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EXCEL - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.Financial_Report.xls
8-K - CURRENT REPORT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_8k.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.R2.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.R1.htm
XML - IDEA: XBRL DOCUMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.R3.htm
EX-99.2 - UNAUDITED PRO FORMA COMBINED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspn_ex992.htm
EX-10.1 - MATHEWS EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex101.htm
EX-10.10 - PLEDGE AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1010.htm
EX-10.11 - PLEDGE AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1011.htm
EX-10.12 - PLEDGE AGREEMENT LETTER - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1012.htm
EX-10.13 - EQUITY INCENTIVE PLAN - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1013.htm
EX-10.15 - EMPLOYEE NON-QUALIFIED STOCK OPTION AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1015.htm
EX-10.14 - EMPLOYEE NON-QUALIFIED STOCK OPTION AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1014.htm
EX-10.17 - AMENDMENT OF MATHEWS EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1017.htm
EX-10.16 - STOCK PLEDGE AGREEMENT (2) - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1016.htm
EX-10.18 - AMENDMENT OF POWERD EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex1018.htm
EX-10.2 - GARRITY EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex102.htm
EX-10.3 - POWERS EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex103.htm
EX-10.4 - SIEGEL EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex104.htm
EX-10.5 - WILLIAMS EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex105.htm
EX-10.6 - SPADA AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex106.htm
EX-10.8 - LOCK-UP SPADA - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex108.htm
EX-10.7 - CONSULTING AGREEMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex107.htm
EX-10.9 - LOCK-UP - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex109.htm
EX-16.1 - LAKE ASSOCIATES, CPA?S LLC - FORMER AUDITOR - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex161.htm
EX-2.1 - EXHIBIT 2.1 - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex21.htm
EX-2.2 - EXHIBIT 2.2 - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex22.htm
EX-2.3 - AGREEMENT AND PLAN OF MERGER - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex23.htm
EX-2.5 - CERTIFICATE OF MERGER - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex25.htm
EX-2.4 - ARTICLES OF MERGER - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex24.htm
EX-3.2 - BYLAWS - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex32.htm
EX-3.1 - CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex31.htm
EX-3.3 - CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex33.htm
EX-3.4 - ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT - ASPEN GROUP, INC.aspu_ex34.htm
 
EXHIBIT 99.1
 
Aspen University Inc. and Subsidiary Index to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
 
 
   
Page
Financial Statements
   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
F-2
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2011 and 2010
 
F-3
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010
 
F-4
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Equity for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010
 
F-5
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010
 
F-6
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
F-7
 
 
 

 
 
F-1

 
 
 
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of:
Aspen University Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Aspen University Inc. and Subsidiary at December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2011.  These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement.  An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements.  An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation.  We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Aspen University Inc. and Subsidiary as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2011 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern.  As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has a net loss allocable to common stockholders and net cash used in operating activities in 2011 of $2,208,023 and $1,082,213, respectively, and has an accumulated deficit of $3,116,410 at December 31, 2011. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plan in regards to these matters is also described in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

/s/ Salberg & Company, P.A.

SALBERG & COMPANY, P.A.
Boca Raton, Florida
March 19, 2012
2295 NW Corporate Blvd., Suite 240 • Boca Raton, FL 33431-7328
Phone: (561) 995-8270 • Toll Free: (866) CPA-8500 • Fax: (561) 995-1920
www.salbergco.com • info@salbergco.com
Member National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts • Registered with the PCAOB
Member CPAConnect with Affiliated Offices Worldwide • Member AICPA Center for Audit Quality
 
F-2

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Assets
           
             
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 766,602     $ 294,838  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $47,595 and $47,934, respectively
    847,234       1,064,663  
Accounts receivable, secured - related party
    772,793       780,169  
Receivable from stockholder, secured - related party
    2,209,960       2,195,084  
Note receivable from officer, secured - related party
    150,000       -  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    103,478       5,794  
Total current assets
    4,850,067       4,340,548  
                 
Property and equipment, net
    129,944       21,884  
Intangible assets, net
    1,236,996       494,161  
Other assets
    6,559       6,559  
                 
Total assets
  $ 6,223,566     $ 4,863,152  
                 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
               
                 
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 1,094,029     $ 313,326  
Accrued expenses
    167,528       266,116  
Deferred revenue
    835,694       890,204  
Notes payable, current portion
    6,383       30,871  
Deferred rent, current portion
    4,291       2,324  
Total current liabilities
    2,107,925       1,502,841  
                 
Line of credit
    233,215       243,499  
Loans payable
    200,000       200,000  
Notes payable
    8,768       15,151  
Deferred rent
    21,274       25,565  
Total liabilities
    2,571,182       1,987,056  
                 
Commitments and contingencies - See Note 10
               
                 
Temporary equity:
               
Series A preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 850,500 shares designated,
               
850,395 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
    809,900       -  
Series D preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 3,700,000 shares designated,
               
1,176,750 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
               
(liquidation value of $1,176,750)
    1,109,268       -  
Series E preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 2,000,000 shares designated,
               
1,700,000 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
               
(liquidation value of $1,700,000)
    1,550,817       -  
Total temporary equity
    3,469,985       -  
                 
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 20,000,000 shares authorized
               
Series C preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 11,411,400 shares designated,
               
11,307,450 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
               
(liquidation value of $11,307)
    11,307       -  
Series B preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 368,421 shares designated,
               
368,411 and 0 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
    368       -  
Common stock, $0.001 par value; 60,000,000 shares authorized,
               
11,837,930 and 21,000,000 issued and outstanding, respectively
    11,838       21,000  
Additional paid-in capital
    3,275,296       3,850,809  
Accumulated deficit
    (3,116,410 )     (995,713 )
Total stockholders’ equity
    182,399       2,876,096  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 6,223,566     $ 4,863,152  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
F-3

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

   
For the
   
For the
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
             
Revenues
  $ 4,477,931     $ 3,028,699  
Revenues - related parties
    -       125,000  
Total revenues
    4,477,931       3,153,699  
                 
Costs and expenses:
               
Instructional costs and services
    2,493,341       1,759,140  
Marketing and promotional
    1,181,558       242,134  
General and adminstrative
    2,634,453       998,777  
Depreciation and amortization
    264,082       338,803  
Total costs and expenses
    6,573,434       3,338,854  
                 
Operating loss
    (2,095,503 )     (185,155 )
                 
Other income (expense):
               
Interest income
    2,656       8  
Interest expense
    (27,850 )     (18,399 )
Total other expense
    (25,194 )     (18,391 )
                 
Loss before income taxes
    (2,120,697 )     (203,546 )
                 
Income tax expense (benefit)
    -       -  
                 
Net loss
    (2,120,697 )     (203,546 )
                 
Cumulative preferred stock dividends
    (87,326 )     -  
                 
Net loss allocable to common stockholders
  $ (2,208,023 )   $ (203,546 )
                 
Loss per share:
               
Basic and diluted
  $ (0.14 )   $ (0.01 )
                 
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding:
               
Basic and diluted
    15,377,413       21,000,000  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
F-4

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
   
Preferred Stock
               
Additional
         
Total
 
   
Series B
   
Series C
   
Common Stock
   
Paid-In
   
Accumulated
   
Stockholders'
 
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Capital
   
Deficit
   
Equity
 
Balance at December 31, 2009
    -     $ -       -     $ -       21,000,000     $ 21,000     $ 3,600,309     $ (792,167 )   $ 2,829,142  
Sale of common stock contributed by majority stockholder for cash
    -       -       -       -       -       -       250,500       -       250,500  
Net loss, 2010
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (203,546 )     (203,546 )
Balance at December 31, 2010
    -       -       -       -       21,000,000       21,000       3,850,809       (995,713 )     2,876,096  
Rescission of common shares
    -       -       -       -       (170,100 )     (170 )     (164,830 )     -       (165,000 )
Common shares issued as part of merger
    -       -       -       -       3,200,000       3,200       -       -       3,200  
Treasury shares acquired for cash
    -       -       -       -       (884,520 )     (885 )     (760,315 )     -       (761,200 )
Conversion of convertible notes into Series B preferred shares
    368,411       368       -       -       -       -       349,632       -       350,000  
Conversion of common shares into Series C preferred shares
    -       -       11,307,450       11,307       (11,307,450 )     (11,307 )     -       -       -  
Net loss, 2011
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (2,120,697 )     (2,120,697 )
Balance at December 31, 2011
    368,411     $ 368       11,307,450     $ 11,307       11,837,930     $ 11,838     $ 3,275,296     $ (3,116,410 )   $ 182,399  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
F-5

