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EX-31.2 - EXHIBIT 31.2 - Wizard World, Inc.v304559_ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - EXHIBIT 31.1 - Wizard World, Inc.v304559_ex31-1.htm
EX-32.1 - EXHIBIT 32.1 - Wizard World, Inc.v304559_ex32-1.htm
EX-32.2 - EXHIBIT 32.2 - Wizard World, Inc.v304559_ex32-2.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

ý QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended: March 31, 2011

 

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission File No. 000-33383

 

WIZARD WORLD, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   98-0357690

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

1350 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS, 2ND FLOOR

NEW YORK, NY 10019

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(646) 801-5572

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months, and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ¨ No ý

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Sec.232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files. Yes ¨ No ý

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer £ Accelerated filer £
Non-accelerated filer £ Smaller reporting company S

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No ý

 

As of March 1, 2012, there were 40,300,000 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock.

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
     
Item 1. Financial Statements. F-1
     
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations. 2
     
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk. 9
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures. 9
     
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings. 10
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors. 10
     
Item 2 Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds. 10
     
Item 3 Defaults Upon Senior Securities. 10
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures. 10
     
Item 5. Other Information. 10
     
Item 6. Exhibits. 10
     
Signatures  

 

 
 

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements.

 

 

WIZARD WORLD, INC.

 

March 31, 2011 and 2010

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Contents Page(s) 
Consolidated Balance Sheets at March 31, 2011 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2010 F-2
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 (Unaudited) F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 (Unaudited) F-4
   
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) F-5

 

 

 

F-1
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.
Consolidated Balance Sheets
 
         
   March 31, 2011   December 31, 2010 
   (Unaudited)     
         
Assets
         
Current Assets          
Cash  $187,236   $542,564 
Accounts receivable, net   12,308    19,127 
Loan Receivable   28,379    - 
Prepaid expenses   188,568    95,306 
 Total Current Assets   416,491    656,997 
           
Property and equipment, net   3,179    6,807 
           
Other Asset   13,000    - 
           
Total Assets  $432,670   $663,804 
           
Liabilities and Stockholders' Deficit
           
Current Liabilities:          
Accounts payable and accrued liabilites   719,760   $508,852 
Accrued dividend   24,599    5,348 
Unearned convention revenue   281,997    75,653 
Related party - notes payable   -    74,983 
Derivative liability   852,077    2,260,571 
 Total Current Liabilities   1,878,433    2,925,407 
           
           
Total Liabilities   1,878,433    2,925,407 
           
Stockholders' Deficit          
 Series A, convertible preferred stock,  $0.0001 par value; 50,000 shares authorized,          
   9,760 shares issued and and outstanding   98    98 
 Common Stock,  $0.0001 par value; 200,000,000 shares authorized,          
  34,687,735 and 19,125,000 share issued and outstanding, respectively   3,469    3,469 
 Additional paid-in capital   1,111,562    849,596 
 Accumulated deficit   (2,560,892)   (3,114,765)
 Total Stockholders' Deficit   (1,445,763)   (2,261,602)
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Deficit  $432,670   $663,804 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

F-2
 

Wizard World, Inc.
Consolidated Statements of Operations
         

 

 
    For the Three Months Ended 
    March 31, 2011    March 31, 2010 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
         
Convention revenue  $536,656  $214,830 
           
Cost of revenue   663,806    217,927 
           
Gross profit (loss)   (127,150)   (3,097)
           
Operating expenses          
Compensation   178,521    28,874 
Consulting fees   516,262    38,875 
General and administrative   194,069    114,171 
Total operating expenses   888,852    181,920 
           
  Loss from operations   (1,016,002)   (185,017)
           
 Other income (expenses)          
Interest Income   1,228    - 
Interest expense   (359)   365 
Bad debt recovery   179,763    - 
Gain (loss) on derivative   1,408,494    - 
Total other income (expense)   1,589,126    365 
           
  Net income (loss)  $573,124   $(185,382)
           
Deemed dividend on Series A Convertible Preferred Stock   (19,251)   - 
           
Net income (loss) attributable to common stockholders  $553,873   $(185,382)
           
  Net income (loss) per common share  attributable to          
 common stockholders - basic and diluted  $0.02   $(0.01)
  Weighted average common shares outstanding          
     - basic and diluted   34,687,735    19,125,000 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

F-3
 

Wizard World, Inc.
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
 
     
   For the Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 2011   March 31, 2010 
   (Unaudited)   (Unaudited) 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:          
Net income (loss)  $573,124   $(185,382)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:          
Share-based compensation  $233,588    - 
Depreciation   989    10,573 
Change in fair value - derivative liability   (1,408,494)   - 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   6,819    (6,530)
Prepaid and other   (106,262)   5,134 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   210,908    157,510 
Unearned convention revenue   206,344    (714)
Net Cash Used In Operating Activities   (282,984)   (19,409)
           
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:          
Disposal of equipment   2,639    - 
Net Cash Provided by Investing Activities   2,639    - 
           
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:          
Net proceeds (repayment) of related party - notes payable   -    666,016 
Proceeds from issuance of related party debt   (74,983)   - 
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities   (74,983)   666,016 
           
Net change  in cash   (355,328)   646,607 
           
Cash at beginning of period   542,564    - 
           
Cash at end of period  $187,236   $646,607 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:          
Interest paid  $-   $- 
Income tax paid  $-   $- 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements

F-4
 

 

Wizard World, Inc.

March 31, 2011 and 2010

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1 - Organization and Operations

 

Wizard World, Inc. (Formerly Goenergy, Inc.)

 

Wizard World, Inc., formerly Goenergy, Inc. (“Wizard World” or the “Company”) was incorporated on May 2, 2001, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Kick the Can Corp.

 

Kicking The Can Corp. was incorporated on September 20, 2010, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Kick the Can L.L.C.

 

Kicking The Can, L.L.C. was formed on April 17, 2009, under the laws of the State of Delaware.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc.

 

Wizard Conventions, Inc. was incorporated on April 17, 2009, under the laws of the State of Delaware. The Company is a producer of pop culture and live multimedia conventions across North America that provides a social networking and entertainment venue for popular fiction enthusiasts of movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels.

 

Acquisition of Kick the Can Corp./ Wizard Conventions, Inc.

 

On December 7, 2010, the Company entered into and consummated a share exchange agreement with successor, Kick the Can Corp (“KTC Corp.”) and its predecessors Wizard Conventions, Inc. and Kicking The Can, L.L.C. (“Conventions”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, the Company issued 32,927,596 shares of its common stock to the KTC Corp. Shareholders in exchange for 100% of the issued and outstanding shares of KTC Corp. The transaction has been treated as a reverse acquisition with KTC Corp. deemed the accounting acquirer and the Company deemed the accounting acquiree under the purchase method of accounting in accordance with section 805-10-55 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. The reverse merger is deemed a capital transaction and the net assets of KTC Corp. (the accounting acquirer) are carried forward to the Company (the legal acquirer and the reporting entity) at their carrying value before the combination. The acquisition process utilizes the capital structure of the Company and the assets and liabilities of KTC Corp. which are recorded at historical cost. The equity of the Company is the historical equity of KTC Corp. retroactively restated to reflect the number of shares issued by the Company in the transaction. Because of the predecessor/successor relationship between the Company and KTC Corp., Conventions ultimately became the accounting acquirer.

