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v2.4.0.6
Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
6 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2012
Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Note 2. Organization and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The Company

The Company provides comprehensive solutions for frozen cold chain logistics, primarily in the life science industries. Its solutions afford new and reliable alternatives to currently existing products and services utilized for bio-pharmaceuticals and biologics, including in-vitro fertilization, cell lines, vaccines, tissue and other commodities requiring a reliable frozen solution. Cryoport’s solutions can contribute to both the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical trials.

The Cryoport Express ® Solution is centered on a web-based logistics platform branded as the Cryoportal TM (formerly referred to as the CryoPort Express ® Portal). The Cryoportal manages customer ordering, tracking, customs documentation, and communication through a single interface as well as enabling the monitoring of the shipment’s location and integrity throughout the entire shipping process. In addition, the Cryoportal provides an array of information dashboards and validation documentation for every shipment.

Integral to this solution are also the Cryoport Liquid Nitrogen Dry Vapor Shippers (Cryoport Express® Shippers) which are cost-effective and reusable cryogenic transport containers utilizing innovative liquid nitrogen (LN2) based technology. Cryoport Express Shippers are non-hazardous, IATA (International Air Transport Association) certified, and are validated to maintain stable temperatures below minus 150° Celsius for a 10-plus day dynamic shipment period. The Company currently features two Cryoport Express Shipper models, the Standard Dry Shipper (holding up to approximately 75-2.0 ml vials) and the High Volume Dry Shipper (holding up to approximately 500-2.0 ml vials).

The Cryoport Express ® Solution provides a fully documented “chain-of-custody” and “chain-of-condition” for every shipment, helping ensure that quality, safety, efficacy, and stability of shipped commodities are maintained. The Cryoport Express Solution can be used by customers, as a “turn-key” solution, through direct access to the cloud-based Cryoportal, or by contacting Cryoport Client Care for order entry tasks. Cryoport provides 24/7/365 logistics services through its Client Care Team. Cryoport also provides complete training and process management services to support each customer’s requirements.

The Cryoport Express ® Solution has been the Company’s principal focus for development and commercialization. In addition, during the first half of fiscal year 2013, the Company expanded its service offering to address specific market needs in the life science industry. The primary Cryoport service offerings are now as follows:

 

   

Cryoport Express® Solution

The fully outsourced turn-key logistics solution described above.

 

   

Customer-Staged Solution

Cryoport ships multiple Cryoport Express Shippers to the Customer (uncharged and in bulk) enabling the Customer to charge the shippers at their facility, process its orders through the Cryoportal and then return the shippers to Cryoport after each shipment for cleaning, testing and refurbishing. Cryoport provides the 24/7/365 logistics services utilizing its Cryoportal logistics platform.

 

   

Customer-Managed Solution

Cryoport ships a fully charged Cryoport Express Shipper(s) to the Customer enabling the customer to utilize their internal expertise and manage all or a portion of the logistics services. As with the above solutions, the shippers are returned to Cryoport for cleaning, testing and refurbishing within a pre-determined time period.

 

   

Customer Integrated Logistics

The Cryoport Logistics Team provides the full capability of the Cryoportal to provide complete logistics services while enabling the customer to utilize their own packaging solutions.

   

Distribution Partnerships

Partnership arrangements with freight forwarder, integrators, and other logistics providers to be a part of their solution.

On January 24, 2011, the Company announced that, in conjunction with the Company, FedEx had launched its deep frozen shipping solution using our CryoPort Express® Dry Shipper. From March through September 2012, the Company worked closely with FedEx to further align its sales efforts and accelerate penetration within FedEx’s healthcare customer base through improved processes, sales incentives, joint customer calls and more frequent communication at the sales and executive level. In addition, the Company has developed a FedEx branded portal, powered by the Cryoportal, which will be used by FedEx and its customers giving them access to the full capabilities of our logistics management platform.

The Company continues its agreement with another global courier, DHL Express (USA), Inc. (“DHL”) that gives DHL life science customers direct access to the Company’s web-based order entry and tracking portal to order the CryoPort Express ® Dry Shipper and receive preferred DHL shipping rates. The agreement covers DHL shipping discounts that may be used to support the Company’s customers using the CryoPort Express® shipping solution. In connection with the agreement, the Company has integrated its proprietary web portal to DHL’s tracking and billing systems to provide DHL life science customers with a seamless way of shipping their critical biological material worldwide.