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

   
For the
   
For the
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
           
Net loss
  $ (2,120,697 )   $ (203,546 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
               
Provision for bad debts
    21,200       23,379  
Depreciation and amortization
    264,082       338,803  
Issuance of convertible notes in exchange for services rendered
    22,000       -  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisition:
               
Accounts receivable
    196,229       (339,313 )
Accounts receivable, secured - related party
    7,376       (111,353 )
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    (97,684 )     821  
Accounts payable
    780,703       105,793  
Accrued expenses
    (98,588 )     84,802  
Deferred rent
    (2,324 )     (358 )
Deferred revenue
    (54,510 )     516,992  
Settlement payable
    -       (169,403 )
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
    (1,082,213 )     246,617  
                 
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Cash acquired as part of merger
    3,200       -  
Purchases of property and equipment
    (133,431 )     -  
Advances to stockholder
    (14,876 )     (140,939 )
Purchases of intangible assets
    (981,546 )     (189,905 )
Advances to officer in exchange for promissory note
    (388,210 )     -  
Proceeds received from officer loan repayments
    238,210       -  
Net cash used in investing activities
    (1,276,653 )     (330,844 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Proceeds from (repayments on) line of credit, net
    (10,284 )     6,753  
Principal payments on notes payable
    (30,871 )     (25,399 )
Proceeds from sale of common stock
    -       250,500  
Proceeds received from issuance of convertible notes
    328,000       -  
Proceeds from issuance of Series A, D and E preferred stock
    3,469,985       -  
Disbursements for stockholder rescissions
    (165,000 )     -  
Disbursements to purchase treasury shares
    (761,200 )     -  
Net cash provided by financing activities
    2,830,630       231,854  
                 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    471,764       147,627  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
    294,838       147,211  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
  $ 766,602     $ 294,838  
                 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
               
Cash paid for interest
  $ 34,804     $ 15,773  
Cash paid for income taxes
  $ -     $ -  
                 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:
               
Conversion of convertible notes to Series B preferred shares
  $ 350,000     $ -  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
F-6

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Note 1.Nature of Operations and Going Concern

Overview
 
Aspen University Inc. (together with its subsidiary, the “Company”, “Aspen” or the “University”) was founded in Colorado in 1987 as the International School of Information Management.  On September 30, 2004, the University was acquired by Higher Education Management Group, Inc. (“HEMG”) and changed its name to Aspen University Inc.  On May 13, 2011, the Company formed in Colorado a subsidiary, Aspen University Marketing, LLC, which is currently inactive.
 
Aspen’s mission is to become an institution of choice for adult learners by offering cost-effective, comprehensive, and relevant online education.  One of the key differences between Aspen and other publicly-traded, exclusively online, for-profit universities is that approximately 88% of our degree-seeking students (as of December 31, 2011) were enrolled in graduate degree programs (Master or Doctorate degree program).  Since 1993, we have been nationally accredited by the Distance Education and Training Council (“DETC”), a national accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education (the “DOE”).
 
Merger with Education Growth Corporation

On May 19, 2011, the Company closed an Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”) wherein the Company acquired Education Growth Corporation, Inc. (“EGC”), a privately-held corporation formed in Delaware on January 21, 2011.  EGC merged with and into Aspen University Inc. and Aspen University Inc. was the surviving corporation.

The consideration with respect to the merger with EGC consisted of 3,200,000 common shares of the Company.  EGC was not an operating company and it did not meet the definition of a business for business combination accounting.  EGC did possess intellectual property and, accordingly, the merger was accounted for as an asset acquisition.  Since the stockholders of EGC acquired more than a 10% voting interest in the Company, the asset acquisition was accounted for in accordance with Staff Accounting Bulletin, Topic 5G, “Transfers of Nonmonetary Assets by Promoters or Shareholders”.  Accordingly, the assets acquired in the merger have been recorded at the transferors’ historical cost basis determined under GAAP.  The net purchase price, including acquisition costs paid, was allocated to assets acquired and liabilities assumed as follows:
 
Current assets (including cash of $3,200)
  $ 3,200  
Intangible assets
    -  
Liabilities assumed
    -  
Net purchase price
  $ 3,200  
 
Intangible assets acquired include a proprietary database of education-specific media publishers, a database of key words and performance metrics specific to the internet search channel of the education market, and a proprietary lead database processing architecture.

Going Concern

The Company had a net loss allocable to common stockholders of $2,208,023 and negative cash flows from operations of $1,082,213 for the year ended December 31, 2011.  The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is contingent on securing additional debt or equity financing from outside investors.  These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.  In this regard, we note that the Company raised $2,876,750 during the second half of 2011.  Management plans to continue to implement its business plan and to fund operations by raising additional capital through the issuance of debt and equity securities.  Since the beginning of 2012, the Company has received an additional $450,000 in funding from the sale of convertible note instruments and warrants.  
 
Also, the Company has presently engaged an underwriter, Laidlaw & Company (UK) Ltd., to assist in raising up to $6,000,000 in additional equity capital subsequent to the close of the merger with Aspen Group Inc.  It is important to note that, based on the accompanying consolidated financial statements for the periods presented, the Company is reporting composite scores of 1.75 (2011) and 1.80 (2010) (calculated in accordance with U.S. Department of Education regulations), which is above the 1.5 minimum composite score required for an institution to be deemed financially responsible without the need for further federal oversight.  
 
The financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recovery of the recorded assets or the classification of the liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

Note 2. Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Aspen University Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiary.  All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
 
 
F-7

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Use of Estimates
 
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the consolidated financial statements.Actual results could differ from those estimates.  Significant estimates in the accompanying consolidated financial statements include the allowance for doubtful accounts and other receivables, the valuation of collateral on certain receivables, the valuation and amortization periods of intangible assets, and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets.
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
The Company considers all highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents.

Fair Value Measurements

Fair value is the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants.  The Company classifies assets and liabilities recorded at fair value under the fair value hierarchy based upon the observability of inputs used in valuation techniques.  Observable inputs (highest level) reflect market data obtained from independent sources, while unobservable inputs (lowest level) reflect internally developed market assumptions. The fair value measurements are classified under the following hierarchy:
 
 
 
 
Level 1—Observable inputs that reflect quoted market prices (unadjusted) for identical assets and liabilities in active markets;
 
 
 
 
Level 2—Observable inputs, other than quoted market prices, that are either directly or indirectly observable in the marketplace for identical or similar assets and liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets and liabilities; and
 
 
 
 
Level 3—Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity that are significant to the fair value of assets or liabilities.

The estimated fair value of certain financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses are carried at historical cost basis, which approximates their fair values because of the short-term nature of these instruments.

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts Receivable
 
Accounts receivable consist primarily of student accounts receivable, which represent amounts due for tuition, technology fees and other fees from students who are in the course of completing a degree or certificate program.  Students generally fund their education through personal funds, grants and/or loans under various DOE Title IV programs, or tuition assistance from military and corporate employers.  Accounts receivable also includes amounts due from the sale of course curricula to other entities, which last occurred in 2010.
 
Accounts and student loans receivable are stated at the amount management expects to collect from outstanding balances.  An allowance for doubtful accounts is estimated by management based on (i) an assessment of individual accounts receivable over a specific aging and amount (and all other balances on a pooled basis based on historical collection experience), (ii) consideration of the nature of the receivable accounts and (iii) potential changes in the economic environment.  Bad debt expense is recorded in instructional costs and services expense in the consolidated statements of operations.
 
All students are required to select both a primary and secondary payment option with respect to amounts due to the University for tuition, fees and other expenses.  The most common payment option for the University’s students is personal funds or payment made on their behalf by an employer.  In instances where a student selects financial aid as the primary payment option, he or she often selects personal cash as the secondary option.  If a student who has selected financial aid as his or her primary payment option withdraws prior to the end of a course but after the date that the University’s institutional refund period has expired, the student will have incurred the obligation to pay the full cost of the course.  If the withdrawal occurs before the date at which the student has earned 100% of his or her financial aid, the University will have to return all or a portion of the Title IV funds to the DOE and the student will owe the University all amounts incurred that are in excess of the amount of financial aid that the student earned and that the University is entitled to retain.  In this case, the University must collect the receivable using the student’s second payment option.
 