 

Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation – Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Information

 

The accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements and related notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information, and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) with respect to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. GAAP for complete financial statements. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements furnished reflect all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to a fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements of the Company for the year ended December 31, 2010 and notes thereto contained in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010, as filed with the SEC on January 13, 2012.

F-5
 

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include all accounts of the entities as of the reporting period ending date(s) and for the reporting period(s) as follows:

 

Entity   Reporting period ending date(s) and reporting period(s)
     
The Company   As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 and for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010
     
KTC Corp.   As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 and for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010
     
Kicking the Can L.L.C.   As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 and for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010
     
Wizard Conventions, Inc.   As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 and for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010

 

All inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  

 

The Company’s significant estimates and assumptions include the fair value of financial instruments; the carrying value, recoverability and impairment, if any, of long-lived assets, including the values assigned to property and equipment, income tax rate, income tax provision, deferred tax assets allowance of deferred tax assets and the assumption that the Company will continue as a going concern.  Those significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to those estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable in relation to the financial statements taken as a whole under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly evaluates the key factors and assumptions used to develop the estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such evaluations, and if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

     
Level 1   Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.
     
Level 2   Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.
     
Level 3   Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

F-6
 

 

 

Financial assets are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

 

The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. If the inputs used to measure the financial assets and liabilities fall within more than one level described above, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

 

The carrying amount of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of those instruments. The Company’s convertible preferred stock and warrants approximate the fair value of such instruments based upon management’s best estimate of interest rates that would be available to the Company for similar financial arrangements at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.

 

The Company uses Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy to measure the fair value of the derivative liabilities and revalues its derivative warrant liability at every reporting period and recognizes gains or losses in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) that are attributable to the change in the fair value of the derivative warrant liability.

 

Transactions involving related parties cannot be presumed to be carried out on an arm's-length basis, as the requisite conditions of competitive, free-market dealings may not exist. Representations about transactions with related parties, if made, shall not imply that the related party transactions were consummated on terms equivalent to those that prevail in arm's-length transactions unless such representations can be substantiated.

 

It is not, however, practical to determine the fair value of advances from significant stockholder and lease arrangement with the significant stockholder due to their related party nature.

 

Fair Value of Financial Assets and Liabilities Measured on a Recurring Basis

 

Level 3 Financial Liabilities – Derivative conversion features and warrant liabilities

 

Financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below and disclosed on the consolidated balance sheets as of March 31, 2011:

 

       Fair Value Measurement Using 
   Carrying Value   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
                          
Derivative conversion features and warrant liabilities  $852,077   $-   $-   $852,077   $852,077 
                          

 

Financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below and disclosed on the consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2010:

 

       Fair Value Measurement Using 
   Carrying Value   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
                          
Derivative conversion features and warrant liabilities  $2,260,571   $-   $-   $2,260,571   $2,260,571 
                          

 

F-7
 

 

 

The table below provides a summary of the changes in fair value, including net transfers in and/or out, of all financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the three months ended March 31, 2011:

 

  Fair Value Measurement Using Level 3 Inputs
      Derivative Liabilities     Total
     
Balance, December 31, 2010   $ 2,260,571     $ 2,260,571  
Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized)                
   included in net loss     (1,408,494 )     (1,408,494 )
Purchases, issuances and settlements     -       -  
Transfers in and/or out of Level 3     -       -  
Balance, March 31, 2011   $ 852,077     $ 852,077  

 

Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company has adopted paragraph 360-10-35-17 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. The Company’s long-lived assets, which include property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.

 

The Company assesses the recoverability of its long-lived assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related long-lived asset or group of long-lived assets over their remaining estimated useful lives against their respective carrying amounts. Impairment, if any, is based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of those assets. Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives.

 

The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; and (v) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

The impairment charges, if any, are included in operating expenses in the accompanying statements of operations.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents.

 

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount, net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company follows paragraph 310-10-50-9 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to estimate the allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company performs on-going credit evaluations of its customers and adjusts credit limits based upon payment history and the customer’s current credit worthiness, as determined by the review of their current credit information; and determines the allowance for doubtful accounts based on historical write-off experience, customer specific facts and economic conditions.

 

Outstanding account balances are reviewed individually for collectability. The allowance for doubtful accounts is the Company’s best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in the Company’s existing accounts receivable. Bad debt expense is included in general and administrative expenses, if any. Pursuant to paragraph 310-10-50-2 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification account balances are charged off against the allowance after all means of collection have been exhausted and the potential for recovery is considered remote. The Company has adopted paragraph 310-10-50-6 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and determine when receivables are past due or delinquent based on how recently payments have been received.

 

The Company does not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure to its customers.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. Expenditures for major additions and betterments are capitalized. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Depreciation of property and equipment is computed by the straight-line method (after taking into account their respective estimated residual values) over the assets estimated useful life of three (3) to five (5) years. Upon sale or retirement of furniture and equipment, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is reflected in statements of operations.

F-8
 

 

Derivative Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its convertible debt, warrants or other contracts to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with Paragraph 810-10-05-4 of the Codification and Paragraph 815-40-25 of the Codification. The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the embedded derivative is marked-to-market each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the consolidated statements of operations as other income or expense. Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity.

 

In circumstances where the embedded conversion option in a convertible instrument is required to be bifurcated and there are also other embedded derivative instruments in the convertible instrument that are required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument. 

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Equity instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification are reclassified to liability at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities will be classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument is expected within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

Related Parties

 

The Company follows subtopic 850-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the identification of related parties and disclosure of related party transactions.

 

Pursuant to Section 850-10-20 the related parties include a. affiliates of the Company; b. entities for which investments in their equity securities would be required, absent the election of the fair value option under the Fair Value Option Subsection of Section 825–10–15, to be accounted for by the equity method by the investing entity; c. trusts for the benefit of employees, such as pension and profit-sharing trusts that are managed by or under the trusteeship of management; d. principal owners of the Company; e. management of the Company; f. other parties with which the Company may deal if one party controls or can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the other to an extent that one of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests; and g. other parties that can significantly influence the management or operating policies of the transacting parties or that have an ownership interest in one of the transacting parties and can significantly influence the other to an extent that one or more of the transacting parties might be prevented from fully pursuing its own separate interests.

