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EX-3.2 - BYLAWS - GWG Holdings, Inc.dex32.htm
EX-21 - LIST OF SUBSIDIARIES - GWG Holdings, Inc.dex21.htm
EX-3.1 - ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION - GWG Holdings, Inc.dex31.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF MAYER HOFFMAN MCCANN P.C. - GWG Holdings, Inc.dex231.htm
Table of Contents

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 14, 2011

Reg. No. 333-             

 

 

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

GWG HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   26-2222607
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)

 

220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402

(612) 746-1944

Fax: (612) 746-0445

 

Jon R. Sabes

Chief Executive Officer

220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402

(612) 746-1944

 

With a copy to:

Paul D. Chestovich, Esq.

Martin R. Rosenbaum, Esq.

Maslon Edelman Borman & Brand, LLP

3300 Wells Fargo Center

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402

Telephone: (612) 672-8200

Fax: (612) 672-8397

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)   (Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)  

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: as soon as practicable after the effective date.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.    x

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.    ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer    ¨   Accelerated filer    ¨
Non-accelerated filer    ¨   Smaller reporting company    x

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of

Securities to Be Registered

 

Amount to be

Registered

 

Proposed Maximum

Offering Price

Per Unit

 

Proposed Maximum

Aggregate Offering
Price

 

Amount of

Registration Fee

Secured Debentures

  $250,000,000   (1)   $ 250,000,000   $ 29,025.00
 
 
(1)

The Secured Debentures will be issued in minimum denominations of $25,000 and in $1,000 increments in excess of such minimum amount.

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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A Registration Statement relating to these securities has been filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission but has not yet become effective. Information contained herein is subject to completion or amendment. These securities may not be sold nor may offers to buy be accepted prior to the time the Registration Statement becomes effective.

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED JUNE 14, 2011

Offering Amount $250,000,000

GWG HOLDINGS, INC.

LOGO

a Delaware corporation

Secured Debentures

GWG Holdings, Inc., through its subsidiaries, purchases life insurance policies sold in the secondary marketplace. Our objective is to earn returns from the purchased life insurance policies that are greater than the costs necessary to purchase, finance and service those policies to their maturity.

We are offering up to $250,000,000 in Secured Debentures (the “debentures”) in this offering. This is a continuous offering and there is no minimum amount of debentures that must be sold before we can use any of the proceeds. The proceeds from the sale of the debentures will be paid directly to us following each sale and will not be placed in an escrow account. We will use the net proceeds from the offering of the debentures primarily to purchase and finance additional life insurance policies, and to service and retire other outstanding debt obligations. The minimum investment in debentures is $25,000. Investments in excess of such minimum amount may be made in $1,000 increments. The debentures will be sold with varying maturity terms, interest rates and frequency of interest payments, all as set forth in this prospectus and in supplements published from time to time. Depending on our capital needs and the amount of your investment, debentures with certain terms may not always be available. Although we will periodically establish and change interest rates on unsold debentures offered pursuant to this prospectus, once a debenture is sold, its interest rate will not change during its term (subject, however, to the extension and renewal provisions contained in such debenture).

The debentures are secured by the assets of GWG Holdings, Inc., and a pledge of all of the common stock by our largest shareholders. Obligations under the debentures will also be guaranteed by our subsidiary GWG Life Settlements, LLC, which guarantee will involve the grant of a security interest in all of the assets of such subsidiary. The majority of our life insurance policy assets are held in our subsidiary GWG DLP Funding II, LLC (which is a direct subsidiary of GWG Life Settlements). The policies held by GWG DLP Funding II will not be collateral for obligations under the debentures although the guarantee and collateral provided by GWG Life Settlements will include that company’s ownership interest in GWG DLP Funding II. The security offered for the debentures will provide rights as to collateral that are pari passu with the holders of other secured debt previously issued by GWG Life Settlements.

We may prepay the outstanding principal balance and accrued and unpaid interest of any or all of the debentures, in whole or in part, at any time without penalty or premium. Debenture holders will have no right to require us to prepay any debenture prior to the due date unless the request is due to death, bankruptcy or total disability. In the event we agree to prepay a debenture upon the request of a debenture holder (other than after death, bankruptcy or total disability), we will impose a prepayment fee of 6% against the outstanding principal balance of the redeemed debenture. This prepayment fee will be subtracted from the amount paid.

We do not intend to list our debentures on any securities exchange during the offering period, and we do not expect a secondary market in the debentures to develop. As a result, you should not expect to be able to resell your debentures regardless of how we perform. Accordingly, an investment in our debentures is not suitable for investors that require liquidity in advance of their debenture’s maturity date.

Investing in our debentures may be considered speculative and involves a high degree of risk, including the risk of losing your entire investment. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 14 to read about the risks you should consider before buying our debentures. You should carefully consider the risk factors set forth in this prospectus. An investment in our debentures is not suitable for all investors. The debentures are only suitable for persons with substantial financial resources and with no need for liquidity in this investment. See “Suitability Standards” for information on the suitability standards that investors must meet in order to purchase the debentures.

Please read this prospectus before investing and keep it for future reference. We file annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information about us with the SEC. This information will be available free of charge by contacting us at 220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402 or by phone at (612) 746-1944 or on our website at www.gwglife.com. The SEC also maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains such information.

Neither the SEC nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is                        , 2011


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The debentures will be offered and sold on a best-efforts basis by our selling group consisting of broker-dealers registered with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”). Arque Capital, Ltd., a member of FINRA, will act as managing broker-dealer, or the “dealer manager.” The dealer manager will enter into agreements with participating members of the selling group and will receive a managing broker-dealer fee ranging from 0.25% to 1.30% of the principal amount of debentures sold, depending on the debentures’ maturity date. The remaining members of the selling group, including wholesale brokers, will receive selling commissions ranging from 0.50% to 10.95% of the principal amount of the debentures sold, and a non-accountable marketing and due-diligence allowance of up to 1.25% of the principal amount of the debentures sold, depending on the debentures’ maturity date. Certain of our employees who are also registered representatives of Arque Capital may receive selling commissions for selling debentures as a member of the selling group. The total amount of the managing broker-dealer fee, selling commission, and non-accountable expense allowance paid to the dealer manager and selling group on each debenture will not exceed 13.50% of the principal amount of the debenture sold. In addition, we may issue warrants for our equity securities to selling group members and the dealer manager. See “Plan of Distribution” and “Use of Proceeds” for further information.

The offering expenses and other expenses incurred in connection with this offering are not expected to exceed $500,000. Such expenses will be charged against initial proceeds.

 

     Price to
Investors
     Dealer Manager
Fee, Selling
Commissions,

and Allowance (1)(2)
     Proceeds to
the Company (3)
 

Minimum Investment

   $ 25,000       $ 1,750       $ 23,250   

Offering

   $ 250,000,000       $ 17,500,000       $ 232,500,000   

 

(1)

Assumes an average sales commission of 5.00%, average non-accountable marketing and due-diligence expenses of 1.00%, and an average dealer manager fee of 1.00%. As indicated above, actual sales commissions, non-accountable marketing and due-diligence allowances, and dealer manager fees will vary based on a range that relates to the maturity of the debentures sold. The total amount of non-accountable expense allowance, commissions and fees to the dealer manager and the selling group paid on each debenture will not exceed 13.50% of the principal amount of the debenture sold.

(2)

The dealer manager has agreed to offer the debentures on an agency and “best efforts” basis. The dealer manager may also sell debentures as part of the selling group, thereby becoming entitled to selling commissions.

(3)

Proceeds we receive are calculated after deducting the dealer manager fee, assumed average selling commissions, fees and allowance, but before deducting offering expenses and other expenses incurred in connection with the offering. If the maximum offering were sold and the maximum allowance, commissions and fees were paid, the proceeds to us would be $215,750,000, less the amount of offering expenses and other expenses incurred in connection with the offering.

We will issue the debentures in book-entry or uncertificated form. Subject to certain limited exceptions, you will not receive a certificated security or negotiable instrument that is or represents your debentures. Instead, we will deliver written confirmation to purchasers of debentures. Bank of Utah, National Association, will act as trustee for the debentures.

 

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

We have prepared this prospectus as part of a registration statement that we filed with the SEC, using a continuous offering process. Periodically, as we make material investments or have other material developments, we will provide a prospectus supplement that may add, update or change information contained in this prospectus. We will endeavor to avoid interruptions in the continuous offering of our debentures, including, to the extent permitted under the rules and regulations of the SEC, by filing an amendment to the registration statement with the SEC. There can be no assurance, however, that our continuous offering will not be suspended while the SEC reviews such amendment, until it is declared effective.

Any statement that we make in this prospectus will be modified or superseded by any inconsistent statement made by us in a subsequent prospectus supplement. The registration statement we filed with the SEC includes exhibits that provide more detailed descriptions of the matters discussed in this prospectus. You should read this prospectus and the related exhibits filed with the SEC and any prospectus supplement, together with additional information described below under “Available Information.” In this prospectus, we use the term “day” to refer to a calendar day, and we use the term “business day” to refer to any day other than Saturday, Sunday, a legal holiday or a day on which banks in New York City are authorized or required to close.

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. Neither we, nor the dealer manager have authorized any other person to provide you with different information from that contained in this prospectus or information furnished by us upon request as described herein. The information contained in this prospectus is complete and accurate only as of the date of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or sale of our debentures. This prospectus contains summaries of certain other documents, which summaries are believed to be accurate, but reference is hereby made to the full text of the actual documents for complete information concerning the rights and obligations of the parties thereto. Such information necessarily incorporates significant assumptions, as well as factual matters. All documents relating to this offering and related documents and agreements, if readily available to us, will be made available to a prospective investor or its representatives upon request. During the course of this offering and prior to sale, each prospective debenture holder is invited to ask questions of and obtain additional information from us concerning the terms and conditions of this offering, our company, the debentures and any other relevant matters, including but not limited to additional information necessary or desirable to verify the accuracy of the information set forth in this prospectus. We will provide the information to the extent it possesses such information or can obtain it without unreasonable effort or expense. If there is a material change in the affairs of our company, we will amend or supplement this prospectus.

Neither the information contained herein, nor any prior, contemporaneous or subsequent communication should be construed by the prospective investor as legal or tax advice. Each prospective investor should consult its, his or her own legal, tax and financial advisors to ascertain the merits and risks of the transactions described herein prior to purchasing the debentures. This written communication is not intended to be issued as a “reliance opinion” or a “marketed opinion,” as defined under Section 10.35 of Circular 230 published by the U.S. Treasury Department, so as to avoid any penalties that could be assessed under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) or its applicable Treasury Regulations. Accordingly, (a) any information contained in this written communication is not intended to be used, and cannot be used or relied upon for purposes of avoiding any penalties that may be imposed on a prospective investor by the Code or applicable Treasury Regulations; (b) this written communication has been written to support the promotion or marketing of the transactions or matters addressed by this written communication; and (c) each prospective investor should seek advice based on the prospective investor’s particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

The debentures will be issued under an indenture. This prospectus is qualified in its entirety by the terms of that indenture filed with SEC as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. To the extent there is any inconsistency between this prospectus and the indenture, the indenture shall prevail. You may obtain a copy of the indenture upon written request to us or online at www.sec.gov.

The indenture trustee did not participate in the preparation of this prospectus and makes no representations concerning the debentures, the collateral, or any other matter stated in this prospectus. The indenture trustee has no duty or obligation to pay the debentures from their funds, assets or capital or to make inquiry regarding, or investigate the use of, amounts disbursed from any account.

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

SUITABILITY STANDARDS

     1   

INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

     2   

HOW TO PURCHASE DEBENTURES

     2   

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

     3   

RISK RELATING TO FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

     12   

RISK FACTORS

     14   

USE OF PROCEEDS

     25   

CAPITALIZATION

     27   

SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION

     28   

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

     29   

BUSINESS

     39   

MANAGEMENT

     55   

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

     59   

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS

     62   

DESCRIPTION OF THE DEBENTURES

     64   

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

     79   

MATERIAL FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

     80   

STATE, LOCAL AND FOREIGN TAXES

     84   

ERISA CONSIDERATIONS

     85   

LEGAL MATTERS

     86   

EXPERTS

     86   

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

     87   

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

     F-1   

 

 

LOGO

GWG Holdings, Inc.

220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200

Minneapolis, MN 55402

(612) 746-1944

(612) 746-0445 fax

 

 

 

 

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SUITABILITY STANDARDS

The following are our suitability standards for investors that are required by the Omnibus Guidelines published by the North American Securities Administrators Association in connection with our continuous offering of debentures under this registration statement.

Pursuant to applicable state securities laws, debentures offered through this prospectus are suitable only as a long-term investment for persons of adequate financial means who have no need for liquidity in this investment. There is not expected to be any public market for the debentures, which means that it may be difficult or impossible for you to resell the debentures. As a result, we have established suitability standards which require investors to have either (i) a net worth (not including home, furnishings, and personal automobiles) of at least $70,000 and an annual gross income of at least $70,000, or (ii) a net worth (not including home, furnishings, and personal automobiles) of at least $250,000. Our suitability standards also require that a potential investor (1) can reasonably benefit from an investment in us based on such investor’s overall investment objectives and portfolio structuring; (2) is able to bear the economic risk of the investment based on the prospective debenture holder’s overall financial situation; and (3) has apparent understanding of (a) the fundamental risks of the investment, (b) the risk that such investor may lose his or her entire investment, (c) the lack of liquidity of the debentures, (d) the qualifications of any advisor in our selling group who is recommending an investment in the debentures, and (e) the tax consequences of the investment.

The minimum purchase for our debentures is $25,000. To satisfy the minimum purchase requirements for retirement plans, unless otherwise prohibited by state law, a husband and wife may jointly contribute funds from their separate individual retirement accounts, or IRAs, provided that each such contribution is made in increments of $500. You should note that an investment in our debentures will not, in itself, create a retirement plan and that, in order to create a retirement plan, you must comply with all applicable provisions of the Code. If you wish to purchase debentures in excess of the $25,000 minimum, any additional purchase must be in amounts of at least $1,000.

In the case of sales to fiduciary accounts, these suitability standards must be met by the person who directly or indirectly supplied the funds for the purchase of our debentures or by the beneficiary of the account. These suitability standards are intended to help ensure that, given the long-term nature of an investment in our debentures, our investment objectives and the relative illiquidity of our debentures, the debentures are an appropriate investment for prospective purchasers. Those selling debentures on our behalf must make every reasonable effort to determine that the purchase of our debentures is a suitable and appropriate investment for each debenture holder based on information known to selling group members and provided by the debenture holder in the subscription agreement. Each selected broker-dealer is required to maintain for six years records of the information used to determine that an investment in our debentures is suitable and appropriate for a debenture holder.

The investor suitability requirements stated above represent minimum suitability requirements we establish for prospective debenture holders. However, satisfaction of these requirements will not necessarily mean that the debentures are a suitable investment for a prospective investor, or that we will accept the prospective investor’s subscription agreement. Furthermore, as appropriate, we may modify such requirements in our sole discretion, and such modifications may raise the suitability requirements for prospective debenture holders.

This prospectus constitutes an offer only to the offeree or to the representative to whom it has been presented. Furthermore, this prospectus does not constitute an offer or solicitation to anyone in any jurisdiction in which such an offer or solicitation is not authorized. This prospectus has been prepared solely for the benefit of persons interested in the proposed offering of the debentures offered hereby. Any reproduction or distribution of this prospectus, in whole or in part, or the disclosure of any of its contents without our prior written consent is expressly prohibited. The recipient, by accepting delivery of this prospectus, agrees to return this prospectus and all documents furnished herewith to us or our representatives immediately upon request if the recipient does not purchase any debentures, or if this offering is withdrawn or terminated.

 

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If you do not meet the requirements described above, do not read further and immediately return this prospectus. In the event you do not meet such requirements, this prospectus does not constitute an offer to sell debentures to you.

INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

The industry, market and data used throughout this prospectus have been obtained from our own research, surveys or studies conducted by third parties and industry or general publications. Industry publications and surveys generally state that they have obtained information from sources believed to be reliable, but do not guarantee the accuracy and completeness of such information. Although we believe that each of these studies and publications is reliable, we have not independently verified such data and make no representations as to the accuracy of such information. Similarly, we believe our internal research is reliable but it has not been verified by any independent sources.

HOW TO PURCHASE DEBENTURES

If, after carefully reading this entire prospectus, obtaining any other information requested and available and being fully satisfied with the results of pre-investment due-diligence activities, you would like to purchase debentures, you must complete, execute and return the Subscription Agreement to us (documents to be completed are in a separate subscription package) together with a certified check or personal check payable to the order of “GWG Holdings, Inc. – Indenture Account” (or wire sent to the Indenture Account) equal to the amount of debentures you wish to purchase. Instructions for subscribing for the debentures are included in the Subscription Agreement. The subscription materials and the certified check or personal check should be delivered to your broker-dealer, who will deliver it to us at the following address:

GWG Holdings, Inc.

220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200

Minneapolis, MN 55402

Wire Instructions

GWG Holdings, Inc.—Indenture Account

Routing:

Bank Name:

You must meet the suitability requirements, and your purchase is subject to our acceptance. All information provided is confidential and will be disclosed only to our officers, affiliates, and legal counsel, and if required, to governmental authorities and self-regulatory organizations or as otherwise required by law.

Upon receipt of the signed Subscription Agreement, verification that the Subscription Agreement contains the appropriate representations and warranties respecting the investor’s investment qualifications, and our acceptance of your purchase (in our sole discretion), we will notify you of receipt and acceptance of your purchase. We may, in our sole discretion, accept or reject any purchase, in whole or in part, for a period of 15 days after receipt of the Subscription Agreement. Any purchase not expressly accepted within 15 days of receipt shall be deemed rejected. In the event we do not accept a your purchase of debentures for any reason, we will promptly return your payment. We may terminate or suspend this offering at any time, for any reason or no reason, in our sole discretion.

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights some of the information in this prospectus. It is not complete and may not contain all of the information that you may want to consider. To understand this offering fully, you should carefully read the entire prospectus, including the section entitled “Risk Factors,” before making a decision to invest in our debentures. Unless otherwise noted or unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company” and “GWG” refers to GWG Holdings, Inc. together with its wholly owned subsidiaries.

Our Company

We are engaged in the emerging secondary market for life insurance policies. We acquire life insurance policies that are sold at a discount to the face value of the insurance benefit. Once we purchase a policy, we continue paying the policy premiums in order to ultimately collect the face value of the insurance benefit. We generally hold the individual policies to maturity in order to ultimately collect the policy’s face value upon the insured’s mortality. Our strategy is to continue to build a diversified and profitable portfolio of policies.

Life insurance companies earn substantial revenue windfalls due to the lapse and surrender behavior of individuals owning insurance policies. These revenue windfalls have enabled life insurance companies to issue policies with reduced premiums. These two business practices create a profit opportunity for participants in the life insurance secondary market. The profit opportunity is the difference, or “spread,” between (i) the cost of purchasing and maintaining a life insurance policy over the insured’s lifetime; and (ii) the policy’s benefit that will paid upon the insured’s mortality. The secondary market for life insurance policies has also been driven by the creation of life insurance policy pricing tools and actuarial modeling techniques developed by investors.

According to the American Council of Life Insurers Fact Book 2010 (ACLI), individuals owned over $10.3 trillion in face value of life insurance policies in the United States in 2009. This figure includes all types of policies, including term and permanent insurance known as whole life, universal life, variable life, and variable universal life. The secondary market for life insurance has developed around individuals aged 65 years or older owning either permanent insurance or term insurance convertible into permanent insurance. According to the ACLI, the average annual lapse rate and surrender rate of life insurance policies for the ten years ended 2009 was 7.3%, or over $750 billion in face value of policy benefits annually.

Owners of life insurance policies generally surrender the policies or allow them to lapse for a variety of reasons, including: (i) unrealistic original earnings assumptions made when the policy was purchased, combined with higher premium payments later in the term of the policy than initially forecasted; (ii) increasing premium payment obligations as the insured ages; (iii) changes in financial status or outlook which cause the insured to no longer require life insurance; (iv) other financial needs that make the insurance unaffordable; or (v) a desire to maximize the policy’s investment value.

The market opportunity for selling and purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market is relatively new. According to Conning Research & Consulting, the secondary market for life insurance policies grew from $2 billion in 2002 to over $11 billion in face value of life insurance policy benefits being purchased in 2008. To participate in the market opportunity, we have spent significant resources: (i) developing a robust operational platform and systems for purchasing and servicing life insurance policies; (ii) obtaining requisite licensure to purchase life insurance in the secondary market; (iii) developing financing resources for purchasing and financing our life insurance policies; (iv) recruiting and developing a professional management team; (v) establishing origination relationships for purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market; and (vi) obtaining financing to participate in the business sector.

We were formed in 2006. Since then, we have acquired over $1.4 billion in face value of life insurance policy benefits and have become an active purchaser and financier of life insurance policies in the secondary

 

 

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market. As of March 31, 2011, we owned approximately $417 million in face value of life insurance policy benefits with an aggregate cost basis of approximately $95 million. To date, we have financed the acquisition of this portfolio through the issuance of secured notes by our direct wholly owned subsidiary GWG Life Settlements, LLC, and the use of a senior revolving credit facility, our “revolving credit facility,” benefitting our indirect wholly owned subsidiary GWG DLP Funding II, LLC, which subsidiary owns title to the majority of our life insurance policy assets. For more information on our corporate structure, please refer to the caption “— Corporate Organization” below.

A summary of our portfolio of life insurance policies as of March 31, 2011 is set forth in the table below:

Life Insurance Portfolio Summary (as of March 31, 2011)

 

Total portfolio face value of policy benefits

   $417,643,414

Average face value per policy *

   $    2,694,474

Average face value per insured life *

   $    2,880,299

Average age of insured (yrs)

   80.37

Average life expectancy estimate (yrs) *

   8.33

Total number of policies

   155

Demographics

   56.7% Males; 43.3% Females

Number of smokers

   No insureds are smokers

Largest policy as % of total portfolio

   2.39%

Average policy as % of total portfolio

   0.65%

 

*

Averages presented in the table are weighted averages.

We generally purchase life insurance policies through secondary market transactions directly from the policy owner who originally purchased the life insurance in the primary market. We purchase policies in the secondary market through a network of life insurance agents, life insurance brokers, and licensed providers who assist policy owners in accessing the secondary market. Before we purchase a life insurance policy, we conduct a rigorous underwriting review that includes obtaining two life expectancy estimates on each insured from third party medical actuarial firms. We base our life expectancy estimates on the average of those two estimates. The policies we purchase are universal life insurance policies issued by rated life insurance companies. The price we are willing to pay for the policy in the secondary market is primarily a function of: (i) the policy’s face value; (ii) the expected actuarial mortality of the insured; (iii) the premiums expected to be paid over the life of the insured; and (iv) market competition from other purchasers.

We seek to earn profits by purchasing policies at discounts to the face value of the insurance benefit. The discounts at which we purchase are expected to exceed the costs necessary to pay premiums and financing and servicing costs through the date of the insured’s mortality. We rely on the actuarial life expectancy assumptions provided to us by third-party medical actuary underwriters to estimate the expected mortality of the insured. We seek to finance our life insurance policy purchases and payment of premiums and financing costs, until we receive policy benefits, through the sale of the debentures and the use of our revolving line of credit. In the past, we have also relied on the sale of subsidiary secured notes.

We believe that our business model provides significant advantages to potential investors. First, our earnings from life insurance policies are non-correlated to traditional external market influences such as real estate, equity markets, fixed income markets, currency, and commodities. Second, life insurance policy benefits are the most senior in rank within an insurance company’s capital structure, senior even to secured debt holders, with some amounts further protected under state guaranteed funds (typically limited to $200,000). Third, our assets provide diversification from many other investment opportunities. In addition, the policies within the life insurance portfolio are diversified as well, with no single insurance company making up more than 20% of the total face value of insurance policy benefits.

 

 

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Our objective is to earn returns from the life insurance policies we purchase in the secondary market which are greater than the costs necessary to purchase and finance those policies to their maturity. We expect to accomplish our objective by:

 

   

purchasing life insurance policies with expected internal rates of returns in excess of our cost of capital;

 

   

paying the premiums and costs associated with the life insurance policy until the insured’s mortality;

 

   

obtaining a large and diverse portfolio to mitigate actuarial risk;

 

   

maintaining diversified funding sources to reduce our overall cost of financing;

 

   

engaging in hedging strategies that reduce potential volatility to our cost of financing; and

 

   

maintaining rigorous portfolio monitoring and servicing.

We have built our business with what we believe to be the following competitive strengths:

 

   

Industry Experience: We have actively participated in the development of the secondary market of life insurance as a principal purchaser and financier since 2006. Our position within the marketplace has allowed us to evaluate over 30,000 life insurance policies for possible purchase, thereby gaining a deep understanding of the variety of issues involved when purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market. We have participated in the leadership of various industry associations and forums, including the Life Insurance Settlement Association and the Insurance Studies Institute. Our experience gives us the confidence in building a portfolio of life insurance policies that will perform to our expectations.

 

   

Operational Platform: We have built an operational platform and systems for efficiently tracking, processing, and servicing life insurance policies that we believe provide competitive advantages when purchasing policies in the secondary marketplace, and servicing the policies once acquired.

 

   

Origination and Underwriting Practices: We purchase life insurance policies that meet published guidelines on what policies would be accepted in a rated securitization. We purchase only permanent life insurance policies we consider to be non-contestable and that meet stringent underwriting criteria and reviews.

 

   

Origination Relationships: We have established origination relationships with over 300 life insurance policy brokers and insurance agents who submit policies for our purchase or financing. Our referral base knows our underwriting standards for purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market, which provides confidence in our bidding and closing process and streamlines our own due-diligence process.

 

   

Life Expectancy Methodology: We rely on at least two life expectancy reports from independent third-party medical actuary underwriting firms such as 21st Services, AVS Underwriting, Fasano Associates, and ISC Services to develop our life expectancy estimate.

 

   

Pricing Software and Methodology: We use actuarial pricing methodologies and software tools that are built and supported by leading independent actuarial service firms such as Milliman USA and Modeling Actuarial Pricing Systems, Inc. (“MAPS”) for calculating our expected returns.

 

   

Diversified Funding: We have actively developed diversified sources for accessing capital markets in support of our buy and hold strategy for our portfolio of life insurance policies, ranging from institutional bank financing and global capital markets, to a network of broker-dealers registered with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) who have participated in our subsidiary secured notes financing.

Corporate Organization

Our business was organized in February 2006. Our principal executive offices are located at 220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402 and our telephone number is (612) 746-1944. Our website address is www.gwglife.com. The information on or accessible through our website is not part of this prospectus.

 

 

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On June 10, 2011, GWG Holdings converted from a Delaware limited liability company to a Delaware corporation through the filing of statutory articles of conversion. In connection with the conversion, each class of limited liability company membership interests in GWG Holdings, LLC was converted into shares of common stock of GWG Holdings, Inc. Our corporate structure, including our principal subsidiaries, is as follows:

LOGO

GWG Life Settlements, LLC (Delaware limited liability company), or GWG Life, is a licensed life/viatical settlement provider. GWG Life has fully and unconditionally guaranteed payment of our secured debentures offered by this prospectus. GWG DLP Funding II, LLC (Delaware limited liability company), or DLP Funding II, is a wholly owned special purpose subsidiary owning life insurance policies and is the borrower under the revolving line of credit from Autobahn/DZ Bank. The life insurance policy assets owned by DLP Funding II are held in the GWG DLP Master Trust II. The trust exists solely to hold the collateral security granted to Autobahn/DZ Bank under the revolving line of credit, and DLP Funding II is the beneficiary under the trust. Neither DLP Funding II nor Master Trust II have guaranteed the secured debentures offered hereby. Further, none of the assets of DLP Funding II nor Master Trust II are collateral for the secured debentures, although GWG Life has pledged the equity in DLP Funding II as collateral.

 

 

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The Offering

 

Issuer

GWG Holdings, Inc.

 

Indenture Trustee

Bank of Utah, National Association

 

Paying Agent

Bank of Utah, National Association

 

Securities Offered

We are offering up to $250,000,000 in principal amount of our Secured Debentures, or the “debentures.” The debentures are being sold on a continuous basis.

 

Method of Purchase

Prior to your purchase of debentures, you will be required to complete a Subscription Agreement setting forth the principal amount of your purchase, the term of the debentures, the interest payment frequency and certain other information regarding your ownership of the debentures, and tender the purchase price for the debentures. The form of Subscription Agreement is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. We will mail you written confirmation that your subscription has been accepted. For more information, see “Plan of Distribution.”

 

Denomination

The minimum purchase of debentures is $25,000 in principal amount. Additional debentures in excess of $25,000 may be purchased in increments of $1,000.

 

Offering Price

100% of the principal of the debenture.

 

Limited Rescission Right

If your Subscription Agreement is accepted at a time when we have determined that a post-effective amendment to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part must be filed with the SEC, but such post-effective amendment has not yet been declared effective, you will have a limited time within which to rescind your investment subject to the conditions set forth in this prospectus. See “Description of the Debentures—Limited Rescission Right” for additional information.

 

Maturity

You may generally choose maturities for your debentures of 6 months or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 or 10 years. Nevertheless, depending on our capital requirements, we may not offer and sell debentures of all maturities at all times during this offering.

 

Interest Rates

The interest rate of the debentures will be established at the time of your purchase, or at the time of renewal, based upon the rates we are offering in this prospectus or our latest interest rate supplement to this prospectus (i.e., any prospectus supplement containing interest rate information for debentures of different maturities), and will remain fixed throughout the term of the debenture. We may offer higher rates of interest to investors with larger aggregate debenture portfolios, as set forth in the then-current interest rate supplement.

 

 

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Interest Payments

We will pay interest on the debentures based on the terms you choose, which may be monthly, annually or at maturity. Interest will accrue from the effective date of the debenture. Interest payments will generally be made on the tenth day immediately following the last day of the month to the debenture holder of record as of the last day of that month. Interest will be paid without any compounding, unless you choose to be paid interest at maturity, or reinvest your interest for another term. Your first payment of interest will include interest for the partial month in which the purchase occurred.