 
F-8

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
For accounts receivable from students, the University records an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability, failure or refusal of its students to make required payments, which includes the recovery of financial aid funds advanced to a student for amounts in excess of the student’s cost of tuition and related fees.  The University determines the adequacy of its allowance for doubtful accounts based on an analysis of its historical bad debt experience, current economic trends, and the aging of the accounts receivable and student status.  The University applies reserves to its receivables based upon an estimate of the risk presented by the age of the receivables and student status.  Historically, the University has written off accounts receivable balances at the earlier of the time the balances were deemed uncollectible, or one year after the revenue is generated.  The University continues to reflect accounts receivable with an offsetting allowance as long as management believes there is a reasonable possibility of collection.

For accounts receivable from companies, the Company estimates its allowance for doubtful accounts by evaluating specific accounts where information indicates the customers may have an inability to meet financial obligations, such as bankruptcy proceedings and receivable amounts outstanding for an extended period beyond contractual terms.  In these cases, the Company uses assumptions and judgment, based on the best available facts and circumstances, to record a specific allowance for those customers against amounts due to reduce the receivable to the amount expected to be collected.  These specific allowances are re-evaluated and adjusted as additional information is received.  The amounts calculated are analyzed to determine the total amount of the allowance.  The Company may also record a general allowance as necessary.

Direct write-offs are taken in the period when the Company has exhausted its efforts to collect overdue and unpaid receivables or otherwise evaluate other circumstances that indicate that the Company should abandon such efforts.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation.  Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the related assets per the following table.

Category
 
 Depreciation Term
Call center equipment
 
5 years
Computer and office equipment
 
5 years
Library (online)
 
 3 years
Vehicle
 
5 years
 
Leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the shorter of the lease term or the estimated useful lives of the assets.  Upon the retirement or disposition of property and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation is removed and a gain or loss is recorded in the consolidated statements of operations.  Repairs and maintenance costs are expensed in the period incurred.

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets with definite lives are stated at cost less accumulated amortization.  Amortization is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets per the following table.

Category
 
 Depreciation Term
Call center
 
5 years
Course curricula
 
5 years
 
F-9

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Long-Lived Assets

The Company assesses potential impairment to its long-lived assets when there is evidence that events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recorded when the carrying amount of the long-lived asset is not recoverable and exceeds its fair value. The carrying amount of a long-lived asset is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset. Any required impairment loss is measured as the amount by which the carrying amount of a long-lived asset exceeds fair value and is recorded as a reduction in the carrying value of the related asset and an expense to operating results. There have been no impairment losses recognized by the Company for any periods presented.

Leases

The Company enters into various lease agreements in conducting its business.  At the inception of each lease, the University evaluates the lease agreement to determine whether the lease is an operating or capital lease.  Leases may contain initial periods of free rent and/or periodic escalations.  When such items are included in a lease agreement, the Company records rent expense on a straight-line basis over the initial term of a lease. The difference between the rent payment and the straight-line rent expense is recorded as a deferred rent liability.  The University expenses any additional payments under its operating leases for taxes, insurance or other operating expenses as incurred.

Revenue Recognition and Deferred Revenue

Revenues consist primarily of tuition and fees derived from courses taught by the University online as well as from related educational resources that the University provides to its students, such as access to our online materials and learning management system.  Tuition revenue and most fees from related educational resources are recognized pro-rata over the applicable period of instruction.  The University maintains an institutional tuition refund policy, which provides for all or a portion of tuition to be refunded if a student withdraws during stated refund periods.  Certain States in which students reside impose separate, mandatory refund policies, which override the University’s policy to the extent in conflict.  If a student withdraws at a time when a portion or none of the tuition is refundable, then in accordance with its revenue recognition policy, the University immediately recognizes as revenue the tuition that was not refunded.  Since the University recognizes revenue pro-rata over the term of the course and because, under its institutional refund policy, the amount subject to refund is never greater than the amount of the revenue that has been deferred, under the University’s accounting policies revenue is not recognized with respect to amounts that could potentially be refunded.  The University also charges students annual fees for library, technology and other services, which are deferred and recognized over the related service period.  Deferred revenue and student deposits in any period represent the excess of tuition, fees, and other student payments received as compared to amounts recognized as revenue and are reflected as current liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.  The University’s educational programs have starting and ending dates that differ from its fiscal quarters.  Therefore, at the end of each fiscal quarter, a portion of revenue from these programs is not yet earned.  Other revenues may be recognized as sales occur or services are performed.

Instructional Costs and Services

Instructional costs and services consist primarily of costs related to the administration and delivery of the Company's educational programs.  This expense category includes compensation for faculty and administrative personnel, costs associated with online faculty, curriculum and new program development costs, bad debt expense related to accounts receivable, financial aid processing costs, technology license costs and costs associated with other support groups that provide services directly to the students.

Marketing and Promotional Costs

Marketing and promotional costs include compensation of personnel engaged in marketing and recruitment, as well as costs associated with purchasing leads, producing marketing materials, and advertising.  Such costs are generally affected by the cost of advertising media and leads, the efficiency of the Company's marketing and recruiting efforts, compensation for the Company's enrollment personnel and expenditures on advertising initiatives for new and existing academic programs.  Advertising costs consists primarily of marketing leads and other branding and promotional activities.  Non-direct response advertising activities are expensed as incurred, or the first time the advertising takes place, depending on the type of advertising activity.

 
F-10

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
General and Administrative

General and administrative expenses include compensation of employees engaged in corporate management, finance, human resources, information technology, compliance and other corporate functions.  General and administrative expenses also include professional services fees, travel and entertainment expenses and facility costs.

Income Taxes

The Company uses the asset and liability method to compute the differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and the related financial amounts. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that more likely than not will be realized. The Company has deferred tax assets and liabilities that reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes. Deferred tax assets are subject to periodic recoverability assessments. Realization of the deferred tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities, is principally dependent upon achievement of projected future taxable income.

The Company records a liability for unrecognized tax benefits resulting from uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The Company accounts for uncertainty in income taxes using a two-step approach for evaluating tax positions. Step one, recognition, occurs when the Company concludes that a tax position, based solely on its technical merits, is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination. Step two, measurement, is only addressed if the position is more likely than not to be sustained. Under step two, the tax benefit is measured as the largest amount of benefit, determined on a cumulative probability basis, which is more likely than not to be realized upon ultimate settlement. The Company recognizes interest and penalties, if any, related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense.

Stock-Based Compensation

Stock-based compensation expense is measured at the grant date fair value of the award and is expensed over the requisite services period.  For employee stock-based awards, the Company calculates the fair value of the award on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model.  Determining the fair value of stock-based awards at the grant date under this model requires judgment, including estimating volatility, employee stock option exercise behaviors and forfeiture rates.  The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of stock-based awards represent the Company's best estimates, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management judgment.  For non-employee stock-based awards, the Company calculates the fair value of the award on the date of grant in the same manner as employee awards, however, the awards are revalued at the end of each reporting period and the prorata compensation expense is adjusted accordingly until such time the nonemployee award is fully vested, at which time the total compensation recognized to date shall equal the fair value of the stock-based award as calculated on the measurement date, which is the date at which the award recipient’s performance is complete.  The estimation of stock-based awards that will ultimately vest requires judgment, and to the extent actual results or updated estimates differ from original estimates, such amounts are recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period estimates are revised.

Net Loss Per Share

Net loss per common share is based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each year. Common stock equivalents, including 456,000 and 0 stock warrants for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, are not considered in diluted loss per share because the effect would be anti-dilutive.
 
In addition to the above common stock equivalents, the Company has outstanding preferred shares (Series A through E) that are contingently convertible into common shares upon the Company becoming an SEC reporting company.  There were an aggregate of 15,403,006 and 0 preferred shares contingently convertible into 13,677,274 and 0 common shares for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, that could be potentially dilutive in the future.  As a result of its merger with Aspen Group, Inc., on March 13, 2012 (the SEC Reporting Date), the Company became subject to SEC reporting requirements.  Accordingly, all of the preferred shares were automatically converted into common shares on that date (See Note 16).
 
Segment Information

The Company operates in one reportable segment as a single educational delivery operation using a core infrastructure that serves the curriculum and educational delivery needs of its online students regardless of geography.  The Company's chief operating decision makers, its CEO and President, manage the Company's operations as a whole, and no revenue, expense or operating income information is evaluated by the chief operating decision makers on any component level.
 