 

The financial statements shall include disclosures of material related party transactions, other than compensation arrangements, expense allowances, and other similar items in the ordinary course of business. However, disclosure of transactions that are eliminated in the preparation of consolidated or combined financial statements is not required in those statements. The disclosures shall include: a. the nature of the relationship(s) involved; b. a description of the transactions, including transactions to which no amounts or nominal amounts were ascribed, for each of the periods for which income statements are presented, and such other information deemed necessary to an understanding of the effects of the transactions on the financial statements; c. the dollar amounts of transactions for each of the periods for which income statements are presented and the effects of any change in the method of establishing the terms from that used in the preceding period; and d. amounts due from or to related parties as of the date of each balance sheet presented and, if not otherwise apparent, the terms and manner of settlement.

 

Commitments and Contingencies

 

The Company follows subtopic 450-20 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report accounting for contingencies. Certain conditions may exist as of the date the consolidated financial statements are issued, which may result in a loss to the Company but which will only be resolved when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. The Company assesses such contingent liabilities, and such assessment inherently involves an exercise of judgment. In assessing loss contingencies related to legal proceedings that are pending against the Company or unasserted claims that may result in such proceedings, the Company evaluates the perceived merits of any legal proceedings or unasserted claims as well as the perceived merits of the amount of relief sought or expected to be sought therein.

 

If the assessment of a contingency indicates that it is probable that a material loss has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be estimated, then the estimated liability would be accrued in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. If the assessment indicates that a potential material loss contingency is not probable but is reasonably possible, or is probable but cannot be estimated, then the nature of the contingent liability, and an estimate of the range of possible losses, if determinable and material, would be disclosed.

F-9
 

 

Loss contingencies considered remote are generally not disclosed unless they involve guarantees, in which case the guarantees would be disclosed. Management does not believe, based upon information available at this time, that these matters will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, there is no assurance that such matters will not materially and adversely affect the Company’s business, financial position, and results of operations or cash flows.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows paragraph 605-10-S99-1 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for revenue recognition. The Company will recognize revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. The Company considers revenue realized or realizable and earned when all of the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) the product has been shipped or the services have been rendered to the customer, (iii) the sales price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Unearned convention revenue is deposits received for conventions that have not yet taken place, which are fully or partially refundable depending upon the terms and conditions of the agreements.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under Section 740-10-30 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are determined based upon differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company adopted section 740-10-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Section 740-10-25”). Section 740-10-25 addresses the determination of whether tax benefits claimed or expected to be claimed on a tax return should be recorded in the financial statements. Under Section 740-10-25, the Company may recognize the tax benefit from an uncertain tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent (50%) likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Section 740-10-25 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties on income taxes, accounting in interim periods and requires increased disclosures.

 

The estimated future tax effects of temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities are reported in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, as well as tax credit carry-backs and carry-forwards. The Company periodically reviews the recoverability of deferred tax assets recorded on its consolidated balance sheets and provides valuation allowances as management deems necessary.

 

Management makes judgments as to the interpretation of the tax laws that might be challenged upon an audit and cause changes to previous estimates of tax liability. In addition, the Company operates within multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit in these jurisdictions. In management’s opinion, adequate provisions for income taxes have been made for all years. If actual taxable income by tax jurisdiction varies from estimates, additional allowances or reversals of reserves may be necessary.

 

Uncertain Tax Positions

 

The Company did not take any uncertain tax positions and had no adjustments to its income tax liabilities or benefits pursuant to the provisions of Section 740-10-25 for the period from October 14, 2010 (inception) through March 31, 2011.

 

Net Loss per Common Share

 

Net loss per common share is computed pursuant to Section 260-10-45 of the Codification.  Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of shares of common stock and potentially outstanding shares of common stock during the period to reflect the potential dilution that could occur from common shares issuable through convertible debt, stock options or warrants.

F-10
 

 

The following table shows the potentially outstanding dilutive common shares excluded from the diluted net loss per share calculation for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 as they were anti-dilutive:

 

    March 31, 2011     March 31, 2010  
Convertible preferred stock     3,877,500       -  
Stock purchase warrants     5,000,000        -  
Warrants issued with the convertible preferred stock     976,392        -  
Total     9,853,892       -  

 

Cash Flows Reporting

 

The Company adopted paragraph 230-10-45-24 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for cash flows reporting, classifies cash receipts and payments according to whether they stem from operating, investing, or financing activities and provides definitions of each category, and uses the indirect or reconciliation method (“Indirect method”) as defined by paragraph 230-10-45-25 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification to report net cash flow from operating activities by adjusting net income to reconcile it to net cash flow from operating activities by removing the effects of (a) all deferrals of past operating cash receipts and payments and all accruals of expected future operating cash receipts and payments and (b) all items that are included in net income that do not affect operating cash receipts and payments

 

Subsequent Events

 

The Company follows the guidance in Section 855-10-50 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for the disclosure of subsequent events. The Company will evaluate subsequent events through the date when the financial statements were issued. Pursuant to ASU 2010-09 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, the Company as an SEC filer considers its financial statements issued when they are widely distributed to users, such as through filing them on EDGAR.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2011, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-04 “Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2011-04”). This amendment and guidance are the result of the work by the FASB and the IASB to develop common requirements for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements in accordance with U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs).

 

This update does not modify the requirements for when fair value measurements apply; rather, it generally represent clarifications on how to measure and disclose fair value under ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement, including the following revisions:

 

  · An entity that holds a group of financial assets and financial liabilities whose market risk (that is, interest rate risk, currency risk, or other price risk) and credit risk are managed on the basis of the entity’s net risk exposure may apply an exception to the fair value requirements in ASC 820 if certain criteria are met. The exception allows such financial instruments to be measured on the basis of the reporting entity’s net, rather than gross, exposure to those risks.
     
  · In the absence of a Level 1 input, a reporting entity should apply premiums or discounts when market participants would do so when pricing the asset or liability consistent with the unit of account.
     
  · Additional disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

 

The amendments in this Update are to be applied prospectively and are effective for public entity during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011.

F-11
 

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05 “Comprehensive Income” (“ASU 2011-05”), which was the result of a joint project with the IASB and amends the guidance in ASC 220, Comprehensive Income, by eliminating the option to present components of other comprehensive income (OCI) in the statement of stockholders’ equity. Instead, the new guidance now gives entities the option to present all non-owner changes in stockholders’ equity either as a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or as two separate but consecutive statements. Regardless of whether an entity chooses to present comprehensive income in a single continuous statement or in two separate but consecutive statements, the amendments require entities to present all reclassification adjustments from OCI to net income on the face of the statement of comprehensive income.

 

The amendments in this Update should be applied retrospectively and are effective for public entity for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011.

