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EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - PALADIN REALTY INCOME PROPERTIES INCv327360_ex31-1.htm
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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Significant Accounting Policies [Text Block]

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Principles of Reporting

 

Variable Interest Entities

 

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Paladin REIT and its wholly owned and controlled entities (collectively, the “Company”). The Company consolidates any variable interest entities (“VIEs”) of which it has control (a) through voting rights or similar rights or (b) by means other than voting rights if the Company is the primary beneficiary, as defined below. When the Company does not have a controlling interest in an entity, but exerts significant influence over the entity, the Company applies the equity method of accounting. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

If an investment was determined to be a VIE, the Company then performed an analysis to determine if the Company is the primary beneficiary of the VIE. A VIE is consolidated by its primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary is the party that has a controlling financial interest in an entity. In order for a party to have a controlling financial interest in an entity it must have (1) the power to direct the activities of a VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance, and (2) the obligation to absorb losses of an entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE or the right to receive benefits from the entity that could potentially be significant to the VIE.

 

Derivative Instruments

 

The Company enters into derivative contracts from time to time to manage interest rate risk and may do so in the future to facilitate asset/liability strategies. The Company has not elected to treat the derivative financial instruments as a hedge because this investment was not entered into for speculative purposes and does not meet the strict hedge accounting requirements of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 815, Derivatives and Hedging. ASC 815 requires that all derivative investments be carried at fair value. Changes in fair value are recorded in earnings for each period.

 

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). Revenues are recognized as earned, and expenses are recognized as incurred.

 

Risks and Uncertainties

 

The Company is operating in a challenging and uncertain economic environment. Financial and real estate companies continue to be affected by the lack of liquidity in financial markets, declines in real estate values and the reduction in the willingness of financial institutions to make new loans and refinance or extend existing loans on similar terms and conditions.

 

 Noncontrolling Interests

 

Background

 

Noncontrolling interests are presented and disclosed as a separate component of equity (not as a liability or other item outside of permanent equity). Condensed consolidated net income includes the noncontrolling interest’s share of income. The calculation of earnings per share continues to be based on income amounts attributable to the Company. All changes in the Company’s ownership interest in a subsidiary are accounted for as equity transactions if the Company retains its controlling financial interest in the subsidiary.

 

Presentation

 

As of September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the Company’s noncontrolling interests represent noncontrolling ownership interests in joint ventures controlled by the Company through ownership or contractual arrangements. These noncontrolling interests reported in equity are not subject to any mandatory redemption requirements or other redemption features outside of the Company’s control that would result in presentation outside of permanent equity.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Management makes significant estimates regarding impairments. These estimates and assumptions are based on management’s best estimates and judgment. Management evaluates its estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis using historical experience and other factors, including the current economic environment. The current economic environment has increased the degree of uncertainty inherent in these estimates and assumptions. Management adjusts such estimates when facts and circumstances dictate. As future events and their effects cannot be determined with precision, actual results could differ from those estimates and assumptions.

 

Real Estate and Depreciation

 

Land is carried at cost. Building and improvements, furniture, fixtures, and equipment, in-place leases, and tenant improvements are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. The Company allocates the purchase price of newly acquired properties between net tangible and identifiable intangible assets. The primary intangible asset associated with an apartment or office building property acquisition is the value of the existing lease agreements. When allocating the purchase price to an acquired property, the Company allocates the purchase price to the estimated value of the land, building, and fixtures assuming the property is vacant and to the estimated intangible value of the existing lease agreements. In some circumstances, the Company engages real estate appraisal firms to provide market information and evaluations that are relevant to its purchase price allocations; however, the Company is ultimately responsible for the purchase price allocation. The Company estimates the intangible value of the lease agreements by determining the lost revenue associated with a hypothetical lease-up. The Company depreciates the buildings and fixtures based on the expected useful life of the asset, which ranges from 27 to 45 years for the buildings and improvements and from 5 to 7 years for furniture, fixtures and equipment, using the straight line basis. The intangible value of the lease agreements is amortized over the average remaining life of the existing leases, which ranges from 3 to 24 months, using the straight line basis. This amortization is included in depreciation and amortization expense on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations. Improvements and betterments are capitalized when they extend the useful life of the asset. Expenditures for repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred.

 

The Company reviews long-lived assets and related identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of the assets may not be recoverable. When such events or changes in circumstances occur, recoverability of the asset to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of the asset to future cash flows, undiscounted and without interest, expected to be generated by the asset. In order to review the Company’s investment properties for recoverability, the Company considers current market conditions, as well as its intent with respect to holding or disposing of the asset. Fair value is determined through various valuation techniques; including discounted cash flow models, quoted market values and third party appraisals, where considered necessary. If the Company’s analysis indicates that the carrying value of the investment property is not recoverable on an undiscounted cash flow basis, the Company recognizes an impairment charge for the amount by which the carrying value exceeds the current estimated fair value of the real estate property. If the sum of the expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest) is less than the Company’s carrying amount for the asset, an impairment loss is recognized based upon the asset’s fair value. There were no impairment charges taken for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011.