 
F-11

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2009-13, which amends Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 605, Revenue Recognition. This update changes the requirements for establishing separate units of accounting in a multiple element arrangement and requires the allocation of arrangement consideration to each deliverable based on the relative selling price. ASU 2009-13 is effective for revenue arrangements entered into in fiscal years beginning on or after June 15, 2010. The Company adopted ASU 2009-13 effective January 1, 2011, and such adoption did not have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-28, which amends ASC Topic 350, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other. This update amends the criteria for performing Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test for reporting units with zero or negative carrying amounts and requires performing Step 2 if qualitative factors indicate that it is more likely than not that a goodwill impairment exists. The amendments in the update are effective for fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The Company adopted ASU 2010-28 effective January 1, 2011, and such adoption did not have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

In December 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-29, which amends ASC Topic 805, Business Combinations, which clarifies that, when presenting comparative financial statements, SEC registrants should disclose revenue and earnings of the combined entity as though any current period business combinations had occurred as of the beginning of the comparable prior annual reporting period only. The update also expands the supplemental pro forma disclosures to include a description of the nature and amount of material, nonrecurring pro forma adjustments directly attributable to the business combination included in the reported pro forma revenue and earnings. ASU 2010-29 is effective prospectively for material (either on an individual or aggregate basis) business combinations entered into in fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2010, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2010-29 effective January 1, 2011, and such adoption did not have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

In June 2011, the FASB, issued ASU 2011-05, which amends ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income, which requires an entity to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. It eliminates the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. The ASU does not change the items which must be reported in other comprehensive income, how such items are measured or when they must be reclassified to net income. This ASU is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company will adopt ASU 2011-05 effective January 1, 2012, and such adoption is not expected to have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-08, which amends ASC Topic 350, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other, to allow entities to use a qualitative approach to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. If after performing the qualitative assessment an entity determines it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. However, if an entity concludes otherwise, then it is required to perform the first step of the two-step goodwill impairment test. The amendments are effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. Early adoption is permitted, including for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed as of a date before September 15, 2011, if an entity’s financial statements for the most recent annual or interim period have not yet been issued or, for nonpublic entities, have not yet been made available for issuance. The Company adopted ASU 2011-08 effective September 30, 2011, and such adoption did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-12, which amends ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income, to defer certain aspects of ASU 2011-05. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company adopted this guidance, along with ASU 2011-05, on December 31, 2011, and such adoption did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 
F-12

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
Note 3. Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable consisted of the following at December 31, 2011 and 2010:

   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
             
Accounts receivable
  $ 894,829     $ 1,112,597  
Less: Allowance for doubtful accounts
    (47,595 )     (47,934 )
Accounts receivable, net
  $ 847,234     $ 1,064,663  

Bad debt expense was $21,200 and $23,379 for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

See also Note 14 for concentrations of accounts receivable.

Note 4. Secured Accounts and Notes Receivable – Related Parties
 
On September 21, 2011, the Company loaned $238,210 to the chief executive officer of the Company (the “CEO”) in exchange for a promissory note bearing 3% per annum.  As collateral, the note was secured by 40,000 shares of common stock of interclick, Inc. (a publicly-traded company) that are owned personally by the CEO.  The note along with accrued interest was due and payable on June 21, 2012.  For the year ended December 31, 2011, interest income of $1,867 was recognized.  On December 20, 2011, the note along with accrued interest of $1,867 was paid in full (See Note 15).
 
On December 14, 2011, the Company loaned $150,000 to an officer of the Company in exchange for a promissory note bearing 3% per annum.  As collateral, the note was secured by 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock owned personally by the officer.  The note along with accrued interest was due and payable on September 14, 2012.  For the year ended December 31, 2011, interest income of $210 was recognized on the note receivable and is included in prepaid expenses and other current assets.  As of December 31, 2011, the balance due on the note receivable was $150,000, all of which is short-term.  On February 16, 2012, the note receivable from an officer was repaid along with accrued interest (See Notes 15 and 16).
 
On March 30, 2008 and December 1, 2008, the Company sold course curricula pursuant to marketing agreements to Higher Education Group Management, Inc. (“HEMG”), a related party and principal stockholder of the Company whose president is Mr. Patrick Spada, the former Chairman of the Company, in the amount of $455,000 and $600,000, respectively; UCC filings were filed accordingly.  Under the marketing agreements, the receivables are due net 60 months.  On September 16, 2011, HEMG pledged 772,793 Series C preferred shares of the Company as collateral for this account receivable.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the remaining balance owed was $772,793 and $780,169, respectively, and is shown as accounts receivable, secured – related party.  On March 8, 2012, due to the impending reduction in the value of the collateral as the result of the Series C conversion ratio and the Company’s inability to engage Mr. Spada in good faith negotiations to increase HEMG’s pledge, Michael Mathews, the Company’s CEO, pledged 117,943 common shares of the Company, owned personally by him, valued at $1.00 per share based on recent sales of capital stock as additional collateral to the accounts receivable, secured – related party.  On March 13, 2012, the Company deemed the receivables stemming from the sale of courseware curricula to be in default (See Notes 15 and 16).
 
During 2005 through September 2011, the Company advanced funds without board authority to both Patrick Spada (former Chairman of the Company) and HEMG, of which Patrick Spada is President.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the receivable due was $2,209,960 and $2,195,084, respectively, and is shown as receivable from stockholder, secured – related party.  Having been unsuccessful since December 2011 to negotiate a settlement agreement with Patrick Spada to secure the receivable, on March 13, 2012, three directors of the Company pledged an aggregate of 2,209,960 common shares of the Company, valued at $1.00 per share, based on recent sales of capital stock as collateral for the receivable from stockholder, secured – related party (See Notes 15 and 16).
 
F-13

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Note 5. Property and Equipment

Property and equipment consisted of the following at December 31, 2011 and 2010:
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Call center
  $ 121,313     $ -  
Computer and office equipment
    38,576       26,458  
Library (online)
    100,000       100,000  
Vehicle
    39,737       39,737  
      299,626       166,195  
Accumulated depreciation
    (169,682 )     (144,311 )
Property and equipment, net
  $ 129,944     $ 21,884  

Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 was $25,371 and $43,848, respectively.  Accumulated depreciation amounted to $169,682 and $144,311 as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Note 6. Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consisted of the following at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:

   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Course curricula
  $ 2,072,238     $ 2,018,147  
Call center
    927,455       -  
      2,999,693       2,018,147  
Accumulated amortization
    (1,762,697 )     (1,523,986 )
Intangible assets, net
  $ 1,236,996     $ 494,161  

The following is a schedule of estimated future amortization expense of intangible assets as of December 31, 2011:

 Year Ending December 31,
     
2012
  $ 325,461  
2013
    300,420  
2014
    258,188  
2015
    220,047  
2016
    132,880  
Total
  $ 1,236,996  

Amortization expense for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 was $238,711 and $294,955, respectively.

During 2010, the Company acquired an aggregate of $52,000 of courseware curricula from an entity owned by the brother of the former Chairman of the Company (See Note 15).

Note 7. Accrued Expenses

Accrued expenses consisted of the following at December 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:

   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
             
Accrued compensation
  $ 33,930     $ 89,847  
Accrued settlement payable
    40,000       100,000  
Other accrued expenses
    93,598       76,269  
Accrued expenses
  $ 167,528     $ 266,116  
 
F-14

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010

In October 2009, the Company entered into an agreement with Glen Oaks College (“Glen Oaks”) whereby Glen Oaks would provide technical training to Aspen students.  Under the agreement, the Company received $100,000 from Glen Oaks in order to develop and obtain the necessary approvals to begin the program.  On May 20, 2011, Glen Oaks filed suit against the Company to return the $100,000 when the agreement was not performed.  On June 23, 2011, the Company agreed to settle the matter and paid Glen Oaks $5,000 on that date.  On July 22, 2011, the Company and Glen Oaks entered into a settlement agreement whereby the Company agreed to pay Glen Oaks as follows: (i) $5,000 upon execution of the settlement agreement and (ii) $10,000 per month for nine consecutive months commencing August 1, 2011.  As of December 31, 2011, the remaining settlement payable to Glen Oaks was $40,000.

Note 8. Loans Payable
 
During 2009, the Company received advances aggregating $200,000 from three individuals.  Of the total funds received, $50,000 was received from a related party.  During 2011 and 2010, the loans were non-interest bearing demand loans and, therefore, no interest expense was recognized or due as of each balance sheet date presented.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the entire balance of the loans payable is included in long-term liabilities as the Company has subsequent to December 31, 2011 converted the loans into long-term convertible notes payable (See Notes 15 and 16).
 