 

Principal Payments

The maturity date for the debentures will be the last day of the month during which the debenture matures. We are obligated to pay the principal on the debenture on the last day of the month next following its maturity (or the first business day following the end of the month).

 

Payment Method

Principal and interest payments will be made by direct deposit to the account you designate in your Subscription Agreement

 

Renewal or Redemption at Maturity

Upon maturity, the debentures will be automatically renewed for the same term at the interest rate we are offering at that time to other investors with similar aggregate debenture portfolios for debentures of the same maturity, unless repaid upon maturity at our or your election. In this regard, we will notify you at least 30 days prior to the maturity date of your debentures. In the notice, we will advise you if we intend to repay the debentures or else remind you that your debentures will be automatically renewed unless you exercise your option, within 15 days, to elect to have your debentures repaid.

 

 

If we determine that a post-effective amendment to the registration statement covering the offer and sale of debentures must be filed during your 15-day repayment election period, we will extend your election period until the amendment we file becomes effective. If debentures with similar terms are not being offered at the time of renewal, the interest rate upon renewal will be (a) the rate specified by us in writing on or before the maturity date or (b) if no such rate is specified, the rate of your existing debentures. Accordingly, you should understand that the interest rate offered upon renewal may differ from the interest rate applicable to your debentures prior to maturity. See “Description of the Debentures—Renewal or Redemption on Maturity.”

 

Prepayment or Early Redemption

We may prepay the outstanding principal balance and accrued and unpaid interest of any or all of the debentures, in whole or in part, at any time without penalty or premium. Debenture holders will have no right to require us to prepay any debenture prior to maturity date unless the request is due to your death, bankruptcy, or total disability. In our sole discretion, we may nonetheless accommodate requests to prepay or redeem any debenture prior to its maturity. In the event we agree to prepay a debenture upon the request of a debenture holder, we will impose a prepayment fee of 6% against the outstanding principal balance of the debenture redeemed. This prepayment fee will be subtracted from the amount paid to you.

 

 

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Ranking

The secured debentures will constitute the senior secured debt of GWG Holdings. The payment of principal and interest on the debentures will be:

 

   

pari passu with respect to collateral securing the approximately $55.7 million in principal amount of subsidiary secured notes previously issued by our subsidiary GWG Life (see the caption “—Collateral Security” below);

 

   

structurally junior to the present and future obligations owed by our subsidiary DLP Funding II under the revolving credit facility with Autobahn/DZ Bank (including the approximately $42 million presently outstanding under such facility); and

 

   

structurally junior to the present and future claims of other creditors of our subsidiaries, other than GWG Life, including trade creditors.

 

 

See “Description of the Debentures—Ranking” for further information.

 

Guarantee

The payment of principal and interest on the debentures is fully and unconditionally guaranteed by GWG Life. This guarantee (and accompanying grant of a security interest in all of the assets of GWG Life) makes the debentures pari passu, with respect to collateral, with the approximately $55.7 million of subsidiary secured notes previously issued by GWG Life.

 

Collateral Security

The debentures are secured by the assets of GWG Holdings, Inc. We will grant a security interest in all of our assets to the indenture trustee for the benefit of the debenture holders. Our assets consist primarily of any cash proceeds we receive from life insurance policy assets of our subsidiaries, and all other cash and investments we hold in various accounts.

 

 

The majority of our life insurance policy assets are held in our subsidiary DLP Funding II, LLC. The debentures’ security interest will be structurally subordinate to the security interest in favor of the lender under DLP Funding II’s revolving credit facility. The assets of GWG Life, including proceeds it receives as distributions from DLP Funding II and derived from the insurance policies owned by DLP Funding II, are collateral for GWG Life’s guarantee of the repayment of principal and interest on the debentures. This security interest will be pari passu to other debt issued and outstanding by GWG Life. The debentures are also secured by a pledge of a majority of our outstanding common stock from our largest stockholders, which pledge is pari passu with the pledge of the common stock to the holders of secured notes issued by GWG Life.

 

Indenture Covenants

The indenture governing the debentures places restrictive covenants and affirmative obligations on us. For example:

 

   

our debt coverage ratio may not exceed 90%; and

 

 

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our subordination ratio may not exceed 50% for the first four years after our initial sale of debentures.

 

 

The indenture defines the debt coverage ratio as a percentage calculated by the ratio of (A) obligations owing by us and our subsidiaries on all outstanding debt for borrowed money (including the debentures), over (B) the net present asset value of all life insurance policy assets we own, directly or indirectly, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value of our life insurance assets is equal to the present value of the cash flows derived from the face value of policy benefit assets we own, discounted at a rate equal to the weighted average cost of capital for all our indebtedness for the prior month.

 

 

The indenture defines the subordination ratio as a percentage calculated as a ratio of (A) the principal amount owing by us or any of our subsidiaries that is either senior in rank to the debentures or secured by the life insurance policy assets owned by us or our subsidiaries, over (B) the net present asset value of all life insurance policy assets we own, directly or indirectly, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value of our life insurance assets is equal to the present value of the cash flows derived from the face value of policy benefit assets we own, discounted at a rate equal to the weighted-average cost of capital for all our indebtedness for the prior month.

 

 

We are required to notify the indenture trustee in the event that we violate one of these restrictive covenants. An “event of default” will exist under the indenture if a violation persists for a period of 30 calendar days after our initial notice to the trustee.

 

 

The indenture also places limitations on our ability to engage in a merger or sale of all of our assets. See “Description of the Indentures—Events of Default” and “—Consolidation Mergers or Sales” for more information.

 

Use of Proceeds

If all the debentures are sold, we would expect to receive up to approximately $232 million of net proceeds from this offering after paying estimated offering and related expenses, expected average commissions, dealer manager fees and non-accountable expense allowances. If the maximum offering were sold and the maximum commissions, fees and allowances were paid, the proceeds to us would be approximately $215 million. There is no minimum amount of debentures that must be sold before we access investor funds. The exact amount of proceeds we receive may vary considerably depending on a variety of factors, including how long the debentures are offered.

 

 

We intend to use the net proceeds of this offering primarily for the purposes of purchasing and servicing life insurance policy and related assets (e.g., policy premiums, principal and interest on debt

 

 

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obligations, indenture trustee fees, and hedging instruments). We may use some of the net proceeds from this offering to repurchase some or all of the subsidiary secured notes previously issued by GWG Life, of which approximately $55.7 million in principal amount is currently outstanding, along with approximately $0.94 million in accrued but unpaid interest as of March 31, 2011. See “Use of Proceeds” for additional information.

 

No Market for Debentures and Restrictions on Transfers

There is no existing market for the debentures and we do not anticipate that a secondary market for the debentures will develop. We do not intend to apply for listing of the debentures on any securities exchange or for quotation of the debentures in any automated dealer quotation system. You will be able to transfer or pledge the debentures only with our prior written consent. See “Description of the Debentures—Transfers.”

 

Book Entry

The debentures will be issued in book entry or uncertificated form only. Except under limited circumstances, the debentures will not be evidenced by certificates or negotiable instruments. See “Description of the Debentures—Book Entry Registration and Exchange.”

 

 

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RISK RELATING TO FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain matters discussed in this prospectus are forward-looking statements. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. These forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions about our operations and the investments we make, including, among other things, factors discussed under the heading “Risk Factors” in this prospectus and the following:

 

   

changes in the secondary market for life insurance;

 

   

our limited operating history;

 

   

the valuation of assets reflected on our financial statements;

 

   

the reliability of assumptions relating to our actuarial models;

 

   

our reliance of debt financing;

 

   

risks relating to the validity and enforceability of the life insurance policies we purchase;

 

   

our reliance on information provided and obtained by third parties;

 

   

federal and state regulatory matters;

 

   

additional expenses, not reflected in our operating history, related to being a public reporting company;

 

   

competition in the secondary life insurance market;

 

   

the relative illiquidity of life insurance policies;

 

   

life insurance company credit exposure;

 

   

economic outlook;

 

   

performance of our investments in life insurance policies;

 

   

financing requirements;

 

   

litigation risks; and

 

   

restrictive covenants contained in borrowing agreements.

Some of the statements in this prospectus that are not historical facts are “forward-looking” statements. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words like “believes,” “could,” “possibly,” “probably,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “projects,” “expects,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seek,” “intend,” “plan,” “consider” or the negative of these expressions or other variations, or by discussions of strategy that involve risks and uncertainties. All forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual transactions, results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future transactions, results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The cautionary statements set forth under the caption “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus identify important factors with respect to such forward-looking statements due to the life insurance focus of our business.

We base these forward-looking statements on current expectations and projections about future events and the information currently available to us. Although we believe that the assumptions for these forward-looking statements are reasonable, any of the assumptions could prove to be inaccurate. Consequently, no representation or warranty can be given that the estimates, opinions, or assumptions made in or referenced by this prospectus will prove to be accurate. Some of the risks, uncertainties and assumptions are identified in the discussion entitled “Risk Factors” in this prospectus. We caution you that the forward-looking statements in this prospectus

 

 

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are only estimates and predictions. Actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements due to risks, uncertainties or actual events differing from the assumptions underlying these statements. These risks, uncertainties and assumptions include, but are not limited to, those discussed in this prospectus.

Although federal securities laws provide a safe harbor for forward-looking statements made by a public company that files reports under the federal securities laws, this safe harbor is not available to certain issuers, including issuers that do not have their equity traded on a recognized national exchange or the Nasdaq Capital Market. Our common stock does not trade on any recognized national exchange or the Nasdaq Capital Market. As a result, we will not have the benefit of this safe harbor protection in the event of any legal action based upon a claim that the material provided by us contained a material misstatement of fact or was misleading in any material respect because of our failure to include any statements necessary to make the statements not misleading.

 

 

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in the debentures involves a high degree of risk. Before purchasing debentures, you should carefully consider the following risk factors in conjunction with the other information contained in this prospectus. The risks discussed in this prospectus can materially harm our operations, operating results, financial condition or future results. If any of these risks materialize or occur, the value of our debentures could decline and could cause you to lose part or all of your investment. You should review the risks of this investment with your legal and financial advisors prior to purchasing debentures.

Risks Related to Our Business and Our Industry

Material changes in the life insurance secondary market, a relatively new and evolving market, may adversely affect our operating results, business prospects and our ability to repay our obligations under the debentures.

Our sole business is the purchase and ownership of life insurance policies acquired in the secondary market, which is a relatively new and evolving market. Our ability to repay the principal and interest on the debentures materially depends on the continued development of the secondary market for life insurance, including the solvency of life insurance companies to pay the face value of the life insurance benefits, both of which will critically impact the performance of the life insurance policies we own. We expect that the development of the secondary market will primarily be impacted by a variety of factors such as the interpretation of existing laws and regulations (including laws relating to insurable interests), the passage of new legislation and regulations, mortality improvement rates, and actuarial understandings and methodologies. Importantly, all of the factors that we believe will most significantly affect the development of the life insurance secondary market are beyond our control. Any material and adverse development in the life insurance secondary market could adversely affect our operating results, our access to capital, our business prospects and viability, and our ability to repay our obligations under the debentures. Because of this, an investment in the debentures generally involves greater risk as compared to investments offered by companies with more diversified business operations in more established markets.

We have a relatively limited history of operations and our earnings may be volatile, resulting in future losses and uncertainty about our ability to service and repay our debt when and as it comes due.

We are a company with a limited history, which makes it difficult to accurately forecast our earnings and cash flows. We have incurred losses in the past. In addition, our lack of a significant history and the evolving nature of our market make it likely that there are risks inherent in our business and the performance characteristics for portfolios of life insurance policies that are as yet recognized by us or others, or not fully appreciated, and that could result in earning less on our life insurance policies than we anticipate or even suffering further losses. As a result of the foregoing, an investment in our debentures necessarily involves uncertainty about the stability of our earnings, cash flows and, ultimately, our ability to service and repay our debt.

The valuation of our principal assets on our balance sheet requires us to make material assumptions that may ultimately prove to be incorrect. In such an event, we could suffer significant losses that could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and eventually cause us to be in default of restrictive covenants contained in our borrowing agreements.

Our principle assets are life insurance policies. Those assets are considered “Level 3” assets under ASU No. 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, as there is currently no active market where we are able to observe quoted prices for identical assets. As a result, our valuation of those assets incorporates significant inputs that are not observable. Fair value is defined as an exit price representing the amount that would be received if assets were sold or that would be paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that should be determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability.

 

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The fair value measurement of Level 3 assets is inherently uncertain and creates additional volatility in our financial statements that are not necessarily related to the performance of the underlying assets. As of March 31, 2011, we estimate the fair value discount rate for our portfolio to be 13.31%. If we determine in the future that fair value requires a higher discount rate for a similarly situated portfolio of life insurance policies, we would experience significant losses materially affecting our results of operations. It is also possible that significant losses of this nature could at some point cause us to fall out of compliance with certain borrowing covenants contained in our revolving credit facility.

In an effort to present results of operations not subject to this volatility, we intend to provide additional non-GAAP financial disclosures, on a consistent basis, presenting the actuarial economic gain occurring within the portfolio of life insurance policies at the expected internal rate of return against the costs we incur over the same period. We report these very same non-GAAP financial measures to the lender under our revolving credit facility pursuant to financial covenants in the related borrowing documents. Nevertheless, our reported GAAP earnings may in the future be volatile for reasons that do not bear an immediate relationship to the cash flows we experience.

Our expected results from our life insurance portfolio may not match actual results, which could adversely affect our ability to service and grow our portfolio for diversification, and to service our debt.

Our business model relies on achieving actual results that are in line with the results we expect to attain from our investments in life insurance policy assets. In this regard, we believe that the larger portfolio we own, the greater likelihood we will achieve our expected results. To our knowledge, rating agencies generally suggest that portfolios of life insurance policies consist of at least 300 lives to be diversified enough to achieve actuarial stability in receiving expected cash flows from underlying mortality. As of March 31, 2011, we own approximately $417 million in face value of life insurance policies covering 155 lives. Accordingly, while there is risk with any portfolio of policies that our actual yield may be less than expected, we believe that the risk we face is presently more significant given the relative lack of diversification in our current portfolio as compared to rating agency recommendations.

Although we plan to expand of the number of life insurance policies we own using proceeds raised from the sale of debentures, we may be unable to meet this goal if we do not sell enough debentures and financing from other capital sources is available only on unfavorable or unacceptable terms. Furthermore, even if our portfolio reaches the size we desire, we still may experience differences between the actuarial models we use and actual mortalities.

Differences between our expectations and actuarial models and actual mortality results could have a materially adverse effect on our operating results and cash flow. In such a case, we may face liquidity problems, including difficulties servicing our remaining portfolio of policies and servicing our outstanding debt obligations owed under our revolving credit facility, subsidiary secured notes, and the debentures. Continued or material failures to meet our expected results could decrease the attractiveness of our debentures or other securities in the eyes of potential investors, making it even more difficult to obtain capital needed to both service our portfolio, grow the portfolio to obtain desired diversification, and service our existing debt.

We rely on debt financing for our business and in particular on our access to liquidity under a revolving credit facility. Any inability to borrow under the revolving credit facility could adversely affect our business operations and our ability to satisfy our obligations under the debentures.

To date, we have chosen to finance our business almost entirely through the issuance of debt, including debt incurred by our subsidiary DLP Funding II, LLC under a senior revolving credit facility provided by Autobahn/DZ Bank (which we refer to throughout this prospectus as our “revolving credit facility”). This revolving credit facility is secured by all of the assets of DLP Funding II, has a maximum amount of $100 million, and the outstanding balance at March 31, 2011 was approximately $42 million. Obligations under the revolving credit

 

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facility have a scheduled maturity date of July 15, 2013. Our business model expects that we will have continued access to financing in order to purchase a large and diversified portfolio of life insurance policies, pay the attendant premiums and costs of maintaining the portfolio, all while satisfying our current interest and principal repayment obligations under our revolving credit facility, our other indebtedness and the debentures. Accordingly, until we achieve cash flows derived from the portfolio of life insurance policy benefits, we expect to rely on debt to satisfy our ongoing financing and liquidity needs, including the costs associated with the offer and sale of the debentures. Nevertheless, continued access to financing and liquidity under the revolving credit facility is not guaranteed. If we are unable to borrow under the revolving credit facility for any reason, our business may be adversely impacted as well as our ability to repay our obligations under the debentures.

Our investments in life insurance policies have inherent risks, including fraud and legal challenges to the validity of the policies, which we will be unable to eliminate and which may adversely affect our results of operations.

When we purchase a life insurance policy, we underwrite the purchase of the policy to mitigate risks associated with insurance fraud and other legal challenges to the validity of the life insurance policy. To the extent that the insured is not aware of the existence of the policy, the insured him or herself does not exist, or the insurance company does not recognize the policy, the insurance company may cancel or rescind the policy thereby causing the loss of an investment in a policy. In addition, if medical records have been altered in such a way as to shorten a related life expectancy report, this may cause us to overpay for the related policy. Finally, we may experience legal challenges from insurance companies that the insured failed to have an insurable interest at the time the policy was originally purchased, or from the beneficiaries of an insurance policy claiming the sale was invalid upon mortality of the insured. To mitigate these risks, we require a current verification of coverage from the insurance company, complete thorough due diligence on the insured and accompanying medical records, review the life insurance policy application, require a policy to have been in force for at least two years before purchasing, and require a legal review of any premium financing associated with the life insurance policy to insure insurable interest existed. Nevertheless, we do not expect that these steps will eliminate the risk of fraud or legal challenges to the life insurance policies we purchase. If a significant face amount of policies were invalidated for reasons of fraud or any other reason, our results of operations may be adversely affected.

Every acquisition of a life insurance policy necessarily requires us to materially rely on information provided or obtained by third parties. Any misinformation or negligence in the course of obtaining material information could materially and adversely affect the value of the policies we own.

The acquisition of each life insurance policy is negotiated based on variables that are particular facts unique to the life insurance policy itself and the health of the insured. The facts we obtain about the policies and the insured at the time at which the policy was applied for and obtained are based on factual representations made to the insurance company by the insured, and the facts the insurance company independently obtains in the course of its own due-diligence examination, such as facts concerning the health of the insured and whether or not there is an insurable interest present at the inception of each issued policy. It is nearly impossible for us to confirm many of the facts provided by the insured or obtained by the insurance company at the time a policy was issued. Any misinformation or negligence in the course of obtaining or supplying material information relating to the insurance policy or the insured could ultimately materially and adversely impact the value of the life insurance policies we own.

Our business is subject to state regulation and changes in state laws and regulations governing our business, or changes in the interpretation of such laws and regulations, could negatively affect our business.

When we purchase a life insurance policy, we are subject to state insurance regulations. Over the past three years, we have seen a dramatic increase in the number of states that have adopted legislation and regulations from a model law promulgated by either the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) or by the National Conference of Insurance Legislators (NCOIL). These laws are essentially consumer protection statutes

 

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responding to abuses that arose early in the development of our industry. Today, almost every state has adopted some version of either the NAIC or NCOIL model laws, which generally require the licensing of purchasers of and brokers for life insurance policies, the filing and approval of purchase agreements, disclosure of transaction fees, require various periodic reporting requirements and prohibit certain business practices deemed to be abusive.

State statutes typically provide state regulatory agencies with significant powers to interpret, administer and enforce the laws relating to the purchase of life insurance policies. Under statutory authority, state regulators have broad discretionary power and may impose new licensing requirements, interpret or enforce existing regulatory requirements in different ways or issue new administrative rules, even if not contained in state statutes. State regulators may also impose rules that are generally adverse to our industry. Because the life insurance secondary market is relatively new and because of the history of certain abuses in the industry, we believe it is likely that state regulation will increase and grow more complex during the foreseeable future. We cannot, however, predict what any new regulation would specifically involve.

Any adverse change in present laws or regulations, or their interpretation, in one or more states in which we operate (or an aggregation of states in which we conduct a significant amount of business) could result in our curtailment or termination of operations in such jurisdictions, or cause us to modify our operations in a way that adversely affects our profitability. Any such action could have a corresponding material and negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition, primarily through a material decrease in revenues, and could also negatively affect our general business prospects.

If federal or state regulators or courts conclude that the purchase of life insurance in the secondary market constitutes, in all cases, a transaction in securities, we could be in violation of existing covenants under our revolving credit facility, which could result in significantly diminished access to capital. We could also face increased operational expenses. The materialization of any of these risks could adversely affect our operating results and possibly threaten the viability of our business.

Some states and the SEC have, on occasion, attempted to regulate the purchase of non-variable universal life insurance policies as transactions in securities under federal or state securities laws. In July 2010, the SEC issued a Staff Report of its Life Settlement Task Force. In that report, the Staff recommended that certain types of purchased life insurance policies be classified as securities. The SEC has not taken any position on the Staff Report, and there is no indication if the SEC will take or advocate for any action to implement the recommendations of the Staff Report. In addition, there have been several federal court cases in which transactions involving the purchase and fractionalization of life insurance contracts have been held to be transactions in securities under the federal Securities Act of 1933. We believe that the matters discussed in the Staff Report, and existing caselaw, do not impact our current business model since our purchases of life settlements are distinguishable from those cases that have been held by courts, and advocated by the Staff Report, to be transactions in securities. For example, we are not involved in fractionalization of any life insurance policies.

With respect to state securities laws, many of states currently treat the sale of a life insurance policy as a securities transaction under state laws, although most states exclude from the definition of security the original sale from the insured or the policy owner to the provider. To date, due to the manner in which we conduct and structure our activities and the availability, in certain instances, of exceptions and exemptions under securities laws, such laws have not adversely impacted our business model.

As a practical matter, the widespread application of securities laws to our purchases of life insurance policies, either through the expansion of the definition of what constitutes a security, the expansion of the types of transactions in life insurance policies that would constitute transactions in securities, or the elimination or limitation of available exemptions and exceptions (whether by statutory change, regulatory change, or administrative or court interpretation) could burden us as well as other companies operating in the life insurance secondary market through the imposition of additional processes in the purchase of life insurance policies or the

 

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imposition of additional corporate governance and operational requirements through the application of the federal Investment Company Act of 1940. Any such burdens could be material. Among the particular repercussions for us would be a violation of existing covenants under our revolving credit facility requiring us to not be an “investment company” under the Investment Company Act of 1940, which could in the short or long term affect our liquidity and increase our cost of capital and operational expenses, all of which would adversely affect our operating results. It is possible that such an outcome could threaten the viability of our business and our ability to satisfy our obligations as they come due, including obligations under our debentures.

Being a public company will result in additional expenses and divert management’s attention. Being a public company could also adversely affect our ability to attract and retain qualified directors.

We will become a public reporting company upon the effectiveness of the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. As a public reporting company, we will be subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 pursuant to Section 15(d) of that Act. These requirements will generate significant accounting, legal and financial compliance costs, and can be expected to make some activities more difficult, time consuming or costly, and may place significant strain on our personnel and resources. The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. In order to establish the requisite disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, significant resources and management oversight are required. As a result, management’s attention may be diverted from other business concerns, which could have an adverse and even material effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. These rules and regulations may also make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance. If we are unable to obtain appropriate director and officer insurance, our ability to recruit and retain qualified officers and directors, especially those directors who may be deemed independent, could be adversely impacted. Our historical financial statements contained in this prospectus do not presently include or reflect any of the costs or strains of being a public reporting company. As a consequence, an investor should understand that our general and administrative expenses can be expected to increase as a result of our becoming a public reporting company.

Our business and prospects may be adversely affected by changes, lack of growth or increased competition in the life insurance secondary market.

The growth of the life insurance policy secondary market and our expansion within the market may be negatively affected by a variety of factors beyond our ultimate control, including:

 

   

the inability to locate sufficient numbers of life insurance policy sellers and agents to source life sellers;

 

   

the inability to convince life insurance policy owners of the benefits of selling their life insurance policy;

 

   

competition from other companies in the life insurance secondary market;

 

   

negative publicity about the market based on actual or perceived abuses; and

 

   

the adoption of additional governmental regulation.

The relatively new and evolving nature of the market in which we operate makes these risks unique and difficult to quantify.

Changes in general economic conditions could adversely impact our business.

Changes in general economic conditions, including, for example, interest rates, investor sentiment, changes specifically affecting insurance industry, competition, technological developments, political and diplomatic events, tax laws, and other factors not known to us today, can substantially and adversely affect our business and prospects. For example, changes in interest rates may increase our cost of capital and ability to raise capital, and have a corresponding adverse impact on our operating results. While we may engage in certain hedging activities to mitigate the impact of these changes, none of these conditions are or will be within our control.

 

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If actuarial assumptions we obtain from third-party providers and rely on to model our expected returns on our investments in life insurance policies changes, our operating results and cash flow could be adversely affected, as well as the value of our collateral and our ability to service our debt obligations, including obligations owed to the holders of debentures.

The expected internal rate of return we calculate we will earn when purchasing a life insurance policy is based upon our estimate of how long the insured will live—an actuarial life expectancy. We obtain actuarial life expectancies from third-party medical actuarial underwriting companies. These actuarial life expectancies are subject to interpretation and change. Any change to the actuarial expectancies or the mortality assumptions accompanied therewith that extend the estimated actuarial life expectancies could have a materially adverse effect on our operating results and cash flow. Adverse impacts on the value of our life insurance policy portfolio or our cash flow could in turn impair the value of the collateral we have pledged to our creditors, including the holders of our debentures, and our ability to service our debt. In September 2008, we experienced adverse changes in actuarial life expectancy estimates by many of the medical actuarial underwriting firms we use with the release of the Society of Actuaries’ 2008 Valuation Basic Table. This change in actuarial estimates by the medical actuarial firms had a negative impact on the valuation of our life insurance policy investments and reduced the rate of return we expected we would earn on those investments.

In addition, to actuarial life expectancies, we rely on pricing and premium forecasting software models developed by third-party actuarial companies for the valuation of policies we purchase, future mortality revenues, and the calculation of anticipated internal rates of return. These pricing models forecast the estimated future premiums due, as well as the future mortalities based on the survival probabilities of the insureds over their life expectancies. It is possible that the actuarial tables we presently use will again change in the future or that the mortality assumptions will fail substantially to meet actuarial estimates, and that any such failure could have a materially adverse effect on our business.

We rely on estimated rates of mortality for the actuarial assumptions we use when valuing life insurance policies and the expected performance of our portfolio. If our estimates prove to be incorrect, it could materially and adversely affect our ability to satisfy our debt service and repayment obligations, including our obligations under the debentures.

If we assume we will receive cash inflows from policies sooner than we actually do, we may not be able to make payment on the obligations, including the debentures, in a timely manner, or at all. Moreover, a significant discovery that results in mortality improvements among seniors above historically predicted rates by medical actuaries providing life expectancies could have a material adverse effect on the life insurance policy investments. For example, we have in fact experienced fewer mortalities than originally projected in the early stages of life insurance policy ownership, which has increased the capital we have needed for premium payments and reduced our anticipated return on those investments. While we intend to purchase insurance policies with improved mortality assumptions, we may be unable to do so. Any change to these pricing models, premium forecasting assumptions, the methodology utilized thereof, or the mortality assumptions accompanied therewith that increase the projected cost of insurance premiums or decrease the probability of mortality could have a material and adverse impact on our results of operations and cash flows. Ultimately, this could adversely affect our ability to meet our debt service and repayment obligations, including our obligations under the debentures.

Risks Related to This Offering and Our Company

We may not be able to raise all of the capital that we are seeking in this offering, and may be unable to meet our immediate business objectives with proceeds from the sale of debentures.

Arque Capital serves as our managing broker-dealer (managing placement agent), but this is not an underwritten offering. And, while Arque Capital and the other broker-dealer members of the selling group will use their best efforts in the placement of the debentures, investors should understand that (i) there is no minimum

 

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aggregate principal amount of debentures that we must sell prior to accessing investor funds, and (ii) we may be unable to sell all of the debentures that we are seeking to sell in this offering. Consequently, some or all of the additional capital we are seeking may not be available.

While we plan to continue the offering in support of our overall business objectives, if we are unable to continue the offering for any reason, we expect that our business will be materially adversely affected and that we will need to seek capital from other sources. In the event that we are unable to continue this offering or are unsuccessful in finding alternative sources of capital, we may be forced to sell our investments in life insurance policies in order to service or satisfy our debt-related obligations. If we are forced to sell investments in life insurance policies, we may be unable to sell them at prices we believe are appropriate. In any such event, our business may be materially and adversely impacted.

We depend upon cash distributions from our subsidiaries, and contractual restrictions on distributions to us or adverse events at one of our operating subsidiaries could materially and adversely affect our ability to pay our debts, including our obligations under the debentures.

GWG Holdings is a holding company. As a holding company, we conduct our operations through our operating subsidiaries, and our only significant assets are the capital stock of our subsidiaries. Accordingly, our ability to meet our cash obligations, including our obligations under the debentures, depends in part upon the ability of our subsidiaries to make cash distributions to us. The ability of our subsidiaries to make distributions to us is, and will continue to be, restricted by certain negative covenants relating to our revolving credit facility. DLP Funding II is the borrower under our revolving credit facility. See note 8 to our consolidated financial statements. The significant majority of insurance policies owned by the Company are subject to a collateral arrangement with the agent to our revolving credit lender, as described in note 2 to the consolidated financial statements. Under this arrangement, collection and escrow accounts are used to fund purchases and premiums of the insurance policies and to pay interest and other charges under its revolving credit facility. The lender and its agent must authorize all disbursements from these accounts, including any distributions to GWG Life. Distributions are limited to an amount that would result in the borrowers realizing an annualized rate of return on the equity funded amount for such assets of not more than 18%, as determined by the agent. After such amount is reached, the credit agreement requires that excess funds be used to fund repayments or a reserve account in certain amount, before any additional distributions may be made.

If any of the above limitations were to materially impede the flow of cash to us, such fact would materially and adversely affect our ability to service and repay our debt, including obligations under the debentures. In addition, any adverse event at the subsidiary level, such as a declaration of bankruptcy, liquidation or reorganization, could materially and adversely affect the ability of our subsidiaries to make cash distributions to us. Just as with a material contractual impediment to cash flow, any such subsidiary corporate event would materially and adversely affect our ability to service and repay our debt, including obligations under the debentures.