 

Acquisition of Real Estate

 

The fair value of real estate acquired, and the fair value adjustments for assumed mortgage debt related to property acquisitions, is allocated to the acquired tangible assets, consisting of land, building and improvements and identified intangible assets and liabilities, consisting of the value of above-market and below-market leases and other value of in-place leases based in each case on their fair values. We aggregate all identified intangible assets and liabilities and present them net as a separate line item on the consolidated balance sheets. The weighted average amortization period for all identified intangible assets and liabilities is 1 year or less. Acquisition costs are expensed as incurred and are included in property operating expense in the accompanying condensed consolidated statement of operations. Noncontrolling interests acquired are also recorded at estimated fair market value.

 

The fair value of the tangible assets of an acquired property (which includes land, building and improvements and furniture, fixtures and equipment) is determined by valuing the property as if it were vacant, and the “as-if-vacant” value is then allocated to land and building and improvements based on management’s determination of relative fair values of these assets. In allocating the fair value of the identified intangible assets and liabilities of an acquired property, above-market and below-market lease values are recorded based on the difference between the current in-place lease rent and management’s estimate of current market rents. Below-market lease intangibles are recorded as part of deferred revenue and amortized into rental revenue over the non-cancelable periods and bargain renewal periods of the respective leases. Above-market leases are recorded as part of intangible assets and amortized as a direct charge against rental revenue over the non-cancelable portion of the respective leases.

 

Deferred Loan Costs

 

Loan costs are capitalized and amortized using the effective interest method over the life of the related loan. The amortization is recorded as a component of interest expense.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company primarily leases residential apartments to tenants under non-cancellable operating leases with terms ranging from 3 to 12 months. The Company also leases commercial space to tenants with lease terms extending to 2017. Rental income related to leases is recognized in the period earned over the lease term.

 

Other income consists of various tenant-related charges and is recognized as revenue in the period in which the applicable charge is incurred.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable is included in prepaid expenses and other assets, net in the condensed consolidated balance sheets. Bad debts are recorded under the specific identification method, whereby, uncollectible receivables are directly written off when identified.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

Cash equivalents represent highly liquid investments with maturities at the date of purchase of three months or less.

 

Restricted Cash

 

At September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011, restricted cash included $2,778,346 and $1,862,128, respectively, held in restricted accounts for building and tenant improvements, repairs, property taxes and insurance as required by lenders. Additionally, at December 31, 2011, restricted cash included $277,911 for subscription proceeds held in escrow until investors are admitted as stockholders. Upon acceptance of stockholders, shares of stock are issued, and the Company receives the subscription proceeds.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company elected to be taxed as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes beginning with the taxable year ended December 31, 2006, under Sections 856 through 860 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. The Company believes it operates in such a manner as to qualify for treatment as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, the Company generally will not be subject to federal income tax, provided that distributions to its stockholders equal at least the amount of its taxable income. A REIT is subject to a number of organizational and operational requirements, including a requirement that it currently distributes at least 90% of its taxable income to stockholders, subject to certain adjustments. If the Company fails to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year without the benefit of certain relief provisions, it will be subject to federal and state income taxes on its taxable income at regular corporate income tax rates. Even if the Company qualifies for taxation as a REIT, the Company may be subject to certain state or local taxes on its income, property or net worth and federal income and excise taxes on its undistributed income. No provision has been made for federal income taxes for the three months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011 in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

The Company uses a more-likely-than-not threshold for recognition and derecognition of tax positions taken or to be taken in a tax return. The Company has assessed its tax positions for all open tax years since January 1, 2009 and concluded that there were no material uncertainties to be recognized. The Company’s accounting policy with respect to interest and penalties related to tax uncertainties is to classify these amounts as provision for income taxes. The Company has not recognized any interest and penalties related to tax uncertainties for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011.

 

Organization and Offering Costs

 

Organization costs are expensed as incurred and offering costs are charged to stockholders’ equity. These costs are subject to a 3.0% limitation of the gross proceeds from the Initial Offering, First Follow-on Offering and Second Follow-on Offering pursuant to the Company’s Advisory Agreement with Paladin Advisors, as described in Note 5.