Note 9. Notes Payable

Notes Payable – Related Party

In June 2009, the Company borrowed an aggregate of $45,000 from an individual, who was an officer of the Company at that time, in exchange for notes payable bearing interest at 18% per annum.  The notes were due in October 2009 and became demand notes at that time.  For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, interest expense of $2,393 and $7,126 was recognized on the notes.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the balance of accrued interest was $0 and $6,953, which is included in accrued expenses.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the balance due on the notes payable was $0 and $25,000, all of which is short-term (See Note 15).

Convertible Notes Payable
 
On March 6, 2011, the Company authorized the issuance of up to $350,000 of convertible notes that were convertible into Series B preferred shares at $0.95 per share, bearing interest of 6% per annum.  The notes were convertible beginning after the closing of the EGC Merger (See Note 1).  As of May 13, 2011, the Company had received an aggregate of $328,000 (of which $73,000 was received from related parties) from the sale of convertible notes.  The Company evaluated the convertible notes and determined that, for the embedded conversion option, there was no beneficial conversion value to record.  In addition, the Company issued an aggregate of $22,000 (of which $16,000 was to related parties) of convertible notes for services rendered.  In May 2011, $350,000 of the convertible notes were converted into 368,411 Series B preferred shares (See Notes 12 and 15).
 
Notes payable consisted of the following at December 31, 2011 and 2010:

   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
             
Note payable - related party originating June 15, 2009, monthly payment of interest only; interest at 18%
  $ -     $ 25,000  
                 
Note payable for vehicle, 72 monthly payments of $618; interest at 8.4% through March 2014
    15,151       21,022  
                 
Less: Current maturities
    (6,383 )     (30,871 )
Amount due after one year
  $ 8,768     $ 15,151  

Future maturities of the notes payable are as follows:
 
 Year Ending December 31,
     
2012
  $ 6,383  
2013
    6,940  
2014
    1,828  
    $ 15,151  
 
 
F-15

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010

Note 10. Commitments and Contingencies

Line of Credit

The Company maintains a line of credit with a bank, up to a maximum credit line of $250,000.  The line of credit bears interest equal to the prime rate plus 0.50% (overall interest rate of 3.75% at December 31, 2011).  The line of credit requires minimum monthly payments consisting of interest only.  The line of credit is secured by all business assets, inventory, equipment, accounts, general intangibles, chattel paper, documents, instruments and letter of credit rights of the Company.  The line of credit is for an unspecified time until the bank notifies the Company of the Final Availability Date, at which time payments on the line of credit become the sum of: (a) accrued interest and (b) 1/60th of the unpaid principal balance immediately following the Final Availability Date.  The balance due on the line of credit as of December 31, 2011 was $233,215.  Since the earliest the line of credit is due and payable is over a five year period and the Company believes that it could obtain a comparable replacement line of credit elsewhere, the entire line of credit is included in long-term liabilities.  The unused amount under the line of credit available to the Company at December 31, 2011 was $16,785.

Operating Leases

The Company leases office space for its Denver, Colorado location under a seven-year lease agreement commencing September 15, 2008.  The operating lease granted four initial months of free rent and had a base monthly rent of $6,526 commencing January 15, 2009.  Thereafter, the monthly rent escalates 2.5% annually over the base year.

The following is a schedule by years of future minimum rental payments required under operating leases that have initial or remaining noncancelable lease terms in excess of one year as of December 31, 2011:

Year ending December 31,
     
2012
  $ 84,206  
2013
    86,172  
2014
    88,139  
2015
    60,070  
Total minimum payments required
  $ 318,587  

Rent expense was $114,511 and $81,532 for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
 
Employment Agreements
 
From time to time, the Company enters into employment agreements with certain of its employees.  These agreements typically include bonuses, some of which are performance-based in nature.  As of December 31, 2011, the Company had entered into five employment agreements whereby the Company is obligated to pay an annual performance bonus ranging from 50% to 100% of the employee’s base salary based upon the achievement of pre-established milestones.  Such annual bonuses are to be paid one-half in cash and the remainder in common shares of the Company.  As of December 31, 2011, no performance bonuses have been earned.
 
Consulting Agreement

On September 16, 2011, the Company entered into a two-year consulting agreement with the former Chairman of the Company in which the Company was obligated to pay $11,667 per month.  On September 28, 2011, the Company prepaid 13 months of the consulting agreement, or $151,667, which was then amortized until December 31, 2011, at which time the consulting agreement was terminated and the remaining unamortized prepaid expense was recognized immediately as consulting expense.  No additional amounts are due under the consulting agreement (See Note 15).

Legal Matters

From time to time, we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of our operations in the normal course of business. As of December 31, 2011, there were no pending or threatened lawsuits that could reasonably be expected to have a material effect on the results of our operations.

There are no proceedings in which any of our directors, officers or affiliates, or any registered or beneficial shareholder, is an adverse party or has a material interest adverse to our interest.

Regulatory Matters
 
The University is subject to extensive regulation by Federal and State governmental agencies and accrediting bodies.  In particular, the Higher Education Act (“HEA”) and the regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Education (“DOE”) subject the University to significant regulatory scrutiny on the basis of numerous standards that schools must satisfy to participate in the various types of federal learner financial assistance under Title IV programs.  The Company has had provisional certification to participate in the Title IV programs.  Aspen’s provisional certification imposes certain regulatory restrictions including, but not limited to, a limit of 500 student recipients for Title IV funding for the duration of the provisional certification.  During 2011, the Company’s provisional certification expired and the Company has filed its application for recertification with the DOE.  Due to the expiration and pending recertification, these restrictions continue with regard to the Company’s participation in DOE Title IV programs.
  
 
F-16

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
To participate in the Title IV programs, an institution must be authorized to offer its programs of instruction by the relevant agencies of the State in which it is located, and since July 2011, potentially in the States where an institution offers postsecondary education through distance education, accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the DOE and certified as eligible by the DOE.  The DOE will certify an institution to participate in the Title IV programs only after the institution has demonstrated compliance with the HEA and the DOE’s extensive academic, administrative, and financial regulations regarding institutional eligibility.  An institution must also demonstrate its compliance with these requirements to the DOE on an ongoing basis.  The University performs periodic reviews of its compliance with the various applicable regulatory requirements.  If we were ineligible to receive Title IV funding, given Title IV cash receipts represented approximately 7% of total revenues in 2011, our operations and liquidity would be minimally impacted.
 
As a result of certain subsequent events, the Company has been requested by DOE to provide a letter of credit in the amount of $105,865 by March 28, 2012, which is 10% of Aspen’s Title IV receipts in 2011.  Aspen has timely informed the DOE that it will provide the requested letter of credit by the deadline.  The DOE may impose additional terms and conditions in any temporary provisional program participation agreement that it may issue pending review of Aspen’s application for approval of the change in ownership and control.  Furthermore, DOE may impose additional or different terms and conditions in any final provisional program participation agreement that it may issue after it reviews Aspen’s application for approval of the change in ownership and control. (See Note 16).
 
Because the Company operates in a highly regulated industry, it may be subject from time to time to audits, investigations, claims of noncompliance or lawsuits by governmental agencies or third parties, which allege statutory violations, regulatory infractions or common law causes of action.

Return of Title IV Funds

An institution participating in Title IV programs must correctly calculate the amount of unearned Title IV program funds that have been disbursed to students who withdraw from their educational programs before completion and must return those unearned funds in a timely manner, generally within 45 days of the date the school determines that the student has withdrawn.  Under Department regulations, failure to make timely returns of Title IV program funds for 5% or more of students sampled on the institution's annual compliance audit in either of its two most recently completed fiscal years can result in the institution having to post a letter of credit in an amount equal to 25% of its required Title IV returns during its most recently completed fiscal year.  If unearned funds are not properly calculated and returned in a timely manner, an institution is also subject to monetary liabilities or an action to impose a fine or to limit, suspend or terminate its participation in Title IV programs.
 
Delaware Approval to Confer Degrees
 
Aspen is a Delaware corporation.  Delaware law requires an institution to obtain approval from the Delaware Department of Education (“Delaware DOE”) before it may incorporate with the power to confer degrees.  Aspen did not obtain such approval.  It has begun communications with the Delaware DOE and is taking steps to obtain Delaware DOE approval.  An application to the State of Delaware has been made and we are awaiting a decision or additional guidance.