We offer our solution to companies in the life science industries and are targeting specific verticals including biotech and diagnostic companies, pharmaceutical companies, central laboratories, contract research organizations and research institutions. These companies operate within a heavily regulated environment and as such, changing vendors and distribution practices typically require a number of steps which may include the audit of our facilities, review of our procedures, qualifying us as a vendor, and performing test shipments. This process can take six to eighteen months or longer to complete prior to a potential customer adopting the Cryoport Express® shipping solution.

Going Concern

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared using the accrual method of accounting in accordance with U.S. GAAP and have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities in the normal course of business. We have sustained operating losses since our inception and have used substantial amounts of working capital in our operations. Further, at September 30, 2012, we had an accumulated deficit of $63,027,526, we had a net loss of $3,098,511 and we used cash in operations of $2,655,869 during the six months ended September 30, 2012. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

We expect to continue to incur substantial additional operating losses from costs related to the commercialization of our Cryoport Express ® shipping solution and do not expect that revenues from operations will be sufficient to satisfy our funding requirements in the near term. We believe that our working capital at September 30, 2012 of approximately $1.2 million, together with the revenues generated from our services and the continued focus on cost reductions of non-sales generating costs will be sufficient to sustain our planned operations into the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2013; however, we must obtain additional capital to fund operations thereafter and for the achievement of sustained profitable operations. We are currently exploring funding alternatives in order to secure sufficient operating capital to allow us to continue to operate as a going concern.

Future capital requirements will depend upon many factors, including the success of our commercialization efforts and the level of customer adoption of our Cryoport Express ® shipping solution as well as our ability to establish additional collaborative arrangements. We cannot make any assurances that the sales ramp together with cost reduction measures will lead to achievement of sustained profitable operations or that any additional financing will be completed on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all. Management’s inability to successfully achieve significant sales increases or its cost reduction strategies or to complete any other financing will adversely impact our ability to continue as a going concern. To address this issue, the Company has instituted a cost containment program and will be seeking additional capitalization to properly fund its efforts to become a self-sustaining financially viable entity.

Principles of Consolidation

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of CryoPort, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, CryoPort Systems, Inc. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from estimated amounts. The Company’s significant estimates include allowances for doubtful accounts and sales returns, recoverability of long-lived assets, deferred taxes and their accompanying valuations, valuation of derivative liabilities and valuation of common stock, warrants and stock options issued for products or services.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, accounts receivable, related-party notes payable and accrued interest, convertible notes payable, accounts payable and accrued expenses. The carrying value for all such instruments approximates fair value at September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012, due to their short term nature. The difference between the fair value and recorded values of the related party notes payable and accrued interest is not significant. The Company’s restricted cash is carried at amortized cost which approximates fair value at March 31, 2012.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers highly liquid investments with original maturities of 90 days or less to be cash equivalents.

Concentrations of Credit Risk

Cash and cash equivalents

The Company maintains its cash accounts in financial institutions. Accounts at these institutions are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) with basic deposit coverage limits up to $250,000 per owner. In addition to the basic insurance deposit coverage, the FDIC is providing temporary unlimited coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts from December 31, 2010 through December 31, 2012. At September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012, the Company had no cash balances which exceeded the FDIC insurance limits. The Company performs ongoing evaluations of these institutions to limit its concentration risk exposure.

Restricted cash

In conjunction with the private placement in February 2012, the Company was required to deposit $444,168 into an escrow account representing the total future principal payments due to one of the convertible debenture holders (see Note 5). At September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012, $0 and $251,368 remained in escrow, respectively.

Customers

The Company grants credit to customers within the U.S. and to a limited number of international customers and does not require collateral. Revenues from international customers are generally secured by advance payments except for a limited number of established foreign customers. The Company generally requires advance or credit card payments for initial revenues from new customers. The Company’s ability to collect receivables is affected by economic fluctuations in the geographic areas and industries served by the Company. Reserves for uncollectible amounts are provided based on past experience and a specific analysis of the accounts which management believes is sufficient. Accounts receivable at September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012 are net of reserves for doubtful accounts of approximately $12,300 and $5,500, respectively. Although the Company expects to collect amounts due, actual collections may differ from the estimated amounts.

The Company has foreign net revenues primarily in Europe, Japan, and India. During the three month periods ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company had foreign sales of approximately $98,000 and $61,000, respectively, which constituted approximately 42% and 55%, respectively, of net revenues. During the six month periods ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company had foreign sales of approximately $179,000 and $121,000, respectively, which constituted approximately 42% and 51%, respectively, of net revenues.