 

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Note 3 – Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates continuity of operations, realization of assets, and liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

As reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements, the Company had an accumulated deficit at March 31, 2011, and had a net loss and net cash used in operating activities for the interim period then ended, respectively. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern

 

While the Company is attempting to commence operations and generate revenues, the Company’s cash position may not be significant enough to support the Company’s daily operations. Management intends to raise additional funds by way of a public or private offering. Management believes that the actions presently being taken to further implement its business plan and generate revenues provide the opportunity for the Company to continue as a going concern. While the Company believes in the viability of its strategy to generate revenues and in its ability to raise additional funds, there can be no assurances to that effect. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon the Company’s ability to further implement its business plan and generate revenues.

 

The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Note 4 – Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consisted of the following at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:

 

   March
31, 2011
   December 31, 2010   Estimated Useful Life 
             
Furniture and fixtures   -    47,844    5 years 
Computer Equipment   3,576    70,662    3 years 
                
    3,576    118,506      
Less: Accumulated depreciation   (397)   (111,699)     
   $3,179   $6,807      

 

Depreciation Expense

 

Depreciation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 was $989, and $2,035, respectively. During the the interim period ended March 31, 2011, the company abandoned certain assets when the company moved offices.

F-12
 

 

 

Note 5 - Notes Payable – Related Party

 

The Company had notes payable to a related party. The notes were secured by all assets of the Company, bear no interest and are due on demand.

 

Notes payable – related party at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, consisted of the following:

 

   March 31, 2011   December 31, 2010 
         
Notes payable  $-   $74,983 
           
            
   $-   $74,983 
           

 

Note 6 – Stockholders’ Deficit

 

Series A Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock

 

Immediately after the Share Exchange, the Company entered into subscription agreements with certain subscribers for the issuance and sale of (i) of $975,928 in Series A Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock with the rights and preferences set forth in the Certificate of Designation, convertible into shares of common stock at a per share conversion price of $0.40; and (ii) Warrants to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock.

 

The Company paid $125,500 in stock issuance costs to complete the convertible preferred stock and warrant raise. 

 

Common Stock

 

On December 17, 2010, the Company entered into a financial reporting services agreement with Brio Financial Group (“Brio”) expiring December 31, 2011.  Pursuant to the agreement the Company is required to pay the firm $4,500 per month. In addition, a retainer of $8,000 is included in prepaid expenses and will be applied to the final two months bills. The Company also agreed to issue Brio 30,000 shares of restricted common stock per quarter payable at the end of each quarter. 30,000 shares per quarter for the quarters ended December 31, 2010 and March 31, 2011 were valued at $0.40 per share, or $24,000 in the aggregate, and recorded as consulting expense for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2011. The common stock has not yet been issued and the liability is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

 

On January 14, 2011, the directors of the Company approved by unanimous written consent and the stockholders of the Company holding a majority in interest of the Company’s voting equity approved by written consent the appointment of Mr. Vadim Mats as a member of the Board of Directors of the Company, effective as of January 14, 2011. Mr. Mats accrued 10,000 shares of the company’s common stock quarterly. As of March 31, 2011, the Company is yet to issue Mr. Mats 30,000 shares of common stock. The Company has valued the issuance and has recorded and accrual of $4,000.

 

On February 1, 2011, the Company entered into an engagement letter with Lucosky Brookman (“Lucbro”) to provide legal services with respect to certain securities work. Pursuant to the agreement the Company is required to pay the firm $4,000 per month along with 5,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The Company also agreed to issue Lucbro 150,000 shares of restricted common upon execution of the agreement. The 160,000 shares for the quarter ended March 31, 2011 were valued at $0.40 per share, or $64,000 in the aggregate, and recorded as consulting expense for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2011. The common stock has not yet been issued and the liability is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

 

On March 23, 2011, Wizard World entered into a Director Agreement with Michael Mathews, pursuant to which Mr. Mathews was appointed Chairman of the Company’s board of directors.  The term of the Director Agreement is from March 23, 2011 through the Company’s next annual stockholders’ meeting.  The Director Agreement may, at the option of the Board, be automatically renewed on such date that Mr. Mathews is re-elected to the Board.  Under the Director Agreement, Mr. Mathews shall be paid a quarterly stipend of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000). Mr. Mathews has waived this stipend for the calendar year ended December 31, 2011.

 

On March 23, 2011, the Company entered into a Consulting Agreement with Mr. Mathews pursuant to which Mr. Mathews will, among other things, develop a digital platform for the Company and establish digital planning systems that will include all forms of digital media and social, search, content, and video applications. The term of the Consulting Agreement is for a four (4) year period. As compensation for his services, Mr. Mathews shall receive, with the first issuance of 250,000 shares occurring on March 23, 2011, one million (1,000,000) restricted shares of the Company’s common stock, issuable in four yearly installments. As of March 31, 2011, the Company is yet to issue Mr. Mathews 250,000 shares of common stock. The Company has valued the issuance and has recorded and accrual of $100,000.

F-13
 

 

On March 23, 2011, the Company entered into a Consulting Agreement with Brad Powers pursuant to which Mr. Powers will, among other things, develop a digital platform for the Company and establish digital planning systems that will include all forms of digital media and social, search, content, and video applications. The term of the Consulting Agreement is for a four (4) year period. As compensation for his services, Mr. Powers shall receive 62,500 shares of restricted Company common stock upon execution of the agreement and an additional 62,500 restricted shares of the Company’s common stock, issuable in annual installments on the anniversary of the execution of the agreement. The 62,500 shares for the quarter ended March 31, 2011 were valued at $0.40 per share, or $25,000 in the aggregate, and recorded as consulting expense for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2011. The common stock has not yet been issued and the liability is included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

 

Warrants

 

On January 3, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with a consultant to assist the Company in general corporate activities, including, but not limited to, strategic planning; management and business operations; introductions to further the Company’s business goals; provide advice and services related to the Company’s growth initiatives; and any other consulting or advisory services which the Company reasonably requests that Consultant provide to the Company. The Term is for six months and the consultant was compensated with 1,000,000 stock purchase warrants with a maturity of 5 years and an exercise price of $0.40. As of March 31, 201, the Company expensed $107,668 to consulting expense for this issuance.

 

On January 3, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with a consultant to assist the Company in general corporate activities, including, but not limited to, strategic planning; management and business operations; introductions to further the Company’s business goals; provide advice and services related to the Company’s growth initiatives; and any other consulting or advisory services which the Company reasonably requests that Consultant provide to the Company. The Term is for six months and the consultant was compensated with 1,000,000 stock purchase warrants with a maturity of 5 years and an exercise price of $0.40. As of March 31, 201, the Company expensed $107,668 to consulting expense for this issuance.

 

On March 3, 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with a consultant to assist the Company in general corporate activities, including, but not limited to, strategic planning; management and business operations; introductions to further the Company’s business goals; provide advice and services related to the Company’s growth initiatives; and any other consulting or advisory services which the Company reasonably requests that Consultant provide to the Company. The Term is for six months and the consultant was compensated with 1,000,000 stock purchase warrants with a maturity of 5 years and an exercise price of $0.40. As of March 31, 201, the Company expensed $34,652 to consulting expense for this issuance.

