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EX-32.1 - SECTION 906 CERTIFICATIONS - Wolverine Exploration Inc.exhibit32-1.htm
EX-31.1 - SECTION 302 CERTIFICATIONS - Wolverine Exploration Inc.exhibit31-1.htm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended February 28, 2011
or

[   ] TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________________________ to __________________________

Commission File Number 000-53767

WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Nevada 98-0569013
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (IRS Employer Identification No.)
   
4055 McLean Road, Quesnel, British Columbia, Canada V2J 6V5
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

250.992.6972
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
[X] YES     [   ] NO

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a small reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act

Large accelerated filer [ ]   Accelerated filer [ ]
Non-accelerated filer [ ] (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company [ X ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act
[   ] YES     [X] NO

APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY
PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PRECEDING FIVE YEARS

Check whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act after the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court.
[   ] YES     [   ] NO

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. 104,330,000 common shares issued and outstanding as of April 12, 2011


PART 1 – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements.

Our unaudited interim financial statements for the three and nine month periods ended February 28, 2011 form part of this quarterly report. They are stated in United States Dollars (US$) and are prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles.

2


WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
February 28, 2011
(expressed in U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)


 

  Index
   
Balance Sheets F–1
Statements of Operations F–2
Statements of Cash Flows F–3
Notes to the Financial Statements F–4


WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
Balance Sheets
(Expressed in U.S. dollars)

    February 28,     May 31,  
    2011     2011  
    $     $  
    (unaudited)        
ASSETS            
             
Current Assets            
             
   Cash   73,423     96,712  
   Amounts receivable   15,805     11,065  
   Prepaid expenses and deposits   9,034     74,103  
Total Current Assets   98,262     181,880  
             
Property and equipment (Note 3)   4,624      
Total Assets   102,886     181,880  
             
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT            
             
Current Liabilities            
             
   Accounts payable   232,532     199,395  
   Accrued liabilities       20,163  
   Loans payable (Note 4)       7,000  
   Due to related party (Note 5)   3,069     7,352  
Total Liabilities   235,601     233,910  
             
Going Concern (Note 1)            
             
Stockholders’ Deficit            
             
   Common stock, 200,000,000 shares authorized, $0.001 par value
        104,330,000 and 82,580,000 shares issued and outstanding, respectively
  104,330     82,580  
   Additional paid-in capital   2,973,097     2,290,522  
   Common stock subscribed       189,875  
   Deficit accumulated during the exploration stage   (3,210,142 )   (2,615,007 )
Total Stockholders’ Deficit   (132,715 )   (52,030 )
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit   102,886     181,880  

(The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements)

F-1


WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
Statements of Operations
(Expressed in U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

                            Accumulated from  
    Three Months     Three Months     Nine Months     Nine Months     February 23, 2006  
    Ended     Ended     Ended     Ended     (Date of Inception)  
    February 28,     February 28,     February 28,     February 28,     To February 28,  
    2011     2010     2011     2010     2011  
     $      $      $      $      
                     
Revenue                    
                               
Expenses                              
                               
   Depreciation   436         1,102         1,102  
   Foreign exchange loss (gain)   (2,008 )   2,241     (210 )   6,012     17,996  
   General and administrative   119,872     74,694     309,172     194,684     2,185,396  
   Mineral exploration costs   45,496     97     285,072     22,896     556,782  
   Write-down of mineral property costs                   348,221  
                               
Total Expenses   163,795     77,032     595,135     223,592     3,109,497  
                               
Loss Before Other Expense   (163,795 )   (77,032 )   (595,135 )   (223,592 )   (3,109,497 )
                               
Other Expense                              
                               
   Loss on settlement of debt       (26,220 )       (26,220 )   (100,645 )
                               
Net Loss   (163,795 )   (103,252 )   (595,135 )   (249,812 )   (3,210,142 )
                               
Net Loss Per Share, Basic and Diluted           (0.01 )          
                               
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding   104,330,000     68,990,000     99,156,740     68,749,000        

(The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements)

F-2


WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
Statements of Cash Flows
(Expressed in U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

                Accumulated from  
    Nine months     Nine months     February 23, 2006  
    Ended     Ended     (Date of Inception)  
    February 28,     February 28,     to February 28,  
    2011     2010     2011  
    $     $     $  
                   