Subordination provisions contained in the indenture will restrict the ability of the trustee or the debenture holders to enforce their rights against us under the indenture, including the right to payment on the debentures, if a default then exists under our senior revolving credit facility.

The debentures will be subordinate in right of payment to any secured claims of the senior lender under our revolving credit facility. In this regard, subordination provisions limiting the right of debenture holders to enforce their rights are contained in the indenture. These provisions include:

 

   

a prohibition on challenging any enforcement action taken by a senior lender or interfering with any legal action or suits undertaken by the senior lender against us and our affiliates;

 

   

a 180-day standstill period during which there may not be brought any action to enforce an event of default against us or our affiliates unless our revolving credit facility has been repaid in full, which period may be extended if the credit facility provider takes action during such standstill period; and

 

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a prohibition on filing a bankruptcy or insolvency case against us or our affiliates for at least one year plus one day after the revolving credit facility lender has been paid in full.

Furthermore, in the event of a default, we will be prohibited from making any payment, direct or indirect (whether for interest, principal, as a result of any redemption or repurchase at maturity, on default, or otherwise), on the debentures and any other indebtedness, and neither the holders of the debentures nor the trustee will have the right, directly or indirectly, to sue to enforce the indenture or the debentures, if a default or event of default under any senior credit facility has occurred and is continuing, or if any default or event of default under any senior credit facility would result from such payment. This payment restriction will generally remain in effect unless and until: (i) the default and event of default respecting the senior credit facility has been cured or waived or has ceased to exist; and (ii) the end of the period commencing on the date the indenture trustee receives written notice of default from a holder of such credit facility and ending on the earlier of (1) the indenture trustee’s receipt of a valid waiver of default from the holder of a credit facility; or (2) the indenture trustee’s receipt of a written notice from the holder of a credit facility terminating the payment blockage period.

Other provisions of the indenture permit the trustee to take action to enforce the right of debenture holders to payment after 179 days have passed since the trustee’s receipt of notice of default from the senior lender, but in such case any funds paid as a result of any such suit or enforcement action shall be applied toward the senior credit facility until the facility is indefeasibly paid in full before being applied to the debentures. These subordination provisions present the risk that, upon any default by us on obligations owed under our senior debt, the holders of the debentures will be unable to enforce their right to payment.

The collateral granted as security for our obligations under the debentures may be insufficient to repay the debentures upon an event of default.

While the debentures will be guaranteed by GWG Life and rank pari passu with our outstanding subsidiary secured notes with respect to collateral security, the debentures will be structurally subordinated to all obligations of any of our subsidiaries other than GWG Life, including DLP Funding II. Importantly in this regard, DLP Funding II owns the vast majority of our life insurance policies. Moreover, trade payables of our operating subsidiaries other than GWG Life will be structurally senior to the debentures. This means that holders of the debentures will have a junior position to the claims of creditors, including trade creditors, of such other operating subsidiaries on their assets and earnings.

The debentures will also be effectively subordinate to all senior secured debt we have or may incur, to the extent of the value of the assets securing that debt. The indenture governing the debentures does not limit the amount of debt that we or our subsidiaries can incur, and it permits us and our subsidiaries to incur secured debt. As of December 31, 2010, we had approximately $42 million of outstanding secured indebtedness under our revolving credit facility that is senior to the debentures. For a description of the ranking of the debentures, see “Description of Debentures—Ranking” in this prospectus. Because of the fact that the majority of our valuable operating assets are held in our DLP Funding II subsidiary, and all of those assets serve as collateral security for our obligations under the revolving credit facility, debenture holders risk the possibility that the collateral security we have granted for our obligations under the debentures may be insufficient to repay the debentures upon an event of default.

If a significant number of holders of our short-term subsidiary secured notes demand repayment of those notes instead of renewing them, and we have not at such time raised sufficient capital in this offering, we may be forced to liquidate some of our life insurance policy assets, which could have a material and adverse impact on our results of operations.

Our direct and wholly owned subsidiary, GWG Life, has issued and outstanding approximately $55.7 million in subsidiary secured notes. By virtue of GWG Life’s full and unconditional guarantee of obligations under the debentures, and other agreements contained in or made in connection with the indenture, the

 

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debentures are pari passu in right of payment and collateral with such subsidiary secured notes. The indenture for the debentures, and the note issuance and security agreement for the subsidiary secured notes, each provide for cross defaults upon an event of default under the provisions of the other agreement (i.e., an event of default under the note issuance and security agreement will constitute an event of default under the indenture for the debentures, and vice versa). We expect to use a portion of the proceeds from this offering to repay all or a portion of the subsidiary secured notes; however, we do not plan to immediately retire all of such notes. See “Use of Proceeds” for more information in this regard. If investors holding existing indebtedness with short-term maturities do not elect to renew and we have not, at such time, raised sufficient capital through the sale of debentures, we may need to liquidate some of our investments in life insurance policies earlier than anticipated. In such an event, we may be unable to sell those life insurance policies at prices we believe are fair or otherwise appropriate, and such sales could have a material and adverse impact on our results of operations.

Because we intend to hold our life insurance policies to their maturity, we therefore measure our debt coverage ratio against our current cost of financing, which may not reflect the sale price if we had to liquidate the policies.

We intend and expect to hold the life insurance policy investments until they are paid out at the mortality of the insured. As a result, we measure our debt coverage ratio based on the portfolio’s gross expected yield against the interest cost of our total debt obligations to finance the portfolio. The debt coverage ratio, expressed as a percentage, is defined as the ratio of (i) total amounts outstanding on any indebtedness for borrowed money, over (ii) the net present asset value of all life insurance assets we own, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value is calculated as the present value of the life insurance portfolio’s expected future cash flows discounted at the weighted average interest rate of the indebtedness for the previous month. Under the indenture, the maximum amount of debentures we may issue at any time is limited to an amount such that our debt coverage ratio does not exceed 90%. This limitation is designed to provide some comfort to holders of our debt that the value of our assets exceeds our obligations to those holders. Nevertheless, the debt coverage ratio is not based on the market value of our life insurance policy assets, which may be different—greater or less—than the amount we would receive if we were forced to sell those assets in the marketplace.

We have no obligation to repurchase debentures prior to their maturity date except in narrowly limited circumstances.

We will have no obligation, and debenture holders will have no right to require us, to prepay any debenture prior to its maturity date. The only exceptions exist for situations in which an individual natural person investor suffers a total permanent disability, a bankruptcy or dies. In such an event, we will be required to repurchase the debenture of such person so long as certain procedural requirements are met. Outside these narrow exceptions, we may nonetheless agree, in our sole and absolute discretion, to accommodate requests to prepay or repurchase a debenture prior to its maturity in other cases. If we do agree to prepay or repurchase debentures, we will assess a 6% repurchase fee for redeeming the debentures. For more information, see “Description of the Debentures—Redemption or Repurchase Prior to Stated Maturity (Prepayment).” As a result, any investment in a debenture should be considered illiquid and unable to be redeemed until its stated maturity.

Fraudulent transfer statutes may limit your rights under the guarantee of the debentures.

Our obligations under the debentures will be fully and unconditionally guaranteed by our direct wholly owned subsidiary, GWG Life. The guarantee may be subject to review under various laws for the protection of creditors. It is possible that other creditors of GWG Life may challenge the guarantee as a fraudulent transfer under relevant federal and state laws. Under certain circumstances, including a finding that GWG Life was insolvent at the time its guarantee was issued, a court could hold that the obligations of GWG under the guarantee may be voided or are subordinate to other obligations of GWG Life, or that the amount for which GWG Life is liable under its guarantee of the debentures may be limited. Different jurisdictions define “insolvency” differently, and we cannot assure you as to what standard a court would apply to determine whether GWG was insolvent. If a court were to determine that

 

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GWG Life was insolvent on the date on which it guaranteed the debentures, or that the guarantee constituted a fraudulent transfer on other legal grounds, the claims of creditors of GWG Life would effectively have priority with respect to GWG Life’s assets and earnings over the claims of the holders of the debentures.

Our controlling stockholders and principal executives are involved in a litigation “clawback” claim made by a bankruptcy trustee to an affiliate, and it is possible that the trustee may assert claims against our company.

Our Chief Executive Officer, Jon R. Sabes and Chief Operating Officer, Steven F. Sabes, who together beneficially own approximately 95.6% of our common stock are subject to litigation relating to claims by a bankruptcy trustee for loan payments made to an affiliate, Opportunity Finance, LLC. Such payments may ultimately be deemed to be avoidable transfers under preference or other legal theories. Case No. 08-45257 (U.S. Bankruptcy Court District of Minnesota). In addition, GWG Holdings invested $1 million in Opportunity Finance, LLC in 2006 and was repaid and received $176,948 of interest income from that investment in 2007. To date, no claim has been made against GWG Holdings.

While we believe there are numerous meritorious defenses to the claims made by the bankruptcy trustee, and we are advised that the defendants in that action will vigorously defend against the trustee’s claims, such defendants may not prevail in the litigation with the bankruptcy trustee. If the bankruptcy trustee sought to sell or transfer the equity interests of Jon R. Sabes or Steven F. Sabes as a result of the litigation, there could be a change in control of the Company and our business together with all of our investors, including investors in our debentures, could be materially and adversely impacted. Such adverse results would likely arise in connection with negative change-in-control covenants contained in our revolving credit facility agreements, the breach of those covenants and an ensuing event of default under such facility. In addition, if the bankruptcy trustee sought to sell or transfer the equity interests of Jon R. Sabes or Steven F. Sabes as a result of the litigation, such transfers would adversely affect debenture holders by reducing the number of shares of common stock of GWG Holdings that have been pledged as collateral security for our obligations under the debentures. Finally, regardless of the outcome of this litigation, these matters are likely to distract management and reduce the time and attention that they are able to devote to our business.

We have no obligation to contribute to a sinking fund to retire the debentures, nor are the debentures guaranteed by any governmental agency.

We have no obligation to contribute funds to a sinking fund to repay principal or interest on the debentures upon maturity or default. The debentures are not certificates of deposit or similar obligations of, or guaranteed by, any depository institution. Further, no governmental entity insures or guarantees payment on the debentures if we do not have enough funds to make principal or interest payments.

The loss of the services of our current executives or other key employees, or the failure to attract additional key individuals, would materially adversely affect our business operations and prospects.

Our financial success is dependent to a significant degree upon the efforts of our current executive officers and other key employees. In addition, our revolving credit facility requires Messrs. Jon R. Sabes and Steven F. Sabes to generally remain active within the business. We have entered into employment agreements with Messrs. Jon R. Sabes, Steven F. Sabes, Paul Siegert and Jon Gangelhoff. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that these individuals will continue to provide services to us. A voluntary or involuntary termination of employment could have an adverse effect on our business operations if we were not able to attract qualified replacements in a timely manner. At present, we do not maintain key-man life insurance policies for any of these individuals. In addition, our success and viability is also dependent to a significant extent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel in all areas of our business, especially our sales, policy acquisition, and financial management team. If we were to lose the members of our respective service teams, we would need to replace them with qualified individuals in a timely manner or our business operations and prospects could be adversely impacted.

 

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We will have the discretion to purchase assets, including life insurance policies, through different subsidiaries, and to transfer assets among our subsidiaries. Any decision to purchase or hold title to assets in one subsidiary, as opposed to a different subsidiary, may affect the value of collateral security for our obligations under the debentures.

We may at our discretion direct the purchase of policies by, and the sale of policies and other assets amongst, different subsidiaries of GWG Holdings as a method of asset and liability management and to attempt to maintain diversification and certain ratios in our investment portfolio. Purchases of assets in, or movements of assets amongst, different subsidiaries could affect the value of the collateral security for obligations under the debentures. For example, purchases through, or transfers of life insurance polices to, DLP Funding II would cause the policies acquired by DLP Funding II to become collateral for our revolving credit facility, whereas purchases through, or transfers of life insurance policies to, GWG Life would cause the policies acquired by GWG Life to become collateral for the debentures. Moreover, we determine the sales prices for intracompany (consolidated) transfers of assets, including life insurance policies, amongst our subsidiaries. In the case of life insurance policies, intracompany sales are generally priced at the sum of the total amount theretofore advanced on the outstanding policies as of the date of transfer. These purchase prices will ordinarily not be equivalent to the fair market value of the policies at the time of the transfer. Accordingly, purchases of assets such as life insurance policies through, or transfers of such assets to, different subsidiaries may affect the value of collateral security for different classes of holders of our debt, including the debentures. In the case of a liquidation, any of these discretionary decisions may affect the value of and amount you may ultimately be entitled to receive with respect to your debentures.

We do not expect a market to exist that will enable you to sell your debentures.

The debentures will not be readily resalable or transferable. No public market for the debentures exists and none is expected to develop. As a result, transferability of the debentures will be limited. The purchase of debentures is not suitable for investors desiring liquidity at any time prior to the maturity of the debentures.

We cannot know the tax implications of an investment in the debentures for the debenture holder.

The section of this prospectus entitled “Material Federal Income Tax Considerations” sets forth a summary of federal income tax consequences to the purchasers of the debentures. No information is provided concerning tax consequences under any other federal, state, local or foreign laws that may apply to the purchasers of the debentures. Prospective investors or their representatives should read that section very carefully in order to properly evaluate the federal income tax risks of an investment in the debentures. Each prospective investor should consult his personal counsel, accountant and other business advisors as to the federal, state, local and foreign tax consequences of an investment in the debentures. Debenture holders will receive an IRS Form 1099-INT in connection with their receipt of interest payments.

The protection provided by the federal securities laws relating to forward-looking statements does not apply to us. The lack of this protection could harm us in the event of an adverse outcome in a legal proceeding relating to forward-looking statements made by us.

Although federal securities laws provide a safe harbor for forward-looking statements made by a public company that files reports under the federal securities laws, this safe harbor is not available to certain issuers, including issuers that do not have their equity traded on a recognized national exchange (or the Nasdaq Capital Market). Our common stock does not trade on any recognized national exchange (or the Nasdaq Capital Market). As a result, we will not have the benefit of this safe harbor protection in the event of any legal action based upon a claim that the material provided by us contained a material misstatement of fact or was misleading in any material respect because of our failure to include any statements necessary to make the statements not misleading. The lack of this protection in a contested proceeding could harm our financial condition.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

If all of the debentures are sold, we expect to receive up to approximately $232 million of net proceeds from this offering after paying estimated offering and related expenses of approximately $500,000 and after paying our estimated average selling commissions (including wholesale broker commissions), dealer manager fees and non-accountable expense allowances. These estimated average commissions, dealer manager fees and non-accountable expense allowances aggregate to approximately $17.5 million based on expected average selling commissions of $12.5 million (5.00%), dealer manager fees of $2.5 million (1.00%), and non-accountable expense allowances of $2.5 million (1.00%), assuming the sale of all of the debentures. As explained elsewhere in this prospectus, the maximum amount of commissions, fees and allowances is limited to 13.50% of the amount of debentures sold. Therefore, if all of the debentures were sold and the maximum commissions, fees and allowances were paid, we estimate that the net proceeds to us, after paying estimated offering and related expenses of $500,000, would be approximately $215 million. For more information about dealer manager fees, selling commissions and non-accountable expense allowances payable to our selling group in connection with the sale of debentures, please see “Plan of Distribution.”

There is no minimum amount of debentures that must be sold before we access investor funds. The exact amount of proceeds we receive may vary considerably depending on a variety of factors, including how long the debentures are offered.

We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering primarily to:

 

   

purchase life insurance policies in the secondary market and pay expenses relating to the acquisition of such policies;

 

   

pay premiums on life insurance policy assets we own;

 

   

pay principal, interest and fees to our lenders, including under our revolving credit facility, the subsidiary secured notes, and the debentures; and the trustees of certain trusts associated with our subsidiary secured notes and the debentures;

 

   

provide funds for portfolio operations, such as obtaining life expectancy estimates, mortality tracking and collection expenses;

 

   

pay fees in connection with, and associated with maintaining the life insurance policies and accounts under the arrangements required by, our revolving credit facility, our subsidiary secured notes and the indenture;

 

   

pay tax liabilities; and

 

   

purchase interest rate caps, swaps or hedging instruments for the portfolio or our indebtedness.

As indicated above, we expect that we will use some of the net proceeds from this offering to pay principal amounts owing under our subsidiary secured notes. In addition to paying such amounts upon maturity, we may under certain circumstances seek to retire certain of our subsidiary secured notes prior to maturity. In general, we expect to retire subsidiary secured notes with remaining terms of one year or less, as opposed to more recently issued subsidiary secured notes or notes with longer terms. In the event that we sell all of the debentures offered, we expect that approximately one-half of the subsidiary secured notes would be retired. We may also offer exchanges of maturing subsidiary secured notes for new debentures. However, we would receive no new proceeds from any such exchange transactions. As a result, and because any such exchange transaction would involve the payment of fees, commissions and non-accountable expense allowances, we do not expect to offer such exchanges in a widespread manner. Instead, we expect to offer such exchanges on a case-by-case basis and generally only to holders of subsidiary secured notes with remaining terms of one year or less, as opposed to more recently issued subsidiary secured notes or notes with longer terms.

 

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Proceeds not immediately applied to the uses summarized above will be invested in money market funds, commercial paper, U.S. Treasury Bills and similar securities investments pending other uses. We may also purchase interest rate hedges to lock in our cost of capital, or longevity hedges to lock in our expected return from our portfolio.

Since we do not know the total principal amount of debentures that will be ultimately sold, we are unable to accurately forecast the total net proceeds that will be generated by this offering.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth, as of March 31, 2010, our consolidated debt and stockholders’ equity on an actual basis and as adjusted to give effect to the sale of the maximum amount of debentures offered hereby and an assumed application of approximately 11% of our net proceeds to repay outstanding amounts owed under our subsidiary secured notes. You should read this table in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto which are incorporated herein by this reference.

 

     At March 31, 2011  
         Actual         As
    Adjusted     
 
    

(Dollars in thousands, except

per share amounts)

(Unaudited)

 

Debt:

    

Debentures offered hereby

     —          250,000   

Subsidiary secured notes (1)

     55,727        27,864   

Revolving credit line (2)

     41,548        41,548   
                

Total debt

   $ 97,275      $ 319,412   
                

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Common stock (par value $0.001 per share; shares authorized 250,000,000; shares issued 4,500,000)

     5        5   

Additional paid-in capital

    

Retained earnings

     5,692        5,692   

Other

     (2,306     (2,306
                

Total stockholders’ equity

     3,391        3,391   
                

Total debt and stockholders’ equity

   $ 100,666      $ 322,803   
                

 

(1)

The total outstanding face amount of subsidiary secured notes outstanding at March 31, 2011 was $56,533,753, less unamortized selling costs of $1,791,880, plus subscriptions receivable of $985,000. The weighted average interest rate of our outstanding subsidiary secured notes at March 31, 2011 was approximately 8.01%, and the weighted average maturity was approximately 1.87 years.

(2)

The interest rate of our revolving credit line floats in conjunction with advances made thereunder. The weighted average interest rate payable under our revolving credit line at March 31, 2011 was approximately 2.14%. Amounts owing under our revolving credit line come due on July 15, 2013.

For more discussion and information relating to the retirement of subsidiary secured notes, please refer to the “Use of Proceeds” section of this prospectus.

 

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SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The following tables set forth our summary consolidated financial information. The summary statement of operations data for fiscal years 2010 and 2009 and the selected balance sheet data as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements contained elsewhere in this prospectus. The selected statement of operations data for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010 and the selected balance sheet data as of March 31, 2011 have been derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements contained elsewhere in this prospectus. In the opinion of management, the interim consolidated financial information reflects all adjustments of a normal recurring nature necessary for a fair statement of our financial position and results of operations at the dates and for the periods indicated. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2011 may not be indicative of the results to be expected for the year ending December 31, 2011 or any other interim period.

The selected consolidated financial information should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified by reference to, our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and the “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” sections of this prospectus.

 

BALANCE SHEET DATA:

        
     December 31,
2010
     December 31,
2009
     March 31,
2011
(Unaudited)
 

Total Assets

   $ 91,050,758       $ 24,090,614       $ 102,030,858   

Investment in Portfolio

     82,717,562         12,908,172         95,731,212   

Cash and Cash Equivalents

     1,758,230         1,180,850         273,972   

Restricted Cash

     5,219,009         5,751,115         4,961,338   

Total Debt

     90,889,411         22,365,538         98,639,310   

Revolving Credit Facility

     37,085,452         4,987,425         41,547,952   

Subsidiary Secured Notes

     51,798,992         13,570,983         55,726,873   

Stockholder Equity

     670,473         2,195,512         3,391,548   

 

INCOME STATEMENT DATA:

  

 
     Year Ended     Three Months Ended
(Unaudited)
 
     December 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
    March 31,
2011
     March 31,
2010
 

Total Revenue

   $ 8,898,947      $ 1,347,123      $ 5,387,797       $ (2,443,850

Gain on Life Insurance Contracts

     8,658,874        808,944        5,357,641         (2,485,629

Interest Expense

     3,683,733        593,101        1,090,772         447,830   

Net Income (Loss)

     (230,395     (4,833,413     3,230,201         (3,786,173

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF

FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following discussion in conjunction with the consolidated and combined financial statements and accompanying notes and the information contained in other sections of this prospectus, particularly under the headings “Risk Factors,” “Summary Financial Information” and “Business.” This discussion and analysis is based on the beliefs of our management, as well as assumptions made by, and information currently available to, our management. The statements in this discussion and analysis concerning expectations regarding our future performance, liquidity and capital resources, as well as other non-historical statements in this discussion and analysis, are forward-looking statements. See “Risk Relating to Forward-Looking Statements.” These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including those described under “Risk Factors.” Our actual results could differ materially from those suggested or implied by any forward-looking statements.

Business Overview

We are engaged in the emerging secondary market for life insurance policies. We acquire life insurance policies in the secondary market from policy owners desiring to sell their policies at a discount to the face value of the insurance benefit. Once we purchase a policy, we continue paying the policy premiums in order to ultimately collect the face value of the insurance benefit. We generally hold the individual policies to maturity, in order to ultimately collect the policy’s face value upon the insured’s mortality. Our strategy is to continue to build a diversified and profitable portfolio of policies.

Corporate Conversion

We converted from a Delaware limited liability company to a Delaware corporation on June 10, 2011. As a limited liability company, we were treated as a partnership for United States federal and state income tax purposes and, as such, we were not subject to income taxation. For all periods after such conversion, our income will be subject to corporate-level United States federal and state income taxes.

Public Company Expenses

We filed the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part on June 14, 2011. Upon the effectiveness of the registration statement, we will become a public reporting company under Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. As a result, we will need to comply with federal securities laws, regulations and requirements, including certain provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Compliance with the requirements of being a public company increase our general and administrative expenses to pay our employees, legal counsel, accountants, and other advisors to assist us in, among other things, external reporting, instituting and maintaining internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and preparing and distributing periodic public reports in compliance with our obligations under the federal securities laws. In addition, being a public company will make it more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance.

Critical Accounting Policies

Critical Accounting Estimates

The preparation of the financial statements requires us to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. We base our judgments, estimates and assumptions on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions and conditions. We evaluate our judgments, estimates and assumptions on a regular basis and make changes accordingly. We believe that the judgments, estimates and assumptions involved in the accounting for the valuation of investments in life insurance policies have the greatest potential impact on our financial statements

 

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and accordingly believe these to be our critical accounting estimates. Below we discuss the critical accounting policies associated with the estimates as well as selected other critical accounting policies. For further information on our critical accounting policies, see the discussion in Note 1 to our audited consolidated financial statements.

Ownership of Life Insurance Policies—Fair Value Option

Our primary business involves the purchasing and financing of life insurance policies. As such, we account for the purchase of life insurance policies in accordance with ASC 325-30, Investments in Insurance Contracts, which requires us to use either the investment method or the fair value method. The election is made on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable. We have elected to account for these life insurance policies as investments using the fair value method.

We initially record our purchase life insurance policies at the transaction price, which is the amount paid for the policy, inclusive of all fees and costs associated with the acquisition. The fair value of the investment in insurance policies is evaluated at the end of each reporting period. Changes in the fair value of the life insurance policy are based on periodic evaluations and are recorded as change in fair value of life insurance policies in our consolidated and combined statement of operations. The fair value is determined as the net present value of the life insurance portfolio’s future expected cash flows that incorporates current life expectancy and discount rate assumptions.

In addition to reporting our results of operations and financial condition based on the fair value of our life insurance policies as required by GAAP, management also makes calculations based on the weighted average expected internal rate of return of the policies. See “Non-GAAP Financial Measures” below.

Valuation of Insurance Policies

Our valuation of insurance policies is a critical component of our estimate for the fair value of our investments in life insurance policies. We currently use a probabilistic method of valuing life insurance policies, which we believe to be the preferred and most prevalent valuation method in the industry. In this regard, the most significant assumptions we make are the life expectancy of the insured and the discount rate.

In determining the life expectancy estimate, we use actuarial medical reviews from independent medical underwriters. These medical underwriters summarize the health of the insured by reviewing historical and current medical records. The medical underwriters evaluate the health condition of the insured in order to produce an estimate of the insured’s mortality—a life expectancy report. The life expectancy report represents a range of probabilities for the insured’s mortality against a group of cohorts with the same age, sex, and smoking status. These mortality probabilities represent a mathematical curve known as a mortality curve, which is then used to generate a series of expected cash flows from the life insurance policy over the expected lifespan of the insured. A discount rate is used to calculate the net present value of the expected cash flows. The discount rate represents the internal rate of return we expect to earn on investments in a policy or in the portfolio as a whole. The discount rate used to calculate fair value of our portfolio incorporates the guidance provided by ASU No. 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures.

At the end of each reporting period we re-value the life insurance policies using our valuation model in order to update our estimate of fair value for investments in policies held on our balance sheet. This includes reviewing our assumptions for discount rates and life expectancies as well as incorporating current information for premium payments and the passage of time. The table below provides the discount rate used for the fair value of the life insurance policies for the period ending:

 

March 31, 2011

   March 31, 2010   December 31, 2010   December 31, 2009

13.31%

   14.21%   13.36%   14.24%

 

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Fair Value Measurement Guidance

We follow ASU No. 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, which defines fair value as an exit price representing the amount that would be received if an asset were sold or that would be paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that should be determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability. As a basis for considering such assumptions the guidance establishes a three-level fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. Level 1 relates to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 relates to observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1. Level 3 relates to unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. The Level 3 fair value measurement is the estimated fair value is based on a model whose significant inputs are the life expectancy of the insured and the discount rate, which are not observable and based on limited information on market activity. Although we believe that the Level 3 fair value is predictable based on the fixed contractual terms of the life insurance policy and its premium schedule and face value of the policy benefit, as well as the ability to predict the insured’s age at the time of mortality, and appropriate discount rate to apply, all of which are the key factors in determining the fair value of a life insurance policy, we cannot be certain of the ultimate accuracy of this estimate.

Principal Revenue and Expense Items

Components of Revenue

We earn revenues from two primary sources.

Policy Benefits Realized. We recognize and record revenues upon the receipt of the face value of the policy benefits paid upon the mortality of an insured. We generally collect the face value of the life insurance policy from the insurance company typically within 45 days of the insured’s mortality.

Change in Fair Value of Life Insurance Policies. We have elected to carry our investments in life insurance policies at fair value in accordance with ASC 325-30, Investments in Life Insurance Contracts. Accordingly, we value our investments in life insurance policies each reporting period in accordance with the fair value principles discussed herein, which includes the payment of premiums for such period.

Components of Expenses

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses. We recognize and record expenses in the operations of the purchasing and servicing of life insurance policies for the current period. These expenses include legal, salaries, and sales and marketing expenditures.

Employee Compensation and Benefits. As described in note 6 to the consolidated financial statements, we had notes receivable from equity owners of the Company at each of the balance sheet dates. Effective January 1, 2011, interest income earned on these notes were treated as guaranteed payments to the members and are included in employee compensation and benefits in the statements of operations.

Interest Expense. We recognize and record interest expenses associated with the costs of financing our life insurance portfolio for the current period. These expenses include interest amounts paid to our senior lender under our revolving credit facility, as well as all interest paid on our other outstanding indebtedness such as our subsidiary secured notes.

Amortization of Deferred Costs. When we issue long-term indebtedness, we amortize the costs associated with such indebtedness over the outstanding term of the financing.

 

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Results of Operations

The following is our analysis of the results of operations for the periods indicated below. This analysis should be read in conjunction with our financial statements, including the related notes to the financial statements.

Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 Compared to Three Months Ended March 31, 2010

Revenue. Recognized revenue includes an increase in the fair value of life insurance policies in the amount of $5,357,641 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to a decline of $(2,485,629) for the same period in 2010. We initially record our investments in life insurance policies at the total purchase price paid for policies. We recorded change in fair value gains of $5,357,641 during the three months ended March 31, 2011 due to the evaluation of the fair value of the total portfolio of life insurance policies at the end of the reporting period. The increases in fair value were due to improved policy purchasing at lower prices, increasing demand for the types of policies we purchase, the aggregated value of a portfolio of policies over a single policy, the increasing ages and declining life expectancies of insureds, the ratings of insurance companies, and the actuarial tables and life expectancy estimates we use. The discount rate used for the fair value of the life insurance policies was 13.31% for the period ending March 31, 2011, compared to 14.21% for the same period in 2010.

Expenses. Interest expense was $1,090,772 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to $477,830 for the same period in 2010, an increase of $612,942. The increase in interest expense was due to the increase in the issuance of debt outstanding to purchase life insurance policies. Selling, general and administrative expenses were $873,407 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to $806,269 for the same period in 2010, an increase of $67,130. This increase was due to an increase in travel and marketing activities related to the issuance of indebtedness. Amortization of deferred issuance costs was $193,417 for the three months ended March 31, 2011, compared to $58,224 for the same period in 2010, an increase of $135,193. This increase resulted from the increase in the issuance of indebtedness in 2010.