 

The following is a summary of the Company’s warrant activity:

 

   Warrants   Weighted Average Exercise Price 
         
Outstanding – December 31, 2010   2,976,392   $0.40 
Exercisable – December 31, 2010   2,976,392   $0.40 
Granted   5,000,000   $0.40 
Exercised   -   $- 
Forfeited/Cancelled   -   $- 
Outstanding – December 31, 2010   7,976,392   $0.40 
Exercisable –  December 31, 2010   7,976,392   $0.40 

 

Warrants Outstanding     Warrants Exercisable  
                                     
Range of     Number Outstanding   Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (in years)   Weighted Average Exercise Price     Number Exercisable     Weighted Average Exercise Price  
exercise price  
$ 0.40       2,976,392   4.85   $ 0.40       2,976,392     $ 0.40  

 

 

 

At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, the total intrinsic value of warrants outstanding and exercisable was $0 and $0, respectively.

F-14
 

 

Note 7 - Commitments and Contingencies

 

Litigations, Claims and Assessments

 

From time to time, the Company may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings, which arise in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm its business. The Company is currently not aware of any such legal proceedings or claims that they believe will have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse affect on its business, financial condition or operating results.

 

Note 8 – Subsequent Events

 

Stock Subscription Agreements

 

On December 21, 2011, Wizard World, entered into a stock subscription agreement with one investor, the Michael Mathews 2011 Children’s GRAT (the “Trust”).  Michael Mathews is the Company’s Executive Chairman.  Pursuant to the terms of the Agreement, the Company issued 357,143 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.001 per share, at a per share subscription price of $0.70 per share, for a total subscription price of $250,000.

 

On December 6, 2011, Wizard World entered into stock subscription agreements with accredited investors, for the issuance and sale of an aggregate of $325,000 in Senior Convertible Debentures. The Debentures bear interest at a rate of six percent (6%) per annum and have a maturity date of February 28, 2012. The Company, at its option, shall have the right to prepay a portion or all outstanding principal of the Debentures prior to the Maturity Date without penalty.  The Debentures are mandatorily convertible into shares of the Company’s Series A Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001, with a per share conversion price of $0.40 per share, upon a private placement of the Company of a minimum of $500,000 of Series A Preferred.  Additionally, at the option of the Subscribers, the Debentures are convertible into shares of Series A Preferred, in whole or in part, at any time between the original issue date of the Debentures and the Maturity Date, unless previously repaid by the Company or mandatorily converted into Series A Preferred.

 

On August 19, 2011, Wizard World entered into stock subscription agreements with certain investors in connection with an offering of up to $455,000 principal amount of Convertible Promissory Notes.  The Notes accrue interest at an annual rate of 14% and are due four months from the issuance date.  The Notes are convertible at a per share price of $.60.

 

In conjunction with the Notes, each investor was granted a Series A Common Stock Purchase Warrant exercisable for one share of common stock of the Company for each $2.00 of investment.  The Warrants have a five year term and are exercisable at $.60 per share, which may be paid via a cashless exercise.

 

On April 18, 2011, Wizard World entered into subscription agreements with certain accredited investors for the issuance and sale of (i) an aggregate of $575,000 in Series A Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock and (ii) Series A Common Stock Purchase Warrants on the basis of one warrant for every $2.00 of investment.

 

Employment and Director Agreements

 

Gareb Shamus Agreement

 

On May 25, 2011, Wizard World, Inc. entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Gareb Shamus, President and CEO of the Company.

 

On May 25, 2011, the Company also entered into a Director Agreement with Mr. Shamus. The term of the Director Agreement commences on May 25, 2011 and continues through the Company’s next annual stockholders’ meeting. However, the Director Agreement may, at the option of the Board, be automatically renewed on such date that Mr. Shamus is re-elected to the Board.

 

For Mr. Shamus’ service on the Board, he received, upon execution of the Director Agreement, and in accordance with a Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement, entered into as of May 25, 2011, by and between the Company and Mr. Shamus, a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to one hundred and fifty thousand (150,000) shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $.0001 per share, at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the execution date of the Director Agreement. The option is exercisable for a period of five years and vests 33% annually over a period of three (3) years, pro-rated for the number of days Mr. Shamus served on the Board. 

 

On December 1, 2011, Mr. Gareb Shamus resigned his positions as President, Chief Executive Officer and Director of the Company.

F-15
 

 

John D. Maatta Agreement

 

On May 25, 2011, Wizard World entered into a Director Agreement with Mr. John D. Maatta in connection with his appointment to the Board of Directors of the Company.  The term of the Director Agreement commences on May 25, 2011 and continues through the Company’s next annual stockholders’ meeting.  However, the Director Agreement may, at the option of the Board, be automatically renewed on such date that Mr. Maatta is re-elected to the Board.

 

Mr. Maatta received, upon execution of the Director Agreement and pursuant to a Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement, entered into as of May 25, 2011, by and between the Company and Mr. Maatta, a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to one hundred and fifty thousand (150,000) shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $.0001 per share, at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the execution date of the Director Agreement.  The option is exercisable for a period of five years and vests in equal amounts over a period of three (3) years at the rate of twelve thousand five hundred (12,500) shares per fiscal quarter at the end of such quarter, commencing in the quarter ending July 31, 2011, and pro-rated for the number of days Mr. Maatta served on the Board during such fiscal quarter.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, if Mr. Maatta ceases to be a member of the Board at any time during the three (3)-year vesting period for any reason (such as resignation, withdrawal, death, disability or any other reason), then any un-vested options shall be irrefutably forfeited.

 

John D. Macaluso Agreement

 

On May 13, 2011, Wizard World entered into a Director Agreement with Mr. John Macaluso in connection with his appointment to the Board of Directors of the Company.  The term of the Director Agreement is from May 13, 2011 through the Company’s next annual stockholders’ meeting.  The Director Agreement may, at the option of the Board, be automatically renewed on such date that Mr. Macaluso is re-elected to the Board.

 

Mr. Macaluso received, upon execution of the Director Agreement and pursuant to a Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement, entered into as of May 13, 2011, by and between the Company and Mr. Macaluso, a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to one hundred and fifty thousand (150,000) shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $.0001 per share, at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the execution date of the Director Agreement.  The option is exercisable for a period of five years and vests in equal amounts over a period of three (3) years at the rate of twelve thousand five hundred (12,500) shares per fiscal quarter at the end of such quarter, commencing in the quarter ending July 31, 2011, and pro-rated for the number of days Mr. Macaluso served on the Board during such fiscal quarter.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, if Mr. Macaluso ceases to be a member of Board at any time during the three (3) year vesting period for any reason (such as resignation, withdrawal, death, disability or any other reason), then any un-vested options shall be irrefutably forfeited.