Operating Activities                  
   Net loss   (595,135 )   (249,812 )   (3,210,142 )
   Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:            
       Depreciation   1,102         1,102  
       Loss on settlement of debt       26,220     100,645  
       Stock-based compensation           746,277  
       Write-down of mineral properties           348,221  
   Changes in operating assets and liabilities                  
       Amounts receivable   (4,740 )   (1,654 )   (15,805 )
       Prepaid expenses and deposits   65,069     (2,284 )   17,066  
       Accounts payable   32,137     60,405     444,424  
       Accrued liabilities   (20,163 )   5,923      
       Due to related party   (4,283 )   709     19,957  
Net Cash Used In Operating Activities   (525,013 )   (160,493 )   (1,548,255 )
Investing Activities                  
   Acquisition of mineral properties           (321 )
   Purchase of property and equipment   (5,726 )       (5,726 )
Net Cash Used In Investing Activities   (5,726 )       (6,047 )
Financing Activities                  
   Proceeds from loans payable           43,000  
   Repayment of loans payable   (7,000 )   (15,000 )   (22,000 )
   Repayment of note payable to related party           (34,000 )
   Proceeds from common stock issued or subscribed   568,500     177,000     1,714,900  
   Stock issuance costs   (54,050 )       (62,175 )
   Repayment of common stock subscribed           (12,000 )
Net Cash Provided By Financing Activities   507,450     162,000     1,627,725  
Increase (Decrease) in Cash   (23,289 )   1,507     73,423  
Cash, Beginning of Period   96,712     673      
Cash, End of Period   73,423     2,180     73,423  
                   
Supplementary Cash Flow Information (Note 8)                  

(The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements)

F-3


WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
February 28, 2011
(Expressed in U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

1.

Basis of Presentation

   

The accompanying financial statements of Wolverine Exploration Inc.(the “Company”) should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and accompanying notes filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2010. In the opinion of management, the accompanying financial statements reflect all adjustments of a recurring nature considered necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the periods shown.

   

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. The results of operations and cash flows for the periods shown are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year.

   

These financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which implies the Company will continue to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has never generated revenues since inception and is unlikely generate earnings in the immediate or foreseeable future. The continuation of the Company as a going concern is dependent upon the continued financial support from its shareholders, the ability of the Company to obtain necessary equity financing to continue operations, and the attainment of profitable operations. As at February 28, 2011, the Company has a working capital deficit of $137,339 and accumulated losses of $3,210,142 since inception. These factors raise substantial doubt regarding the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. These financial statements do not include any adjustments to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

   
2.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

   

In January 2010, the FASB issued an amendment to ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures”, to require reporting entities to separately disclose the amounts and business rationale for significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and separately present information regarding purchase, sale, issuance, and settlement of Level 3 fair value measures on a gross basis. This standard is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009 with the exception of disclosures regarding the purchase, sale, issuance, and settlement of Level 3 fair value measures which are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010. The adoption of the applicable standard on June 1, 2010 did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

   

The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.

   
3.

Property and Equipment


                  February 28,     May 31,  
                  2011     2010  
            Accumulated     Net Carrying     Net Carrying  
    Cost     Depreciation     Value     Value  
    $     $     $     $  
  Equipment   5,726     1,102     4,624      

4.

Loans Payable

   

As at February 28, 2011, the Company owes $nil (May 31, 2010 – $7,000) for cash advances received which are non- interest bearing, unsecured and due on demand. During the nine months ended February 28, 2011, the Company repaid the $7,000 balance that was owed as at May 31, 2010.

   
5.

Related Party Transactions

   

As at February 28, 2011, the Company owed $3,069 (May 31, 2010 - $7,352 (Cdn$7,672)) to the President of the Company which is non-interest bearing, unsecured and due on demand.



WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
(An Exploration Stage Company)
Notes to the Financial Statements
February 28, 2011
(Expressed in U.S. dollars)
(unaudited)

6.

Common Stock

     
a)

On November 14, 2010, the Company issued 5,700,000 shares at $0.05 per share for proceeds of $285,000. The Company paid finder’s fees of $19,000 in relation to this private placement.

     
b)

On August 9, 2010, the Company issued 100,000 shares at $0.03 per share for proceeds of $3,000.

     
c)

On July 2, 2010, the Company issued 15,950,000 shares of common stock at $0.03 per share for gross proceeds of $478,500, of which $198,000 was received prior to May 31, 2010 and included in common stock subscribed. The Company paid finders’ fees of $35,050 in relation to this private placement.