2010 Compared to 2009

Revenue. Recognized revenue from the receipt of policy benefits was $157,552 in 2010, compared to no revenue from the receipt of policy benefits during 2009. Revenue recognized from the change in fair value of our life insurance policies was $8,501,322 in 2010 compared to $808,994 in 2009. We initially record these investments at the total purchase price paid for policies. We recorded change in fair value gains of $8,501,322 in 2010 due to the evaluation of the fair value of the total portfolio of life insurance policies at the end of the reporting period. The increases in fair value were due to our improved policy purchasing at lower prices, increasing demand for the types of policies we purchase, the aggregated value of a portfolio of policies over a single policy, the increasing ages and declining life expectancies of insureds, the ratings of insurance companies, and the actuarial tables and life expectancy estimates we use. The discount rate used for the fair value of the life insurance policies we own was 13.36% for the period ending December 31, 2010 compared to 14.24% for the same period ending in 2009.

Expenses. Interest expense was $3,683,733 in 2010 compared to $593,101 in 2009, an increase of $3,090,632. The increase in interest expense was due to an increase in the issuance of debt outstanding to purchase life insurance policies. Selling, general and administrative expenses were $4,772,399 in 2010 compared to $5,506,059 in 2009, a decrease of $783,660. This decrease in expense was due to the restructuring of the sales and marketing activities associated with the issuance of indebtedness to include hiring the services of a managing broker-dealer. Amortization of deferred issuance costs was $743,635 in 2010, compared to $232,896 in 2009, an increase of $510,739. This increase resulted from the increase in principal amount of subsidiary secured notes sold in 2010.

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

Historically, we have funded our operational expenditures for the management of our business primarily through origination fees derived from the purchase of life insurance policies, and we have funded the acquisition, servicing and financing of our life insurance policy portfolio through various forms of debt financing.

The origination fee we charge is generally one to four percent of the face value of a life insurance policy’s benefit and is charged and received by us when we acquire the related policy. The origination fee we charge is calculated into the total purchase price we pay for a life insurance policy. In 2010, we generated $6,048,493 origination fees that covered our operational expenditures. Origination fees are not reflected on our income statement due to the fact that fees received by us are offset by the purchase price of related life insurance policies. As such, the origination fees we collect are reflected in our statement of cash flows. See the subcaption “—Cash Flows” below for further information. In 2010, we used origination fees earned in 2010 to repay approximately $1,446,825 in unsecured operating working capital loans, along with $90,900 in accrued interest from those loans. The loans were made to us by Insurance Strategies Fund, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company controlled by Jon R. Sabes and Steven F. Sabes, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer, respectively, in 2009. The agreement with Insurance Strategies Fund under which the working capital loans were made remains in effect so that additional working capital loans may in the future be made as our Board of Directors determines to be necessary. See “Management—Related-Party Transactions.”

To date, we have financed our policy acquisition, servicing and related financing expenditures primarily through restricted borrowings made directly by our subsidiaries. In particular, DLP Funding II has entered into a $100 million revolving credit facility with Autobahn/DZ Bank and GWG Life has issued secured notes (referred to throughout this prospectus as the “subsidiary secured notes”). At March 31, 2011, we owed approximately $42 million in principal amount on our revolving credit facility. Interest accrues on amounts borrowed under the revolving credit facility at a floating rate the weighted average of which was 2.14% per annum at March 31, 2011. We have the ability to borrow up to $58 million, subject to us having a sufficient borrowing base and other limitations set forth in the revolving credit facility. At March 31, 2011 we estimate our borrowing base made available to us an additional $11.17 million under the revolving credit facility. On that same date, we had approximately $55.7 million in principal amount of subsidiary secured notes outstanding. The weighted-average interest rate of our outstanding subsidiary secured notes at that date was 8.01%, and the weighted-average maturity at that date was 1.87 years. The subsidiary secured notes outstanding have renewal features similar to those of the debentures. Of the subsidiary secured notes sold that have matured through March 31, 2011, approximately 77.04% of such notes (in principal) have been renewed.

As of March 31, 2011, we had approximately $16.13 million in available cash and available borrowing capacity under our revolving credit facility for the purpose of purchasing of additional life insurance policies, paying premiums on existing policies, paying portfolio servicing expenses, and paying of principal and interest on our outstanding financing obligations. As of March 31, 2011, we also had approximately $2.44 million in outstanding unsecured notes receivable from certain of our equity owners, as described in note 6 to the consolidated financial statements. Because management believes the ability to collect the amounts due is directly linked to future profits, the Company has classified these receivables as members’ equity on its consolidated balance sheets.

We expect to meet our ongoing operational capital needs through origination fees and our unsecured working capital loans. We expect to meet our policy acquisition, servicing, and financing capital needs from the net proceeds from our offering of debentures, and our revolving credit facility. We expect to begin receiving insurance benefit payments on our portfolio of life insurance policies as the average age of the insureds increase and mortality events occur over time—beginning in 2012 and steadily increasing until 2018. In addition, despite recent capital market conditions including a credit crisis, we demonstrated continued access to credit and financing markets. As a result, we estimate that our liquidity and capital resources are sufficient for our current and projected financial needs.

 

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Capital expenditures have historically not been material and we do not anticipate making material capital expenditures in 2011 or beyond.

Debt Financings Summary

We had the following outstanding debt balances as of March 31, 2011:

 

Issuer/Borrower

   Principal Amount
Outstanding at

March 31, 2011 ($)
     Weighted Average
Interest Rate (%)
 

GWG Holdings, Inc.

   $ 0         —     

GWG Life Settlements, LLC

   $ 56,533,753         8.01

GWG DLP Funding II, LLC

   $ 41,547,952         2.14
                 

Total

   $ 98,081,705         5.57

Our total credit facility and other indebtedness balance as of $98,081,705 was used to purchase and finance our portfolio of life insurance policies. The fair value of our investments in life insurance policies of $95,731,212, plus our restricted cash balance of $4,961,338 totaled $100,692,550, representing an excess of assets over indebtedness of $2,610,845 at March 31, 2011.

Cash Flows

The payment of premiums and servicing costs to maintain life insurance policies represents our most significant requirement for cash disbursement. When a policy is purchased, we are able to calculate the minimum premium payments required to maintain the policy in-force. Over time as the insured ages, premium payments will increase, however the probability of actually needing to pay the premiums decreases since mortality becomes more likely. These scheduled premiums and associated probabilities are factored into our expected internal rate of return and cash-flow modeling. Beyond premiums, we incur policy servicing costs, including annual trustee and tracking costs, and debt servicing costs, including principal and interest payments. Until we receive proceeds from the policy benefits, we intend to pay these costs from our credit facility and through the issuance of debt. We presently expect that by 2014, the cash inflows from the receipt of policy benefits will exceed the premium obligations on the remaining life insurance policies held within the portfolio. We expect to begin servicing and paying down our outstanding indebtedness from these cash flows when we receive payments from the policy benefits. See “Business—Portfolio Management.”

The significant majority of insurance policies owned by the Company are subject to a collateral arrangement with the agent to our revolving credit lender, as described in notes 2 and 8 to the consolidated financial statements. Under this arrangement, collection and escrow accounts are used to fund purchases and premiums of the insurance policies and to pay interest and other charges under its revolving credit facility. The lender and its agent must authorize all disbursements from these accounts, including any distributions to GWG Life, which is the guarantor subsidiary under the secured debentures offered hereby. Distributions are limited to an amount that would result in the borrowers realizing an annualized rate of return on the equity funded amount for such assets of not more than 18%, as determined by the agent. After such amount is reached, the credit agreement requires that excess funds be used to fund repayments or a reserve account in certain amount, before any additional distributions may be made. In the future, these arrangements may restrict the cash flows available for payment of principal and interest on the secured debentures offered hereby.

Inflation

Changes in inflation do not necessarily correlate with changes in interest rates. We presently do not foresee any material impact of inflation on our results of operations in the periods presented in our financial statements.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

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Credit Risk

We review our portfolio of life insurance policies to determine their adequacy of bad debt reserves for losses on life insurance policy benefits, and other assets. We expect to maintain the reserves for losses on policies at an amount estimated to be sufficient to absorb future losses, net of recoveries, inherent in the policies. In evaluating the adequacy of the bad debt reserves, we consider insurance company solvency, credit risk indicators, economic conditions, on-going credit evaluations, reserve account balances if any, and company positions. We attempt to manage our credit risk related to life insurance policies typically by purchasing policies issued only from companies with an investment grade credit rating by either Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s, or A.M. Best Company. As of March 31, 2011, 98.7% of our life insurance policies were issued by companies rated “A” or better by Standard & Poor’s. Our overall credit risk is subject to rapid changes that may be unforeseen and could result in immediate increased losses and material adjustments to the allowance or actual losses.

Interest Rate Risk

Our credit facility is floating rate financing. In addition, our ability to offer interest rates that attract capital (including in the offer and sale of debentures) is generally impacted by prevailing interest rates. Furthermore, while our other indebtedness provides us with fixed-rate financing, our debt coverage ratio is calculated in relation to our total cost of financing. Therefore, fluctuations in interest rates impact our business by increasing our borrowing costs, and reducing availability under our debt financing arrangements. Furthermore, we calculate our portfolio earnings based upon the spread generated between the return on our life insurance portfolio and the cost of our financing. As a result, increases in interest rates will reduce the earnings we expect to achieve from our investments in life insurance policies. While we expect to manage this volatility with interest rate hedges to mitigate our exposure to changes in interest rates, our income and business may nonetheless be impacted by changes in interest rates.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

We use non-GAAP financial measures when evaluating our financial results, for planning and forecasting purposes, and for maintaining compliance with covenants contained in our borrowing agreements. Non-GAAP financial measures disclosed by management are provided as additional information to investors in order to provide them with an alternative method for assessing our financial condition and operating results. These non-GAAP financial measures are not in accordance with GAAP and may be different from non-GAAP measures used by other companies, including other companies within our industry. This presentation of non-GAAP financial information is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for comparable amounts prepared in accordance with GAAP.

We have elected to carry our investments in life insurance policies at fair value in accordance with ASC 325-30, Investments in Life Insurance Contracts. Accordingly, we value our investments in life insurance policies at the conclusion of each reporting period in accordance with GAAP fair value accounting principles. In addition to GAAP, we are required to report non-GAAP financial measures to Autobahn/DZ Bank under certain financial covenants made to that lender under our revolving credit facility. We also use non-GAAP financial reporting to manage and evaluate the financial performance of our business.

GAAP-based fair value accounting imports subjective financial market volatility into our financial reporting by requiring management to estimate the value of our assets as if they were sold in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date based upon prevailing conditions supported by little or no market activity that is readily observable. However, we believe one of the key attractions for purchasing life insurance policies is the non-correlated nature of the returns to be derived from such policies. Therefore, in contrast to a GAAP-based fair valuation, we can accrue for the actuarial gain occurring within life insurance policies at the expected internal rate of return based on statistical mortality probabilities for an insured (using primarily the insured’s age, sex and smoking status). The expected internal rate of return tracks actuarial gain occurring within the policies according to mortality tables as the ages of insureds increase. By comparing the

 

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actuarial gain accruing within our life insurance policies against our costs in the same period, we manage and evaluate the financial profitability of our business. We use this information to balance our life insurance policy purchasing and manage our capital structure, including the issuance of debt under our revolving credit agreement and utilization of our other sources of capital, and to monitor our compliance with borrowing covenants. We believe that these non-GAAP financial measures provide information that is useful for investors to understand period-over-period operating results separate and apart from fair value items that may, or could, have a disproportionately positive or negative impact on results in any particular period.

Our revolving credit facility requires us to maintain an “excess spread,” which is the difference between (i) the weighted average of our expected internal rate of return and (ii) the weighted average of our credit facility’s interest rate. In addition, our credit facility requires us to maintain a “tangible net worth” and “positive net income” each of which are calculated on an adjusted non-GAAP basis by recognizing the accrual of value at the expected internal rate of return of the policies we own, without regard to GAAP-based fair value.

Excess Spread. Our revolving credit facility requires us to maintain a 2.00% “excess spread” between our weighted-average expected internal rate of return and the credit facility’s interest rate. A presentation of our excess spread and our total excess spread is set forth below. Management uses the “total excess spread” to gauge expected profitability of our investments, and uses the “excess spread” to monitor compliance with our borrowing covenants.

 

     As of
March 31,
2011
    As of
March 31,
2010
    At
December 31,
2010
    At
December 31,
2009
 

Weighted-average expected IRR (1)

     13.38     12.02     12.87     15.41

Weighted-average revolving credit facility interest rate (2)

     2.14     2.61     2.14     2.16

Excess spread (3)

     11.24     8.81     10.73     13.25
                                

Total weighted-average interest rate on indebtedness for borrowed money (4)

     5.52     6.39     5.54     6.12

Total excess spread

     7.86     5.03     7.33     9.29
                                

 

(1)

This represents the weighted-average expected internal rate of return of the life insurance policies as of the measurement date based upon our investment cost basis of the insurance policies and the expected cash flows from the life insurance portfolio. Our investment cost basis is calculated as our cash investment in the life insurance policies, without regard to GAAP-based fair value measurements, and is set forth in the following table.

 

    As of
March 31,
2011
    As of
March 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2009
 

GAAP fair value

  $ 95,731,212      $ 20,074,182      $ 82,717,562      $ 12,908,173   

Unrealized fair value loss/(gain) (A)

    (14,667,907     1,676,684        (9,310,266     (808,944

Adjusted cost basis increase/(decrease) (B)

    13,263,742        2,787,023        11,195,989        1,556,803   
                               

Investment cost basis (C)

    94,327,047        24,537,889        84,603,285        13,656,032   
                               

 

  (A)

This represents the reversal of cumulative unrealized GAAP fair value gain or loss of life insurance policies.

  (B)

Adjusted cost basis is increased to include those acquisition and servicing expenses that are not capitalized by GAAP.

  (C)

This is the full cash investment cost basis in life insurance policies from which our expected internal rate of return is calculated.

 

(2)

This is the weighted-average revolving credit relating to our revolving credit facility interest rate as of the measurement date.

 

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(3)

We must maintain an excess spread of 2.00% relating to our revolving credit facility to maintain compliance under such facility.

(4)

Represents the weighted-average interest rate paid on all outstanding indebtedness as of measurement date, determined as follows:

 

           Outstanding Indebtedness        
     As of
March 31,
2011
    As of
March 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2009
 

Revolving credit facility

   $ 41,547,952      $ 9,892,124      $ 37,085,452      $ 4,987,425   

Subsidiary secured notes

   $ 56,533,753      $ 31,802,641      $ 53,292,714      $ 13,220,983   
                                

Total

   $ 98,081,705      $ 41,694,765      $ 90,378,166      $ 18,208,408   

Interest Rates on Indebtedness:

        

Revolving credit facility

     2.14     2.61     2.14     2.16

Subsidiary secured notes

     8.01     7.57     7.90     7.62

Weighted-average interest rates on indebtedness

     5.52     6.39     5.54     6.12

Adjusted Tangible Net Worth. Our revolving credit facility requires us to maintain a tangible net worth in excess of $5 million calculated on an adjusted non-GAAP basis. We calculate the adjusted tangible net worth by recognizing the accrual of value at the expected internal rate of return of the policies we own without regard to fair value.

 

     As of
March 31,
2011
    As of
March 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2010
    As of
December 31,
2009
 

GAAP net worth (1)

   $ 3,391,548      $ (2,312,548   $ 161,347      $ 1,725,076   

Less intangible assets

     (2,370,256     (1,806,049     (619,008     (824,381
                                

GAAP tangible net worth

     1,021,292        (4,118,597     (457,661     900,695   
                                

Unrealized fair value loss/(gain) (2)

     (14,667,907     1,676,684        (9,310,266     (808,944

Adjusted cost basis increase/(decrease) (3)

     13,263,742        2,787,023        11,195,989        1,556,803   

Accrual of unrealized actuarial gain (4)

     12,820,488        2,190,198        9,977,051        479,365   
                                

Adjusted non-GAAP tangible net worth

     12,437,615        2,535,308        11,405,113        2,127,919   
                                

Accrual of unrealized gain of portfolio sold (5)

     —          58,962,062        —          52,871,708   
                                

Total adjusted non-GAAP tangible net worth (6)

     12,437,615        61,497,370        11,405,113        54,999,627   
                                

 

(1)

Includes termination of redeemable member’s interest prior to corporate conversion.

(2)

Reversal of cumulative unrealized fair value gain or loss of life insurance policies.

(3)

Adjusted cost basis is increased by acquisition and servicing expenses which are not capitalized under GAAP.

(4)

Accrual of cumulative actuarial gain at expected internal rate of return based on investment cost basis.

(5)

Represents the accrual of unrealized gain in the life insurance portfolio sold on November 1, 2010 owned by GWG DLP Funding, LLC and financed by WestLB AG. This entity was deconsolidated in our GAAP financial statements, but consolidated for our total adjusted non-GAAP tangible net worth measurement.

(6)

We must maintain a total adjusted non-GAAP tangible net worth of $5 million to maintain compliance with our revolving credit facility with DZ Bank/Autobahn.

 

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Adjusted Net Income. Our credit facility requires us to maintain a positive net income calculated on an adjusted non-GAAP basis. We calculate the adjusted net income by recognizing the accrual of value at the expected internal rate of return of the policies we own without regard to fair value.

 

    January 1, 2011 to
March 31, 2011
    January 1, 2010 to
March 31, 2010
    January 1, 2010 to
December 31, 2010
    January 1, 2009 to
December 31, 2009
 

GAAP net income before tax

  $ 3,230,201      $ (3,786,173   $ (230,395   $ (4,833,413

Unrealized fair value loss/(gain) (1)

    (5,357,641     (426,282     (8,501,322     (808,944

Adjusted cost basis increase/(decrease) (2)

    2,000,772        1,096,017        9,675,064        1,556,803   

Accrual of unrealized actuarial gain (3)

    2,843,436        624,970        6,246,378        479,366   
                               

Adjusted non-GAAP income before tax

    2,716,768        (2,491,468     7,189,725        (3,606,188
                               

Adjusted non-GAAP income (loss) of portfolio sold (4)

    —          5,135,412        24,837,599        10,001,433   
                               

Total adjusted non-GAAP income before tax (5)

    2,716,768        2,643,944        32,027,324        6,395,245   
                               

 

(1)

Reversal of unrealized fair value gain or loss of life insurance policies for current period.

(2)

Adjusted cost basis is increased to include those acquisition and servicing expenses which are not capitalized by GAAP.

(3)

Accrual of actuarial gain at expected internal rate of return based on Investment Cost Basis for the period.

(4)

Represents adjusted non-GAAP income from the life insurance portfolio sold on November 1, 2010 owned by GWG DLP Funding, LLC and financed by WestLB AG. This entity was deconsolidated in our GAAP financial statements, but consolidated for our total adjusted non-GAAP Income measurement.

(5)

We must maintain a positive consolidated net income, calculated on a non-GAAP basis, to maintain compliance with our revolving credit facility with DZ Bank/Autobahn.

 

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BUSINESS

Overview

We are engaged in the emerging secondary market of life insurance. We acquire life insurance policies in the secondary market from policy owners who sell their policies at a price greater than the cash surrender value, but less than the face value of the policy’s benefit. We continue to pay the premiums and generally hold the individual policies to maturity, in order to ultimately collect the policy’s face value upon the insured’s mortality. Our strategy is to continue to build a diversified and profitable portfolio of policies.

The market opportunity for selling and purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market is relatively new. According to Conning Research & Consulting, the secondary market for life insurance policies grew from $2 billion in 2002 to over $12 billion in face value of life insurance policy benefits being purchased in 2008. To participate in the market opportunity, we have spent significant resources: (i) developing a robust operational platform and systems for purchasing and servicing life insurance policies; (ii) obtaining requisite licensure to purchase life insurance in the secondary market; (iii) developing financing resources for purchasing and financing our life insurance policies; (iv) recruiting and developing a professional management team; (v) establishing origination relationships for purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market; and (vi) obtaining financing to participate in the business sector.

As of March 31, 2010, we owned $417 million in face value of life insurance policy benefits with an aggregate cost basis of $95 million. We have acquired this portfolio through a combination of the sale of secured notes by a subsidiary and our revolving credit facility. Since 2006, we have acquired over $1.4 billion in face value of life insurance policy benefits and have established ourselves as an active purchaser and financier of life insurance policies in the secondary market. Our objective is to earn returns from the life insurance policies we purchase in the secondary market which are greater than the costs necessary to purchase and finance those policies to their maturity. We expect to accomplish our objective by:

 

   

purchasing life insurance policies with expected internal rates of returns in excess of our cost of capital;

 

   

paying the premiums and costs associated with the life insurance policy until the insured’s mortality;

 

   

obtaining a large and diverse portfolio to mitigate actuarial risk;

 

   

maintaining diversified funding sources to reduce our overall cost of financing;

 

   

engaging in hedging strategies that reduce potential volatility to our cost of financing; and

 

   

maintaining rigorous portfolio monitoring and servicing practices.

We generally purchase life insurance policies through secondary market transactions directly from the policy owner who originally purchased the life insurance in the primary market. We purchase policies in the secondary market through a network of life insurance agents, life insurance brokers, and licensed providers who assist policy owners in accessing the secondary market. Before we purchase a life insurance policy, we conduct a rigorous underwriting review that includes obtaining two life expectancy estimates on each insured from third party medical actuarial firms. The policies we purchase are universal life insurance policies issued by rated life insurance companies. The price we are willing to pay for the policy in the secondary market is primarily a function of: (i) the policy’s face value; (ii) the expected actuarial mortality of the insured; (iii) the premiums expected to be paid over the life of the insured; and (iv) market competition from other purchasers.

We intend to apply the proceeds of this offering, along with approximately $59 million potentially available to DLP Funding II under the revolving credit facility with Autobahn/DZ Bank, to expand the portfolio of insurance policies we own, and finance those policies until their maturity.

 

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Table of Contents

Industry Background

Life insurance companies earn substantial revenue windfalls due to the lapse and surrender of many insurance policies. These revenue windfalls have enabled life insurance companies to issue policies with reduced premiums. These two business practices create a profit opportunity for the life insurance secondary market. The profit opportunity is the difference, or “spread,” between (i) the cost of purchasing and maintaining a life insurance policy over the insured’s lifetime; and (ii) the policy’s benefit that will paid upon the insured’s mortality. The secondary market for life insurance policies has also been driven by the creation of life insurance policy pricing tools and actuarial modeling techniques developed by investors.

According to the American Council of Life Insurers Fact Book 2010 (ACLI), individuals own over $10.3 trillion of face value of life insurance policies in the United States in 2009. This figure includes all types of policies, including term and permanent insurance known as whole life, universal life, variable life, and variable universal life. The secondary market for life insurance has developed around individuals aged 65 years or older owning either permanent insurance or term insurance convertible into permanent insurance. According to the ACLI, the average annual lapse rate and surrender rate of life insurance policies for the ten years ended 2009 was 7.3%, or over $750 billion in face value of policy benefits annually.

Owners of life insurance policies generally surrender the policies or allow them to lapse for a variety of reasons, including: unrealistic original earnings assumptions made when the policy was purchased, combined with higher premium payments later in the term of the policy than initially forecasted; (ii) increasing premium payment obligations as the insured ages; (iii) changes in financial status or outlook which cause the insured to no longer require life insurance; (iv) other financial needs that make the insurance unaffordable; or (v) a desire to maximize the policy’s investment value. Rather than allowing a policy to lapse as worthless, or surrendering a life insurance policy at a fraction of its inherent value, the sale of a life insurance policy in the secondary market can bring significant value to the policy owner. The life insurance secondary market often pays policy sellers amounts ranging from two to ten times the value that would otherwise be paid by the insurer upon policy surrender.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population of individuals aged 65 years or older is growing three times faster than the general population over the next 20 years, growing from an estimated 39 million seniors in 2010 to over 69 million seniors by 2030. As awareness of the secondary market grows, we expect that recent financial recessionary pressures coupled with historically low savings rates will lead many individuals to sell their life insurance policies rather than lapse or surrender the policies. Therefore, we believe there will be continued growth in the number of life insurance policy owners seeking to sell their life insurance in the secondary market.

As the life insurance secondary market has grown, a regulatory framework has been established to oversee the sale of life insurance policies in the secondary market. Since 2007, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of states who have adopted legislation and regulations. Today, almost every state has adopted some version of model laws that prohibit business practices deemed to be abusive and generally require the licensing of life insurance purchasers and brokers, the filing and approval of purchase agreements, disclosure of transaction fees and periodic reporting requirements. The widespread adoption of this regulatory framework by states has brought about standardized practices and procedures for purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market. In addition, several states have modified their laws to adopt notice requirements for the benefit of life insurance owners, alerting them to the existence of the secondary market before they lapse or surrender their life insurance policy.

We believe the strengthened regulatory framework, along with the emergence of best practices adopted within the life insurance secondary market, has led to a growing awareness of the secondary market among life insurance agents and financial advisors. We expect this growing awareness, along with the demographic factors described above, will lead to continued growth in the secondary market for life insurance policies.

 

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Table of Contents

The secondary market for life insurance policies has also attracted global investor interest because investments in these policies can provide non-correlated investment diversification. The ability for investors to invest in the life insurance asset class comes as a result of the development of life insurance policy pricing tools and actuarial modeling techniques for valuing portfolios of life insurance policies. Standardized life insurance pricing tools and actuarial modeling software, including life expectancies, have provided foundational support for the development of the life insurance secondary market. The appeal for investors to achieve non-correlated diversification is strong, particularly after the global recession of 2008. The notion of non-correlation is that the underlying investment return is independent of the factors contributing to economic downturns such as real estate values, commodity prices, and stock market indices. In addition, many life insurance policies represent payment obligations from highly rated life insurance companies. As a result, investors can evaluate the expected risk premium they receive for investing in the asset class as compared to the credit profile of the underlying insurance company. The risk premium offered by the asset class, along with the non-correlated return profile has attracted a large number of investors seeking investment opportunities in the life insurance secondary market. As innovation and investor awareness of the secondary market for life insurance increases, we expect continued investor interest in the asset class.

Company History

After we were founded in 2006, we developed a platform to evaluate, purchase, service, and track life insurance policies purchased in the secondary market. Our original model was to operate as a joint venture with WestLB, AG, a German commercial bank, with the goal of having the bank securitize and sell the life insurance policies we purchased. During 2006 and 2007, we built an institutional platform to underwrite, purchase, service, and track life insurance policies purchased in the secondary market in conjunction with a $250 million revolving credit facility we obtained from WestLB. In 2008, however, WestLB informed us that they were abandoning their effort to securitize and sell our life insurance portfolio in light of the global economic and financial crisis. This resulted in a material change to our business plan, as we had earlier purchased the portfolio of life insurance policies in DLP Funding per WestLB’s mandate with the expectation these policies would be sold through a securitization. Subsequently, in 2010, we sold the original portfolio owned by DLP Funding.

Since 2008, we have focused on establishing diversified funding sources whose investment expectation is based on the purchase and finance of life insurance policies to their maturity—a buy and hold strategy—as opposed to the securitized sale of those assets prior to maturity. In July 2008, our wholly owned subsidiary GWG DLP Funding II, LLC, or “DLP Funding II,” established a $100 million credit facility with Autobahn Funding Company, LLC, a bank sponsored commercial paper conduit administered by DZ Bank AG Deutsche Zentral-Genossenschaftsbank, or DZ Bank. In addition, our subsidiary GWG Life Settlements, LLC, or “GWG Life,” began selling secured notes to further finance the business.

Our Business Model

Our business plan is to earn returns from life insurance policies purchased in the secondary market which are greater than the costs to finance those policies to their maturity. We purchase life insurance policies at a discount to the face value of the policy benefit. We base our purchase price on an actuarial assessment or valuation of the expected mortality of the insured and the costs of maintaining the policy over this same period. Once we purchase a life insurance policy, we continue to pay the premiums until the insured’s mortality, at which time we collect the face value of the life insurance policy benefit. We perform the services required for the assessment, valuation, purchase, underwriting, monitoring, administration, and servicing of the life insurance policies we purchase.

We are also compensated for underwriting and purchasing the life insurance policies in an amount typically between one and four percent of the face value of the policy benefits we purchase in the form of an origination fee. The origination fees are incorporated into our total acquisition costs and expected yield calculations. We expect that the difference between the returns we earn from the life insurance policies we purchase and the cost of financing those purchases to their maturity represents the majority of the compensation we stand to earn.

 

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Table of Contents

We believe that our business model provides significant advantages to potential investors, including:

 

   

Non-Correlating Assets: Our earnings from life insurance policies are non-correlated to traditional external market influences such as real estate, equity markets, currency, and commodities.

 

   

Insurance Carrier Capital Structure: Life insurance policy benefits are the most senior in rank within an insurance company’s capital structure, senior even to secured debt holders, with some amounts further protected under state guaranteed funds (typically limited to $200,000).

 

   

Asset Diversification: Our assets provide diversification from many other investment opportunities. In addition, the policies within the life insurance portfolio are diversified as well, with no single insurance company making up more than 20% of the total face value of insurance policy benefits.

Our Strategy and Competitive Strengths

Our objective is to earn returns from the life insurance policies we purchase in the secondary market which are greater than the costs necessary to purchase and finance those policies to their maturity. We expect to accomplish our objective by:

 

   

purchasing life insurance policies with expected internal rates of returns in excess of our cost of capital;

 

   

paying the premiums and costs associated with the life insurance policies until the insured’s mortality;

 

   

obtaining a large and diverse portfolio to mitigate actuarial risk;

 

   

maintaining diversified funding sources to reduce our overall cost of financing;

 

   

engaging in hedging strategies that reduce potential volatility to our cost of financing; and

 

   

maintaining rigorous portfolio monitoring and servicing.

We have built our business with what we believe to be the following competitive strengths:

 

   

Industry Experience: We have actively participated in the development of the secondary market of life insurance as a principal purchaser and financier since 2006. Our position within the marketplace has allowed us to evaluate over 30,000 life insurance policies for possible purchase, thereby gaining a deep understanding of the variety of issues involved when purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market. We have participated in the leadership of various industry associations and forums, including the Life Insurance Settlement Association and the Insurance Studies Institute. Our experience gives us the confidence in building a portfolio of life insurance policies that will perform to our expectations.