 

Greg Suess Agreement

 

On May 9, 2011, Wizard World entered into a Director Agreement, made as of May 9, 2011, with Mr. Greg Suess in connection with his appointment to the Board of Directors of the Company.  The term of the Director Agreement is from May 9, 2011 through the Company’s next annual stockholders’ meeting.  The Director Agreement may, at the option of the Board, be automatically renewed on such date that Mr. Suess is re-elected to the Board.

 

Mr. Suess received, upon execution of the Director Agreement, a non-qualified stock option to purchase up to one hundred and fifty thousand (150,000) shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price per share equal to the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the execution date of the Director Agreement.  The option is exercisable for a period of five years and vests in equal amounts over a period of three (3) years at the rate of twelve thousand five hundred (12,500) shares per fiscal quarter at the end of such quarter, commencing in the quarter ending July 31, 2011, and pro-rated for the number of days Mr. Suess served on the Board during the fiscal quarter.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, if Mr. Suess ceases to be a member of the Board at any time during the three (3) year vesting period for any reason (such as resignation, withdrawal, death, disability or any other reason), then any un-vested options shall be irrefutably forfeited.

 

Equity Incentive Plan

 

On May 9, 2011, the Board of Directors of Wizard World approved, authorized and adopted (subject to stockholder approval) the 2011 Incentive Stock and Award Plan (the “Plan”).  The Plan provides for the issuance of up to 3,000,000 shares of common stock, par value $.0001 per share, of the Company through the grant of non-qualified options (the “Non-qualified Options”), incentive options (the “Incentive Options” and together with the Non-qualified Options, the “Options”) and restricted stock (the “Restricted Stock”) to directors, officers, consultants, attorneys, advisors and employees.

 

The 2011 Award Plan shall be administered by a committee consisting of two or more independent, non-employee and outside directors (the “Committee”). In the absence of such a Committee, the Board of the Company shall administer the Plan.

F-16
 

 

Each Option shall contain the following material terms:

 

(i) the exercise price, which shall be determined by the Committee at the time of grant, shall not be less than 100% of the Fair Market Value (defined as the closing price on the final trading day immediately prior to the grant on the principal exchange or quotation system on which the common stock is listed or quoted, as applicable) of the common stock of the Company, provided that if the recipient of the Option owns more than ten percent (10%) of the total combined voting power of the Company, the exercise price shall be at least 110% of the Fair Market Value;

 

(ii) the term of each Option shall be fixed by the Committee, provided that such Option shall not be exercisable more than five (5) years after the date such Option is granted, and provided further that with respect to an Incentive Option, if the recipient owns more than ten percent (10%) of the total combined voting power of the Company, the Incentive Option shall not be exercisable more than five (5) years after the date such Incentive Option is granted;

 

(iii) subject to acceleration in the event of a Change of Control of the Company (as further described in the Plan), the period during which the Options vest shall be designated by the Committee or, in the absence of any Option vesting periods designated by the Committee at the time of grant, shall vest and become exercisable in equal amounts on each fiscal quarter of the Company through the four (4) year anniversary of the date on which the Option was granted;

 

(iv) no Option is transferable and each is exercisable only by the recipient of such Option except in the event of the death of the recipient; and

 

(v) with respect to Incentive Options, the aggregate Fair Market Value of common stock exercisable for the first time during any calendar year shall not exceed $100,000.


Each award of Restricted Stock is subject to the following material terms:

 

(i) no rights to an award of Restricted Stock is granted to the intended recipient of Restricted Stock unless and until the grant of Restricted Stock is accepted within the period prescribed by the Committee;

 

(ii) Restricted Stock shall not be delivered until they are free of any restrictions specified by the Committee at the time of grant;

 

(iii) recipients of Restricted Stock have the rights of a stockholder of the Company as of the date of the grant of the Restricted Stock;

 

(iv) shares of Restricted Stock are forfeitable until the terms of the Restricted Stock grant have been satisfied or the employment with the Company is terminated; and

 

(v) the Restricted Stock is not transferable until the date on which the Committee has specified such restrictions have lapsed.

F-17
 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This quarterly report on Form 10-Q and other reports filed by Wizard World, Inc. (the “Company”) from time to time with the SEC (collectively, the “Filings”) contain or may contain forward-looking statements and information that are based upon beliefs of, and information currently available to, the Company’s management as well as estimates and assumptions made by Company’s management. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which are only predictions and speak only as of the date hereof. When used in the Filings, the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “future,” “intend,” “plan,” or the negative of these terms and similar expressions as they relate to the Company or the Company’s management identify forward-looking statements. Such statements reflect the current view of the Company with respect to future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other factors, including the risks relating to the Company’s business, industry, and the Company’s operations and results of operations. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should the underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may differ significantly from those anticipated, believed, estimated, expected, intended, or planned.

 

Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, the Company cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance, or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, the Company does not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

 

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). These accounting principles require us to make certain estimates, judgments and assumptions. We believe that the estimates, judgments and assumptions upon which we rely are reasonable based upon information available to us at the time that these estimates, judgments and assumptions are made. These estimates, judgments and assumptions can affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the date of the financial statements as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented. Our financial statements would be affected to the extent there are material differences between these estimates and actual results. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by GAAP and does not require management’s judgment in its application. There are also areas in which management’s judgment in selecting any available alternative would not produce a materially different result. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this report.

 

Overview

 

We intend for this discussion to provide information that will assist in understanding our financial statements, the changes in certain key items in those financial statements, and the primary factors that accounted for those changes, as well as how certain accounting principles affect our financial statements. This discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and accompanying notes for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and for the year ended December 31, 2010, included elsewhere in this report.

 

We are a producer of pop culture and multimedia conventions (“Comic Cons”) across North America that markets movies, TV shows, video games, technology, toys, social networking/gaming platforms, comic books and graphic novels. These Comic Cons provide sales, marketing, promotions, public relations, advertising and sponsorship opportunities for entertainment companies, toy companies, gaming companies, publishing companies, marketers, corporate sponsors and retailers.

 

Plan of Operation

 

Our Company has two lines of business: (i) live multimedia events, which involves ticket sales and exhibitor booth space, and (ii) sponsorships and advertising. Our current focus is on growing our existing Comic Cons by obtaining new exhibitors and dealers and attracting more high profile celebrities and VIPs. We also plan to expose our database of fans and our target market of young adult males to our content through digital media such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flicker, and Tumblr, and draw higher traffic to our website www.wizardworld.com by creating content from our live multimedia events and promoting such events through emails, newsletters, our iPad app and our soon to be released iPhone and Android apps.

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We expect to produce nine (9) live events during the year ended December 31, 2011. We run the risk that we will not be profitable in the live event business. To date, we have operated profitable live events in both the Philadelphia and Chicago markets, but we have operated at a deficit in other events. In order for us to operate a successful event, we must produce an event that is relevant to the public in order drive ticket sales, booth sales, sponsorship and advertising. In order for the Company to grow the digital business, we must attract unique users and drive traffic to our online site. To date, we have exhausted considerable resources developing our media platform, but we have yet to earn a profit from the platform.