     
7.

Stock Options

     

A summary of the Company’s stock option activity is as follows:


            Weighted     Weighted        
            Average     Average     Aggregate  
            Exercise     Remaining     Intrinsic  
      Number of     Price     Contractual Life     Value  
      Options     $     (years)     $  
                           
  Outstanding and exercisable, May 31, 2010 and February 28, 2011   5,100,000     0.14     4.25      

8.

Supplementary Cash Flow Information


                  Accumulated from  
      Nine months     Nine months     February 23, 2006  
      Ended     Ended     (Date of Inception)  
      February 28,     February 28,     to February 28,  
      2011     2010     2011  
      $     $     $  
                     
  Non-cash Investing and Financing Activities                  
                     
     Shares issued to settle accounts payable       100,500     312,425  
     Shares issued to settle loans payable           21,000  
     Shares issued to settle related party debt           15,000  
     Note payable to related party pursuant to mineral property vend-in agreement           34,000  
     Refundable staking security deposits received pursuant to
          mineral property vend-in agreement
          26,100  
      Shares issued pursuant to mineral property vend-in agreement           340,000  
                     
  Supplemental Disclosures                  
                     
     Interest paid            
     Income taxes paid            


Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Forward-Looking Statements

This quarterly report contains forward-looking statements. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may", "should", "expects", "plans", "anticipates", "believes", "estimates", "predicts", "potential" or "continue" or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. These statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including the risks in the section entitled "Risk Factors", that may cause our or our industry's actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Except as required by applicable law, including the securities laws of the United States, we do not intend to update any of the forward-looking statements to conform these statements to actual results.

Our unaudited financial statements are stated in United States Dollars (US$) and are prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this quarterly report. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed below and elsewhere in this quarterly report, particularly in the section entitled "Risk Factors".

In this quarterly report, unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars. All references to "CDN$" refer to Canadian dollars and all references to "common shares" refer to the common shares in our capital stock.

As used in this quarterly report, the terms "we", "us", "our", the “Company” and "Wolverine" mean Wolverine Exploration Inc., unless otherwise indicated.

Corporate History

Our company was incorporated in the State of Nevada on February 23, 2006 and is quoted on the OTCQB under the symbol WOLV.

On February 28, 2007, we entered into a vend-in agreement with Shenin Resources Inc. (“Shenin”), a private Canadian corporation, for the purchase of a 90% interest 516 mineral claims located in Labrador, Canada. The purchase price paid to Shenin was $374,000 satisfied by the issuance of 34,000,000 shares of our common stock at a fair value of $0.01 per share and a note payable of $34,000. Under the terms of the vend-in agreement we are required to incur the following expenditures on the claims: (i) CDN$150,000 on or before March 1, 2008; (ii) CDN$200,000 on or before March 1, 2009, and (iii) CDN$250,000 on or before March 1, 2010; provided that (iv) any excess amount spent in one year may be carried forward and applied towards fulfillment of the expenditure required in the later year. Shenin has also granted our company a first right of refusal to purchase a 90% interest in all further property in Labrador, Canada that Shenin may obtain an interest in from time to time.

On August 27, 2009 we signed an amending agreement with Shenin. which waives all of the remaining work commitments required under the vend-in agreement subject to us incurring sufficient exploration expenditures on the claims to keep them in good standing with the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. To date, we have incurred expenditures of $556,782.

On August 15, 2007, we registered our company as an extra-provincially registered company in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador for the purpose of being able to register the Claims in the name of our company and for the purpose of being able to conduct our business in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

4


Subsequent to the vend-in agreement, Richard Haderer, a consultant of Wolverine, staked twenty-four (24) additional mineral claims on behalf of Wolverine. The staking costs for these additional claims was CDN$1,440 and the additional claims are contiguous to the 516 claims acquired pursuant to the vend-in agreement.

In March 2010, as a result of the exploration carried out to date, Wolverine reduced the number of claims by 128 in order to concentrate its exploration efforts on the claims with anomalous mineralization.

In June 2010, Ed Montague, transferred 37 claims to Wolverine which had been staked on behalf of Wolverine. Wolverine now holds a 90% interest and Shenin holds a 10% interest in a total of 449 claims.