Note 11. Temporary Equity
 
During 2011, the Company sold an aggregate of 850,395 Series A preferred shares in exchange for cash proceeds of $809,900 (of which $230,000 was received from then related parties).  The Series A shares have the following features:  (i) equal voting rights as the common shares; (ii) automatically convert to common shares at the time the Company is required to file Forms 10-Q and 10-K with the SEC (the “SEC Reporting Date”); (iii) a conversion ratio of 1 share of common for each share of Series A; (iv) until the SEC Reporting Date, transfer restricted to permitted transfers; (v) until the SEC Reporting Date, price protection should any common stock or equivalents be issued with a lower conversion ratio; (vi) 5% cumulative accruing dividends whether or not declared (payable only upon redemption per vii); and (vii) shall be redeemed by the Company if: (a) Michael Mathews is no longer the CEO, or (b) the SEC Reporting Date does not occur on or before January 31, 2012 (on February 29, 2012, this was extended to March 15, 2012), but (c) only to the extent the Company has EBITDA.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, cumulative dividend on the Series A preferred shares amounted to $34,500 (See Notes 15 and 16).
 
During 2011, the Company sold an aggregate of 1,176,750 Series D preferred shares and a warrant to purchase 400,000 Series D shares in exchange for cash proceeds of $1,109,268, net of offering costs of $67,482.  The warrants are exercisable at $1.00 per share for five years beginning June 28, 2011 and, after the SEC Reporting Date, are exercisable into common shares of the Company.  The Series D shares have the same features as the Series A shares (see above) except for 550,000 of the Series D shares for which the price protection is for a period of 36 months following the SEC Reporting Date.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, cumulative dividend on the Series D preferred shares amounted to $30,632 (See Note 16).
 
 
F-17

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
During 2011, the Company sold an aggregate of 1,700,000 Series E preferred shares in exchange for cash proceeds of $1,550,817, net of offering costs of $149,183 and a warrant to purchase 56,000 Series E shares.  The warrants are exercisable at $1.00 per share for five years beginning September 28, 2011 and, after the SEC Reporting Date, are exercisable into common shares of the Company.  The Series E shares have the same features as the Series A shares (see above) except item (v) the price protection is for a period of 36 months following the SEC Reporting Date.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, cumulative dividend on the Series E preferred shares amounted to $22,194 (See Note 16).

On October 28, 2011, the Company filed a First Amendment to the second amended and restated certificate of incorporation whereby a liquidation preference equal to the original issue price ($1.00) was added to both the Series D and Series E shares.  In addition, the liquidation preferences of the Series D shares became pari passu with the liquidation preferences of the Series E shares and the liquidation preferences of both the Series D and Series E shares became senior to the liquidation preferences of the Series C shares (See Note 16).
 
Note 12. Stockholders’ Equity

Stock Dividends and Reverse Split

On May 17, 2011, the Company declared a stock dividend of 1.1 new shares of common stock of the Company for each share presently held as of the close of business on May 20, 2011.  All references to the Company’s outstanding shares, warrants and per share information have been retroactively adjusted to give effect to the stock dividend.

On February 23, 2012, the Company approved a stock dividend of one new share of the Company for each share presently held.  Following the stock dividend, the Company approved a one-for-two reverse stock split as of the close of business on February 24, 2012 in which each two shares of common stock shall be combined into one share of common stock.  This was done in order to reduce the conversion ratio of the convertible preferred stock for all Series to 1 for 1 except for Series C, which now has a conversion ratio of 0.8473809 (See Note 16).

Authorized Shares

On May 17, 2011, the Company amended its certificate of incorporation whereby the total number of authorized shares was increased from 10,000,000 shares to: (i) 60,000,000 shares of common stock having a par value of $0.001 per share, and (ii) 20,000,000 shares of preferred stock having a par value of $0.001 per share.

On May 17, 2011, the Company designated 850,500 Series A preferred shares, 368,421 Series B preferred shares, 11,411,400 Series C preferred shares, and 3,700,000 Series D preferred shares.

On September 9, 2011, the Company filed its second amended certificate of incorporation whereby the Company designated 2,000,000 Series E preferred shares.

Preferred Shares
 
In May 2011, $350,000 of convertible notes were converted into 368,411 Series B preferred shares (See Notes 9 and 15).  The Series B shares have the following features:  (i) equal voting rights as the common shares; (ii) automatically convert to common shares at the time the Company is required to file Forms 10-Q and 10-K with the SEC (the “SEC Reporting Date”); (iii) a conversion ratio of 1 share of common for each share of Series B; (iv) until the SEC Reporting Date, transfer restricted to permitted transfers; and (v) until the SEC Reporting Date, price protection should any common stock or equivalents be issued with a lower conversion ratio (See Note 16).
 
On May 20, 2011, as part of a post-closing transaction of the merger with EGC, the Company’s largest stockholder exchanged all 11,307,450 common shares owned into 11,307,450 Series C shares.  The Series C shares have the following features:  (i) equal voting rights as the common shares; (ii) automatically convert to common shares at the time the Company is required to file Forms 10-Q and 10-K with the SEC (the “SEC Reporting Date”); (iii) a conversion ratio of 0.8473809 shares of common for each share of Series C; (iv) until the SEC Reporting Date, transfer restricted to permitted transfers; (v) exclusion from the two-for-one stock split effectuated immediately prior to the SEC Reporting Date (See Note 16); and (vi) a liquidation preference of $0.001 per share (See Note 16).
 
Common Shares

On May 11, 2011, pursuant to a rescission offer, the Company rescinded an aggregate of 170,100 common shares and returned to investors an aggregate of $165,000 as a result of Blue Sky violations.  The treasury shares were subsequently retired.
 
 
F-18

 

ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
On May 19, 2011, the Company issued 3,200,000 common shares of the Company in order to acquire all of the outstanding shares of EGC as part of a merger (See Note 1).

On May 20, 2011, as part of a post-closing transaction of the merger with EGC and a settlement with a certain group of investors, the Company repurchased an aggregate of 850,500 common shares and returned to investors an aggregate of $740,000.  The treasury shares were subsequently retired.

On December 28, 2011, the Company repurchased an aggregate of 34,020 common shares and returned to investors an aggregate of $21,200.  The treasury shares were subsequently retired.

During 2010, the Company’s largest stockholder contributed some of its common shares, which the Company sold for net proceeds of $250,500 to the Company.  Since there was no increase in the overall number of shares outstanding, the entire amount was recognized as additional paid-in capital.

Stock Warrants
 
All outstanding warrants issued by the Company to date have been related to capital raises.  Accordingly, the Company has not recognized any stock-based compensation for warrants issued during the years presented.

A summary of the Company’s warrant activity during the year ended December 31, 2011 is presented below:

               
Weighted
       
         
Weighted
   
Average
       
         
Average
   
Remaining
   
Aggregate
 
   
Number of
   
Exercise
   
Contractual
   
Intrinsic
 
Warrants
 
Shares
   
Price
   
Term
   
Value
 
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2010
    -       -              
  Granted
    456,000     $ 1.00              
  Exercised
    -       -              
  Forfeited
    -       -              
  Expired
    -       -              
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2011
    456,000     $ 1.00       4.5     $ -  
                                 
Exercisable, December 31, 2011
    456,000     $ 1.00       4.5     $ -  

All of the Company’s warrants contain price protection.  The Company evaluated whether the price protection provision of the warrant would cause derivative treatment.  In its assessment, the Company determined that since its shares are not readily convertible to cash due to no public market existing, the warrants are excluded from derivative treatment.

Note 13. Income Taxes

The components of income tax expense (benefit) are as follows:
 
   
For the
Year Ended
December 31, 2011
   
For the
Year Ended
December 31, 2010
 
Current:
           
Federal
  $ -     $ -  
State
    -       -  
      -       -  
                 
Deferred:
               
Federal
    -       -  
State
    -       -  
      -       -  
                 
Total Income tax expense (benefit)
  $ -     $ -  
 
 
F-19

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
Significant components of the Company's deferred income tax assets and liabilities are as follows:

   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Deferred tax assets:
           
Net operating loss
  $ 1,245,807     $ 123,586  
Allowance for doubtful accounts
    17,637       17,763  
Intangible assets
    (148,345 )     187,111  
Property and equipment
    (805 )     776  
Deferred rent
    9,473       10,335  
Total deferred tax assets
    1,123,767       339,571  
                 
Valuation allowance:
               
Beginning of year
    (339,571 )     (264,144 )
(Increase) decrease during year
    (784,196 )     (75,427 )
Ending balance
    (1,123,767 )     (339,571 )
                 
Net deferred tax asset
  $ -     $ -  

A valuation allowance is established if it is more likely than not that all or a portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.  The Company recorded a valuation allowance in 2010 and 2011 due to the uncertainty of realization.  Management believes that based upon its projection of future taxable operating income for the foreseeable future, it is more likely than not that the Company will not be able to realize the tax benefit associated with deferred tax assets.  The net change in the valuation allowance during the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010 was an increase of $748,196 and $75,427, respectively.

