
2014     1,968,307  
2015     1,663,623  
2016     1,038,382  
2017     309,111  
Thereafter     1,302,257  
         
Total minimum lease payments   $ 7,891,554  

  

Rent expense amounted to $536,907 and $449,999 for the three months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Pension and Other Postretirement Plans, Nonpension Benefits, Policy [Policy Text Block]
l) 401(k) Savings Plan

 

The Company has employee savings plans under which the Company provides safe harbor matching contributions. During the three months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company’s contributions under the plans were $68,053 and $27,552 respectively.

Income Tax, Policy [Policy Text Block]
m) Income Taxes

 

Deferred income taxes are reported using the liability method. Deferred tax assets are recognized for deductible temporary differences and deferred tax liabilities are recognized for taxable temporary differences. Temporary differences are the differences between the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and their tax bases. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are adjusted for the effects of changes in tax laws and rates on the date of enactment.

 

The Company reports a liability for unrecognized tax benefits resulting from uncertain income tax positions taken or expected to be taken in an income tax return. Estimated interest and penalties are recorded as a component of interest expense or other expense, respectively.

Revenue Recognition, Cargo and Freight, Policy [Policy Text Block]
n) Revenue Recognition and Purchased Transportation Costs

 

The Company is the primary obligor responsible for providing the service desired by the customer and is responsible for fulfillment, including the acceptability of the service(s) ordered or purchased by the customer. At the Company’s sole discretion, it sets the prices charged to its customers, and is not required to obtain approval or consent from any other party in establishing its prices. The Company has multiple suppliers for the services it sells to its customers, and has the absolute and complete discretion and right to select the supplier that will provide the product(s) or service(s) ordered by a customer, including changing the supplier on a shipment-by-shipment basis. In most cases, the Company determines the nature, type, characteristics, and specifications of the service(s) ordered by the customer. The Company also assumes credit risk for the amount billed to the customer.

 

As a non-asset based carrier, the Company does not own transportation assets. The Company generates the major portion of its freight forwarding revenues by purchasing transportation services from direct (asset-based) carriers and reselling those services to its customers. Based upon the terms in the contract of carriage, revenues related to shipments where the Company issues a House Airway Bill or a House Ocean Bill of Lading are recognized at the time the freight is tendered to the direct carrier at origin net of taxes. Costs related to the shipments are also recognized at this same time based upon anticipated margins, contractual arrangements with direct carriers, and other known factors. The estimates are routinely monitored and compared to actual invoiced costs. The estimates are adjusted as deemed necessary by the Company to reflect differences between the original accruals and actual costs of purchased transportation.

This method generally results in recognition of revenues and purchased transportation costs earlier than the preferred methods under GAAP which does not recognize revenue until a proof of delivery is received or which recognizes revenue as progress on the transit is made. The Company’s method of revenue and cost recognition does not result in a material difference from amounts that would be reported under such other methods.

 

All other revenue, including revenue from other value added services including warehousing and fulfillment services, is recognized upon completion of the service.

Share-based Compensation, Option and Incentive Plans Policy [Policy Text Block]
o) Share-Based Compensation

 

The Company has issued restricted stock awards and stock options to certain directors, officers and employees. The Company accounts for share-based compensation under the fair value recognition provisions such that compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the value of the award and is expensed ratably over the vesting period. Determining the fair value of share-based awards at the grant date requires judgment, including estimating the percentage of awards that will be forfeited, stock volatility, the expected life of the award, and other inputs. If actual forfeitures differ significantly from the estimates, share-based compensation expense and the Company's results of operations could be materially impacted.

 

The Company recorded share-based compensation expense of $101,501 and $24,244 for the three months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.
Earnings Per Share, Policy [Policy Text Block]
p) Basic and Diluted Income per Share

 

Basic income per share is computed by dividing net income attributable to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted income per share is computed similar to basic income per share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares, such as stock options, had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive.

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2012, the weighted average outstanding number of potentially dilutive common shares totaled 35,602,281 shares of common stock, including options to purchase 4,948,719 shares of common stock as of September 30, 2012, of which 1,240,803 were excluded as their effect would have been anti-dilutive. For the three months ended September 30, 2011, the weighted average outstanding number of potentially dilutive common shares totaled 34,609,965, including options to purchase 3,865,242 shares of common stock as of September 30, 2011, of which none were excluded as the option price was less than the weighted average share price.

 

The following table reconciles the numerator and denominator of the basic and diluted per share computations for earnings per share as follows:

 

    Three months ended September 30,  
    2012     2011  
Weighted average basic shares outstanding     33,031,110       31,676,438  
Options     2,571,171       2,933,527  
Weighted average dilutive shares outstanding     35,602,281       34,609,965
Comprehensive Income Policy [Policy Text Block]
q) Other Comprehensive Income

 

The Company has no components of Other Comprehensive Income and, accordingly, no Statement of Comprehensive Income has been included in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

Reclassification Policy [Policy Text Block]
r) Reclassifications

 

Certain amounts for prior periods have been reclassified in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements to conform to the classification used in fiscal year 2012.