Our Current Business

We are an exploration stage company engaged in the business of acquisition and exploration of base and precious metal mineral properties. Our current exploration is focused on mineral properties located in Labrador, Canada. We have not yet determined whether the Labrador claims contain mineral reserves that are economically recoverable.

For the nine month period ended February 28, 2011, we incurred exploration costs of $285,072.

Cash Requirements

There is limited historical financial information about us upon which to base an evaluation of our performance. We are an exploration stage company and have not generated any revenues from activities. We cannot guarantee we will be successful in our business activities. Our business is subject to risks inherent in the establishment of a new business enterprise, including limited capital resources, possible delays in the exploration of our properties, and possible cost overruns due to price and cost increases in services.

Over the next twelve months we intend to use any funds that we may have available to fund our operations and conduct exploration on our Labrador Claims. We expect to review other potential exploration projects from time to time as they are presented to us.

Not accounting for our working capital deficiency of $137,339, we require additional funds of approximately $160,000 at a minimum to proceed with our plan of operation over the next twelve months, exclusive of any acquisition costs. Wolverine has raised the necessary funds pursuant a recent private placement and the refund of a security deposit form the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Our auditors have issued a going concern opinion for our year ended May 31, 2010. This means that there is substantial doubt that we can continue as an on-going business for the next twelve months unless we obtain additional capital to pay our bills. This is because we have not generated any revenues and no revenues are anticipated until we begin removing and selling minerals. As we had cash in the amount of $73,423 and a working capital deficiency in the amount of $137,339 as of February 28, 2011, we do not have sufficient working capital to enable us to carry out our stated plan of operation for the next twelve months.

Exploration Plan

Wolverine recently completed an induced polarization (IP) Survey which was conducted by Abitibi Geophysics. Abitibi Geophysics has been providing geophysical services to the mineral exploration industry for over 25 years. Their expertise ranges from detecting precious and base metal deposits to exploring for diamonds and uranium. Val-d'Or-based Abitibi Geophysics mainly conducts surveys in Canada, but also provides exploration services to the international market.

The Abitibi report on the IP Survey recommends a total of 11 drillholes (or 600 m of drilling) to test the best targets. Wolverine will conduct this drill program during April-May of 2011 at an estimated cost of $160,000. The drilling will be conducted by Ultralight Drilling Systems. Ultralight Drilling Systems is a Canadian-based company owned and managed by Wayne Parnell. The focus of Ultralight Drilling Systems is to fabricate and support complete man-portable, light-weight drilling systems for exploration, prospecting and development work in the mining industry.

5


Mr. Parnell has an extensive and diversified portfolio in the drilling and exploration industry. Mr. Parnell has used and promoted man-potrable drilling equipment since 1980 because of the benefits to both the contractor and client.

The drilling program will be supervised by Ed Montague the project geologist. Mr. Montague graduated from Memorial University in 1959 and for the past 49 years has been a geologist for projects located in Canada and International and as a government geologist and a mineral industry analyst for the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

The drilling program will be funded by cash on hand and through funds raised pursuant to a private placement.

As at February 28, 2011, we had a cash balance of $73,423 and a working capital deficiency of $137,339.

The continuation of our business is dependent upon obtaining further financing, a successful program of exploration and/or development, and, finally, achieving a profitable level of operations. The issuance of additional equity securities by us could result in a significant dilution in the equity interests of our current stockholders. Obtaining commercial loans, assuming those loans would be available, will increase our liabilities and future cash commitments.

There are no assurances that we will be able to obtain further funds required for our continued operations. As noted herein, we are pursuing various financing alternatives to meet our immediate and long-term financial requirements. There can be no assurance that additional financing will be available to us when needed or, if available, that it can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. If we are not able to obtain the additional financing on a timely basis, we will be unable to conduct our operations as planned, and we will not be able to meet our other obligations as they become due. In such event, we will be forced to scale down or perhaps even cease our operations.

Purchase of Significant Equipment

We do not intend to purchase any significant equipment over the twelve months ending February 28, 2012.

Corporate Offices

We do not own any real property. Our principal business office is located at 4055 McLean Road, Quesnel, British Columbia, Canada, V2J 6V5. The Company also maintains an office in Richmond, British Columbia at a cost of CDN$1,000 per month. We believe that our current lease arrangements provide adequate space for our foreseeable future needs.