The majority of the Company’s customers are in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and life science industries. Consequently, there is a concentration of receivables within these industries, which is subject to normal credit risk. At September 30, 2012, net revenues for the six months ended September 30, 2012 from one customer accounted for 11%, of our total net revenues. No customers accounted for more than 10% of revenues during the three months ended September 30, 2012. At September 30, 2011, net revenues for the three and six months ended September 30, 2011 from two major customers accounted for 31%, of our total net revenues. The Company maintains reserves for bad debt and such losses, in the aggregate, which historically have not exceeded our estimates.

Inventories

The Company’s inventories consist of accessories that are sold and shipped to customers along with pay-per-use containers that are not returned to the Company along with the containers at the culmination of the customer’s shipping cycle. Inventories are stated at the lower of standard cost or current estimated market value. Cost is determined using the standard cost method which approximates the first-in, first-to-expire method. At September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012, the Company’s inventories consisted of $28,340 and $32,559 in raw materials, respectively, and $27,579 and $19,195 in finished goods, respectively.

 

Property and Equipment

The Company provides shipping containers to its customers and charges a fee in exchange for the use of the container. The Company’s arrangements are similar to the accounting standard for leases since they convey the right to use the containers over a period of time. The Company retains title to the containers and provides its customers the use of the container for a specified shipping cycle. At the culmination of the customer’s shipping cycle, the container is returned to the Company. As a result the Company classifies the containers as property and equipment.

Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Cryogenic shippers, which comprise 86% of the Company’s net property and equipment balance at September 30, 2012, are depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives of three years. Equipment and furniture are depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives (generally three to seven years) and leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the asset or the lease term, whichever is shorter. Equipment acquired under capital leases is amortized over the estimated useful life of the assets or term of the lease, whichever is shorter and included in depreciation and amortization expense.

Betterments, renewals and extraordinary repairs that extend the lives of the assets are capitalized; other repairs and maintenance charges are expensed as incurred. The cost and related accumulated depreciation and amortization applicable to assets retired are removed from the accounts, and the gain or loss on disposition is recognized in current operations.

Depreciation expense for property and equipment was $92,705 and $159,546 and $59,254 and $114,424 for the three and six months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets are comprised of patents and trademarks and software development costs. The Company capitalizes costs of obtaining patents and trademarks which are amortized, using the straight-line method over their estimated useful life of five years. The Company capitalizes certain costs related to software developed for internal use. Software development costs incurred during the preliminary or maintenance project stages are expensed as incurred, while costs incurred during the application development stage are capitalized and amortized using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the software, which is five years. Capitalized costs include purchased materials and costs of services including the valuation of warrants issued to consultants.

Amortization expense for intangible assets for the three and six months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011 was $29,197 and $57,385 and $23,906 and $47,627, respectively. All of the Company’s intangible assets are subject to amortization.

Long-lived Assets

If indicators of impairment exist, we assess the recoverability of the affected long-lived assets by determining whether the carrying value of such assets can be recovered through undiscounted future operating cash flows. If impairment is indicated, we measure the amount of such impairment by comparing the fair value to the carrying value. We believe the future cash flows to be received from the long-lived assets will exceed the assets’ carrying value, and accordingly, we have not recognized any impairment losses at September 30, 2012 or March 31, 2012.

Financing Costs

Financing costs represent costs incurred in connection with private equity financing. Financing from equity financings are netted against the gross proceeds received from the equity financings.

During the year ended March 31, 2012, the Company incurred $572,255 of offering costs in connection with the private placement that closed in February and March 2012, which were charged to additional paid-in capital and netted against the proceeds received in the private placements. As of March 31, 2012, offering costs of $78,480 related to the private placement were included in accounts payable and accrued expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet and were paid during the six months ended September 30, 2012. During the three and six months ended September 30, 2012, the Company incurred $103,542 of offering costs in connection with this private placement. As of September 30, 2012, offering costs of $59,569 related to this private placement were included in accounts payable and accrued expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet.

During the three and six months ended September 30, 2011, the Company incurred $0 and $36,543, respectively, of offering costs in connection with the private placement that closed in February 2011 which were charged to additional paid-in capital and netted against the proceeds received in the private placements. During the six months ended September 30, 2011, the Company made payments of $121,727 in connection with offering cost related to the private placement in February 2011.