 

   

Operational Platform: We have built an operational platform and systems for efficiently tracking, processing, and servicing life insurance policies that we believe provide competitive advantages when purchasing policies in the secondary marketplace, and servicing the policies once acquired.

 

   

Origination and Underwriting Practices: We purchase life insurance policies that meet published guidelines on what policies would be accepted in a rated securitization. We purchase only non-contestable permanent life insurance policies that meet stringent underwriting criteria and reviews.

 

   

Origination Relationships: We have established origination relationships with over four hundred life insurance policy brokers and insurance agents who submit policies for our purchase or financing. Our referral base knows our underwriting standards for purchasing life insurance policies in the secondary market, which provides confidence in our bidding and closing process and streamlines our due-diligence process.

 

   

Life Expectancy Methodology: We rely on at least two life expectancy reports from independent third-party medical actuary underwriting firms that include 21st Services, AVS Underwriting, Fasano Associates, and ISC Services to develop our life expectancy estimate.

 

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Table of Contents
   

Pricing Software and Methodology: We use actuarial pricing methodologies and software tools that have been built and are supported by leading independent actuarial service firms, such as Milliman USA and Modeling Actuarial Pricing Systems, Inc. (“MAPS”) for calculating our expected returns.

 

   

Diversified Funding: We have actively developed diversified sources for accessing capital markets in support of our buy and hold strategy for our portfolio of life insurance policies, ranging from institutional bank financing and global capital markets, to a network of broker-dealers registered with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) who have participated in our subsidiary secured notes financing.

Our Portfolio and Operations

Our Portfolio

Our portfolio of life insurance policy portfolio as of March 31, 2011 is summarized and set forth below:

Life Insurance Portfolio Summary (as of March 31, 2011)

 

Total portfolio face value of policy benefits

     $417,643,414   

Average face value per policy *

     $    2,694,474   

Average face value per insured life *

     $    2,880,299   

Average age of insured (yrs)

     80.37   

Average life expectancy estimate (yrs) *

     8.33   

Total number of policies

     155   

Demographics

     56.7% Males; 43.3% Females   

Number of smokers

     No insureds are smokers   

Largest policy as % of total portfolio

     2.39

Average policy as % of total portfolio

     0.65

 

*

Averages presented in the table are weighted averages.

 

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Table of Contents

Life Insurance Portfolio Detail (as of March 31, 2011)

 

Face Value
Ben. Amt. ($)

     Sex    Insured
Current
Age
(years)
(1)
   Est. Life
Expectancy
(months) (2)
    

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
$ 5,000,000       F    87      86.6       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  2,000,000       F    87      45.0       Pruco Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       F    87      38.6       Protective Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    86      64.5       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  5,000,000       F    86      54.3       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  3,500,000       F    85      85.9       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,500,000       F    85      89.3       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,500,000       F    85      89.3       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,000,000       F    85      69.8       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       F    85      87.4       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  5,000,000       F    85      58.1       Lincoln National Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  715,000       F    85      97.0       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,203,520       M    85      71.4       Columbus Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  1,350,000       F    85      90.8       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       F    85      56.0       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  600,000       F    85      86.4       Columbus Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  3,333,333       M    85      77.0       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       F    84      70.0       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  2,500,000       F    84      85.1       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  2,500,000       M    84      72.7       Pacific Life Ins. Co.    A+
  5,000,000       M    84      97.7       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4,500,000       F    84      79.3       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,500,000       M    84      71.1       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,500,000       M    84      71.1       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  500,000       M    84      84.4       Lincoln National Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4,785,380       F    84      74.4       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,803,455       F    84      85.3       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,529,270       F    84      85.3       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    84      75.1       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,225,000       F    84      108.4       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,000,000       F    84      113.4       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  1,500,000       M    84      65.7       Union Central Life Ins. Co.    A+
  3,500,000       F    84      87.5       Lincoln National Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  500,000       F    83      78.2       Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada (U.S.)    AA-
  5,000,000       F    83      69.3       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-

 

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Table of Contents

Face Value
Ben. Amt. ($)

     Sex    Insured
Current
Age
(years)
(1)
   Est. Life
Expectancy
(months) (2)
    

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
  4,000,000       F    83      108.4       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,600,000       F    83      59.4       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  1,000,000       F    83      90.4       New York Life Ins. Co.    AAA
  5,000,000       F    83      86.4       Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,500,000       M    83      83.7       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  800,000       M    83      87.3       National Western Life Ins. Co.    A
  200,000       M    83      75.4       Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  4,445,467       M    83      85.9       Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  7,500,000       M    83      66.7       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,600,000       F    83      110.4       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       M    83      72.1       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,000,000       M    82      89.0       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,000,000       M    82      89.0       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  5,000,000       M    82      78.4       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,200,000       M    82      106.4       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       F    82      126.4       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  8,500,000       M    82      99.2       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  1,000,000       M    82      69.4       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  1,365,000       F    81      126.9       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,750,000       M    81      112.0       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       M    81      99.2       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       M    81      77.6       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,000,000       M    81      67.9       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,500,000       M    81      84.8       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  1,500,000       M    81      84.8       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  3,000,000       F    81      133.8       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  750,000       M    81      50.1       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  750,000       M    81      50.1       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  1,000,000       M    81      62.9       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,800,000       M    81      71.5       John Hancock Variable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       F    81      145.4       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  2,000,000       M    81      95.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,750,000       M    81      95.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       M    81      61.1       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       F    80      134.6       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       F    80      116.8       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-

 

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Table of Contents

Face Value
Ben. Amt. ($)

     Sex    Insured
Current
Age
(years)
(1)
   Est. Life
Expectancy
(months) (2)
    

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
  6,000,000       F    80      136.4       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  1,500,000       M    80      83.2       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,500,000       F    80      138.6       Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  4,000,000       M    80      70.1       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,000,000       M    80      103.7       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,000,000       F    80      146.6       Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  2,700,000       M    80      85.0       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  829,022       F    80      48.7       Hartford Life and Ann. Ins. Co.    A
  5,000,000       M    80      106.9       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  7,600,000       F    80      134.6       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,500,000       F    80      97.8       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  4,000,000       F    80      79.0       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  3,500,000       F    80      132.6       Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  500,000       F    79      135.5       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  500,000       M    79      132.0       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4,200,000       F    79      166.1       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  750,000       M    79      133.7       West Coast Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    79      89.7       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,500,000       M    79      139.1       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,500,000       F    79      113.3       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4,500,000       M    79      94.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       M    79      98.4       Pacific Life Ins. Co.    A+
  2,000,000       F    79      125.8       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  10,000,000       F    79      90.6       American National Ins. Co.    A+
  500,000       M    79      73.2       West Coast Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    79      111.0       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,500,000       F    78      128.2       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,500,000       M    78      87.9       Pacific Life Ins. Co.    A+
  1,900,000       M    78      78.5       American National Ins. Co.    A+
  500,000       M    78      73.8       New York Life Ins. Co.    AAA
  500,000       M    78      73.8       New York Life Ins. Co.    AAA
  250,000       M    78      63.9       Jackson National Life Ins. Co.    AA
  5,000,000       F    78      114.2       Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada (U.S.)    AA-
  750,000       M    78      83.9       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,995,000       F    78      108.4       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,250,000       F    78      112.1       Columbus Life Ins. Co.    AA+

 

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Face Value
Ben. Amt. ($)

     Sex    Insured
Current
Age
(years)
(1)
   Est. Life
Expectancy
(months) (2)
    

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
  5,403,000       F    78      130.1       Phoenix Life Ins. Co.    BB-
  5,000,000       M    78      97.8       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  350,000       M    78      85.7       Reassure America Life Ins. Co.    A+
  3,000,000       M    77      93.2       Protective Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       F    77      141.6       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    77      135.9       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  550,000       M    77      147.2       Genworth Life Ins. Co.    A
  1,680,000       F    77      104.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,250,000       F    77      110.1       Principal Life Ins. Co.    A
  2,000,000       M    77      117.4       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    77      77.2       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  10,000,000       M    77      128.7       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  3,000,000       F    77      138.3       West Coast Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  8,000,000       M    76      117.9       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       M    76      74.3       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,000,000       M    76      127.8       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  250,000       M    76      97.4       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  3,000,000       M    76      147.7       Principal Life Ins. Co.    A
  5,000,000       M    76      110.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    76      110.1       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4,000,000       M    75      122.6       Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  3,601,500       M    75      117.1       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       M    75      158.0       Empire Gen. Life Assurance Corporation    AA-
  500,000       M    75      103.2       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    74      112.8       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,000,000       M    74      106.0       Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada (U.S.)    AA-
  870,000       M    74      80.4       Pruco Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,009,467       M    74      71.8       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  4,000,000       M    74      105.4       MetLife Investors USA Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,500,000       M    74      121.4       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  2,500,000       M    74      121.4       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  5,000,000       M    74      98.6       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  2,250,000       M    74      95.2       Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  3,750,000       M    74      96.8       AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  1,000,000       M    74      125.8       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-

 

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Face Value
Ben. Amt. ($)

     Sex    Insured
Current
Age
(years)
(1)
   Est. Life
Expectancy
(months) (2)
    

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
  500,000       M    73      91.8       John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  1,000,000       M    73      138.3       Metropolitan Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  500,000       F    73      129.9       Columbus Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  750,000       M    73      151.7       U.S. Financial Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2,000,000       F    73      80.0       Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  600,000       M    72      121.9       Protective Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    72      107.1       West Coast Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5,000,000       M    71      72.8       Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  850,000       M    71      104.9       New York Life Ins. Co.    AAA
  200,000       M    70      135.8       ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  2,000,000       M    70      130.0       U.S. Financial Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  500,000       M    69      95.7       Midland National Life Ins. Co.    A+
  2,000,000       M    69      159.7       American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
                    
$ 417,643,414                  
                    

 

(1)

The insured’s age is current as of the measurement date.

(2)

The insured’s life expectancy estimate is the average of two life expectancy estimates provided by independent third-party medical actuarial underwriting firms.

Obtaining Life Insurance Policies

We seek to purchase life insurance policies nationwide. We work directly with consumers to purchase their policies in states where we hold proper licensure, and in states where we are not licensed we work through other licensed providers. Policy sourcing typically begins with life insurance agents that identify policy owners who should consider selling a life insurance policy. The agents typically work with professional life insurance policy brokers specializing in packaging the policies for presentation to potential purchasers. Their packaging includes obtaining medical records on the insured, life expectancy estimates from medical actuarial firms, current insurance policy illustrations, and other information needed to enable potential purchasers to properly evaluate the policy. The purchasers may work directly in the market or through “providers” who represent investors. Once potential purchasers have evaluated the policy, the policy is sold through an auction process whereby brokers facilitate competing bids from purchasers, concurrently negotiating fees. The highest bidder typically wins the auction, but not always. Brokers and agents also consider the track record of the purchaser and will sometimes award the policy to the purchaser most likely to get the sale of the policy closed. This has been one of our advantages, as we have developed a network of brokers throughout the United States who have advised us that they recognize that our purchase criteria and bids are reliable. This enables the brokers to focus on policy referrals, thus filtering out policies they know we will not consider, and maximizing their return on effort to close the sale of a policy.

Our contacts with life insurance policy brokers and life insurance agent, from whom we obtain referrals, have been developed over the past several years through our marketing efforts. We maintain membership affiliations and representation within key industry groups, such as the Life Insurance Settlement Association (LISA). We typically sponsor events and or maintain a trade booth where we are able to maintain contacts with existing life settlement brokers and meet new brokers to submit policies for purchase.

 

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Life Insurance Policy Underwriting and Purchasing Process

The process used to value and underwrite life insurance policies is relatively new and continues to be refined. We underwrite and administer all the life insurance policies that we purchase. When we identify a suitable client owning a life insurance policy that meets our purchasing criteria, we seek to make a bid that provides us with an expected internal rate of return that meets our internal guidelines. Once our bid is accepted, we enter into a policy purchase agreement with the seller. This agreement gives us the right to, among other things, pay premiums, collect policy benefits, file collateral assignments, change the ownership, and obtain medical records. The terms of the agreement are standardized.

We maintain an underwriting department with experience in underwriting life insurance policies for purchase in the secondary market. The underwriting due diligence process consists of a careful review and analysis of available due-diligence materials related to a life insurance policy and the covered individual. The goal of the underwriting process is to make an informed purchasing decision with respect to the life insurance policy. While we believe that our underwriting policies and practices are consistent with industry best practices, it is possible that the processes may change or may not accurately reflect actual mortality experience or catch fraud or deception by sellers. To the extent the underwriting is not accurate or we are subject to fraud or deception by sellers, the performance of policies may be different from the expected results, which could adversely affect profitability.

Life Insurance Policy Characteristics

We purchase universal life insurance policies whose insureds are 65 years or older and whose actuarial life expectancies are less than 168 months. In some cases, however, we purchase term life insurance policies that are convertible into universal life insurance policies, depending on the analysis of the life insurance policy and the insured’s life expectancy. The life expectancy is the number of months the insured is expected to live based upon 50% mortality (meaning roughly half of the individuals with similar age, sex, smoking and medical statuses will have died within that number of months), which is in turn based upon actuarial studies. We purchase life insurance policies with the goal that the average life expectancy in the portfolio generally will not exceed 144 months. The requirements as to which life insurance policies we will purchase are set forth in the indenture. We reserve the right to disqualify some life insurance companies or categories of life insurance policies for purchasing in our sole discretion.

We purchase life insurance policies that have been in force for more than two years from the policy issuance date and meet our other underwriting guidelines. Our underwriting and business development departments use pricing and credit criteria that are similar to those used by other institutions that finance similar assets. We test the prospective life insurance policies through the use of at least two life expectancy reports for assessing the value of the life insurance policies. In addition, the relevant historical, projected and actual premium streams are reviewed to assess the accuracy of the pricing expectations and identify any variance from projected premium levels, as well as the cause of such variance. This includes a periodic review of the policy’s premium payment history and ongoing confirmations of account values with life insurance companies.

Pricing Life Insurance Policies

Pricing involves an analysis of both the policy and the insured. An analysis of the insurance policy starts with an illustration obtained from the insurance company providing a schedule of level premium payments until the insured reaches age 125. Then, utilizing pricing software originally developed by Milliman USA, a leading actuarial firm, and now owned by Modeling Actuarial Pricing Systems, Inc. (“MAPS”), we reverse engineer the premium schedule of the policy to determine an “optimized” premium schedule. An analysis of the insured involves an actuarial evaluation of the insured’s probable mortality at different points in the future—the mortality curve. This analysis covers the insured’s entire projected lifespan using estimates generated by third-party medical actuarial underwriting firms (“life expectancy reports”).

 

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In determining the life expectancy estimate, we require at least two life expectancy reports from independent medical actuarial underwriting firms, and we average the estimates of the two reports to generate our estimated life expectancy. The health of the insured is summarized by the underwriters into a health assessment based on the review of the insured’s historical and current medical records. The underwriting assesses the characteristics and health risks of the insured in order to quantify the health into a mortality rating that represents their life expectancy. We average the life expectancy estimates provided by independent medical actuarial underwriting firms to form our life expectancy estimate.

By combining the optimized premiums and the insured’s life expectancy estimate within the MAPS software, we generate detailed information, including the expected mortality curve over the insured’s total projected lifespan; the expected servicing and related costs over the insured’s total projected lifespan; the expected policy benefit paid over the insured’s total projected lifespan; the account values within the policy; and the expected internal rate of return we will achieve at various purchase prices. From this information set, we are able to calculate the present value of the life insurance policy by discounting the anticipated cash flows at the sought for internal rate of return using the probabilistic pricing methodology employed by the MAPS program. The price of the policy, or its value, is the present value of the policy’s cash flows discounted at our expected internal rate of return. We expect that we will realize an operating profit as long as we are able to acquire and service life insurance policies that generate yields in excess of our borrowing costs.

Portfolio Administration

We have developed a comprehensive administration and servicing platform to administer and service the life insurance policies we own. This allows us to safeguard our life insurance policy assets and to process and report on the assets in our portfolio. We regularly contact each insurance company on every policy we own to verify policy account values, confirm the correct application of premium payments made, and the resulting account values inside the life insurance policy after application of the premium payment and the deduction of the cost of insurance. We typically maintain little account value inside the policy and seek to make only minimum premium payments necessary to keep the life insurance policy in force until the next scheduled premium payment.

In addition to policy servicing, we monitor insureds by periodically contacting them directly, or their appointed representatives, to confirm their location and health status. We monitor social security database for mortalities as well as online obituary databases. When we are notified of an insured’s mortality, we are required to obtain a copy of the death certificate and present it to the life insurance company for payment of the face value of the policy benefit.

Portfolio Management

We realize profits by earning a spread between the cost of purchasing and maintaining a life insurance portfolio over its duration and face value of the policy benefits that will be paid upon the insured’s mortality. We believe that building and managing a profitable portfolio of life insurance policies is complex, requires considerable technical knowledge and resources, and is subject to numerous regulations. We have developed extensive experience and disciplines to work toward a stable and profitable portfolio. We update our actuarial projections each month for the portfolio based on the life expectancies, premium payments made, and mortalities experienced. These data points combine to provide us with future forecasted cash flows with respect to our portfolio of life insurance assets. These forecasted future cash flows, along with our current financial position, are combined in a comprehensive model that includes detailed assumptions as to interest rates, financing costs, policy acquisitions, and capital markets activities. This comprehensive financial model enables us to closely monitor and manage our necessary capital reserves and future profitability.

We believe our portfolio represents a balanced and stable portfolio of life insurance policies. In order to assess the stability of our portfolio, we analyze longevity risk, which is the risk of the insured living longer than his/her life expectancy estimate. Longevity risk is the single largest variable affecting the returns on an

 

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investment in life insurance policy assets and the ability to predict the portfolio’s value over time. Research by A.M. Best and others indicates that, as the number of insured lives increase within a portfolio of life insurance policies, there is a decrease in the standard deviation of the value of the portfolio—i.e., the stability of longevity risk increases with an increase in the number of insured lives.

In a study published in 2009, A.M. Best concluded that at least 300 lives are necessary to narrow the band of cash flow volatility in the Monte Carlo simulations, i.e., the same methodology we use to evaluate our portfolios. However, our internal analysis of our portfolio, which currently consists of 155 policies, results in a standard deviation that is comparable with the A.M. Best measurement for a portfolio of 200 lives. We believe this result is due to the specific portfolio make up of our portfolio relative to the variation in underlying life expectancy estimates. Further, A.M. Best suggests that no one life should comprise more than 3.33% of the face value of an entire portfolio or collateral pool. As of March 31, 2011, the largest face value policy in our portfolio represented approximately 2.4% of the total portfolio. We intend to maintain a well diversified and relatively stable portfolio as we continue to expand our purchases of life insurance policies.

We also believe our portfolio represents a profitable portfolio. In order to assess the profitability, we analyze the future cash flows expected from our portfolio of life insurance policies. The standard practice within the insurance industry is to analyze the timing of uncertain future cash flows through stochastic modeling, or Monte Carlo simulations. We continue to analyze the internal rates of return and spread against borrowing costs represented by our portfolio.

Portfolio Credit Risk Management

The life insurance policies that we acquire represent obligations of third-party life insurance companies to pay the benefits under the relevant policy. Because we finance life insurance policies, we rely on the payments from the face value of policy benefits from life insurance companies for revenue collections. We rely on the face value of the life insurance policy at maturity as the exclusive form of payment.

The possible insolvency or loss by a life insurance company is a significant risk to our business. In order to manage this risk, our purchasing policy is that, unless the benefits of a particular policy fall within applicable state minimum guarantees, 90% of life insurance companies insuring the policies in our portfolio hold an investment grade rating from either A.M. Best, Moody’s or Standard & Poor’s. This policy also comprises a covenant under the borrowing documents relating to our subsidiary secured notes. To further mitigate risk, our purchasing policy is to limit the face amount of policies issued by any one life insurance company within the total portfolio to 20%. State guaranty funds generally guaranty policy benefits less than $200,000. In addition, to assure diversity and stability in our portfolio, we regularly review the various metrics of our portfolio relating to credit risk. We track industry rating agency reports and industry journals and articles in order to gain insight into possible financial problems of life insurance companies. Recently, some of the credit ratings on insurance companies were downgraded and we will no longer consider purchasing policies issued by these insurance companies. Finally, we will only purchase those life insurance policies that meet the financial requirements and underwriting standards established in the indenture.

 

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Of the 31 insurance companies that insure the policies we own, ten companies insure approximately 81.38% of total face value of insurance benefits and the remaining 21 insurance companies insure the remaining approximately 18.62% of total face value of insurance benefits. We seek to have not more than 20% of our total insured benefits insured by any one company. All of the companies are rated “A” or better from Standard & Poor’s. The concentration risk of our ten largest insurance company holdings as of March 31, 2011, is set forth in the table below.

Rank

     Face Value
Benefit Amt.
($)
     Percentage of
Total Portfolio
Face Value
Benefit Amt.
(%)
   

Insurance Company

   Ins. Co.
S&P
Rating
  1       $ 74,030,000         17.73   AXA Equitable Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  2         71,744,847         17.18   John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A)    AA-
  3         51,686,500         12.38   Transamerica Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  4         37,565,000         8.99   Jefferson-Pilot Life Ins. Co.    AA-
  5         26,250,000         6.29   American Gen. Life Ins. Co.    A+
  6         23,750,000         5.69   Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA+
  7         21,300,000         5.10   ING Life Ins. and Ann. Co.    A
  8         12,200,000         2.92   Lincoln Ben. Life Co.    A+
  9         11,900,000         2.85   American National Ins. Co.    A+
  10         9,445,467         2.26   Penn Mutual Life Ins. Co.    AA-

Servicing Agents

We have contracted with Wells Fargo Bank to provide servicing, collateral agent, and trustee services with respect to certain life insurance policies owned by DLP Funding II. In addition, we have contracted with Bank of Utah to provide servicing, collateral agent, and trustee services with respect to all other life insurance policies we own. Wells Fargo Bank and Bank of Utah provide services for certain life insurance policies in connection with ownership and tracking of life insurance policies it owns, including paying premiums, posting of payments (receipts) of the life insurance policies, certain monitoring, enforcement of rights and payor notifications, and related services. We reserve the right to service and provide collateral agent services for certain life insurance policies directly, or appoint additional third-party servicers in the future. Neither Wells Fargo Bank nor Bank of Utah participated in the preparation of this prospectus and they make no representations concerning the debentures, the collateral securing obligations under the debentures, or any other matter stated in this prospectus. Wells Fargo Bank and Bank of Utah have no duty or obligation to pay the debentures from their funds, assets or corporate capital or to make inquiry regarding, or investigate the use of, amounts disbursed from any account.

Competition

We encounter significant competition in the life insurance purchasing and financing business from numerous companies, including hedge funds, investment banks, secured lenders, specialty life insurance finance companies and life insurance companies themselves. Many of these competitors have greater financial and other resources than we do and may have significantly lower cost of funds because they have greater access to insured deposits or the capital markets. Moreover, some of these competitors have significant cash reserves and can better fund shortfalls in collections that might have a more pronounced impact on companies such as ours. They also have greater market share. In the event that the life insurance companies make a significant effort to compete against the business, we would experience significant challenges with our business model.

Competition can take many forms, including the pricing of the financing, transaction structuring, timeliness and responsiveness in processing a seller’s application and customer service. Some of the competitors may outperform us in these areas. Some competitors target the same type of life insurance clients as we do and generally have operated in the markets we service for a longer period of time. Increased competition may result

 

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in increasing our costs of purchasing policies, or it may affect the availability and qualify of policies that are available for our purchase. These factors could adversely affect our profitability by reducing our return on investment or increasing our risk.

Government Regulation

The life insurance sector is highly regulated at both the federal and state levels. We are subject to federal and state regulation and supervision in the life insurance purchasing and finance business. There are significant regulations in many states that require us to obtain specific licenses or approvals to be able to purchase life insurance policies in those states. We continually research and monitor regulations and apply for the appropriate licenses in the required states.

Governments at both the federal and state levels have continued to review the impact of the business on the life insurance industry. Moreover, recent federal government actions with respect to insurance companies have increased the federal government’s role in regulating the insurance industry. These efforts may affect the number of life insurance policies available for purchase and their attractiveness.

State Life Settlement License Requirements

State laws differ as to the extent to which purchasers of life insurance policies are required to be licensed by a state regulatory agency. We may elect to conduct the life insurance policy purchasing only in those states in which we are licensed or where no licensure is required. The licensing requirements differ from state to state, but where they exist, they typically require the payment of licensing fees, periodic reporting, and submission to audit by state regulators. We do not intend to purchase any life insurance policies in any states that require a license or similar qualification without first obtaining such license or qualification or purchasing through a licensed provider in that state.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

HIPAA requires that holders of medical records maintain such records and implement procedures in ways designed to assure the privacy of patient records. HIPAA has precipitated widespread changes in record keeping, including patient consent forms and access restrictions in data processing software. In order to carry out the business, we receive medical records and obtain a release to share such records with a defined group of persons. We are entitled to have access to patient information, take on the responsibility for preserving the privacy of that information, and use the information only for purposes related to the life insurance policies.

Regulatory Matters

In 2007, the Florida Department of Insurance issued us an order to desist and refrain from further operating as a life settlement provider unless and until qualification had been made under the Florida law, or unless exempt. In April 2009, without admitting any wrongdoing, we settled the matter with the Department of Insurance. We believe that we are in compliance with all applicable laws and that this offering is not impacted by the Florida order. In April 2011, without admitting any wrongdoing, we entered into a settlement agreement with the Nevada Secretary of State, Securities Division, for alleged failures to register as a broker-dealer of life insurance settlement transactions and to file a notice of exempt offering for the sale of subsidiary secured notes to residents of that state in 2009-2010.

Employees

We employ approximately 22 employees.

 

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Properties

Our principal executive offices are located at 220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402. We lease 11,695 square feet of space for a lease term expiring in April 20, 2012. We believe that the existing facilities are adequate for our current needs and that suitable additional space will be available as needed.

Legal Proceedings

Our Chief Executive Officer, Jon R. Sabes and Chief Operating Officer, Steven F. Sabes, who together beneficially own approximately 95.6% of our common stock are subject to litigation relating to claims by a bankruptcy trustee for loan payments to an affiliate, Opportunity Finance, LLC, received, and such payments may ultimately be deemed to be avoidable transfers under preference or other legal theories. Case No. 08-45257 (U.S. Bankruptcy Court District of Minnesota). In addition, GWG Holdings invested $1 million in Opportunity Finance, LLC in 2006 and was repaid and received $176,948 of interest income from that investment in 2007. To date, no claim has been made against us.

While we believe there are numerous meritorious defenses to the claims made by the bankruptcy trustee, and we are advised that the defendants in that action will vigorously defend against the trustee’s claims, such defendants may not prevail in the litigation with the bankruptcy trustee. If the bankruptcy trustee sought to sell or transfer the equity interests of Jon R. Sabes or Steven F. Sabes as a result of the litigation, there could be a change in control and our business together with all of our investors, including investors in our debentures could be materially and adversely impacted. Such adverse results would likely arise in connection with negative change-in-control covenants contained in our revolving credit facility agreements, the breach of those covenants and an ensuing event of default under such facility. In addition, if the bankruptcy trustee sought to sell or transfer the equity interests of Jon R. Sabes or Steven F. Sabes as a result of the litigation, such transfers would adversely affect debenture holders by reducing the number of shares of common stock of GWG Holdings that have been pledged as collateral security for our obligations under the debentures. Finally, regardless of the outcome of this litigation, these matters are likely to distract management and reduce the time and attention that they are able to devote to our business.

 

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MANAGEMENT

Directors and Executive Officers

The name, age and positions of our current executive officers and directors are as follows:

 

Name

   Age     

Positions

Jon R. Sabes

     44       Chief Executive Officer and Director

Paul A. Siegert

     72       President and Director (Chairman of the Board)

Steven F. Sabes

     42       Chief Operating Officer, Secretary and Director

Jon Gangelhoff

     51       Chief Financial Officer

Brian Tyrell

     50       Director

Laurence Zipkin

     71       Director

Kenneth Chaim Fink

     46       Director

Jon R. Sabes, co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of our company and GWG Life, is a financial professional with over 20 years of experience in the fields of law, finance, banking, venture capital, business development, managerial operations, and federal taxation. Since 1999, Mr. Sabes has served as Chief Executive Officer of Opportunity Finance, LLC, a family investment company specializing in structured finance. Over his career, Mr. Sabes has been active in receivable financing, life insurance financing, and casualty insurance financing, structuring over $900 million in financing commitments for his related businesses. Mr. Sabes’ experience includes co-founding and leading the development of two leading insurance-related finance companies: GWG Life Settlements, LLC, a company in the life insurance finance industry founded in 2006, and MedFinance, an innovator in casualty insurance and healthcare finance founded in 2005. Through these companies, Mr. Sabes has developed and applied financial structuring techniques, underwriting algorithms, and business modeling aspects to the insurance industry. Mr. Sabes’ education includes a Juris Doctor degree cum laude from the University of Minnesota Law School; and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics, from the University of Colorado. Over his career, Mr. Sabes has held several licenses and professional association memberships including FINRA Series 7, Series 63, Minnesota State Bar Association, and American Bar Association. In addition to being an active father of three, Mr. Sabes serves on the boards of several charities and foundations, including Saving Children and Building Families, and the Insurance Studies Institute. Mr. Sabes is the brother of Steven F. Sabes. Mr. Sabes has served as our Chief Executive Officer, and a director, since 2006.

Steven F. Sabes, co-founder and Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of our company and GWG Life, is responsible for various managerial aspects of our business, with a specific focus on treasury and financial operations, life insurance policy purchasing, and specialty finance operations. Since 1998, Mr. Sabes has served as a Managing Director of Opportunity Finance, LLC, a family investment company specializing in structured finance. Mr. Sabes holds a Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in organic chemistry from the University of Minnesota, as well as a Bachelor of Arts degree from The Colorado College. Mr. Sabes is the brother of Jon Sabes. Mr. Sabes has served as our Chief Operating Officer and Secretary, and a director, since 2006.