 

Currently, our digital media business has been funded on capital raised from outside investors. We are currently earning revenue from the site and from the newly launched digital entertainment ad network, but not enough to maintain the costs to operate. We must continue to fund the digital media business from outside investors and from cash flow from the live event business until the media platform generates enough revenue to support its own operation.

 

Results of Operations

 

Summary of Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 and 2010:

 

   Three months ended 
   March 31,
2011
   March 31,
2010
 
Convention revenue  $536,656   $214,830 
Gross loss  $(127,150)  $(3,097)
Operating expenses  $(888,852)  $(181,920)
Loss from operations  $(1,016,002)  $(185,017)
Other income (expenses)  $1,589,126   $(365)
Net income (loss)  $573,124   $(185,382)
Income (loss) per common share – basic and diluted  $553,873   $(185,382)

 

Convention Revenue

 

Convention revenue was $536,656 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, as compared to $214,830 for the comparable period ended March 31, 2010, an increase of $321,826. The significant increase in convention revenue is primarily attributable to an increase in the number of live events (3) produced in 2011, as compared to 2010 (1). Average per show revenue increased during the three months ended March 31, 2011 as compared to the comparable three months ended March 31, 2010.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit percentage decreased from a gross loss of 1% during the three months ended March 31, 2010, to a gross loss of 24% during the three months ended March 31, 2011. The decline in gross loss percentage was the inability of the company to properly budget newly run conventions. The company did not experience the attendance and realize the revenue as planned to offset the costs associated with running conventions during the quarter ended March 31, 2011.

 

Operating Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2011, was $888,852, as compared to $181,920 for the three months ended March 31, 2010. The $706,932 increase is primarily attributable to an increase in compensation of approximately $150,000, and increase in professional fees associated with being a public company in the amount of $52,000, and non-cash stock based compensation to key consultants and professionals in the amount of $465,000.

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Loss from Operations

 

Loss from operations for the three months ended March 31, 2011, was 1,016,002 as compared to a loss of $185,017 for the three months ended March 31, 2010. The primary increase in loss from operations is due to running 3 unprofitable events, an increase in stock based compensation to key professionals and consultants and an increased overhead due to an increase in staff and running a publicly traded company.

 

Other income (expenses)

 

Other income (expense) for the three months ended March 31, 2011, was $1,589,491, as compared to $(365) for the three months ended March 31, 2010. The $1,588,761 increase is primarily attributable to the company realizing a gain on fair market value – derivative liability in the amount of $1,408,000 during the three months ended March 31, 2011.

 

Net Income (Loss)

 

Net income (loss) for three months ended March 31, 2011, was $573,124 or income per share of $0.02, as compared to $(185,382) or loss per share of $(0.01), for the comparable three months ended March 31, 2010.

 

Inflation did not have a material impact on the Company’s operations for the period. Other than the foregoing, management knows of no trends, demands, or uncertainties that are reasonably likely to have a material impact on the Company’s results of operations.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The following table summarizes total current assets, liabilities and working capital at March 31, 2011, compared to December 31, 2010:

 

   March 31,
2011
   December 31,
2010
   Increase/Decrease 
Current Assets  $416,491   $656,997   $(240,506)
Current Liabilities  $1,878,433   $2,925,407   $(1,046,974)
Working Capital (Deficit)  $(1,461,942)  $(2,268,410)  $(806,468)

 

At March 31, 2011, we had a working capital deficit of $1,461,942, as compared to a working capital deficit of $2,268,410, at December 31, 2010, a decrease of $(806,468). The working capital deficit decrease is primarily driven by the decrease in the derivative liability.

 

Net cash used for operating activities for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 was $(282,984) and $(19,409), respectively. The net income (loss) for three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 was $573,124 and $(185,382), respectively. The Company’s cash used in operations increased significantly due to running an additional event during the quarter and the costs associated and increased professional fees associated with running a public company,

 

Net cash obtained through all financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2011 was $(74,983), as compared to $666,016 for the three months ended March 31, 2010.

 

Going Concern

 

As reflected in the accompanying unaudited interim financial statements, the Company had net cash used in operations for the three months ended March 31, 2011, and a working capital deficit and stockholders’ deficit, respectively, at March 31, 2011. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 

The ability of the Company to continue its operations is dependent on management’s plans, which include the raising of capital through debt and/or equity markets with some additional funding from other traditional financing sources, including term notes.

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The Company will require additional funding to finance the growth of its current and expected future operations as well as to achieve its strategic objectives. The Company believes its current available cash along with anticipated revenues may be insufficient to meet its cash needs for the near future. There can be no assurance that financing will be available in amounts or terms acceptable to the Company, if at all.

 

In response to these problems, management has taken the following actions:

 

·seek additional third party debt and/or equity financing;

 

·continue with the implementation of the business plan;

 

·increase product prices and reduce discounts;

 

·increase revenue from existing live events; and

 

·increase revenue through sponsorship and advertising deals.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

As of March 31, 2011, the Company had no off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We believe that the following accounting policies are the most critical to aid you in fully understanding and evaluating this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation.”

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  

 

The Company’s significant estimates and assumptions include the fair value of financial instruments; the carrying value, recoverability and impairment, if any, of long-lived assets, including the values assigned to deposits and construction in progress, income tax rate, income tax provision, allowance of deferred tax assets and the assumption that the Company will continue as a going concern. Those significant accounting estimates or assumptions bear the risk of change due to the fact that there are uncertainties attached to those estimates or assumptions, and certain estimates or assumptions are difficult to measure or value.

 

Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.

 

Management regularly reviews its estimates utilizing currently available information, changes in facts and circumstances, historical experience and reasonable assumptions. After such reviews, and if deemed appropriate, those estimates are adjusted accordingly. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, varying from 3 to 5 years or, when applicable, the life of the lease, whichever is shorter.

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Carrying Value, Recoverability and Impairment of long-lived assets

 

The Company has adopted paragraph 360-10-35-17 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for its long-lived assets. The Company’s long-lived assets, which include property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.

 

The Company assesses the recoverability of its long-lived assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related long-lived asset or group of long-lived assets over their remaining estimated useful lives against their respective carrying amounts. Impairment, if any, is based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of those assets. Fair value is generally determined using the asset’s expected future discounted cash flows or market value, if readily determinable. If long-lived assets are determined to be recoverable, but the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives are shorter than originally estimated, the net book values of the long-lived assets are depreciated over the newly determined remaining estimated useful lives.