 

Convertible Debentures

If a conversion feature of conventional convertible debt is not accounted for as a derivative instrument and provides for a rate of conversion that is below market value, this feature is characterized as a beneficial conversion feature (“BCF”). A BCF is recorded by the Company as a debt discount. The convertible debt is recorded net of the discount related to the BCF. The Company amortizes the discount to interest expense over the life of the debt using the effective interest rate method.

Derivative Liabilities

Certain of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock purchase warrants which have exercise price reset features are treated as derivatives for accounting purposes. The common stock purchase warrants were not issued with the intent of effectively hedging any future cash flow, fair value of any asset, liability or any net investment in a foreign operation. The warrants do not qualify for hedge accounting, and as such, all future changes in the fair value of these warrants are recognized currently in earnings until such time as the warrants are exercised, expire or the related rights have been waived. These common stock purchase warrants do not trade in an active securities market, and as such, the Company estimates the fair value of these warrants using the Black-Scholes option pricing model (“Black-Scholes”) (see Note 6).

Supply Concentration Risks

The component parts for our products are primarily manufactured at third party manufacturing facilities. The Company also has a warehouse at our corporate offices in Lake Forest, California, where the Company is capable of manufacturing certain parts and fully assembles its products. Most of the components that the Company uses in the manufacture of its products are available from more than one qualified supplier. For some components, however, there are relatively few alternate sources of supply and the establishment of additional or replacement suppliers may not be accomplished immediately; however, the Company has identified alternate qualified suppliers which the Company believes could replace existing suppliers. Should this occur, the Company believes that with its current level of shippers and production rate the Company has enough components to cover a four to six week maximum disruption gap in production.

There are no specific long-term agreements with any manufacturer nor are there any long-term commitments to any manufacturer. The Company believes that any of the manufacturers currently used by it could be replaced within a short period of time as none have a proprietary component or a substantial capital investment specific to its products.

Revenue Recognition

The Company provides shipping containers to their customers and charges a fee in exchange for the use of the shipper. The Company’s arrangements are similar to the accounting standard for leases since they convey the right to use the containers over a period of time. The Company retains title to the containers and provides its customers the use of the container for a specified shipping cycle. At the culmination of the customer’s shipping cycle, the container is returned to the Company.

The Company recognizes revenue for the use of the shipper at the time of the delivery of the shipper to the end user of the enclosed materials, and at the time that collectability is reasonably certain. Revenue is based on gross sales, net of discounts and allowances.

Accounting for Shipping and Handling Revenue, Fees and Costs

The Company classifies amounts billed for shipping and handling as revenue. Shipping and handling fees and costs are included in cost of revenues in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations.

Research and Development Expenses

Expenditures relating to research and development are expensed in the period incurred. Research and development expenses to date have consisted primarily of costs associated with continually improving the features of the Cryoport Express® System including the web based customer service portal and the Cryoport Express ® Shippers. Further, these efforts are expected to lead to the introduction of shippers of varying sizes based on market requirements, constructed of lower cost materials and utilizing high volume manufacturing methods that will make it practical to provide the cryogenic packages offered by the Cryoport Express ® System. Other research and development effort has been directed toward improvements to the liquid nitrogen retention system to render it more reliable in the general shipping environment and to the design of the outer packaging. Alternative phase change materials in place of liquid nitrogen may be used to increase the potential markets these shippers can serve such as ambient and 2-8°C markets.

Stock-based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based payments to employees and directors in accordance with stock-based payment accounting guidance which requires all stock-based payments to employees and directors, including grants of employee stock options and warrants, to be recognized based upon their fair values. The fair value of stock-based awards is estimated at grant date using Black-Scholes and the portion that is ultimately expected to vest is recognized as compensation cost over the requisite service period.

 

Since stock-based compensation is recognized only for those awards that are ultimately expected to vest, the Company has applied an estimated forfeiture rate to unvested awards for the purpose of calculating compensation cost. These estimates will be revised, if necessary, in future periods if actual forfeitures differ from estimates. Changes in forfeiture estimates impact compensation cost in the period in which the change in estimate occurs. The estimated forfeiture rates at September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012 was zero as the Company has not had a significant history of forfeitures and does not expect significant forfeitures in the future.

Cash flows from the tax benefits resulting from tax deductions in excess of the compensation cost recognized for those options or warrants are classified as financing cash flows. Due to the Company’s loss position, there were no such tax benefits during the six months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011.