Paul A. Siegert, co-founder of our company and GWG Life, has over 50 years experience in national and international business with focus on general business, financial and investment strategies, management practices, fiscal controls, profit incentives, systems and corporate structuring and governance. Over his career, Mr. Siegert has consulted to Fortune 500 corporations, regional firms, emerging businesses, government and education, and has served as director, general partner and advisor to partnerships and corporations, including restructuring of economically troubled businesses. Mr. Siegert has provided written testimony to the Senate Finance Committee regarding SEC practices and created two companies registered under the Investment Advisors Act of 1940. Mr. Siegert was an active participant in the formation and direction of the Colorado Institute for Artificial Intelligence at the University of Colorado. Mr. Siegert’s education includes studies toward a Master of Business Administration, University of Chicago; and Bachelor of Science and Industrial Management, Purdue University. His insurance-related experiences include the creation of one of the nation’s first employer self-funded life, medical and disability insurance programs; designing medical, life insurance and social security opt-out

 

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programs for educational institutions; incorporation of financial analysis disciplines in life insurance and estate planning; and strategizing of key-man insurance plans and life insurance in business continuation planning for corporations and senior executives. From 1979 to 1986, Mr. Siegert was nationally recognized as a tax and estate planning expert. In 1999 Mr. Siegert retired from active business to engage in various personal financial and investment endeavors. In 2004, he founded Great West Growth, LLC, a Nevada limited liability company and a predecessor to GWG Life, to purchase life insurance policies. In his capacities with GWG Life, he created an insurance policy valuation and pricing model, created life insurance policy purchase documentation, undertook state licensing and compliance and developed operating and marketing systems. Mr. Siegert currently serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Insurance Studies Institute, which he founded in 2007. Mr. Siegert currently serves as President, Director and Chairman of the Board of GWG Holdings, Inc. He has been active in a variety of charities and foundations, including Rotary International.

Jon Gangelhoff has served rapidly growing businesses in several industries as chief financial officer with a strong focus on business operations since 1986. Prior to joining our company and GWG Life in 2009, he served as chief financial officer for Northern Metal Recycling, a metal recycling firm the sales of which exceeded $500 million annually. Mr. Gangelhoff’s responsibilities at Northern Metal Recycling included acquisition and related integration operations focused on finance, information systems, and human resources functions. Prior to that, Mr. Gangelhoff served as the chief financial officer of Kuhlman Company, formerly a public reporting company, where he established corporate infrastructure, developed financial reporting and internal control systems, and managed the SEC reporting process. During his 25-year career, Mr. Gangelhoff has used an integrated hands-on and financial management approach to improve the performance of the companies he served in a variety of industries. Mr. Gangelhoff holds a bachelor of Bachelor of Arts degree from Mankato State University.

Brian Tyrell is a principal of Athena Securities Ltd. based in Dublin, Ireland where he has worked in the financial services industry specializing in structured investments and fund creation for over the past 19 years. Mr. Tyrrell has held directorships in a number of financial service companies with a particular focus on the life insurance finance industry for the past several years. Mr. Tyrrell is a Business Studies (Finance) graduate of Dublin City University. He completed postgraduate studies with the Society of Investment Analysts of Ireland and the Institute of Investment Management and Research UK. He is a member of the CFA Institute and a fellow of the Chartered Institute of Securities and Investment.

Laurence Zipkin is nationally recognized for his expertise in the gaming industry, restaurants, and emerging small growth companies. From 1996 to 2006, Mr. Zipkin owned Oakridge Securities, Inc. where, as an investment banker, he successfully raised capital for various early growth-stage companies and advising clients with regard to private placements, initial public offerings, mergers, debt offerings, bridge and bank financings, developing business plans and evaluating cash needs and resources. He has extensive experience in the merger and acquisition field and has represented companies on both the buy and sell side. Since 2006, Mr. Zipkin has been self-employed, engaging in various consulting activities, owning and operating two restaurant properties, and purchasing distressed real estate. Mr. Zipkin is a licensed insurance agent for both life and health insurance. Mr. Zipkin attended the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Finance.

Kenneth Chaim Fink is President and Chief Executive Officer of Tamar-Fink, Inc. and Family Wealth Counselors, LLC, representing family offices for estate and wealth counseling services. Since 1999, Mr. Fink has led Tamar-Fink, Inc. to become a leading life insurance agency, transacting over $1 billion of insurance sales transactions. Mr. Fink is a lifetime and qualifying member of the Million Dollar Round Table, the nation’s leading life insurance sales organization. He is a member of the prestigious International Forum and Top of the Table organizations, which are limited to approximately 500 of the leading insurance agents in the world. Mr. Fink is also a member of the Planned Giving Counsel, Minnesota Life Underwriters, National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors, and the Association for Advanced Life Underwriting. Mr. Fink is a member of the National Association of Family Wealth Counselors and was named the 1998 Family Wealth Counselor of the Year after creating and implementing plans that would generate more than $700 million dollars for charities. Recently, Mr. Fink designed a plan that resulted in a $42 million dollar gift to the United Hospitals in Cleveland,

 

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the largest gift in their history. Mr. Fink is the recipient of the 2006 Preston Hotchkis Distinguished Achievement Award for his generous charitable and business contributions to the community. Mr. Fink has published numerous articles on tax, estate and charitable giving in leading national and regional publications. Mr. Fink is a co-contributor to the book Getting to the Heart of the Matter, which has received critical acclaim nationwide. Mr. Fink has been featured in Forbes magazine and quoted in many of the nation’s newspapers as an expert in the field of insurance and charitable planned giving. Mr. Fink graduated Cum Laude from the University of Pennsylvania and received advanced certification as a Family Wealth Counselor in 1997.

When considering whether directors have the experience, qualifications, attributes and skills to enable the Board of Directors to satisfy its oversight responsibilities effectively in light of the Company’s business and structure, the Board of Directors focuses primarily on the information discussed in each of the directors’ individual biographies set forth above. With regard to Mr. Jon R. Sabes, the board considered his significant experience, expertise and background with regard to financial matters, and his demonstrated experience and skills in managing the Company’s business. With regard to Mr. Steven F. Sabes, the board considered his background and experience with the Company and its business. With respect to Mr. Siegert, the board considered his significant experience in securities and finance, and his background in secondary life insurance market. With regard to Mr. Tyrell, the board considered his experience in global capital markets and his knowledge and experience with the secondary life insurance market. In the case of Mr. Zipkin, the board considered his knowledge, experience and skills in the finance, public securities and investment banking fields. With regard to Mr. Fink, the board considered his extensive background and knowledge of the insurance industry.

Indemnification of Directors and Executive Officers

Section 145 of the Delaware General Corporation Law provides for, under certain circumstances, the indemnification of our officers, directors, employees and agents against liabilities that they may incur in such capacities. A summary of the circumstances in which such indemnification provided for is contained herein, but that description is qualified in its entirety by reference to the relevant Section of the Delaware General Corporation Law.

In general, the statute provides that any director, officer, employee or agent of a corporation may be indemnified against expenses (including attorneys’ fees), judgments, fines and amounts paid in settlement, actually and reasonably incurred in a proceeding (including any civil, criminal, administrative or investigative proceeding) to which the individual was a party by reason of such status. Such indemnity may be provided if the indemnified person’s actions resulting in the liabilities: (i) were taken in good faith; (ii) were reasonably believed to have been in or not opposed to our best interest; and (iii) with respect to any criminal action, such person had no reasonable cause to believe the actions were unlawful. Unless ordered by a court, indemnification generally may be awarded only after a determination of independent members of the Board of Directors or a committee thereof, by independent legal counsel or by vote of the stockholders that the applicable standard of conduct was met by the individual to be indemnified.

The statutory provisions further provide that to the extent a director, officer, employee or agent is wholly successful on the merits or otherwise in defense of any proceeding to which he was a party, he is entitled to receive indemnification against expenses, including attorneys’ fees, actually and reasonably incurred in connection with the proceeding.

Indemnification in connection with a proceeding by or in the right of GWG Holdings, Inc. in which the director, officer, employee or agent is successful is permitted only with respect to expenses, including attorneys’ fees actually and reasonably incurred in connection with the defense. In such actions, the person to be indemnified must have acted in good faith, in a manner believed to have been in our best interest and must not have been adjudged liable to us unless and only to the extent that the Court of Chancery or the court in which such action or suit was brought shall determine upon application that, despite the adjudication of liability, in view of all the circumstances of the case, such person is fairly and reasonably entitled to indemnity for such expense

 

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which the Court of Chancery or such other court shall deem proper. Indemnification is otherwise prohibited in connection with a proceeding brought on behalf of GWG Holdings, Inc. in which a director is adjudged liable to us, or in connection with any proceeding charging improper personal benefit to the director in which the director is adjudged liable for receipt of an improper personal benefit.

Delaware law authorizes us to reimburse or pay reasonable expenses incurred by a director, officer, employee or agent in connection with a proceeding in advance of a final disposition of the matter. Such advances of expenses are permitted if the person furnishes to us a written agreement to repay such advances if it is determined that he is not entitled to be indemnified by us.

The statutory section cited above further specifies that any provisions for indemnification of or advances for expenses does not exclude other rights under our certificate of incorporation, corporate bylaws, resolutions of our stockholders or disinterested directors, or otherwise. These indemnification provisions continue for a person who has ceased to be a director, officer, employee or agent of the corporation and inure to the benefit of the heirs, executors and administrators of such persons.

The statutory provision cited above also grants the power to GWG Holdings, Inc. to purchase and maintain insurance policies that protect any director, officer, employee or agent against any liability asserted against or incurred by him in such capacity arising out of his status as such. Such policies may provide for indemnification whether or not the corporation would otherwise have the power to provide for it.

Article 6 of our corporate bylaws provides that we shall indemnify our directors, officers, employees and agents to the fullest extent permitted by the Delaware General Corporation Law. Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933 may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling GWG Holdings, Inc. pursuant to the foregoing provisions, we understand that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in that Act and is therefore unenforceable.

We have purchased directors’ and officers’ liability insurance through in order to limit the exposure to liability for indemnification of directors and officers, including liabilities under the 1933 Securities Act.

 

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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Summary Compensation Table

The following table sets forth the cash and non-cash compensation awarded to or earned by: (i) each individual who served as the principal executive officer and principal financial officer of GWG Holdings during the year ended December 31, 2010; and (ii) each other individual that served as an executive officer of either GWG Holdings or GWG Life Settlements, Inc. at the conclusion of the year ended December 31, 2010 and who received more than $100,000 in the form of salary and bonus during such fiscal year. For purposes of this report, these individuals are collectively the “named executives” of the Company.

 

Name and Principal Position

     Salary     Other Annual
Compensation
     Stock Option
Awards
     Total  

Jon R. Sabes

     2010       $ 0 (1)      —           —         $ 0 (1) 

Chief Executive Officer

     2009       $ 0 (1)      —           —         $ 0 (1) 

Jon Gangelhoff

     2010       $ 120,000        25,000         —         $ 145,000   

Chief Financial Officer

     2009       $ 120,000        2,500         —         $ 122,500   

 

(1)

Mr. Sabes received no salary during 2010 or 2009. Mr. Sabes did, however, receive loan advances, on which advances interest accrued at rates ranging from 4.2% to 5.0% per annum. The advances were to be repaid upon or in connection with operating distributions by us. This arrangement is more fully described in the narrative below. Total advances made under this arrangement during 2010 and 2009 were $162,500 and $137,500, respectively.

Employment Agreements and Change-in-Control Provisions

In June 2011, we entered into employment agreements with each of Messrs. Jon R. Sabes, Steven F. Sabes, Paul Siegert and Jon Gangelhoff. Mr. Jon R. Sabes is our Chief Executive Officer; Mr. Steven F. Sabes is our Chief Operating Officer and Secretary; Mr. Siegert is our President (and also our Chairman of the Board); and Mr. Gangelhoff is our Chief Financial Officer. These employment agreements establish key employment terms (including reporting responsibilities, base salary, discretionary and bonus opportunity and other benefits), provide for severance benefits in certain situations, and contain non-competition, non-solicitation and confidentiality covenants.

Under their respective employment agreements, Mr. Jon R. Sabes receives an annual base salary of $200,000, Messrs. Steven F. Sabes and Paul A. Siegert receive an annual base salary of $150,000, and Mr. Gangelhoff receives an annual base salary of $120,000. The employment agreements contain customary provisions prohibiting the executives from soliciting our employees for one year after any termination of employment, and from competing with the Company for either two years (if the executive is terminated for good cause or if he resigns without good reason) or one year (if we terminate the executive’s employment without good cause or if he resigns with good reason). If an executive’s employment is terminated by us without “good cause” or if the executive voluntarily resigns with “good reason,” then the executive will be entitled to (i) severance pay for a period of 12 months and (ii) reimbursement for health insurance premiums for his family if he elects continued coverage under COBRA.

The employment agreements for Messrs. Jon Sabes, Steve Sabes and Paul Siegert also provide that we will reimburse them for any legal costs they incur in enforcing their rights under the employment agreement and, to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law, indemnify them for claims, costs and expenses arising in connection with their employment, regardless of the outcome of any such legal contest, as well as interest at the prime rate on any payments under the employment agreements that are determined to be past due, unless prohibited by law.

All of the executive employment agreements include a provision allowing us to reduce their severance payments and any other payments to which the executive becomes entitled as a result of our

 

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change in control to the extent needed for the executive to avoid paying an excise tax under Code Section 280G, unless, the named executive officer is better off, on an after-tax basis, receiving the full amount of such payments and paying the excise taxes due.

Prior to entering into the executive employments with Messrs. Jon R. Sabes, Paul A. Siegert and Steven F. Sabes, those individuals received loan advances that accrued interest at rates ranging from 4.2% to 5.0% per annum. Under this arrangement, made during the time when GWG Holdings was a limited liability company, these advance amounts were to be repaid upon or in connection with operating distributions made by us. Effective June 13, 2011 and in connection with our conversion to a Delaware corporation, we memorialized the agreements of the individuals to repay us the aggregate amount advanced, together with interest accruing thereon at the rate of 3% per annum, in the executive employment agreement we reached with each such individual. Under the prior arrangements and through June 13, 2011, advances aggregating approximately $981,167 were made to Jon R. Sabes with cumulative interest owed of $114,496, $287,500 to Paul A. Siegert with cumulative interest owed of $22,708, and $861,976 to Steven F. Sabes with cumulative interest owed of $94,438. As indicated in footnote (1) to the Summary Compensation Table, Mr. Jon R. Sabes received $162,500 of these advances during 2010. In addition, each of Mr. Paul A. Siegert and Mr. Steven F. Sabes received $150,000 of advances during 2010.

The employment agreements provide that monthly payments of $5,000, $2,000 and $5,000 are to be withheld from salary payments made to Jon R. Sabes, Paul A. Siegert and Steven F. Sabes, respectively, in satisfaction of the repayment of advance amounts owed by these individuals. The executive employment agreements provide that a balloon payment satisfying the remaining amount owed is to be made in July 2020. The balloon payment for each individual is $812,789 in the case of Mr. Jon R. Sabes, $157,003 in the case of Mr. Paul A. Siegert, and $629,906 in the case of Mr. Steven F. Sabes. Nevertheless, the executive employment agreements provide that all or any portion of such balloon payments may be forgiven by the Company, upon the approval of the disinterested directors serving on the board, after June 30, 2012.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year End

We had no outstanding equity awards as of December 31, 2010 for any named executives.

Compensation of Directors

Currently, our directors receive no compensation pursuant to any standard arrangement for their services as directors. Nevertheless, we may in the future determine to provide our directors with some form of compensation, either cash or options or contractually restricted securities.

Related-Party Transactions

As explained above under “—Employment Agreements and Change-in-Control Provisions,” we were party to an arrangement with each of Jon R. Sabes, Paul A. Siegert and Steven F. Sabes whereby those individuals received loan advances that accrued interest at rates ranging from 4.2% to 5.0% per annum. Under this arrangement, made during the time when GWG Holdings was a limited liability company, these advance amounts were to be repaid upon or in connection with operating distributions made by us. From inception through June 13, 2011, advances aggregating approximately $981,167 were made to Jon R. Sabes with cumulative interest owed of $114,496, $287,500 to Paul A. Siegert with cumulative interest owed of $22,708, and $861,976 were made to Steven F. Sabes with cumulative interest owed of $94,438. As indicated in footnote (1) to the Summary Compensation Table above, Mr. Jon R. Sabes received $162,500 of these advances during 2010. In addition, each of Mr. Paul A. Siegert and Mr. Steven F. Sabes received $150,000 of advances during 2010.

In June 2011 and in connection with our conversion to a Delaware corporation, we entered into executive employment agreements with these individuals setting forth, among other things, their promise to repay us the aggregate amount advanced, together with interest accruing thereon at the rate of 3% per annum. The agreements

 

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provide that monthly payments of $5,000 are to be withheld from salary payments to these individuals in satisfaction of the repayment of advance amounts owed by them. The agreements also provide that a balloon payment satisfying the remaining amount owed is to be made in July 2020. The balloon payment for each individual is $812,789 in the case of Mr. Jon R. Sabes, $157,003 in the case of Mr. Paul A. Siegert, and $629,906 in the case of Mr. Steven F. Sabes. However, as explained above, all or any portion of such balloon payments may be forgiven by the Company, upon the approval of the disinterested directors serving on the board, after June 30, 2012.

Due to the fact that the executive employment agreements provide that, subject to the conditions identified above, we will forgive the balloon payments, we have not presented the amounts owed to us by these individuals as assets on our balance sheet, but rather contra-equity accounts.

In May 2008, our affiliate, Insurance Strategies Fund, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company beneficially owned by Mr. Jon R. Sabes, our Chief Executive Officer, agreed to make discretionary unsecured general working capital loans to GWG Holdings for short-term working capital needs. In 2010, GWG Holdings repaid a total of $1,446,825 outstanding in principal amount of earlier made working capital loans, together with a total of $90,900 of interest on such loans. Presently, we owe no amounts to Insurance Strategies Fund. Nevertheless, an Amended and Restated Investment Agreement with Insurance Strategies Fund, dated as of September 3, 2009, remains in place. That agreement permits Insurance Strategies Fund to make additional discretionary unsecured short-term work capital loans in the future. Future requests for any such loans will be approved only by the disinterested directors serving on the board.

 

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SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS

AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS

As of the close of business on June 13, 2011, we had outstanding one class of voting securities—common stock, of which there were 4,500,000 shares issued and outstanding. Each share of capital stock is currently entitled to one vote on all matters put to a vote of our stockholders. The following table sets forth the number of common shares, and percentage of outstanding common shares, beneficially owned as of June 10, 2010, by:

 

   

each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than five percent of our outstanding common stock

 

   

each of our current directors

 

   

each our current executive officers and any other persons identified as a “named executive” in the Summary Compensation Table above, and

 

   

all current executive officers and directors as a group.

Unless otherwise indicated, the address of each of the following persons is 220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402, and each such person has sole voting and investment power with respect to the shares set forth opposite his, her or its name.

 

Name and Address

   Common Shares
Beneficially Owned (1)
     Percentage of
Common  Shares
 

Jon R. Sabes (2)

     2,182,852         48.5

Steven F. Sabes (3)

     2,116,704         47.0

Paul A. Siegert (4)

     200,444         4.5

Jon Gangelhoff (5)

     0         *   

Brian Tyrell (6)

     0         *   

Laurence Zipkin (7)

     0         *   

Kenneth Chaim Fink (8)

     0         *   

All current directors and officers as a group (9)

     4,500,000         100

 

*

less than one percent.

(1)

Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC, and includes general voting power and/or investment power with respect to securities. Shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options or warrants that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of the record rate, and shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of other securities currently convertible or convertible within 60 days, are deemed outstanding for computing the beneficial ownership percentage of the person holding such securities but are not deemed outstanding for computing the beneficial ownership percentage of any other person. Under the applicable SEC rules, each person’s beneficial ownership is calculated by dividing the total number of shares with respect to which they possess beneficial ownership by the total number of outstanding shares of the Company. In any case where an individual has beneficial ownership over securities that are not outstanding, but are issuable upon the exercise of options or warrants or similar rights within the next 60 days, that same number of shares is added to the denominator in the calculation described above. Because the calculation of each person’s beneficial ownership set forth in the “Percentage of Common Shares” column of the table may include shares that are not presently outstanding, the sum total of the percentages set forth in such column may exceed 100%.

(2)

Mr. Sabes is our Chief Executive Officer and a director of the Company. Shares reflected in the table include 200,445 shares held individually, 1,737,863 shares held by Mokeson, LLC, a Minnesota limited liability company of which Mr. Sabes is a manager and member, and 489,087 shares held by Opportunity Finance, LLC, a Minnesota limited liability company of which Mr. Sabes is a manager and member.

(3)

Mr. Sabes is our Chief Operating Officer, Secretary and a director of the Company. Shares reflected in the table include 799,777 shares held individually, 489,087 shares held by Opportunity Finance, LLC, a Minnesota limited liability company of which Mr. Sabes is a manager and member, 521,158 shares held by

 

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SFS Trust 1982, a trust of which Mr. Sabes is the beneficiary, 350,780 shares held by SFS Trust 1982 Esther, a trust of which Mr. Sabes is a beneficiary, and 200,445 shares held by SFS Trust 1976, a trust of which Mr. Sabes is a beneficiary. The trustees of each of the trusts are Robert W. Sabes, Jon R. Sabes and Ross A. Sabes.

(4)

Mr. Siegert is our President and a director of the Company.

(5)

Mr. Gangelhoff is our Chief Financial Officer.

(6)

Mr. Tyrell is a director of the Company.

(7)

Mr. Zipkin is a director of the Company.

(8)

Mr. Fink is a director of the Company.

(9)

Includes the beneficial ownership of Messrs. Jon R. Sabes, Steven F. Sabes, Siegert, Gangelhoff, Tyrell, Zipkin and Fink.

 

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DESCRIPTION OF THE DEBENTURES

General

The debentures will be secured obligations of GWG Holdings. The debentures will be issued under an indenture between us and Bank of Utah, National Association, as the indenture trustee. The terms and conditions of the debentures include those stated in the indenture and those made part of the indenture by reference to the Trust Indenture Act of 1939. The following is a summary of the material provisions of the indenture. For a complete understanding of the debentures, you should review the definitive terms and conditions contained in the indenture, which include definitions of certain terms used below. A copy of the indenture has been filed with the SEC as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, and is available from us at no charge upon request.

The following is a summary of the material terms associated with the debentures:

 

   

The debentures are general secured obligations of GWG Holdings, Inc. The obligations are secured by a grant of a security interest in all of the assets of GWG Holdings, which assets will serve as collateral for our obligations under the debentures. This grant of a security interest is effected pursuant to a pledge and security agreement attached to the indenture.

 

   

The debentures are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by our wholly owned direct subsidiary, GWG Life, but otherwise are not guaranteed by any other person or entity. The guarantee is backed by a grant of a security interest in all of the assets of GWG Life, which assets will serve as additional collateral for our obligations under the debentures. Chief among these assets is GWG Life’s ownership interest in DLP Funding II. This guarantee is effected pursuant to a subsidiary guarantee agreement attached to the indenture.

 

   

The debentures are also secured by a pledge of the equity ownership interests in GWG Holdings, Inc. by its principal stockholders—Jon R. Sabes and Steven F. Sabes—which pledge will be effected pursuant to a pledge and security agreement attached to the indenture.

 

   

The collateral granted for our obligations under the debentures (i.e., the security interest in all of the assets of GWG Holdings, and the guarantee by GWG Life and corresponding security interest in all of its assets including a pledge of the equity ownership interests in DLP Funding II), together with (i) certain covenants contained in the documents relating to our earlier issued series of subsidiary secured notes (of which approximately $55.7 million is presently outstanding), and (ii) an intercreditor agreement between the trustee (on behalf of the debenture holders) and Lord Securities Corporation (the collateral trustee for our subsidiary secured notes), make the debentures pari passu with the subsidiary secured notes with respect to security and collateral. The intercreditor agreement is attached to the indenture.

 

   

The debentures will be junior to the $100 million revolving credit facility of DLP Funding II with Autobahn/DZ Bank, which currently has an outstanding balance of approximately $42 million. The debentures will also be junior to any later senior lending facility we may obtain.

 

   

The debentures are not savings accounts, certificates of deposit (CDs) or other forms of “deposits,” and are not insured by the FDIC or any other governmental agency.

 

   

The debentures are not directly secured by any life insurance policy assets that are not owned by GWG Life. The vast majority of our life insurance policy assets are held by our DLP Funding II subsidiary. Although GWG Life’s equity ownership interests in DLP Funding II is an asset in which GWG Life has pursuant to its guarantee granted a security interest to serve as collateral for obligations under the debentures, the payment on such equity interests will be subordinate to the interests of creditors of DLP Funding II, including our senior creditor Autobahn/DZ Bank.

 

   

The debentures do not have the benefit of a “sinking fund” for the retirement of principal.

 

 

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The debentures are not convertible into our capital stock or other securities.

 

   

We have the option to prepay the outstanding principal balance and accrued but unpaid interest of the debentures, in whole or in part, at any time without premium or penalty. If we elect to prepay your debentures, the redeemed debentures will cease to accrue interest after the prepayment date under the terms and subject to the conditions of the indenture.

 

   

Except in limited circumstances (death, bankruptcy or total disability), debenture holders will have no right to require us to prepay any debenture prior to its maturity date. If we in our sole discretion nonetheless elect to accommodate a prepayment request, we will impose a prepayment fee of 6% against the outstanding principal balance of the debenture redeemed and this fee will be subtracted from the amount paid to you.

The debentures will be denominated in U.S. dollars and we intend to sell the debentures at 100% of their principal face amount. The minimum investment amount in the debentures will be $25,000. Above that minimum amount, debentures may be purchased in $1,000 increments. Subject to the minimum investment amount, you may select the principal amount and term (ranging from six months to 10 years) of the debentures you would like to purchase when you subscribe. The interest rate of your debenture will remain fixed until maturity. Depending our capital requirements, we may not, however, always offer debentures with the particular terms you seek. See “Description of the Debentures—Interest Rate and Maturity” below.

Upon acceptance of your purchase subscription, we will create an account in a book-entry registration and transfer system for you, and credit the principal amount of your subscription to your account. We will send you a purchase confirmation that will indicate our acceptance of your subscription. You will have five business days from the postmark date of your purchase confirmation to rescind your subscription. If your subscription is rejected, or if you rescind your subscription during the rescission period, all funds deposited will be promptly returned to you without any interest. See “—Book-Entry Registration and Exchange” and “—Limited Rescission Right” below.

Investors whose subscriptions for debentures have been accepted and anyone who subsequently acquires debentures in a qualified transfer are referred to as “holders” or “registered holders” in this prospectus. We may modify or supplement the terms of the debentures described in this prospectus from time to time in a supplement to the indenture and a supplement to this prospectus. Except as set forth under “—Amendment, Supplement and Waiver” below, any modification or amendment will not affect debentures outstanding at the time of such modification or amendment.

The debentures are not assignable without our prior consent. The debentures may be transferred or exchanged for other debentures of the same series and class of a like aggregate principal amount subject to limitations contained in the indenture. We will not charge a fee for any registration, transfer or exchange of debentures. However, we may require the holder to pay any tax, assessment fee, or other governmental charge required in connection with any registration, transfer or exchange of debentures. The registered holder of a debenture will be treated as its owner for all purposes.

Denomination

You may purchase debentures in the minimum principal amount of $25,000, and in whole increments of $1,000 above $25,000. You will determine the original principal amount of each debenture you purchase when you subscribe. You may not cumulate purchases of multiple debentures with principal amounts less than $25,000 to satisfy the minimum requirement. In our discretion, we may waive the $25,000 minimum purchase requirement for any investor.

 

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Term

We may offer debentures with the following terms to maturity:

 

•    six months

 

•    four years

•    one year

 

•    five years

•    two years

 

•    seven years

•    three years

 

•    ten years

You will select the term of each debenture you purchase when you subscribe. You may purchase multiple debentures with different terms by filling in investment amounts for more than one term on your subscription agreement. However, during this offering we may not always offer debentures with each of the terms outlined above.

The actual maturity date will be on the last day of the month in which the debenture matures (i.e., in which the debenture’s term ends). For example, if you select a one-year term and your debenture becomes effective on January 15, 2011, the actual maturity date will be January 31, 2012. After actual maturity, we will pay the principal and all accrued but unpaid interest on the debenture on or prior to the tenth day of the calendar month next following its maturity (or the first business day following the tenth day of such month). So, in the case of a debenture with a maturity date of January 31, 2012, actual payment will be made on or prior to February 10, 2012 (unless such date is not a business day, in which case actual payment will be made on the next business day).

Should the original debenture holder (x) no longer be the holder of the debenture or (y) be unavailable, or a change in payee be necessary, such as in the case of a surviving estate, we may require a copy of the executed assignment agreement between the original debenture holder and any transferee along with our consent to such transfer, or an order from a court or probate commission, as the case may be, in order that we know the principal is returned to the rightful party.

Interest Rate

The rate of interest we will offer to pay on debentures at any particular time will vary based upon market conditions, and will be determined by the length of the term of the debentures, our capital requirements and other factors described below. The interest rate on a particular debenture will be determined at the time of subscription or renewal, and then remain fixed for the original or renewal term of the debenture. We will establish and may change the interest rates payable for debentures of various terms and at various investment levels in an interest rate supplement to this prospectus.

We may offer debentures that earn incrementally higher interest rates when, at the time they are purchased or renewed, the aggregate principal amount of the debenture portfolio of the holder increases. If applicable, the interest rates payable at each level of investment will be set forth in an interest rate supplement to this prospectus. We may change the interest rate for any or all maturities to reflect market conditions at any time by supplementing this prospectus. If we change the interest rates, the interest rate on debentures issued before the date of the change will not be affected.

Payments on the Debentures; Paying Agent and Registrar

Investors will have the opportunity to select whether interest on their debentures will be paid monthly, annually, or on the maturity date. This selection opportunity will be presented in the Subscription Agreement.

