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EX-99.1 - "ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS" OF GOODRICH PETROLEUM CORPORATION'S ANNUAL REPORT - GOODRICH PETROLEUM CORPd278099dex991.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM - GOODRICH PETROLEUM CORPd278099dex231.htm
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Description of Business and Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2010
Description of Business and Significant Accounting Policies  
Description of Business and Significant Accounting Policies

NOTE 1—Description of Business and Accounting Policies

 

Goodrich Petroleum Corporation (together with its subsidiary, "we," "our," or "the Company") is an independent oil and gas company engaged in the exploration, development and production of oil and natural gas on properties primarily in Northwest Louisiana, East Texas and South Texas.

 

Principles of Consolidation—The consolidated financial statements of Goodrich Petroleum Corporation ("Goodrich," "the Company" or "we") included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") and in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (US GAAP). The consolidated financial statements include the financial statements of Goodrich Petroleum Corporation and its wholly-owned subsidiary. Intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The consolidated financial statements reflect all normal recurring adjustments that, in the opinion of management, are necessary for a fair presentation. Certain data in prior periods' financial statements have been adjusted to conform to the presentation of the current period. We have evaluated subsequent events through the date of this filing.

 

Use of Estimates—Our Management has made a number of estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities to prepare these consolidated financial statements in conformity with US GAAP.

 

Presentation Change—The Consolidated Statement of Operations includes a category of expense titled "Interest income and other" which includes immaterial effects of discontinued operations from the prior periods. The net effect of discontinued operations is added to this account for the comparative years of 2009 and 2008.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents—Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, demand deposit accounts and temporary cash investments with maturities of ninety days or less at date of purchase.

 

Restricted Cash—Restricted cash consists of cash held in escrow totaling $4.2 million for the posting of the suspensive appeal bond relating to the Hoover Tree Farm, LLC v. Goodrich Petroleum Company, LLC litigation. See Note 9.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts—We routinely assess the recoverability of all material trade and other receivables to determine their collectability. Many of our receivables are from a limited number of purchasers. Accordingly, accounts receivable from such purchases could be significant. Generally, our natural gas and crude oil receivables are collected within thirty to sixty days of production. We also have receivables from joint interest owners of properties we operate. We may have the ability to withhold future revenue disbursements to recover any non-payment of joint interest billings.

 

We accrue a reserve on a receivable when, based on the judgment of management, it is probable that a receivable will not be collected and the amount of the reserve may be reasonably estimated. As of each of December 31, 2010 and 2009, our allowance for doubtful accounts was immaterial.

 

Inventory–Inventory consists of casing and tubulars that are expected to be used in our capital drilling program and oil in storage tanks. Inventory is carried on the Balance Sheet at the lower of cost or market.

 

Property and Equipment—We follow the successful efforts method of accounting for exploration and development expenditures. Under this method, costs of acquiring unproved and proved oil and gas leasehold acreage are capitalized. When proved reserves are found on an unproved property, the associated leasehold cost is transferred to proved properties. Significant unproved leases are reviewed periodically, and a valuation allowance is provided for any estimated decline in value. Costs of all other unproved leases are amortized over the estimated average holding period of the leases.

 

Exploration—Exploration expenditures, including geological and geophysical costs, delay rentals and exploratory dry hole costs are expensed as incurred. Costs of drilling exploratory wells are initially capitalized pending determination of whether proved reserves can be attributed to the discovery. If management determines that commercial quantities of hydrocarbons have not been discovered, capitalized costs associated with exploratory wells are expensed. Development costs are capitalized, including the costs of unsuccessful development wells.

 

Fair Value Measurement—Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. We carry our derivative instruments at fair value and measure their fair value by applying the income approach, using level 2 inputs based on third-party quotes or available interest rate information and commodity pricing data obtained from third party pricing sources and our creditworthiness or that of our counterparties. We carry our oil and gas properties held for use and for sale at historical cost. We use level 3 inputs which are unobservable data such as discounted cash flow models or valuations, based on the Company's various assumptions and future commodity prices to determine the fair value of our oil and gas properties in determining impairment. We carry cash and cash equivalents, account receivables and payables at carrying value which represent fair value because of the short-term nature of these instruments.

 

Impairment—Proved oil and gas properties are reviewed for impairment on a field-by-field basis when facts and circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. In performing this review, future net cash flows are calculated based on estimated future oil and gas sales revenues less future expenditures necessary to develop and produce the reserves. If the sum of these estimated future cash flows (undiscounted) is less than the carrying amount of the property, an impairment loss is recognized for the excess of the property's carrying amount over its estimated fair value based on estimated discounted future cash flows. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. We perform this comparison using estimates of future commodity prices and our estimates of proved and probable reserves and recent market transactions. For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, we recorded impairments of $234.9 million, $208.9 million and $28.6 million, respectively. See Note 13.

 

Depreciation—Depreciation and depletion of producing oil and gas properties is calculated using the units-of-production method. Proved developed reserves are used to compute unit rates for unamortized tangible and intangible development costs, and proved reserves are used for unamortized leasehold costs.