Employees

Currently we do not have any employees. The Company utilizes consultants for the management, regulatory, administration, investor relations and geological functions of the Company. We do not expect any material changes in the number of employees over the next 12 month period. We will continue to retain consultants as required.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our financial statements and accompanying notes are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles used in the United States. Preparing financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, and expenses. These estimates and assumptions are affected by management's application of accounting policies. We believe that understanding the basis and nature of the estimates and assumptions involved with the following aspects of our financial statements is critical to an understanding of our financial statements.

6


Mineral Property Costs

Our company has been in the exploration stage since inception on February 23, 2006 and have not yet realized any revenues from its operations. We are primarily engaged in the acquisition and exploration of mineral exploration properties. We expense mineral property exploration costs as they are incurred. Mineral property acquisition costs are initially capitalized, when incurred. Our company assesses the carrying costs for impairment under ASC 360, “Property, Plant and Equipment at each fiscal quarter end. An impairment is recognized when the sum of the expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the mineral property. Impairment losses, if any, are measured as the excess of the carrying amount of the mineral property over its estimated fair value. When it has been determined that a mineral property can be economically developed as a result of establishing proven and probable reserves, the costs then incurred to develop such property, are capitalized. Such costs will be amortized using the units-of-production method over the estimated life of the proven and probable reserves. If mineral properties are subsequently abandoned or impaired, any capitalized costs will be charged to operations.

Long-Lived Assets

In accordance with ASC 360, “Property, Plant and Equipment”, the Company tests long-lived assets or asset groups for recoverability when events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be recoverable. Circumstances which could trigger a review include, but are not limited to: significant decreases in the market price of the asset; significant adverse changes in the business climate or legal factors; accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of the asset; current period cash flow or operating losses combined with a history of losses or a forecast of continuing losses associated with the use of the asset; and current expectation that the asset will more likely than not be sold or disposed significantly before the end of its estimated useful life. Recoverability is assessed based on the carrying amount of the asset and its fair value which is generally determined based on the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and the eventual disposal of the asset, as well as specific appraisal in certain instances. An impairment loss is recognized when the carrying amount is not recoverable and exceeds fair value.

Stock-based Compensation

The Company records stock-based compensation in accordance with ASC 718, “Compensation - Stock Compensation”, using the fair value method. All transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable.

Results of Operations

Three Months Ended February 28, 2011 and 2010

The following summary of our results of operations should be read in conjunction with our financial statements for the quarter ended February 28, 2011 which are included herein.

Three month summary ending February 28, 2011 and 2010

    Three Months Ended  
    February 28  
    2011     2010  
Revenue $  Nil   $  Nil  
Operating Expenses $  163,795   $  77,032  
Net Loss $  (163,795 ) $  (103,252 )

7


Nine month summary ending February 28, 2011 and 2010

    Nine Months Ended  
    February 28  
    2011     2010  
Revenue $  Nil   $  Nil  
Operating Expenses $  595,135   $  223,592  
Net Loss $  (595,135 ) $  (249,812 )

Expenses

Our operating expenses for the three month periods ended February 28, 2011 and 2010 are outlined in the table below:

    Three Months Ended  
    February 28  
    2011     2010  
Depreciation $  436   $  –  
Foreign exchange loss (gain) $  (2,008 ) $  2,241  
General and administrative $  119,872   $  74,694  
Mineral exploration costs $  45,496   $  97  

Operating expenses for the three months ended February 28, 2011 increased compared to the comparative period in 2010 primarily due to an increase in financing and exploration activities.

Our operating expenses for the nine month periods ended February 28, 2011 and 2010 are outlined in the table below:

    Nine Months Ended  
    February 28  
    2011     2010  
Depreciation $  1,102   $  –  
Foreign exchange loss $  (210 ) $  6,012  
General and administrative $  309,172   $  194,684  
Mineral exploration costs $  285,072   $  22,896  

Operating expenses for the nine months ended February 28, 2011 increased compared to the comparative period in 2010 primarily due to an increase in financing and exploration activities.

Revenue

We have not earned any revenues since our inception and we do not anticipate earning revenues in the upcoming quarter.