Interest will accrue on the debentures at the stated rate from and including the effective date of the debenture until maturity. The effective date of a debenture will be: (a) if the debenture is paid for via wire transfer directly to us, the business day on which we receive the wire; (b) if the debenture is paid for by bank

 

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draft, the business day after we receive the draft; and (c) if by personal check, five business days after we receive the check. For purposes of the foregoing, the date we receive the bank draft or personal check means the date on which GWG Holdings actually receives such draft or check either directly from an investor or from a broker-dealer. We will receive all Subscription Agreements, bank drafts, and personal checks, and will deposit the drafts and checks, together with information specifying the effective date, provided that no debentures will be issued or dated prior to our receipt and acceptance of a completed and executed related Subscription Agreement. The debentures generally do not earn interest after the maturity date or any date set for prepayment.

Interest payments on debentures, other than those debentures that pay interest only at maturity, will be paid ten days immediately following the last day of the month. Interest will be paid without any compounding unless all interest is deferred by the holder and paid at maturity. The first payment of interest will include interest for the partial month in which the purchase occurred. Interest on debentures paying interest only at maturity will compound annually and be paid along with principal at the maturity date. The indenture provides that all interest will be calculated based on a year with twelve 30-day months.

We will pay the principal of, and interest on, debentures by direct deposit to the account you specify in your Subscription Agreement. We will not accept subscriptions from investors who are not willing to receive their interest payments via direct deposit. If the foregoing payment method is not available, principal and interest payments on the notes will be payable at our principal executive office or at such other place as we may designate for payment purposes.

We will withhold 28% of any interest payable to any investor who has not provided us with a social security number, employer identification number, or other satisfactory equivalent in the Subscription Agreement (or another document) or where the IRS has notified us that backup withholding is otherwise required. Please see “Material Federal Income Tax Considerations—Backup Withholding and Information Reporting.”

Book-Entry Registration and Exchange

The debentures will be issued in book-entry form, which means that no physical debenture is created. Evidence of your ownership is provided by written confirmation. Except under limited circumstances described below, holders will not receive or be entitled to receive any physical delivery of a certificated security or negotiable instrument that evidences their debentures. The issuance and transfer of debentures will be accomplished exclusively through the crediting and debiting of the appropriate accounts in our book-entry registration and transfer system.

The holders of the accounts established upon the purchase or transfer of debentures will be deemed to be the owners of the debentures under the indenture. The holder of the debentures must rely upon the procedures established by the trustee to exercise any rights of a holder of debentures under the indenture. We will regularly provide the trustee with information regarding the establishment of new accounts and the transfer of existing accounts.

On or prior to any interest payment date or upon redemption, we will also provide the trustee with information regarding the total amount of any principal and interest due to holders of debentures. On each interest payment date, we will credit interest due on each account and direct payments to the holders. We will determine the interest payments to be made to the book-entry accounts and maintain, supervise and review any records relating to book-entry beneficial interests in the debentures.

Book-entry notations in the accounts evidencing ownership of the debentures are exchangeable for certificated debentures in principal denominations of $1,000 and any amount in excess of $25,000 and fully registered in those names as we direct only if: (i) we, at our option, advise the trustee in writing of our election to terminate the book-entry system; or (ii) after the occurrence of an event of default under the indenture, holders of more than 50% of the aggregate outstanding principal amount of the debentures advise the trustee in writing that

 

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the continuation of a book-entry system is no longer in the best interests of the holders of debentures and the trustee notifies all registered holders of the occurrence of any such event and the availability of certificated securities that evidence the debentures. Subject to these limited exceptions, the book-entry interests in these securities will not be exchangeable for fully registered certificated debentures.

Limited Rescission Right

If your Subscription Agreement is accepted at a time when we have determined that a post-effective amendment to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part must be filed with the SEC, but such post-effective amendment has not yet been declared effective, we will send to you at your registered address a notice and a copy of the related prospectus once it has been declared effective. You will thereupon have the right to rescind your investment upon written request within five business days from the postmark date of the notice we send to you that the post-effective amendment has been declared effective (and containing the related prospectus). We will promptly return any funds sent with a Subscription Agreement that is properly rescinded without penalty, although any interest previously paid on a rescinded debenture will be deducted from the funds returned to you upon rescission. A written request for rescission, except in the case of a mailed rescission, must be postmarked on or before the fifth business day after our notice to (described above). If you notify us other than by mail, we must actually receive your rescission request on or before the fifth business day after our notice to you.

Renewal or Repayment on Maturity

At least 30 days prior to the maturity of your debenture, we will send you a notice at your registered address, or such other address as you instruct us, indicating that your debenture is about to mature and whether we will allow automatic renewal of your debenture. If we allow you to renew your debenture, we will also send to you the then-current form of prospectus, which will include an interest rate supplement and any other updates to the information contained in this prospectus. The interest rate supplement will set forth the interest rates then in effect. The notice will recommend that you review the then-current prospectus, including any prospectus supplements and the interest rate supplement, prior to exercising one of the below options. If we do not send you a new prospectus because the prospectus has not changed since the delivery of this prospectus in connection with your original subscription or any prior renewal, we will nonetheless send you a new copy of the prospectus upon your request. Unless the election period is extended as described below, you will have until 15 days prior to the maturity date to exercise one of the following options:

 

   

You can do nothing, in which case your debenture will automatically renew for a new term equal to the original term but at the interest rate in effect at the time of renewal. If your debenture pays interest only at maturity, all accrued interest will be added to the principal amount of your debenture upon renewal. For debentures with other interest payment schedules, interest will be paid on the renewed debenture on the same schedule as the original debenture.

 

   

You can elect repayment of your debenture, in which case the principal amount will be repaid in full along with any accrued but unpaid interest. If you choose this option, your debenture will not earn interest on or after the maturity date.

 

   

You can elect repayment of your debenture and use all or part of the proceeds to purchase a new debenture with a different term or principal amount. To exercise this option, you will need to complete a new Subscription Agreement for the new debenture and mail it along with your request. The issue date of the new debenture will be the maturity date of the old debenture. Any proceeds from the old debenture that are not applied to the new debenture will be sent to you.

 

   

If your debenture pays interest only at maturity, you can receive the accrued interest that you have earned during the debenture term just ended while allowing the principal amount of your debenture to roll over and renew for the same term but at the interest rate then in effect. To exercise this option, you will need to call, fax or send a written request to us.

 

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The foregoing options will be available to holders unless and until terminated under the indenture. Interest will accrue from the first day of each renewed term. Each renewed debenture will retain all its original provisions, including provisions relating to payment, except that the interest rate payable during any renewal term will be the interest rate that is being offered at that time to other holders with similar aggregate debenture portfolios for debentures of the same term as set forth in the interest rate supplement delivered with the maturity notice. If similar debentures are not then being offered, the interest rate upon renewal will be the rate specified by us on or before the maturity date, or the rate of the existing debenture if no such rate is specified.

If we notify the holder of our intention to repay a debenture at maturity, or if the holder timely request repayment, we will pay the principal and all accrued but unpaid interest on the debenture on or prior to the tenth day of the calendar month after the maturity date (or the first business day following the tenth day of such month). Thus, in the case of a debenture with a maturity date of January 31, 2012, actual payment will be made on or prior to February 10, 2012 (unless such date is not a business day, in which case actual payment will be made on the next business day). No interest will accrue after the maturity date. You should be aware that because payment is made by ACH transfer, funds may not be received in the holder’s account for two to three business days.

We will be required from time to time to file post-effective amendments to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part to update the information it contains. If you would otherwise be required to elect to have your debentures renewed or repaid following their stated maturity at a time when we have determined that a post-effective amendment must be filed with the SEC, but such post-effective amendment has not yet been declared effective, the period during which you can elect renewal or repayment will be automatically extended until ten days following the postmark date of our notice to you that the post-effective amendment has been declared effective, which notice shall contain a copy of the related prospectus. All other provisions relating to the renewal or redemption of debentures upon their stated maturity described above shall remain unchanged.

Redemption or Repurchase Prior to Stated Maturity (Prepayment)

The debentures may be redeemed prior to stated maturity only as set forth in the indenture and described below. The holder has no right to require us to prepay or repurchase any debenture prior to its maturity date (as originally stated or as it may be extended), except as indicated in the indenture and described below.

Our Voluntary Redemption

We have the right to redeem any debenture at any time prior to its stated maturity upon 30 days written notice to the holder of the debenture. The holder of the debenture being redeemed will be paid a redemption price equal to the outstanding principal amount thereof plus accrued and unpaid interest up to but not including the date of redemption without any penalty or premium. We may use any criteria we choose to determine which debentures we will redeem if we choose to do so. We are not required to redeem debentures on a pro rata basis.

Repurchase Election Upon Death, Bankruptcy or Total Permanent Disability

Notes may be repurchased prior to maturity, in whole and not in part, at the election of a holder who is a natural person (including debentures held in an individual retirement account), by giving us written notice within 45 days following the holder’s total permanent disability or bankruptcy, as established to our satisfaction, or at the election of the holder’s estate, by giving written notice within 45 days following his or her death. Subject to the limitations described below, we will repurchase the debentures on the tenth day of the month next following the month in which we establish to our satisfaction the holder’s death, bankruptcy or total permanent disability. In the event that the tenth day of the month next following the month in which we so establish such facts is not a business day, we will repurchase the debentures on the next business day. The repurchase price, in the event of such a death, bankruptcy or total permanent disability, will be the principal amount of the debentures, plus interest accrued and not previously paid up to and through the last day of the calendar month preceding the repurchase date.

 

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If spouses are joint registered holders of a debenture, the right to elect to have us repurchase will apply when either registered holder dies, files bankruptcy or suffers a total permanent disability. If the debenture is held jointly by two or more persons who are not legally married, none of these persons will have the right to request that we repurchase the debentures unless all joint holders have either died, filed bankruptcy or suffered a total permanent disability. If the debenture is held by a trust, partnership, corporation or other similar entity, the right to request repurchase upon death or total permanent disability does not apply.

Repurchase at Request of Holder

We have no obligation to repurchase any debentures other than upon maturity, or upon the death, bankruptcy or total permanent disability of a natural person holder. Nevertheless, we at our sole discretion may agree from time to time, at the written request of a holder, to repurchase a debenture, subject, however, to a repurchasing fee of 6.0% of the principal amount of such debenture. This repurchasing fee will be subtracted from the amount paid to you.

Transfers

The debentures are not negotiable debt instruments and, subject to certain exceptions, will be issued only in book-entry form. The purchase confirmation issued upon our acceptance of a subscription is not a certificated security or negotiable instrument, and no rights of record ownership can be transferred without our prior written consent. Ownership of debentures may be transferred on the debenture register only as follows:

 

   

The holder must deliver us written notice requesting a transfer signed by the holder(s) or such holder’s duly authorized representative on a form to be supplied by us.

 

   

We must provide our written consent to the proposed transfer.

 

   

We may require a legal opinion from counsel satisfactory to us that the proposed transfer will not violate any applicable federal or state securities laws.

 

   

We may require a signature guarantee in connection with such transfer.

Upon transfer of a debenture, we will provide the new holder of the debenture with a purchase confirmation that will evidence the transfer of the account on our records. We may charge a reasonable service charge in connection with the transfer of any debenture.

Quarterly Statements

We will provide holders of the debentures with quarterly statements, which will indicate, among other things, the account balance at the end of the quarter, interest credited, redemptions or repurchases made, if any, and the interest rate paid during the quarter. These statements will be sent electronically on or prior to the 32nd day after the end of each calendar quarter. If a holder is unwilling or unable to receive quarterly statements electronically, we will mail the statements to the address of record on or prior to the 32nd day after the end of each calendar quarter. In such a case, we may charge such holders a reasonable fee to cover our expenses incurred in mailing the statements.

Ranking

The secured debentures will constitute the senior secured debt of GWG Holdings. The payment of principal and interest on the debentures will be:

 

   

pari passu with respect to the collateral securing the approximately $55.7 million in principal amount of subsidiary secured notes previously issued by our subsidiary GWG Life (see the caption “—Collateral Security” below);

 

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structurally junior to the present and future obligations owed by our subsidiary DLP Funding II under the revolving credit facility with Autobahn/DZ Bank (including the approximately $42 million presently outstanding under such facility); and

 

   

structurally junior to the present and future claims of creditors of our subsidiaries, other than GWG Life, including trade creditors.

The indenture will permit us to issue other forms of debt, including secured and senior debt, in the future.

Guarantee by GWG Life Subsidiary

The payment of principal and interest on the debentures is fully and unconditionally guaranteed by GWG Life. This guarantee, together with (i) the accompanying grant of a security interest in all of the assets of GWG Life, including GWG Life’s entire ownership interest in DLP Funding II, (ii) the pledge of ownership interests in GWG Holdings, Inc. by our principal stockholders, and (iii) an intercreditor agreement between the trustee and Lord Securities Corporation (collateral trustee for our subsidiary secured notes), makes the debentures pari passu with respect to the collateral securing the subsidiary secured notes previously issued by GWG Life. There was approximately $55.7 million in principal amount of subsidiary secured notes outstanding as of March 31, 2011.

Collateral Security

The debentures are secured by the assets of GWG Holdings, Inc. We will grant a security interest in all of the assets of GWG Holdings to the indenture trustee for the benefit of the debenture holders. Prior to this offering, the assets of GWG Holdings consist primarily of (i) any cash proceeds received from its subsidiaries as distributions derived from life insurance policy assets of subsidiaries, (ii) all other cash and investments held in various accounts, (iii) the equity ownership interests in subsidiaries of GWG Holdings, including the equity ownership interest in GWG Life, together with (iv) all proceeds from the foregoing. This collateral security granted by us is referred to as the “GWG Holdings Assets Collateral.”

As indicated above, our direct and wholly owned subsidiary, GWG Life, will fully and unconditionally guarantee our obligations under the debentures. This guarantee will be supported by GWG Life’s grant of a security interest in all of its assets. Prior to this offering, the assets of GWG Life consist primarily of (i) certain life insurance policy assets, (ii) any cash proceeds received from life insurance policy assets owned by GWG Life or received from its direct subsidiary DLP Funding II as distributions derived from life insurance policies owned by that subsidiary, (iii) all other cash and investments held by GWG Life in its various accounts, (iv) GWG Life’s equity ownership interest in its direct subsidiary DLP Funding II, together with (v) all proceeds from the foregoing. The collateral security granted by GWG Life pursuant to its guarantee of our obligations under the debentures is referred to as the “GWG Life Assets Collateral.”

In addition, Messrs. Jon R. Sabes and Steven F. Sabes, our principal stockholders beneficially holding approximately 95.6% of the outstanding shares of our common stock, have pledged all of the shares they beneficially own in GWG Holdings to further secure our obligations under the debentures. This collateral security granted by Messrs. Jon R. Sabes and Steven F. Sabes is referred to as the “GWG Holdings Equity Collateral.”

Together, the GWG Holdings Assets Collateral, GWG Life Assets Collateral and GWG Holdings Equity Collateral comprise all of the collateral security for our obligations under the debentures. To the extent that we subsequently establish a one or more wholly owned subsidiaries of GWG Holdings or GWG Life, the debentures will have a security interest in the equity ownership interests of those subsidiaries if and to the extent owned by GWG Holdings or GWG Life.

The guarantee by GWG Life is effected through a “Subsidiary Guarantee Agreement” that is an exhibit to the indenture, and the grant of security interests in the GWG Holdings Assets Collateral, GWG Life Assets Collateral and GWG Holdings Equity Collateral is effected through a “Pledge and Security Agreement” that is

 

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also an exhibit to the indenture. The grant of collateral security comprising the GWG Life Assets Collateral and GWG Holdings Equity Collateral is designed to afford the holders of debentures with rights to the same payment and collateral as that granted to holders of our subsidiary secured notes on a pari passu basis. To effect this arrangement, the trustee under the indenture, Bank of Utah, National Association (to whom the security grant is made under the Pledge and Security Agreement), will enter into an “Intercreditor Agreement” with GWG Holdings, GWG Life, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., the collateral trustee for our subsidiary secured notes. This Intercreditor Agreement is an exhibit to the indenture.

The vast majority of our life insurance policy assets are held in our subsidiary GWG DLP Funding II, LLC, which we refer to throughout this prospectus as “DLP Funding II.” The debentures will not be directly secured by any security interest in the assets of DLP Funding II. Instead, the debentures will be secured by a pledge of the equity ownership interests in DLP Funding II owned by GWG Life by virtue of the Subsidiary Guarantee Agreement and associated Pledge and Security Agreement referenced above. An equity ownership interest is, by its very nature, subordinate to the interests of creditors. Therefore, although investors in the debentures will have a security interest in the ownership of DLP Funding II, any claim they may have to the assets owned by such entity will be subordinate to the interests of creditors of that entity, including (i) Autobahn/DZ Bank which is the lender to DLP Funding II under our revolving credit facility, and (ii) all other creditors of DLP Funding II, including trade creditors.

Subordination; Other Indebtedness

Our obligations under the debentures will be subordinate to all our senior debt. For this purpose, “our senior debt” presently includes all indebtedness of our subsidiaries with respect to which the debentures are not pari passu with respect to collateral (i.e., other than our subsidiary secured notes). In this regard, our subsidiary DLP Funding II has, as of March 31, 2011, approximately $42 million of debt outstanding under our revolving credit facility. With respect to pari passu indebtedness, as of March 31, 2011 our subsidiary GWG Life has approximately $55.7 million of debt outstanding under our subsidiary secured notes.

The maximum amount of debt, including the debentures, we may issue pursuant to the indenture is an amount such that our debt coverage ratio does not exceed 90%. The indenture defines the debt coverage ratio as a percentage calculated by the ratio of (A) obligations owing by us and our subsidiaries on all outstanding debt for borrowed money (including the debentures), over (B) the net present asset value of all life insurance policy assets we own, directly or indirectly, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value of our life insurance assets is equal to the present value of the cash flows derived from the face value of policy benefit assets we own, discounted at a rate equal to the weighted average cost of capital for all our indebtedness for the prior month.

The indenture provides that for the first four years after our initial sale of debentures, our subordination ratio may not exceed 50%. The indenture defines the subordination ratio as a percentage calculated as a ratio of (A) the principal amount owing by us or any of our subsidiaries that is either senior in rank to the debentures or secured by the life insurance policy assets owned by us or our subsidiaries, over (B) the net present asset value of all life insurance policy assets we own, directly or indirectly, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value of our life insurance assets is equal to the present value of the cash flows derived from the face value of policy benefit assets we own, discounted at a rate equal to the weighted-average cost of capital for all our indebtedness for the prior month.

We are required to notify the indenture trustee in the event that we violate one of these restrictive covenants. An “event of default” will exist under the indenture if a violation persists for a period of 30 consecutive calendar days after our initial notice to the trustee. See “Risk Factors” page 18.

The debentures are guaranteed by GWG Life but otherwise are not guaranteed by any of our subsidiaries, affiliates or control persons. The indenture does not prevent holders of debt issued by our subsidiaries from disposing of, or exercising any other rights with respect to, any or all of the collateral securing that debt.

 

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Accordingly, in the event of a liquidation or dissolution of one of our subsidiaries (other than GWG Life), creditors of that subsidiary that are senior in rank will be paid in full, or provision for such payment will be made, from the assets of that subsidiary prior to distributing any remaining assets to us as an equity owner of that subsidiary.

The indenture also contains specific subordination provisions, benefitting lenders under senior credit facilities to our operating subsidiaries, restricting the right of debenture holders to enforce certain of their rights in certain circumstances, including:

 

   

a prohibition on challenging any enforcement action taken by a senior lender or interfering with any legal action or suits undertaken by the senior lender against us and our affiliates;

 

   

a 180-day standstill period during which there may not be brought any action to enforce an event of default against us or our affiliates unless our revolving credit facility has been repaid in full, which period may be extended if the credit facility provider takes action during such standstill period; and

 

   

a prohibition on filing a bankruptcy or insolvency case against us or our affiliates for at least one year plus one day after the revolving credit facility lender has been paid in full.

We will not make any payment, direct or indirect (whether for interest, principal, as a result of any redemption or repurchase at maturity, on default, or otherwise), on the debentures and any other indebtedness, and neither the holders of the debentures nor the trustee will have the right, directly or indirectly, to sue to enforce the indenture or the debentures, if a default or event of default under any senior credit facility has occurred and is continuing, or if any default or event of default under any senior credit facility would result from such payment, in each case unless and until:

 

   

the default and event of default has been cured or waived or has ceased to exist; and

 

   

the end of the period commencing on the date the indenture trustee receives written notice of default from a holder of such credit facility and ending on the earlier of (i) the indenture trustee’s receipt of a valid waiver of default from the holder of a credit facility; or (ii) the indenture trustee’s receipt of a written notice from the holder of a credit facility terminating the payment blockage period.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, if any of the blockage events described above have occurred and 179 days have passed since the indenture trustee’s receipt of the notice of default without the occurrence of the cure, waiver, termination, or extension of all blockage periods described above, the trustee may thereafter sue on and enforce the indenture and our obligations thereunder and under the debentures as long as any funds paid as a result of any such suit or enforcement action shall be paid toward the senior credit facility until it is indefeasibly paid in full before being applied to the debentures.

No Sinking Fund

The debentures are not associated with any sinking fund. A sinking fund is generally any account to which contributions will be made, from which payments of principal or interest owed on the debentures will be made. See “Risk Factors” page 19.

Restrictive Covenants

The indenture contains certain limited covenants that restrict us from certain actions as described below. In particular, the indenture provides that:

 

   

we will not declare or pay any dividends or other payments of cash or other property solely in respect of our capital stock to our stockholders (other than a dividend paid in shares of our capital stock on a pro rata basis to all our stockholders) unless no default and no event of default with respect to the debentures exists or would exist immediately following the declaration or payment of the dividend or other payment;

 

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to the extent legally permissible, we will not at any time insist upon, plead, or in any manner whatsoever claim or take the benefit or advantage of, any stay, extension or usury law wherever enacted, now or at any time hereafter in force, which may affect the covenants or the performance of the indenture;

 

   

our Board of Directors will not adopt a plan of liquidation that provides for, contemplates or the effectuation of which is preceded by (a) the sale, lease, conveyance or other disposition of all or substantially all of our assets, otherwise than (i) substantially as an entirety, or (ii) in a qualified sales and financing transaction, and (b) the distribution of all or substantially all of the proceeds of such sale, lease, conveyance or other disposition and of our remaining assets to the holders of our capital stock, unless, prior to making any liquidating distribution pursuant to such plan, we make provision for the satisfaction of our obligations under the renewable unsecured subordinated notes;

 

   

our debt coverage ratio may not exceed 90%; and

 

   

for the first four years after our initial sale of debentures, our subordination ratio may not exceed 50%.

The indenture defines the debt coverage ratio as a percentage calculated by the ratio of (A) obligations owing on all outstanding debt for borrowed money (including the debentures), over (B) the net present asset value of all life insurance policy assets we own, plus any cash held in our accounts. For this purpose, the net present asset value of our life insurance assets is equal to the present value of the face value of policy benefit assets we own, discounted at a rate equal to the weighted average cost of capital for all our indebtedness for the prior month. The indenture defines the subordination ratio as a percentage calculated as a ratio of (1) the principal amount owing by us or any of our subsidiaries that is either senior in rank to the debentures or secured by the life insurance policy assets owned by us or our subsidiaries, over (2) the principal amount of outstanding debentures and subsidiary secured notes.

Importantly, we are not restricted from entering into qualified sale and financing transactions or incurring additional indebtedness, including additional senior debt. See “Risk Factors” page 17.

Consolidation, Mergers or Sales

The indenture generally permits a consolidation or merger between us and another entity. It also permits the sale or transfer by us of all or substantially all of our property and assets. These transactions are permitted if:

 

   

the resulting or acquiring entity, if other than us, is a United States corporation, limited liability company or limited partnership and assumes all of our responsibilities and liabilities under the indenture, including the payment of all amounts due on the notes and performance of the covenants in the indenture; and

 

   

immediately after the transaction, and after giving effect to the transaction, no event of default shall exist under the indenture.

If we consolidate or merge with or into any other entity or sell or lease all or substantially all of our assets, according to the terms and conditions of the indenture, the resulting or acquiring entity will be substituted for us in the indenture with the same effect as if it had been an original party to the indenture. As a result, the successor entity may exercise our rights and powers under the indenture in our name, and we (as an entity) will be released from all our liabilities and obligations under the indenture and under the debentures. Nevertheless, no such transaction will by itself eliminate or modify the collateral that we have provided as security for our obligations under the indenture.

Events of Default and Remedies

The indenture provides that each of the following constitutes an event of default:

 

   

the failure to pay interest or principal on any debenture for a period of 30 days after it becomes due and payable

 

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a failure to observe or perform any material covenant, condition or agreement in the indenture, but only after notice of failure to the indenture trustee and such failure is not cured within 60 days

 

   

our debt coverage ratio exceeds 90% for a period of 30 consecutive calendar days

 

   

the subordination ratio exceeds 50% for a period of 30 consecutive calendar days during the four-year period after the commencement of the offering of the debentures

 

   

certain events of bankruptcy, insolvency or reorganization with respect to us; or

 

   

the cessation of our business.

In addition, the indenture provides that for so long as any subsidiary secured notes remain outstanding, an event of default under the borrowing agreements relating to the subsidiary secured notes (as the same may from time to time be amended) will constitute an event of default under the indenture.

The indenture requires that we give immediate notice to the indenture trustee upon the occurrence of an event of default, unless it has been cured or waived. The indenture trustee may then provide notice to the debenture holders or withhold the notice if the indenture trustee determines in good faith that withholding the notice is in your best interest, unless the default is a failure to pay principal or interest on any debenture.

If an event of default occurs, the indenture trustee or the holders of at least a majority in principal amount of the outstanding debentures, may by written notice to us declare the unpaid principal and all accrued but unpaid interest on the debentures to be immediately due and payable. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the indenture limits certain rights of the debenture holders to enforce their rights under the indenture in certain circumstances. These limitations are required subordination provisions under our revolving credit facility and are summarized above under “—Subordination; Other Indebtedness.”

Amendment, Supplement and Waiver

Except as provided in this prospectus or the indenture, the terms of the indenture or the debentures then outstanding may be amended, supplemented or waived with the consent of the holders of at least a majority in principal amount of the debentures then outstanding (which consent will be presumed if a holder does not object within 30 days of a request for consent), and any existing default or compliance with any provision of the indenture or the debentures may be waived with the affirmative consent of the holders of a majority in principal amount of the then outstanding debentures.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, an amendment or waiver will not be effective with respect to the debentures held by a holder who him, her or itself has not consented if such amendment or waiver has any of the following consequences:

 

   

reduces the principal of or changes the fixed maturity of any debenture or alters the repurchase or redemption provisions or the price at which we shall offer to repurchase or redeem the debenture (other than as permitted under the indenture and described in the following paragraph);

 

   

reduces the rate of or changes the time for payment of interest, including default interest, on any debenture;

 

   

waives a default or event of default in the payment of principal or interest on the debentures, except for a rescission or withdrawal of acceleration of the debentures made by the holders of at least a majority in aggregate principal amount of the then-outstanding debentures and a waiver of the payment default that resulted from such acceleration;

 

   

makes any debenture payable in money other than that stated in this prospectus;

 

   

makes any change in the provisions of the indenture relating to waivers of past defaults or the rights of holders of debentures to receive payments of principal of or interest on the debentures; or

 

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makes any change to the subordination provisions of the indenture that has a material adverse effect on holders of debentures.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, the following kinds of amendments or supplements to the indenture may be effected by us and the trustee without any consent of any holder of the debentures:

 

   

to cure any ambiguity, defect or inconsistency

 

   

to provide for assumption of our obligations to holders of the debentures in the case of a merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets

 

   

to provide for additional uncertificated or certificated debentures

 

   

to make any change that does not materially and adversely affect the legal rights under the indenture of any holder of debentures, including but not limited to an increase in the aggregate dollar amount of debentures which may be outstanding under the indenture

 

   

to modify or eliminate our policy regarding repurchases elected by a holder of debentures prior to maturity, including our obligation to repurchase debentures upon the death, bankruptcy or total permanent disability of any holder of the debentures, but only so long as such modifications do not materially and adversely affect any then-outstanding debentures; or

 

   

to comply with requirements of the SEC in order to effect or maintain the qualification of the indenture under the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, or to comply with other applicable federal or state laws or regulations.

Rights of Debenture Holders

As a debenture holder, you have limited rights to vote on our actions. In general, you will have the right to vote on whether or not to approve some amendments to the indenture. For a description of these rights, see “—Amendment, Supplement and Waiver” above. You will also have the right to direct some actions that the trustee takes if there is an event of default with respect to the debentures. For a description of these rights, see above under the caption “—Events of Default.” For a complete description of your rights as a debenture holder, we encourage you to read a copy of the indenture, which is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. We will also provide you with a copy of the indenture upon your request.

The trustee and the debenture holders will have the right to direct the time, method and place of conducting any proceeding for some of the remedies available, except as otherwise provided in the indenture. The trustee may require reasonable indemnity satisfactory to the Indenture Trustee from debenture holders before acting at their direction. You will not have any right to pursue any remedy with respect to the indenture or the debentures unless you satisfy the conditions contained in the indenture.

The Indenture Trustee

General

Bank of Utah, National Association, has agreed to be the trustee under the indenture. The indenture contains certain limitations on the rights of the trustee, should it become one of our creditors, to obtain payment of claims in certain cases, or to realize on certain property received in respect of any claim as security or otherwise. The trustee will be permitted to engage in other transactions with us.

Subject to certain exceptions, the holders of a majority in principal amount of the then-outstanding debentures will have the right to direct the time, method and place of conducting any proceeding for exercising any remedy available to the trustee. The indenture provides that if an event of default specified in the indenture shall occur and not be cured, the trustee will be required, in the exercise of its power, to use the degree of care of

 

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a reasonable person in the conduct of his own affairs. Subject to such provisions, the trustee will be under no obligation to exercise any of its rights or powers under the indenture at the request of any holder of debentures, unless the holder shall have offered to the trustee security and indemnity satisfactory to it against any loss, liability or expense.