 

The Company considers the following to be some examples of important indicators that may trigger an impairment review: (i) significant under-performance or losses of assets relative to expected historical or projected future operating results; (ii) significant changes in the manner or use of assets or in the Company’s overall strategy with respect to the manner or use of the acquired assets or changes in the Company’s overall business strategy; (iii) significant negative industry or economic trends; (iv) increased competitive pressures; and (v) regulatory changes. The Company evaluates acquired assets for potential impairment indicators at least annually and more frequently upon the occurrence of such events.

 

The impairment charges, if any, are included in operating expenses in the accompanying statements of operations.

 

Derivative Instruments

 

The Company evaluates its convertible debt, warrants or other contracts to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with Paragraph 810-10-05-4 of the Codification and Paragraph 815-40-25 of the Codification. The result of this accounting treatment is that the fair value of the embedded derivative is marked-to-market each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the consolidated statements of operations as other income or expense. Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity.

 

In circumstances where the embedded conversion option in a convertible instrument is required to be bifurcated and there are also other embedded derivative instruments in the convertible instrument that are required to be bifurcated, the bifurcated derivative instruments are accounted for as a single, compound derivative instrument. 

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Equity instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification are reclassified to liability at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities will be classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument is expected within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

Income Taxes

 

We comply with SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes, which requires an asset and liability approach to financial reporting for income taxes. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed for differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities that will result in future taxable or deductible amounts, based on enacted tax laws and rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred income tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

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Revenue Recognition

 

In accordance with the provisions of Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) No. 101, Revenue Recognition, as amended by SAB 104, revenues are generally recognized when products are shipped or as services are performed. However, due to the nature of our business, there are additional steps in the revenue recognition process, as described below:

 

·Sponsorships: We follow the guidance of Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) Issue 00-21 Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables, and assign the total of sponsorship revenues to the various elements contained within a sponsorship package based on their relative fair values.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

We follow paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of our financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of our financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs. The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

·Level 1 – Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date;

 

·Level 2 – Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date; and

 

·Level 3 – Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

The carrying amount of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash, prepaid expenses and accrued expenses approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of those instruments. The Company’s convertible preferred stock and warrants approximate the fair value of such instruments based upon management’s best estimate of interest rates that would be available to the Company for similar financial arrangements at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.

 

The Company uses Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy to measure the fair value of the derivative liabilities and revalues its derivative warrant liability at every reporting period and recognizes gains or losses in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) that are attributable to the change in the fair value of the derivative warrant liability.

 

Financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below and disclosed on the consolidated balance sheets:

 

       Fair Value Measurement Using 
   Carrying Value   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Total 
                          
Derivative conversion features and warrant liabilities  $852,077   $-   $-   $852,077   $852,077 
                          

 

The table below provides a summary of the changes in fair value, including net transfers in and/or out, of all financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the three months ended March 31, 2011 and the year ended December 31, 2010:

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   Fair Value Measurement Using Level 3 Inputs 
   Derivative warrants   Total 
         
Balance, December 31, 2009  $-   $- 
Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized)          
  included in net loss   -    - 
Purchases, issuances and settlements   2,260,571    2,260,571 
Transfers in and/or out of Level 3   -    - 
Balance, December 31, 2010  $2,260,571   $2,260,571 
Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized)          
  included in net loss   (1,408,494)   (1,408,494)
Purchases, issuances and settlements          
Transfers in and/or out of Level 3          
Balance, March 31, 2011  $852,077   $852,077 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2011, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-04 “Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2011-04”). This amendment and guidance are the result of the work by the FASB and the IASB to develop common requirements for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements in accordance with U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs).

 

This update does not modify the requirements for when fair value measurements apply; rather, it generally represent clarifications on how to measure and disclose fair value under ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement, including the following revisions:

 

·An entity that holds a group of financial assets and financial liabilities whose market risk (that is, interest rate risk, currency risk, or other price risk) and credit risk are managed on the basis of the entity’s net risk exposure may apply an exception to the fair value requirements in ASC 820 if certain criteria are met. The exception allows such financial instruments to be measured on the basis of the reporting entity’s net, rather than gross, exposure to those risks.

 

·In the absence of a Level 1 input, a reporting entity should apply premiums or discounts when market participants would do so when pricing the asset or liability consistent with the unit of account.

 

·Additional disclosures about fair value measurements.

 

The amendments in this Update are to be applied prospectively and are effective for public entity during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011.

 

In June 2011, the FASB issued the FASB Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05 “Comprehensive Income” (“ASU 2011-05”), which was the result of a joint project with the IASB and amends the guidance in ASC 220, Comprehensive Income, by eliminating the option to present components of other comprehensive income (OCI) in the statement of stockholders’ equity. Instead, the new guidance now gives entities the option to present all non-owner changes in stockholders’ equity either as a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or as two separate but consecutive statements. Regardless of whether an entity chooses to present comprehensive income in a single continuous statement or in two separate but consecutive statements, the amendments require entities to present all reclassification adjustments from OCI to net income on the face of the statement of comprehensive income.

 

The amendments in this Update should be applied retrospectively and are effective for public entity for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011.

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Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

We do not hold any derivative instruments and do not engage in any hedging activities.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

 

Pursuant to Rule 13a- 15(b) under the Exchange Act, the Company carried out an evaluation, with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s Principal Executive Officer (“PEO”) and Principal Financial Officer (“PFO”), of the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined under Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based upon that evaluation, the Company’s PEO and PFO concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the Company’s PEO and PFO, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

(b) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, during our most recently completed fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

 

We are currently not involved in any litigation that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. There is no action, suit, proceeding, inquiry or investigation before or by any court, public board, government agency, self-regulatory organization or body pending or, to the knowledge of the executive officers of our Company or any of our subsidiaries, threatened against or affecting our company, our common stock, any of our subsidiaries or of our companies or our subsidiaries’ officers or directors in their capacities as such, in which an adverse decision could have a material adverse effect.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

We believe there are no changes that constitute material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the SEC on February 1, 2012.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

 

There were no unregistered sales of the Company’s equity securities during the quarter ended March 31, 2011, other than those previously reported in a Current Report on Form 8-K.

 

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

 

There has been no default in the payment of principal, interest, sinking or purchase fund installment, or any other material default, with respect to any indebtedness of the Company.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information.

 

There is no other information required to be disclosed under this item which was not previously disclosed.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.   Description
     
3.1   Second Certificate of Correction filed January 20, 2011 (as filed as Exhibit 3.5 on Form 8-K filed on January 25, 2011)
     
10.1   Form of Director Agreement (as filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K, as filed with the SEC on January 19, 2011)
     
31.1   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
31.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer of Registrant pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (Rule 13a-14(a) or Rule 15d-14(a)). *
     
32.2   Certification by the Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *
     
32.2   Certification by the Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 1350 as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. *

* Filed herewith

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

      WIZARD WORLD, INC.
           
           
Date: March 2, 2012   By:  /s/ Michael Mathews  
        Name: Michael Mathews  
        Title: Executive Chairman