At December 31, 2011, the Company had $3,361,975 of net operating loss carryforwards which will expire from 2029 to 2031. The Company believes its tax positions are all highly certain of being upheld upon examination. As such, the Company has not recorded a liability for unrecognized tax benefits. As of December 31, 2011, tax years 2004 and 2007 through 2010 remain open for IRS audit. The Company has received no notice of audit from the Internal Revenue Service for any of the open tax years.

A reconciliation of income tax computed at the U.S. statutory rate to the effective income tax rate is as follows:

   
For the
   
For the
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
Statutory  U.S. federal income tax rate
    34.0 %     34.0 %
State income taxes, net of federal tax benefit
    3.1       3.1  
Other
    (0.1 )     -  
Change in valuation allowance
    (37.0 )     (37.1 )
Effective income tax rate
    0.0 %     0.0 %

Note 14. Concentrations
 
Concentration of Credit Risk

On November 9, 2010, the FDIC issued a Final Rule implementing section 343 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that provides for unlimited insurance coverage of noninterest-bearing transaction accounts.  Beginning December 31, 2010, through December 31, 2012, all noninterest-bearing transaction accounts are fully insured, regardless of the balance of the account, at all FDIC-insured institutions.  The unlimited insurance coverage is available to all depositors, including consumers, businesses, and governmental entities.  This unlimited insurance coverage is separate from, and in addition to, the insurance coverage provided to a depositor’s other deposit accounts held at an FDIC-insured institution.  A noninterest-bearing transaction account is a deposit account where interest is neither accrued nor paid; depositors are permitted to make an unlimited number of transfers and withdrawals; and the bank does not reserve the right to require advance notice of an intended withdrawal.
 
 
F-20

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010

The Company maintains its cash in bank and financial institution deposits that at times may exceed federally insured limits. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts through December 31, 2011.  As of December 31, 2011, the Company’s bank balances exceeded FDIC insured amounts by approximately $50,000.  There were no balances in excess of FDIC insured levels as of December 31, 2010.

Concentration of Revenues, Accounts Receivable and Publisher Expense

For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company had significant customers with individual percentage of total revenues equaling 10% or greater as follows:

   
For the
   
For the
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
 Customer 1
    44.6 %     50.1 %
 Totals
    44.6 %     50.1 %

At December 31, 2011 and 2010, concentration of accounts receivable with significant customers representing 10% or greater of accounts receivable was as follows:
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
 Customer 1
    53.4 %     29.1 %
 Customer 2
    17.3     - %
 Customer 3
    -       30.3 %
 Customer 4     -        20.2
 Totals
    70.7 %     79.6 %

For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, the Company had significant vendors representing 10% or greater of cost and expense as follows:

   
For the
   
For the
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
 Vendor 1
    24.4 %     38.8 %
 Totals
    24.4 %     38.8 %

Note 15. Related Party Transactions

On September 21, 2011, the Company loaned $238,210 to the chief executive officer of the Company (the “CEO”) in exchange for a promissory note bearing 3% per annum.  As collateral, the note was secured by 40,000 shares of common stock of interclick, Inc. (a publicly-traded company) that are owned personally by the CEO.  The note along with accrued interest was due and payable on June 21, 2012.  For the year ended December 31, 2011, interest income of $1,867 was recognized.  On December 20, 2011, the note along with accrued interest of $1,867 was paid in full (See Note 4).
 
On December 14, 2011, the Company loaned $150,000 to an officer of the Company in exchange for a promissory note bearing 3% per annum.  As collateral, the note was secured by 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock owned personally by the officer.  The note along with accrued interest was due and payable on September 14, 2012.  For the year ended December 31, 2011, interest income of $210 was recognized on the note receivable and is included in prepaid expenses and other current assets.  As of December 31, 2011, the balance due on the note receivable was $150,000, all of which is short-term.  On February 16, 2012, the note receivable from an officer was repaid along with accrued interest (See Notes 4 and 16).
 
 
F-21

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
On March 30, 2008 and December 1, 2008, the Company sold course curricula pursuant to marketing agreements to Higher Education Group Management, Inc. (“HEMG”), a related party and principal stockholder of the Company whose president is Mr. Patrick Spada, the former Chairman of the Company, in the amount of $455,000 and $600,000, respectively; UCC filings were filed accordingly.  Under the marketing agreements, the receivables are due net 60 months.  On September 16, 2011, HEMG pledged 772,793 Series C preferred shares of the Company as collateral for this account receivable.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the remaining balance owed was $772,793 and $780,169, respectively, and is shown as accounts receivable, secured – related party.  On March 8, 2012, due to the impending reduction in the value of the collateral as the result of the Series C conversion ratio and the inability to engage Mr. Spada in good faith negotiations to increase HEMG’s pledge, Michael Mathews, the Company’s CEO, pledged 117,943 common shares of the Company, owned personally by him, valued at $1.00 per share based on recent sales of capital stock as additional collateral to the accounts receivable, secured – related party.  On March 13, 2012, the Company deemed the receivables stemming from the sale of courseware curricula to be in default (See Notes 4 and 16).

During 2005 through September 2011, the Company advanced funds without board authority to both Patrick Spada (former Chairman of the Company) and HEMG, of which Patrick Spada is President.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the receivable due was $2,209,960 and $2,195,084, respectively, and is shown as receivable from stockholder, secured – related party.  Having been unsuccessful since December 2011 to negotiate a settlement agreement with Patrick Spada to secure the receivable, on March 13, 2012, three directors of the Company pledged an aggregate of 2,209,960 common shares of the Company, valued at $1.00 per share, based on recent sales of capital stock as collateral for the receivable from stockholder, secured – related party (See Notes 4 and 16).

During 2009, the Company received advances aggregating $200,000 from three individuals.  Of the total funds received, $50,000 was received from a related party.  During 2011 and 2010, the loans were non-interest bearing demand loans and, therefore, no interest expense was recognized or due as of each balance sheet presented.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the entire balance of the loans payable is included in long-term liabilities as the Company has subsequent to December 31, 2011 converted the loans into long-term convertible notes payable (See Notes 8 and 16).

In June 2009, the Company borrowed an aggregate of $45,000 from an individual, who was an officer of the Company at that time, in exchange for notes payable bearing interest at 18% per annum.  The notes were due in October 2009 and became demand notes at that time.  For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, interest expense of $2,393 and $7,126 was recognized on the notes.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the balance of accrued interest was $0 and $6,953, which is included in accrued expenses.  As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, the balance due on the notes payable was $0 and $25,000, all of which is short-term (See Note 9).

On March 6, 2011, the Company authorized the issuance of up to $350,000 of convertible notes that were convertible into Series B preferred shares at $0.95 per share, bearing interest of 6% per annum.  The notes were convertible beginning after the closing of the EGC Merger (See Note 1).  As of May 13, 2011, the Company had received an aggregate of $328,000 (of which $73,000 was received from related parties) from the sale of convertible notes.  In addition, the Company issued an aggregate of $22,000 (of which $16,000 was to related parties) of convertible notes for services rendered.  In May 2011, $350,000 of the convertible notes were converted into 368,411 Series B preferred shares (See Notes 9 and 12).

On September 16, 2011, the Company entered into a two-year consulting agreement with the former Chairman of the Company in which the Company was obligated to pay $11,667 per month.  On September 28, 2011, the Company prepaid 13 months of the consulting agreement, or $151,667, which was then amortized until December 31, 2011, at which time the consulting agreement was terminated and the remaining unamortized prepaid expense was recognized immediately as consulting expense.  No additional amounts are due under the consulting agreement (See Note 10).
 