The Company uses Black-Scholes to estimate the fair value of stock-based awards. The determination of fair value using Black-Scholes is affected by its stock price as well as assumptions regarding a number of complex and subjective variables, including expected stock price volatility, risk-free interest rate, expected dividends and projected employee stock option exercise behaviors (see Note 8 for the Stock Plan Description and summary of assumptions and activity).

Equity Instruments Issued to Non-Employees for Acquiring Goods or Services

Issuances of the Company’s common stock for acquiring goods or services are measured at the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date for the fair value of the equity instruments issued to consultants or vendors is determined at the earlier of (i) the date at which a commitment for performance to earn the equity instruments is reached (a “performance commitment” which would include a penalty considered to be of a magnitude that is a sufficiently large disincentive for nonperformance) or (ii) the date at which performance is complete. When it is appropriate for the Company to recognize the cost of a transaction during financial reporting periods prior to the measurement date, for purposes of recognition of costs during those periods, the equity instrument is measured at the then-current fair values at each of those interim financial reporting dates (see Note 8).

Income Taxes

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is provided for certain deferred tax assets if it is more likely than not that the Company will not realize tax assets through future operations. The Company is a subchapter “C” corporation and files a federal income tax return. The Company files separate state income tax returns for California and Nevada. It is not anticipated that there will be a significant change in the unrecognized tax benefits over the next twelve months.

In June 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an interpretation which clarified the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in the financial statements in accordance with current guidance. The updated guidance provides that a tax benefit from an uncertain tax position may be recognized when it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including resolutions of any related appeals or litigation processes, based on the technical merits. Income tax positions must meet a more likely than not recognition threshold. The Company did not record any unrecognized tax benefits upon adoption of the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes. The Company’s policy is to recognize interest and penalties that would be assessed in relation to the settlement value of unrecognized tax benefits as a component of income tax expense.

Basic and Diluted Loss Per Share

Basic loss per common share is computed based on the weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average shares outstanding assuming all dilutive potential common shares were issued. In addition, in computing the dilutive effect of convertible securities, the numerator is adjusted to add back the after-tax amount of interest, if any, recognized in the period associated with any convertible debt. For the three and six months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, the Company was in a loss position and the basic and diluted loss per share are the same since the effect of stock options, warrants and convertible notes payable on loss per share was anti-dilutive and thus not included in the diluted loss per share calculation. The impact under the treasury stock method of dilutive stock options and warrants and the if-converted method of convertible debt would have resulted in weighted average common shares outstanding of approximately 37,761,000 and 37,779,000, and 36,482,000 and 35,521,000 for the three and six month periods ended September 30, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Segment Reporting

We currently operate in only one segment.

 

Fair Value Measurements

The Company determines the fair value of its derivative instruments using a three-level hierarchy for fair value measurements which these assets and liabilities must be grouped, based on significant levels of observable or unobservable inputs. Observable inputs reflect market data obtained from independent sources, while unobservable inputs reflect the Company’s market assumptions. This hierarchy requires the use of observable market data when available. These two types of inputs have created the following fair-value hierarchy:

Level 1 — Valuations based on unadjusted quoted market prices in active markets for identical securities. Currently the Company does not have any items classified as Level 1.

Level 2 — Valuations based on observable inputs (other than Level 1 prices), such as quoted prices for similar assets at the measurement date; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3 — Valuations based on inputs that are unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement, and involve management judgment. The Company uses Black-Scholes to determine the fair value of the instruments. If the inputs used to measure fair value fall in different levels of the fair value hierarchy, a financial security’s hierarchy level is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The following table presents the Company’s warrants measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2012 and March 31, 2012 classified using the valuation hierarchy:

 

                 
    Level 3
Carrying Value
September  30,
2012
    Level 3
Carrying Value
March  31,
2012
 
   
   
   
    (unaudited)        

Derivative Liabilities

  $ 3,510     $ 37,334  
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances for the Company’s derivative liabilities measured at fair value using Level 3 inputs for the six months ended September 30, 2012 and 2011:

 

                 
    Level 3
Carrying Value
2012
    Level 3
Carrying Value
2011
 
   
   

Balance at March 31,

  $ 37,334     $ 156,497  

Change in fair value

    (33,824     (48,968
   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at September 30, (unaudited)

  $ 3,510     $ 107,529