 

Gains and losses on disposals or retirements that are significant or include an entire depreciable or depletable property unit are included in operating income. Depreciation of furniture, fixtures and equipment, consisting of office furniture, computer hardware and software and leasehold improvements, is computed using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives, which vary from three to five years.

 

Asset Retirement Obligations—We follow the accounting standard related to accounting for asset retirement obligations. These obligations relate to the retirement of tangible long-lived assets that result from the acquisition, construction and development of the assets. We record the fair value of a liability for an asset retirement obligation in the period in which it is incurred and a corresponding increase in the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset. Accretion expense is included in depreciation, depletion and amortization on our consolidated statement of operations.

 

Revenue Recognition—Oil and gas revenues are recognized when production is sold to a purchaser at a fixed or determinable price, when delivery has occurred and title has transferred, and if collectability of the revenue is probable. Revenues from the production of crude oil and natural gas properties in which we have an interest with other producers are recognized using the entitlements method. We record a liability or an asset for natural gas balancing when we have sold more or less than our working interest share of natural gas production, respectively. At December 31, 2010 and 2009 the net liability for gas balancing was immaterial. Differences between actual production and net working interest volumes are routinely adjusted.

 

Derivative Instruments—We use derivative instruments such as futures, forwards, options, collars and swaps for purposes of hedging our exposure to fluctuations in the price of crude oil and natural gas and to hedge our exposure to changing interest rates. Accounting standards related to derivative instruments and hedging activities require that all derivative instruments subject to the requirements of those standards be measured at fair value and recognized as assets or liabilities in the balance sheet. Changes in fair value are required to be recognized in earnings unless specific hedge accounting criteria are met. We have not designated any of our derivative contracts as hedges accordingly; changes in fair value are reflected in earnings.

 

Income Taxes—We account for income taxes, as required, under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

 

We recognize, as required, the financial statement benefit of an uncertain tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit. For tax positions meeting the more-likely-than-not threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than 50 percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority.

 

Earnings Per Share—Basic income per common share is computed by dividing net income available to common stockholders for each reporting period by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted income per common share is computed by dividing net income available to common stockholders for each reporting period by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, plus the effects of potentially dilutive stock options and restricted stock calculated using the Treasury Stock method and the potential dilutive effect of the conversion of shares associated with Convertible Preferred Stock and Convertible Notes.

 

Commitments and Contingencies—Liabilities for loss contingencies, including environmental remediation costs, arising from claims, assessments, litigation, fines and penalties, and other sources are recorded when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the assessment and/or remediation can be reasonably estimated. Recoveries from third parties, when probable of realization, are separately recorded and are not offset against the related environmental liability.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk—Due to the nature of the industry, we sell our oil and natural gas production to a limited number of purchasers and, accordingly, amounts receivable from such purchasers could be significant. Revenues from the top two purchasers accounted for 29% and 17% of oil and gas revenues for the year ended December 31, 2010. Revenues from the top three purchasers accounted for 32%, 19% and 10% of oil and gas revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009. Revenues from the top three purchasers accounted for 33%, 20% and 9% of oil and gas revenues for the year ended December 31, 2008.

 

Share-Based Compensation—We account for our share-based transactions using fair value and recognized compensation expense over the requisite service period. The fair value of each option award is estimated using a Black-Scholes option valuation model with various assumptions based on our estimates. Our assumptions include expected volatility, expected term of option, risk-free interest rate and dividend yield. Expected volatility estimates are developed by us based on historical volatility of our stock. We use historical data to estimate the expected term of the options. The risk-free interest rate for periods within the expected life of the option is based on the U.S. Treasury yield in effect at the grant date. Our common stock does not pay dividends; therefore, the dividend yield is zero. The fair value of restricted stock is measured using the close of the day stock price on the day of the award.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Accounting for Own-Share Lending Arrangements in Contemplation of Convertible Debt Issuance or Other Financing.    In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued guidance on accounting for own-share lending arrangements in contemplation of convertible debt issuance. The standard requires that such share-lending arrangement be measured at fair value at the date of issuance and recognized as an issuance cost with an offset to paid-in-capital and the loaned shares be excluded in the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share. The issuance cost is required to be amortized as interest expense over the life of the financing arrangement. The standard also requires additional disclosures including a description and the terms of the arrangement and the reason for entering into the arrangement. Retrospective application is required for all arrangements outstanding as of the beginning of the fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2009. The impact of the new guidance on our financial statements, as it relates to the shares outstanding under the share lending agreement (the "Share Lending Agreement") that we entered into in connection with the December 2006 issuance of our 3.25% Convertible Senior Notes due 2026, was evaluated and considered immaterial.

 

Fair Value Measurements.    In January 2010, the FASB issued authoritative guidance related to improving disclosures about fair value measurements. This guidance requires separate disclosures of the amounts of transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and a description of the reason for such transfers. In the reconciliation for Level 3 fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs, information about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements shall be presented separately. These disclosures are required for interim and annual reporting periods effective January 1, 2010, except for the disclosures related to the purchases, sales, issuances and settlements in the roll forward activity of Level 3 fair value measurements, which are effective on January 1, 2011. This guidance was adopted on January 1, 2010 for Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and did not impact the Company's operating results, financial position, cash flows or disclosures.