Liquidity and Financial Condition

Working Capital

    As At     As At  
    February 28,     May 31,  
    2011     2010  
Current assets $  98,262   $  181,880  
Current liabilities   235,601     233,910  
Working capital (deficit) $  (137,339 ) $  (52,030 )

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Cash Flows

    Nine Months Ended  
    February 28  
    2011     2010  
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities $  (525,013 ) $  (160,493 )
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities   (5,726 )   -  
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities   507,450     162,000  
Net increase (decrease) in cash during period $  (23,289 ) $  1,507  

Operating Activities

Net cash used in operating activities during the nine months ended February 28, 2011, was $525,013 compared to $160,493 during the nine months ended February 28, 2010. The significant increase in cash used in operating activities was mainly due to $285,072 incurred for mineral exploration costs compared to $22,896 in the comparable period.

Financing Activities

During the nine months ended February 28, 2011, we received $568,500 through the issuance of shares/shares subscribed in private placements, paid share issuance costs in the amount of $54,050 and repaid loans in the amount of $7,000. In the comparable period, the Company received $177,000 through the issuance of shares in a private placement and repaid a loan in the amount of $15,000.

Contractual Obligations

As a “smaller reporting company”, we are not required to provide tabular disclosure obligations.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no significant off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to stockholders.

Recent Accounting Standards

In January 2010, the FASB issued an amendment to ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures”, to require reporting entities to separately disclose the amounts and business rationale for significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and separately present information regarding purchase, sale, issuance, and settlement of Level 3 fair value measures on a gross basis. This standard is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009 with the exception of disclosures regarding the purchase, sale, issuance, and settlement of Level 3 fair value measures which are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010. The adoption of the applicable standard on June 1, 2010 did not have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

The Company has implemented all new accounting pronouncements that are in effect and that may impact its financial statements and does not believe that there are any other new accounting pronouncements that have been issued that might have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

Management’s Report on Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our president (also our principal executive officer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer) to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

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As of February 28, 2011, the end of the quarter covered by this report, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our president (also our principal executive officer, principal financial and accounting officer), of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based on the foregoing, and in light of weakness identified in our internal controls over financial reporting which were disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and 10-K/A for the year ended May 31, 2010, our president (also our principal executive officer, principal financial and accounting officer) concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective .

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There have been no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended February 28, 2011 that have materially or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

We are not a party to any pending legal proceedings and, to the best of our knowledge, none of our property or assets are the subject of any pending legal proceedings

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Much of the information included in this annual report includes or is based upon estimates, projections or other “forward looking statements”. Such forward looking statements include any projections and estimates made by us and our management in connection with our business operations. While these forward-looking statements, and any assumptions upon which they are based, are made in good faith and reflect our current judgment regarding the direction of our business, actual results will almost always vary, sometimes materially, from any estimates, predictions, projections, assumptions or other future performance suggested herein.

Such estimates, projections or other “forward looking statements” involve various risks and uncertainties as outlined below. We caution the reader that important factors in some cases have affected and, in the future, could materially affect actual results and cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed in any such estimates, projections or other “forward looking statements”.

If we do not obtain additional financing, the business plan will fail.

Our current operating funds are insufficient to complete the next phases of our proposed exploration program on our Labrador mineral claims. We will need to obtain additional financing in order to complete our business plan and our proposed exploration program. Our business plan calls for significant expenses in connection with the exploration of the Labrador Claims. We have not made arrangements to secure any additional financing.

Because we have only recently commenced business operations, we face a high risk of business failure and this could result in a total loss of your investment.

We recently begun the initial stages of exploration of the Labrador Claims, and thus has no way to evaluate the likelihood whether our company will be able to operate our business successfully. Our Company was incorporated on February 23, 2006 and to date we have been involved primarily in organizational activities, obtaining financing and preliminary exploration of the Labrador Claims. We have not earned any revenues and we have never achieved profitability as of the date of this annual report. Potential investors should be aware of the difficulties normally encountered by new mineral exploration companies and the high rate of failure of such enterprises. The likelihood of success must be considered in the light of problems, expenses, difficulties, complications and delays encountered in connection with the exploration of the mineral properties that our company plans to undertake. These potential problems include, but are not limited to, unanticipated problems relating to exploration and additional costs and expenses that may exceed current estimates. We have no history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that its business will prove successful, and we can provide no assurance to investors that our company will generate any operating revenues or ever achieve profitable operations. If our company is unsuccessful in addressing these risks its business will likely fail and you will lose your entire investment in this offering.

10


Because our company has only recently commenced business operations, we expect to incur operating losses for the foreseeable future.