Resignation or Removal of the Trustee

The trustee may resign at any time, or may be removed by the holders of a majority of the aggregate principal amount of the outstanding debentures for certain failures in its duties, including the insolvency of the trustee or the trustee’s ineligibility to serve as trustee under the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, we may remove the trustee. However, no resignation or removal of the trustee may become effective until a successor trustee has accepted the appointment as provided in the indenture.

Reports to Trustee

We will provide the trustee with (i) a calculation date report by the 15th day of each month containing a calculation of the debt coverage ratio that includes a summary of all cash, life insurance policy investments serving as collateral, as well as our total outstanding indebtedness including outstanding principal balances, interest credited and paid, transfers made, any redemption or repurchase and interest rate paid; (ii) copies of our audited annual financials, no earlier than when the same become a matter of public record; and (iii) any additional information reasonably requested by the trustee.

No Personal Liability of Our Directors, Officers, Employees and Stockholders

No director, officer, employee, incorporator or stockholder of ours or any servicing agent, will have any liability for any of our obligations under the debentures, the indenture or for any claim based on, in respect to, or by reason of, these obligations or their creation. Each holder of debentures waives and releases these persons from any liability, including any liability arising under applicable securities laws. The waiver and release are part of the consideration for issuance of the debentures. We have been advised that the waiver may not be effective to waive liabilities under the federal securities laws and it is the view of the SEC that such a waiver is against public policy.

Certain Charges

We and our servicing agents, if any, may assess service charges for changing the registration of any debenture to reflect a change in name of the holder, multiple changes in interest payment dates or transfers (whether by operation of law or otherwise) of a debenture by the holder to another person. The indenture permits us to set off, against amounts otherwise payable to you under the debentures, the amount of these charges.

Variations in Terms and Conditions

We may from time to time to vary the terms and conditions of the debentures offered by this prospectus, including but not limited to minimum initial principal investment amount requirements, maximum aggregate principal amount limits, interest rates, minimum denominations, service and other fees and charges, and redemption provisions. Terms and conditions may be varied by state, locality, principal amount, type of investor (for example, new or current investor) or as otherwise permitted under the indenture governing the securities offered by this prospectus. No change in terms, however, will apply to any debentures already issued and outstanding at the time of such change.

 

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Satisfaction and Discharge of Indenture

The indenture shall cease to be of further effect upon the payment in full of all of the outstanding debentures and the delivery of an officer’s certificate to the trustee stating that we do not intend to issue additional debentures under the indenture or, with certain limitations, upon deposit with the trustee of funds sufficient for the payment in full of all of the outstanding debentures.

Reports

We will publish annual reports containing financial statements and quarterly reports containing financial information for the first three quarters of each fiscal year. We will send copies of these reports, at no charge, to any holder of debentures who sends us a written request.

 

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PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

We are offering up to $250,000,000 in principal amount of debentures on a continuous basis. The debentures will be sold at their face value and in amounts of $25,000 or more in principal. There is no minimum amount of debentures that must be sold before we use the proceeds. The proceeds of new sales of debentures will be paid directly to us promptly following each sale and will not be placed in an escrow account. Even if we sell less than all the $250,000,000 in debentures being offered, the debentures that we sell will be issued, and the proceeds of those debenture sales will be invested as described in this prospectus.

The debentures will be offered and sold on a best efforts basis by broker-dealers (the “selling group”) registered with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”). We may also directly offer and sell debentures apart from the selling group. We and the selling group will offer the debentures to the public on the terms set forth in this prospectus and the prospectus supplements that we file from time to time. Both we and the selling group plan to market the debentures directly to the public primarily through seminar presentations, the Internet, and personal contacts made by us and through the selling group. We may also sell debentures to registered investment advisors. In addition, our selling group will manage certain administrative and customer service functions relating to the debentures, including handling all inquiries from potential investors, mailing investment materials, meeting with investors, processing Subscription Agreements and responding all written and telephonic questions relating to the debentures. No broker-dealer member of our selling group will have any obligation to take or purchase any debentures. Each broker-dealer member of our selling group is expected to assist in the offering as follows: (1) conducting informational meetings for subscribers and other qualified potential purchasers; (2) keeping records of all subscriptions; and (3) training and educating employees regarding the mechanics and regulatory requirements of the offering process. The broker-dealer members of our selling group will receive sales commissions.

The broker-dealer members of the selling group will only be compensated to the extent that debentures are sold in the offering. The selling group is not obligated, however, to sell any minimum amount of debentures or to purchase any debentures. The table below summarizes the amounts of compensation or reimbursement that we estimate we will pay the selling group, including the dealer-manager, for services rendered in connection with the offer and sale of the debentures. Arque Capital, Ltd., a member of FINRA, will act as managing broker-dealer of the selling group (“dealer manager”), and will receive a dealer manager fee ranging from 0.25% to 1.30% of the principal amount of the debenture sold depending upon the debentures’ maturity date. The selling group, including wholesale brokers, will receive selling commissions ranging from 0.50% to 10.95% of the principal amount of the debenture sold, and a non-accountable marketing and due-diligence allowance of up to 1.50% of the principal amount of the debenture sold depending upon the debentures’ maturity date. Certain employees of GWG Holdings who are also registered representatives of Arque Capital may receive selling commissions for selling debentures as a member of the selling group. In no event will the total selling commissions, dealer manager fees and non-accountable expense allowances exceed 13.50% of the aggregate principal amount of debentures sold. The line items reflected in the table are our current estimates of average dealer manager fees, selling commissions and non-accountable expense allowances that we will pay. Specifically, we estimate that the average dealer manager fee will be 1.00%, the average sales commission will be 5.00%, and the average non-accountable expense allowance will be 1.00%. Actual costs may differ from the percentages and amounts shown in the table below, subject, however, to the 13.50% limitation noted above.

 

Debentures

Sold

  

Dealer

Manager

Fees

  

Selling

Commissions

  

Non-

Accountable

Expense

Allowance

$  75,000,000

   $   750,000    $  3,750,000    $   750,000

$125,000,000

   $1,250,000    $  6,250,000    $1,250,000

$250,000,000

   $2,500,000    $12,500,000    $2,500,000

The dealer manager may also sell debentures as part of the selling group, thereby becoming entitled to selling commissions. In addition, we may issue warrants for the purchase of our common stock to members of

 

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the selling group or the dealer manager. The table above does not reflect other offering and offering-related expense that we expect to incur in connection with the offer and sale of debentures, such as legal, audit, accounting and printing expenses. We presently estimate that these expenses will aggregate to approximately $500,000.

To memorialize our agreement with the selling group, we have entered into a Managing Broker-Dealer Agreement with Arque Capital. That agreement provides for reciprocal indemnification between us and members of the selling group, including the selling officers, directors and controlling persons of each member of the selling group and of us, against civil liabilities in connection with this offering, including certain liabilities under the Securities Act of 1933. Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted pursuant to such indemnification provisions, we have been advised that, in the opinion of the SEC, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable. The Managing Broker-Dealer Agreement may be terminated by either us or, subject to prior conditions, or Arque Capital upon giving prior notice.

Prior to the offering, there has been no public market for the debentures. We do not intend to list the debentures on any securities exchange or include them on any quotation or listing service. Members of the selling group are not obligated to make a market in the debentures and do not intend to do so. In sum, we do not anticipate that a secondary market for the debentures will develop.

The foregoing is a summary of the material terms relating to the plan of distribution of the notes debentures contained in the Managing Broker-Dealer Agreement. Any amendment to the Managing Broker-Dealer Agreement will be filed as an exhibit to an amendment to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part.

MATERIAL FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

The following is a general discussion of the material United States (“U.S.”) federal income tax considerations relating to the initial purchase, ownership and disposition of the debentures by U.S. and non-U.S. holders. This discussion is a summary only and is not a complete analysis of all the potential tax considerations relating to the purchase, ownership and disposition of the debentures. We have based this summary current provisions of the Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), applicable U.S. Treasury Regulations promulgated thereunder, judicial opinions, and published rulings of the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”), all as in effect on the date of this Private Placement prospectus. However, these laws and other guidance are subject to differing interpretations or change, possibly with retroactive effect. In addition, we have not sought, and will not seek, a ruling from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) or an opinion of counsel with respect to any tax consequences of purchasing, owning or disposing of debentures. Thus, the IRS could challenge one or more of the tax consequences or matters described in this Private Placement prospectus; and there can be no assurance that any position taken by the IRS would not be sustained.

This discussion is limited to purchasers of debentures who acquire the debentures from us in this offering and hold the debentures as capital assets for federal income tax purposes. This discussion does not address all possible tax consequences that may be applicable to you in light of your specific circumstances. For instance, this discussion does not address the alternative minimum tax provisions of the Code, or special rules applicable to some categories of investors such as financial institutions, insurance companies, tax-exempt organizations, dealers in securities, real estate investment trusts, regulated investment companies, or persons who hold debentures as part of a hedge, conversion or constructive sale transaction, straddle or other risk reduction transaction that may be subject to special rules. This discussion also does not address the tax consequences arising under the laws of any foreign, state or local jurisdiction; or any U.S. estate or gift tax laws.

If you are considering the purchase of a debenture, you should consult your own tax advisors as to the particular tax consequences to you of acquiring, holding or otherwise disposing of the debentures, including the effect and applicability of state, local or foreign tax laws, or any U.S. estate and gift tax laws.

 

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As used in this discussion, the term “U.S. holder” means a holder of a debenture that is:

 

  (i)

for United States federal income tax purposes, a citizen or resident of the United States;

 

  (ii)

a corporation, partnership or other entity created or organized in or under the laws of the United States or of any political subdivision thereof or other entity characterized as a corporation or partnership for federal income tax purposes;

 

  (iii)

an estate, the income of which is subject to United States federal income taxation regardless of its source; or

 

  (iv)

a trust, the administration of which is subject to the primary supervision of a court within the United States and which has one or more United States persons with authority to control all substantial decisions, or if the trust was in existence on August 20, 1996, and has elected to continue to be treated as a United States trust.

For the purposes of this discussion, a “non-U.S. holder” means any holder of debentures other than a U.S. holder. Any debenture purchaser who is not a U.S. citizen will be required to furnish documentation, on IRS Form W-8BEN, that clearly states whether it is subject to U.S. withholding taxes, in accordance with applicable requirements of the United States taxing authority.

Characterization of the Debentures

The federal income tax consequences of owning debentures depend on characterization of the debentures as debt for federal income tax purposes, rather than as equity interests or a partnership among the holders of the debentures. We believe that the debentures have been structured in a manner that will allow the debentures to be characterized as debt for federal income tax purposes. However, this is only our belief; and no ruling from the IRS or an opinion of counsel has been sought in this regard. Thus, the IRS could successfully challenge this characterization.

If the debentures were treated as equity interests, there could be adverse effects on some holders. For example, payments on the debentures could (1) if paid to non-U.S. holders, be subject to federal income tax withholding; (2) constitute unrelated business taxable income to some tax-exempt entities, including pension funds and some retirement accounts (if the relationship were characterized as a partnership for tax purposes); and (3) cause the timing and amount of income that accrues to holders of debentures to be different from that described below.

Because of these potential adverse effects, you are urged to consult your own tax advisors as to the tax consequences that may apply to your particular situation in the event the debentures are re-characterized as equity interests; and as to the likelihood that the debentures could be so re-characterized. The remainder of this discussion assumes that the debentures are characterized as debt.

Taxation of U.S. Holders

Stated Interest

Under general federal income tax principles, you must include stated interest in income in accordance with the method of accounting you use for federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, if you are using the accrual method of tax accounting, you must include stated interest in income as it accrues. If you are using the cash method of tax accounting, you must include stated interest in income as it is actually or constructively received. Payments of interest to taxable holders of debentures will constitute portfolio income, and not passive activity income, for the purposes of the passive loss limitations of the Code. Accordingly, income arising from payments on the debentures will not be subject to reduction by losses from passive activities of a holder.

 

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Income attributable to interest payments on the debentures may be offset by investment expense deductions, subject to the limitation that individual investors may only deduct miscellaneous itemized deductions, including investment expenses other than interest, to the extent these deductions exceed 2% of the investor’s adjusted gross income.

If a partnership (or other entity or arrangement treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes) holds debentures, the tax treatment of a partner generally will depend upon the status of the partner and the activities of the partnership. If you are a partner in a partnership purchasing debentures, we urge you to consult your tax advisor.

Disposition of Debentures

In general, a U.S. holder will recognize gain or loss upon the sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of a debenture measured by the difference between (1) the sum of the cash and the fair market value of all other property received on such disposition, excluding any portion of the payment that is attributable to accrued interest on the debentures; and (2) your adjusted tax basis in the debenture. A U.S. holder’s adjusted tax basis in a debenture generally will be equal to the price the U.S. holder paid for the debenture. Any of this gain or loss generally will be long-term capital gain or loss if, at the time of any such taxable disposition, the debenture was a capital asset in the hands of the holder and was held for more than one year. Under current law, net long-term capital gain recognized by individual U.S. holders in tax years beginning before January 1, 2013, is eligible for a reduced rate of taxation. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to annual limitations.

The terms of the debentures may be modified upon the consent of a specified percentage of holders and, in some cases, without consent of the holders. In addition, the debentures may be assumed upon the occurrence of specific transactions. The modification or assumption of a debenture could, in some instances, give rise to a deemed exchange of a debenture for a new debt instrument for federal income tax purposes. If an exchange is deemed to occur by reason of a modification or assumption, you could realize gain or loss without receiving any cash.

Additional Tax on Net Investment Income

For taxable years beginning after December 31, 2012, if you are a U.S. holder other than a corporation, you generally will be subject to a 3.8% additional tax (the “Medicare tax”) on the lesser of (1) your “net investment income” for the taxable year, and (2) the excess of your modified adjusted gross income for the taxable year over a certain threshold. Your net investment income generally will include any income or gain recognized by you with respect to our debentures, unless such income or gain is derived in the ordinary course of the conduct of your trade or business (other than a trade or business that consists of certain passive or trading activities).

Considerations for Tax-Exempt Holders of Debentures

Tax-exempt entities, including charitable corporations, pension plans, profit sharing or stock bonus plans, individual retirement accounts and some other employee benefit plans are subject to federal income tax on unrelated business taxable income. For example, net income derived from the conduct of a trade or business regularly carried on by a tax-exempt entity or by a partnership in which it is a partner is treated as unrelated business taxable income.

A $1,000 special deduction is allowed in determining the amount of unrelated business taxable income subject to tax. Tax-exempt entities taxed on their unrelated business taxable income are also subject to the alternative minimum tax for items of tax preference which enter into the computation of unrelated business taxable income.

 

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In general, interest income does not constitute unrelated business taxable income. However, under the debt-financed property rules, if tax-exempt holders of debentures finance the acquisition or holding of debentures with debt, interest on the debentures will be taxable as unrelated business taxable income. The debentures will be treated as debt-financed property if the debt was incurred to acquire the debentures or was incurred after the acquisition of the debentures, so long as the debt would not have been incurred but for the acquisition and, at the time of the acquisition, the incurrence of the debt has already occurred or was foreseeable.

Non-U.S. Holders

The following discussion is a summary of the principal U.S. federal income consequences resulting from the ownership of the debentures by non-U.S. holders. However, application of the U.S. federal income tax rules associated with non-U.S. holders is complex and factually sensitive. Thus, if you could be considered to be a non-U.S. holder, you are urged to consult your own tax advisors with respect to the application of the federal income tax rules for your particular situation.

Payments of Interest to Non-U.S. Holders

Subject to the discussion below under “Backup Withholding and Information Reporting,” payments of interest received by a non-U.S. holder generally will not be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax, provided (1) that (a) the non-U.S. holder does not own, actually or constructively, 10% or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of our stock entitled to vote; (b) the non-U.S. holder is not a controlled foreign corporation, actually or constructively, through stock ownership; and (c) the beneficial owner of the debenture complies with the certification requirements, including delivery of a statement, signed by the holder under penalties of perjury, certifying that the holder is a foreign person and provides its name and address; or (2) that the non-U.S. holder is entitled to the benefits of an income tax treaty under which the interest is exempt from U.S. withholding tax and the non-U.S. holder complies with the reporting requirements. If a debenture is held through a securities clearing organization or other specified financial institutions (an “Intermediary”), the Intermediary may provide the relevant signed statement and, unless the Intermediary is a “qualified” intermediary as defined under the Code, the signed statement provided by the Intermediary must be accompanied by a copy of a valid Form W-8BEN provided by the non-U.S. beneficial holder of the debenture.

Payments of interest not exempt from United States federal withholding tax as described above will be subject to a withholding tax at the rate of 30%, subject to reduction under an applicable income tax treaty. Payments of interest on a debenture to a non-U.S. holder generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax, as opposed to withholding tax, unless the income is effectively connected with the conduct by the non-U.S. holder of a trade or business in the United States. To claim the benefit of a lower treaty withholding rate, a Non-U.S. holder must provide a properly executed IRS Form W-8BEN to us or our paying agent before the payment of stated interest; and may be required to obtain a U.S. taxpayer identification number and provide documentary evidence issued by foreign governmental authorities to prove residence in the foreign country. You should consult your own tax advisor to determine the effects of the application of the U.S. federal withholding tax to your particular situation.

Disposition of the Debentures by Non-U.S. Holders

Subject to the discussion below under “Backup Withholding and Information Reporting,” a non-U.S. holder generally will not be subject to United States federal income tax, and generally no tax will be withheld with respect to gains realized on the disposition of a debenture, unless (a) the gain is effectively connected with a United States trade or business conducted by the non-U.S. holder or (b) the non-U.S. holder is an individual who is present in the United States for 183 or more days during the taxable year of the disposition and other requirements are satisfied.

 

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Non-U.S. Holders Subject to U.S. Income Taxation

If interest and other payments received by a non-U.S. holder with respect to the debentures, including proceeds from the disposition of the debentures, are effectively connected with the conduct by the non-U.S. holder of a trade or business within the United States, or the non-U.S. holder is otherwise subject to United States federal income taxation on a net basis with respect to the holder’s ownership of the debentures, or are individuals that have by operation of law become residents in the United States for federal income tax purposes, the non-U.S. holder generally will be subject to the rules described above applicable to U.S. holders of debentures, subject to any modification provided under an applicable income tax treaty. If any of these non-U.S. holders is a corporation, it may also be subject to a U.S. “branch profits tax” at a 30% rate.

Backup Withholding and Information Reporting

Non-corporate U.S. holders may be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 31% on payments of principal, premium, and interest on, and the proceeds of the disposition of, the debentures. In general, backup withholding will be imposed only if the U.S. holder (1) fails to furnish its taxpayer identification number (“TIN”), which for an individual would be his or her Social Security number; (2) furnishes an incorrect TIN; (3) is notified by the IRS that it has failed to report payments of interest or dividends; or (4) under some circumstances, fails to certify under penalty of perjury that it has furnished a correct TIN and has been notified by the IRS that it is subject to backup withholding tax for failure to report interest or dividend payments. In addition, the payments of principal and interest to U.S. holders generally will be subject to information reporting. You should consult your tax advisors regarding your qualification for exemption from backup withholding and the procedure for obtaining an exemption, if applicable.

Backup withholding generally will not apply to payments made to a non-U.S. holder of a debenture who provides the certification that it is a non-U.S. holder, and the payor does not have actual knowledge that a certificate is false, or otherwise establishes an exemption from backup withholding. Payments by United States office of a broker of the proceeds of a disposition of the debentures generally will be subject to backup withholding at a rate of 31% unless the non-U.S. holder certifies it is a non-U.S. holder under penalties of perjury or otherwise establishes an exemption. In addition, if a foreign office of a foreign custodian, foreign nominee or other foreign agent of the beneficial owner, or if a foreign office of a foreign “broker” pays the proceeds of the sale of a debenture to the seller, backup withholding and information reporting will not apply; provided that the nominee, custodian, agent or broker is not a “United States related person,” or a person which derives more than 50% of its gross income for some periods from the conduct of a trade or business in the United States or is a controlled foreign corporation. The payment by a foreign office of a broker that is a United States person or a United States related person of the proceeds of the sale of debentures will not be subject to backup withholding, but will be subject to information reporting unless the broker has documentary evidence in its records that the beneficial owner is not a United States person for purposes of the backup withholding and information reporting requirements and other conditions are met, or the beneficial owner otherwise establishes an exemption.

The amount of any backup withholding imposed on a payment to a holder of a debenture will be allowed as a credit against the holder’s United States federal income tax liability and may entitle the holder to a refund; provided that the required information is furnished to the IRS.

STATE, LOCAL AND FOREIGN TAXES

We make no representations regarding the tax consequences of the purchase, ownership or disposition of the debentures under the tax laws of any state, locality or foreign country. You should consult your own tax advisors regarding these state and foreign tax consequences.

 

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ERISA CONSIDERATIONS

General

Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), and Section 4975 of the Code impose restrictions on employee benefit plans that are subject to ERISA, or plans or arrangements that are subject to Code Section 4975, and on persons who are parties in interest or disqualified persons with respect to those plans or arrangements. Some employee benefit plans, like governmental plans and church plans (if no election has been made under Section 410(d) of the Code), are not subject to the restrictions of Title I of ERISA or Code Section 4975, and assets of these plans may be invested in the debentures without regard to the ERISA considerations described below, subject to the Code and other applicable federal and state laws affecting tax-exempt organizations generally. Any plan fiduciary that proposes to cause a plan to acquire any of the debentures should consult with its counsel with respect to the potential consequences under ERISA and the Code of the plan’s acquisition and ownership of the debentures. Investments by plans are also subject to ERISA’s and the Code’s general fiduciary requirements, including the requirement of investment prudence and diversification and the requirement that a plan’s investments be made in accordance with the documents governing the plan.

Prohibited Transactions

General

Section 406 of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Code prohibits certain “parties in interest” and “disqualified persons” with respect to a plan from engaging in select transactions involving a plan and its assets unless a statutory, regulatory or administrative exemption applies to the transaction. Section 4975 of the Code imposes excise taxes, or in some cases a civil penalty may be assessed under Section 502(i) of ERISA, on parties in interest that engage in non-exempt “prohibited transactions.” Section 502(i) of ERISA requires the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor (“Labor”) to assess a civil penalty against a fiduciary who breaches any fiduciary responsibility under, or commits any other violation of, part 4 of Title I of ERISA, or any other person who knowingly participates in a breach or violation.

Plan Asset Regulations

Labor has issued regulations concerning the definition of what constitutes the assets of a plan for purposes of ERISA and the prohibited transaction provisions of the Code. The plan asset regulations describe the circumstances where the assets of an entity in which a plan invests will be considered to be “plan assets,” so that any person who exercises control over the assets would be subject to ERISA’s fiduciary standards. Generally, under the plan asset regulation, when a plan invests in another entity, the plan’s assets do not include, solely by reason of the investment, any of the underlying assets of the entity. However, the plain asset regulation provides that, if a plan acquires an “equity interest” in an entity that is neither a “publicly-offered security” nor a security issued by an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940 the assets of the entity will be treated as assets of the plan investor unless exceptions apply. Under the plan asset regulation the term “equity interest” is defined as any interest in an entity other than an instrument that is treated as indebtedness under “applicable local law” and that has no “substantial equity features.” Although the plan asset regulation is silent with respect to the question of which law constitutes “applicable local law” for this purpose, Labor has stated that these determinations should be made under the state law governing interpretation of the instrument in question. In the preamble to the plan asset regulation, Labor declined to provide a precise definition of what features are equity features or the circumstances under which the features would be considered “substantial,” noting that the question of whether a plan’s interest has substantial equity features is an inherently factual one, but that in making that determination it would be appropriate to take into account whether the equity features are such that a plan’s investment would be a practical vehicle for the indirect provision of investment management services. We believe that the debentures will be classified as indebtedness without substantial equity features for ERISA purposes. Each investor who purchases a debenture will be required to represent and warrant, in the subscription agreement for the investment, whether or not the assets being invested constitute “plan assets” for purposes of ERISA.

 

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If the debentures were deemed to be equity interests for this purpose and no statutory, regulatory, or administrative exception applies, we could be considered to hold plan assets by reason of a plan’s investment in the debentures. These plan assets would include an undivided interest in all of our assets. In this case, we may be considered a fiduciary with respect to the investing plans. We would be subject to the fiduciary responsibility provisions of Title I of ERISA, including the prohibited transaction provisions of Section 406 of ERISA and Section 4975 of the Code, and to Section 4975 of the Code with respect to transactions involving any of our assets. The ERISA fiduciary standards could affect the way we conduct the business, which would have consequences for all investors, not just those that are employee benefit plans.

Depending on the relevant facts and circumstances, prohibited transaction exemptions may apply to the purchase or holding of the debentures. See, for example, Prohibited Transaction Class Exemption (“PTE”) 96-23, which exempts some transactions effected on behalf of a plan or by an “in-house asset manager;” PTE 95-60, which exempts some transactions between insurance company general accounts and parties in interest; PTE 91-38, which exempts some transactions between bank collective investment funds and parties in interest; PTE 90-1, which exempts some transactions between insurance company pooled separate accounts and parties in interest; or PTE 84-14, which exempts some transactions effected on behalf of a plan by a “qualified professional asset manager.” However, there can be no assurance that any of these exemptions will apply with respect to any plan’s investment in the debentures, or that the exemption, if it did apply, would apply to all prohibited transactions that may occur in connection with the investment.

Any plan fiduciary considering whether to purchase debentures on behalf of a plan should consult with its counsel regarding the applicability of the fiduciary responsibility and prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and the Code. Before purchasing any debentures, a fiduciary of a plan should make its own determination as to (1) whether GWG Life, as borrower on the debentures, is a “party in interest” under ERISA or a “disqualified person” under the Code with respect to the plan; (2) the availability of the relief provided in the plan asset regulation and (3) the availability of any other prohibited transaction exemptions. In addition, purchasers that are insurance companies should consult their own ERISA counsel with respect to their fiduciary responsibilities associated with their purchase and ownership of the debentures, including any responsibility under the Supreme Court case John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. v. Harris Trust and Savings Bank.

LEGAL MATTERS

Certain legal matters in connection with the debentures will be passed upon for us by Maslon Edelman Borman & Brand, LLP, of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

EXPERTS

The consolidated financial statements of GWG Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries as of and at December 31, 2009 and 2010, included in this prospectus and in the related registration statement, have been audited by Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C., an independent registered public accounting firm. As indicated in their report with respect thereto, these consolidated financial statements are included in this prospectus in reliance upon the authority of such firm as experts in auditing and accounting.

 

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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

We have filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-1 under the Securities Act with respect to the debentures to be offered and sold pursuant to the prospectus which is a part of that registration statement. This prospectus does not contain all the information contained in the registration statement. For further information with respect to us and the debentures to be sold in this offering, we refer you to the registration statement, including the agreements, other documents and schedules filed as exhibits to the registration statement.

We file annual, quarterly and current reports, and other information with the SEC. We intend to make these filings available on our website at www.gwglife.com. Information on our website is not incorporated by reference in this prospectus. We maintain an office at 220 South Sixth Street, Suite 1200, Minneapolis, MN 55402 where all records concerning the debentures are to be retained. Debenture holders and their representatives can request information regarding the debentures by contacting our office by mail at our address or by telephone at (612) 746-1944 or by fax at (612) 746-0445. Upon request, we will provide copies of our filings with the SEC free of charge to our investors. Our SEC filings, including the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, will also be available on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. You may read and copy all or any portion of the registration statement or any reports, statements or other information we file at the SEC’s public reference room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. In addition, you may call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information on the operation of the public reference room. You may receive copies of these documents upon payment of a duplicating fee by writing to the SEC.

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Members and Board of Directors of

GWG Holdings, LLC and Subsidiaries:

We have audited and accompanying consolidated balance sheets of GWG Holdings, LLC and Subsidiaries (the Company) as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. We were not engaged to perform an audit of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of GWG Holdings, LLC and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 and the consolidated results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

/s/ Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C.

Minneapolis, Minnesota

June 13, 2011

 

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GWG HOLDINGS, LLC AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

     December  31,
2010
    December  31,
2009
    March  31,
2011
(unaudited)
 
      
      
ASSETS       

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 1,758,230      $ 1,180,850      $ 273,972   

Restricted cash

     5,219,009        5,751,115        4,961,338   

Bridge loans, net

     —          3,226,274        —     

Due from related parties

     2,415        —          30,129   

Investment in life settlements

     82,717,562        12,908,172        95,731,212   

Deferred financing costs

     562,834        795,730        504,609   

Other assets

     790,708        228,473        529,598   
                        

TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 91,050,758      $ 24,090,614      $ 102,030,858   
                        
LIABILITIES & EQUITY       

LIABILITIES

      

Revolving credit facility

   $ 37,085,452      $ 4,987,425      $ 41,547,952   

Series I Secured notes payable

     51,798,992        13,570,983        55,726,873   

Accounts payable

     710,547        761,859        111,655   

Due to related parties

     —          2,301,055        —     

Accrued expenses

      

Interest

     975,817        147,089        1,008,444   

Other

     318,603        597,127        244,386   
                        

TOTAL LIABILITIES

     90,889,411        22,365,538        98,639,310   
                        

REDEEMABLE MEMBER’S INTEREST

     (509,126     (470,436     —     
                        

EQUITY

      

Members’ capital

     2,976,541        3,806,061        5,697,616   

Notes receivable from related parties

     (2,306,068     (1,761,134     (2,306,068
                        

Total equity attributable to controlling interest

     670,473        2,044,927        3,391,548   

Noncontrolling interest

     —          150,585        —     
                        

TOTAL EQUITY

     670,473        2,195,512        3,391,548   
                        

TOTAL LIABILITIES & EQUITY

   $ 91,050,758      $ 24,090,614      $ 102,030,858   
                        

The Accompanying Notes are an Integral Part of these Consolidated Financial Statements

 

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GWG HOLDINGS, LLC AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

     Year Ended     Three Months Ended  
                 March 31,     March 31,  
     December 31,     December 31,     2011     2010  
     2010     2009     (unaudited)  

REVENUE