During 2011, the Company sold an aggregate of 850,395 Series A preferred shares in exchange for cash proceeds of $809,900 (of which $230,000 was received from then related parties).  The Series A shares have the following features:  (i) equal voting rights as the common shares; (ii) automatically convert to common shares at the time the Company is required to file Forms 10-Q and 10-K with the SEC (the “SEC Reporting Date”); (iii) a conversion ratio of 1 share of common for each share of Series A; (iv) until the SEC Reporting Date, transfer restricted to permitted transfers; (v) until the SEC Reporting Date, price protection should any common stock or equivalents be issued with a lower conversion ratio; (vi) 5% cumulative accruing dividends whether or not declared (payable only upon redemption per vii); and (vii) shall be redeemed by the Company if: (a) Michael Mathews is no longer the CEO, or (b) the SEC Reporting Date does not occur on or before January 31, 2012 (on February 29, 2012, this was extended to March 15, 2012), but (c) only to the extent the Company has EBITDA.  During the year ended December 31, 2011, cumulative dividend on the Series A preferred shares amounted to $34,500 (See Notes 11 and 16).
 
 
F-22

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
On March 13, 2012, the Company’s CEO made an investment of $300,000 in a convertible promissory note due March 31, 2013, bearing interest at 0.19% per annum.  The note is convertible into common shares of the Company at the rate of $1.00 per share upon five days written notice to the Company.  The Company evaluated the convertible notes and determined that, for the embedded conversion option, there was no beneficial conversion value to record (See Note 16).
 
Included in revenues for the year ended December 31, 2010 is $125,000 of revenue from the sale of course curricula to a related party, which was controlled by our former Chairman.

During 2010, the Company acquired an aggregate of $52,000 of courseware curricula, which was capitalized and included in intangible assets, from an entity owned by the brother of Patrick Spada, the former Chairman of the Company.
 
Note 16. Subsequent Events
 
On January 23, 2012, the Company filed a Second Amendment to the second amended and restated certificate of incorporation whereby the Series A, Series D and Series E preferred shares shall be redeemed if the SEC Reporting Date does not occur on or before February 29, 2012 (See Notes 11 and 15).
 
On February 16, 2012, the note receivable from an officer was repaid along with accrued interest (See Notes 4 and 15).
 
On February 23, 2012, the Company approved a stock dividend of one new share of the Company for each share presently held.  Following the stock dividend, the Company approved a one-for-two reverse stock split as of the close of business on February 24, 2012 in which each two shares of common stock shall be combined into one share of common stock (See Note 12).
 
On February 25, 2012, February 27, 2012 and February 29, 2012, loans payable to an individual, another individual and a related party (the brother of Patrick Spada, the former Chairman of the Company), of $100,000, $50,000 and $50,000, respectively, were converted into two-year convertible promissory notes, bearing interest of 0.19% per annum.  Beginning March 31, 2012, the notes are convertible into common shares of the Company at the rate of $1.00 per share.  As these loans (now convertible promissory notes) are not due for at least 12 months after the balance sheet, they have been included in long-term liabilities as of December 31, 2011 (See Notes 8 and 15).
 
On February 29, 2012, the Company filed a Third Amendment to the second amended and restated certificate of incorporation whereby the Series A, Series D and Series E preferred shares shall be redeemed if the SEC Reporting Date does not occur on or before March 15, 2012 (See Note 11).
 
On February 29, 2012, (the "Effective Date") the Company retained the investment bank of Laidlaw & Company (UK) Ltd. ("Laidlaw") on an exclusive basis with certain "carve-out" provisions for the purpose of raising up to $6,000,000 (plus up to an additional $1,200,000 million to cover over-allotments at the option of Laidlaw) through two successive best-efforts private placements of the Company's securities.  The agreement has been modified by substituting Aspen Group, Inc. The Phase One financing is an offering of up to 40 units of $50,000 each and is to be completed by March 31, 2012 with an extension possible to April 30, 2012.  Each unit consists of: (i) senior secured convertible notes (the "Convertible Notes"), bearing 10% interest, convertible into the Company's common shares at the lower of (a) $1.00 or (b) 95% of the per share purchase price of any shares of common stock (or common stock equivalents) issued on or after the original issue date of the note and (ii) five-year warrant to purchase that number of the Company's common shares equal to 25% of the number of shares issuable upon conversion of the Convertible Notes.  Mandatory conversion will occur on the initial closing of the Phase Two financing.  The Convertible Notes mature on June 30, 2012, carry provisions for price protection and require the Company to file a registration statement for the resale of the underlying common stock nine months after closing of the Phase Two offering.  For the Phase One financing, Laidlaw will receive a cash fee of 10% of aggregate funds raised along with a five-year warrant (the "Laidlaw Warrant") equal to 10% of the common stock reserved for issuance in connection with the units.  For funds raised by other parties, Laidlaw's compensation shall be 5% cash and 5% Laidlaw Warrant.  Separately, Laidlaw requires an activation fee of $25,000, of which $15,000 was paid upon execution of the agreement. Subsequent to the closing of the Reverse Merger, Aspen Group, Inc., without the assistance of any broker dealer, raised $150,000 from the Phase One financing.  Laidlaw will commence its offering after Aspen Group, Inc. files its report on Form 8-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission disclosing the Reverse Merger.
 
On March 8, 2012, due to the impending reduction in the value of the collateral as the result of the Series C conversion ratio and the inability to engage Mr. Spada in good faith negotiations to increase HEMG’s pledge, Michael Mathews, the Company’s CEO, pledged 117,943 common shares of the Company, owned personally by him, valued at $1.00 per share based on recent sales of capital stock as additional collateral to the accounts receivable, secured – related party.  On March 13, 2012, the Company deemed the receivables stemming from the sale of courseware curricula to be in default (See Notes 4 and 15).
 
On March 13, 2012, three directors of the Company pledged an aggregate of 2,209,960 common shares of the Company as collateral for the receivable from stockholder, secured – related party (See Notes 4 and 15).
 
On March 13, 2012, the Company’s CEO made an investment of $300,000 in a convertible promissory note due March 31, 2013, bearing interest at 0.19% per annum.  The note is convertible into common shares of the Company at the rate of $1.00 per share upon five days written notice to the Company.  The Company evaluated the convertible notes and determined that, for the embedded conversion option, there was no beneficial conversion value to record (See Note 15).
 
 
F-23

 
 
ASPEN UNIVERSITY INC. AND SUBSIDIARY
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DECEMBER 31, 2011 AND 2010
 
On March 13, 2012 (the “recapitalization date”), the Company was acquired by Aspen Group, Inc., an inactive publicly-held company, in a reverse merger transaction accounted for as a recapitalization of the Company (the “Recapitalization” or the “Reverse Merger”).  The common and preferred stockholders of the Company received 25,515,204 common shares of Aspen Group, Inc. in exchange for 100% of the capital stock of Aspen University Inc.  For accounting purposes, Aspen is the acquirer and Aspen Group, Inc. is the acquired company.  Accordingly, after completion of the recapitalization, the historical operations of the Company are those of Aspen and the operations since the recapitalization date are those of Aspen and Aspen Group, Inc.  The assets and liabilities of both companies are combined at historical cost on the recapitalization date.  As a result of the recapitalization and conversion of all Company preferred shares into common shares of the public entity, all redemption and dividend rights of preferred shares were terminated.  As a result of the recapitalization, the Company now has 120,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $0.001 per share, and 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.001 per share authorized.
 
Immediately following the closing of the Reverse Merger, the Company adopted the 2012 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”) which provides for 2,500,000 shares to be granted under the Plan.  On March 14, 2012, the Company granted an aggregate of 1,500,000 stock options, all of which were under the Plan, having an exercise price of $1.00 per share.  The options vest one-third on each anniversary date commencing March 14, 2013 and expire five years from the grant date.  The total fair value of stock options granted was $495,000, which is being recognized over the respective vesting period.
 
Consistent with the Higher Education Act, Aspen’s certification to participate in Title IV programs terminated after closing of the Reverse Merger, and Aspen must apply to DOE to reestablish its eligibility and certification to participate in the Title IV programs.  However, in order to avoid significant disruption in disbursements of Title IV funds, the DOE may temporarily and provisionally certify an institution that is seeking approval of a change in ownership, like Aspen, under certain circumstances while the DOE reviews the institution’s application.  On March 15, 2012 the DOE asked Aspen to notify it in writing whether Aspen would be able to provide to the DOE by March 28, 2012 a letter of credit in the amount of $105,865, which is 10% of Aspen’s Title IV receipts in 2011.  Aspen has timely informed the DOE that it will provide the requested letter of credit by March 28, 2012.  The DOE may impose additional terms and conditions in any temporary provisional program participation agreement that it may issue pending review of Aspen’s application for approval of the change in ownership and control.  Furthermore, DOE may impose additional or different terms and conditions in any final provisional program participation agreement that it may issue after it reviews Aspen’s application for approval of the change in ownership and control.
 
 
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