Our company has never earned any revenue and our company has never been profitable. Prior to completing exploration on the Labrador Claims, we may incur increased operating expenses without realizing any revenues from the Labrador Claims, this could cause our company to fail and you will lose your entire investment in this offering.

If we do not find a joint venture partner for the continued development of our mineral claims, we may not be able to advance exploration work.

If the results of the exploration program are successful, we may try to enter into a joint venture agreement with a partner for the further exploration and possible production of the Labrador Claims. Our company would face competition from other junior mineral resource exploration companies who have properties that they deem to be attractive in terms of potential return and investment cost. In addition, if our company entered into a joint venture agreement, our company would likely assign a percentage of our interest in the Labrador Claims to the joint venture partner. If our company is unable to enter into a joint venture agreement with a partner, our company may fail and you may lose your entire investment in this offering.

Because of the speculative nature of mineral property exploration, there is substantial risk that no commercially viable deposits will be found and our business will fail.

Exploration for base and precious metals is a speculative venture involving substantial risk. We can provide investors with no assurance that the Labrador Claims contain commercially viable mineral deposits. The exploration program that our company will conduct on the Labrador Claims may not result in the discovery of commercial viable mineral deposits. Problems such as unusual and unexpected rock formations and other conditions are involved in base and precious metal exploration and often result in unsuccessful exploration efforts. In such a case, we may be unable to complete our business plan and you could lose your entire investment.

Because of the inherent dangers involved in base and precious metal exploration, there is a risk that our company may incur liability or damages as we conducts our business.

The search for base and precious metals involves numerous hazards. As a result, our company may become subject to liability for such hazards, including pollution, cave-ins and other hazards against which we cannot insure or against which we may elect not to insure. Our company currently has no such insurance nor do we expect to get such insurance in the foreseeable future. If a hazard were to occur, the costs of rectifying the hazard may exceed our asset value and cause our company to liquidate all of our assets resulting in the loss of your entire investment.

As our company undertakes exploration of the Labrador Claims, we will be subject to compliance with government regulation that may increase the anticipated time and cost of its exploration program.

There are several governmental regulations that materially restrict the exploration of minerals. Our company will be subject to the mining laws and regulations as contained in the Mineral Act of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador as we carry out our exploration program. We may be required to obtain work permits, post bonds and perform remediation work for any physical disturbance to the land in order to comply with these regulations. While our company’s planned exploration program budgets for regulatory compliance, there is a risk that new regulations could increase our time and costs of doing business and prevent our company from carrying out our exploration program.

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Because market factors in the mining business are out of our control, our company may not be able to market any minerals that may be found.

The mining industry, in general, is intensely competitive and we can provide no assurance to investors even if minerals are discovered that a ready market will exist from the sale of any base or precious metals found. Numerous factors beyond our control may affect the marketability of base or precious metals. These factors include market fluctuations, the proximity and capacity of natural resource markets and processing equipment, government regulations, including regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, importing and exporting of minerals and environmental protection. The exact effect of these factors cannot be accurately predicted, but the combination of these factors may result in our company not receiving an adequate return on invested capital and you may lose your entire investment.

Because our company holds a significant portion of our cash reserves in United States dollars, we may experience weakened purchasing power in Canadian dollar terms.

Our company holds a significant portion of our cash reserves in United States dollars. Due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations, the value of these United States dollar reserves can result in both translation gains or losses in Canadian dollar terms. If there was to be a significant decline in the United States dollar versus the Canadian Dollar, our US dollar purchasing power in Canadian dollars would also significantly decline. Our company has not entered into derivative instruments to offset the impact of foreign exchange fluctuations.

Our auditors have expressed substantial doubt about our company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that our company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 1 to the May 31, 2010 financial statements, our company was incorporated on February 23, 2006, and does not have a history of earnings, and as a result, our company’s auditor has expressed substantial doubt about the ability of our company to continue as a going concern. Continued operations are dependent on our ability to complete equity or debt financings or generate profitable operations. Such financings may not be available or may not be available on reasonable terms. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments that may result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

Our stock is a penny stock. Trading of our stock may be restricted by the SEC’s penny stock regulations which may limit a stockholder’s ability to buy and sell our stock.