 

Expense Reimbursement

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Advisory Agreement, Paladin Advisors is entitled to reimbursement of actual expenses incurred for administrative and other services provided to the Company by Paladin Advisors and its affiliates for which they do not otherwise receive a fee. Additionally, Paladin Advisors must repay the Company quarterly any amounts by which the Company’s operating expenses exceed the 2%/25% Rule in the 12 months then ended (the “Expense Period”), unless a majority of the Company’s independent directors approves reimbursement of any excess. The Company will not reimburse Paladin Advisors for operating expenses that in any fiscal year exceed the 2%/25% Rule. The Company’s average invested assets, as defined in the Advisory Agreement, for any period are equal to the average book value of the Company’s assets invested in equity interests in, and loans secured by, real estate before reserves for depreciation or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves, computed by taking the average of such values at the end of each month during the period. For the year ended September 30, 2012, the average book value of the Company’s invested assets before reserves for depreciation or bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves was approximately $225,300,000. The Company’s net income, as defined in the Advisory Agreement, for any period, for purposes of the 2%/25% Rule, is equal to our total revenue less total expenses other than additions to reserves for depreciation, bad debts or other similar non-cash reserves for such period. Operating expenses include all expenses incurred by the Company under GAAP including the asset management fee, but excluding organization and offering expenses, selling commissions and dealer manager fees, interest payments, taxes, non-cash expenditures such as depreciation, amortization and bad debt reserves, the subordinated disposition fee, acquisition fees and expenses and distributions pursuant to Paladin Advisors’ subordinated participation interest in Paladin OP.

 

On a quarterly basis, in accordance with the Advisory Agreement, the Company recognizes an expense for operating expenses paid on its behalf by Paladin Advisors that do not exceed the 2%/25% Rule. Additionally, Paladin Advisors must repay to the Company within 60 days after the end of each fiscal quarter for the 12 months then ended any expenses in excess of the 2%/25% Rule, unless a majority of the Company’s independent directors determine that the excess expenses were justified based on unusual and nonrecurring factors which they deem sufficient. Such approved excess represents an unrecognized commitment and becomes payable by the Company at such time when the excess amount and amounts of future operating expenses are within the 2%/25% Rule. Within 60 days after the end of any Expense Period for which total operating expenses exceed the 2%/25% Rule, the Company will send its stockholders written disclosure, together with an explanation of the factors the independent directors considered in arriving at the conclusion that the excess expenses were justified. However, at Paladin Advisors’ option, Paladin Advisors or its affiliate, as applicable, may defer the refund of expenses and elect to receive such payments, without interest, in any subsequent fiscal year that Paladin Advisors designates. As of September 30, 2012, there were no unrecognized commitments relating to unreimbursed excess operating expenses pursuant to the 2%/25% Rule.

 

During the Expense Period ended September 30, 2012, the Company’s general and administrative expenses, including expenses incurred on the Company’s behalf by Paladin Advisors and its affiliates, did not exceed the 2%/25% Rule. During the Expense Period ended September 30, 2012, $44,258 was paid by Paladin Advisors.

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2012, the Company recognized $1,413,633 of general and administrative expenses, including $30,553 paid on the Company’s behalf by Paladin Advisors in general and administrative expenses. In accordance with the Advisory Agreement, the Company recognizes on a quarterly basis amounts not exceeding the 2%/25% Rule.

 

Per Share Data

 

The Company presents both basic and diluted loss per share (“EPS”). Basic EPS excludes potentially dilutive securities and is computed by dividing net loss available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Dilutive EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common shares were exercised, where such exercise would result in a lower EPS amount. There were no unvested shares of restricted stock as of September 30, 2012.

 

Unaccepted Subscriptions for Common Stock

 

Unaccepted subscriptions for shares of our common stock include proceeds related to subscriptions that were held in escrow but had not been accepted by the Company as of September 30, 2012.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

In evaluating fair value, GAAP outlines a valuation framework and creates a fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between market assumptions based on market data (observable inputs) and a reporting entity’s own assumptions about market data (unobservable inputs). The hierarchy ranks the quality and reliability of inputs used to determine fair value, which are then classified and disclosed in one of the three categories (or levels).  Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices in active markets for similar assets and liabilities, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, and model-derived valuations whose inputs are observable. Level 3 includes model-derived valuations with unobservable inputs.

 

The Company’s financial assets and liabilities are not carried at fair value, however the fair values of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, other assets, distributions payable and other liabilities approximate the carrying values due to the short-term nature of these financial instruments. As of September 30, 2012, the mortgage loans had an estimated fair value of approximately $183.5 million compared to the carrying value of $167.2 million. As of December 31, 2011, the mortgage loans had an estimated fair value of approximately $183.3 million compared to the carrying value of $168.9 million. To determine fair value, the fixed rate debt is discounted at a rate based on an estimate of current lending rates as of September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011.  The estimated fair values of the Company’s mortgage loans are considered level 2 within the fair value hierarchy.  

 

Share-based Compensation

 

The Company records compensation expense for the restricted common stock using the straight-line attribution method, assuming no forfeitures. For the nine months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company recorded $0 and $16,821, respectively, of related compensation expense which amounts are included in general and administrative expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations. There were no unamortized compensation costs on non-vested shares at September 30, 2012 and December 31, 2011.