Our stock is a penny stock. The Securities and Exchange Commission has adopted Rule 15g-9 which generally defines “penny stock” to be any equity security that has a market price (as defined) less than $5.00 per share or an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. Our securities are covered by the penny stock rules, which impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors”. The term “accredited investor” refers generally to institutions with assets in excess of $5,000,000 or individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 jointly with their spouse. The penny stock rules require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document in a form prepared by the SEC which provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer’s confirmation. In addition, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction. These disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the stock that is subject to these penny stock rules. Consequently, these penny stock rules may affect the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities. We believe that the penny stock rules discourage investor interest in and limit the marketability of our common stock.

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Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

Effective June 1, 2010, we issued 200,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $6,000. We have issued all of the shares to two non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 2, 2010, we issued 500,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $15,000. We have issued all of the shares to four non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 3, 2010, we issued 700,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $21,000. We have issued all of the shares to three non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 4 2010, we issued 250,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $7,500. We have issued all of the shares to two non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 4, 2010, we issued 300,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $9,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 7, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $3,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 8, 2010, we issued 800,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $24,000. We have issued all of the shares to four non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 10, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $3,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 11, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $3,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 14, 2010, we issued 400,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $12,000. We have issued all of the shares to three non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

13


Effective June 15, 2010, we issued 1,300,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $39,000. We have issued all of the shares to three non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 17, 2010, we issued 1,000,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $30,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 18, 2010, we issued 300,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $9,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 23, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $3,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 25, 2010, we issued 1,200,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $36,000. We have issued all of the shares to five non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective June 30, 2010, we issued 600,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.03 raising gross proceeds of $18,000. We have issued all of the shares to four non-US persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 20, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $5,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 24, 2010, we issued 500,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $25,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 25, 2010, we issued 500,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $25,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 30, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $5,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

14


Effective August 30, 2010, we issued 250,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $12,500. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 31, 2010, we issued 400,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $20,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective August 31, 2010, we issued 500,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $25,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 3, 2010, we issued 250,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $12,500. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 7, 2010, we issued 600,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $30,000. We have issued all of securities to two U.S. persons (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 10, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $5,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 14, 2010, we issued 600,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $30,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 15, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $5,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 15, 2010, we issued 500,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $25,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective September 21, 2010, we issued 200,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $10,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

15


Effective September 23, 2010, we issued 300,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $15,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective October 1, 2010, we issued 100,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $5,000. We have issued all of securities to one U.S. person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) relying upon Rule 506 of Regulation D of the Securities Act of 1933.

Effective October 4, 2010, we issued 600,000 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a purchase price of $0.05 raising gross proceeds of $30,000. We have issued all of the shares to one non-US person (as that term is defined in Regulation S of the Securities Act of 1933) in an offshore transaction relying on Regulation S and/or Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

None.

Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Securities Holders

None.

Item 5. Other Information

None.

Item 6. Exhibits

Exhibit
Number

Description

 
(3)

(i) Articles of Incorporation; and (ii) Bylaws

 
3.1

Articles of Incorporation of Wolverine Exploration Inc. filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) on July 15, 2008, and incorporated herein by reference.

 
3.2

Bylaws of Wolverine Exploration Inc., filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) on July 15, 2008, and incorporated herein by reference.

 
3.3

Certificate of Amendment of Wolverine Exploration Inc., filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

 
3.4

Certificate of Registration of Extra-Provincial Corporation, filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

 
(10)

Material Contracts

 
10.1

Vend-In Agreement dated February 28, 2007 between Wolverine and Shenin Resources Inc., filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

 
10.2

Consulting Agreement dated January 31, 2007 between Wolverine and Texada Consulting Inc., filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

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Exhibit  
Number

Description

   
10.3

Additional Property Agreement dated May 17, 2007 among Wolverine, Shenin Resources Inc. and Richard Haderer, filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

   
(14)

Code of Ethics

   
14.1

Code of Ethics, filed as an Exhibit to our Form S-1 (Registration Statement) filed on July 15, 2008 and incorporated herein by reference.

   
(31)

Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certifications

   
31.1*

Section 302 Certifications under Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

   
(32)

Section 1350 Certifications

   
32.1*

Section 906 Certifications under Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

* Filed herewith.

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

  WOLVERINE EXPLORATION INC.
                               (Registrant)
   
   
Dated: April 12, 2011 /s/ Lee Costerd
  Lee Costerd
  Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer
  and Director
  (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial
  Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

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