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Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
Form 10-K
 
     
þ
  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
or
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the transition period from          to          
 
Commission File Number: 1-9047
Independent Bank Corp.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
     
Massachusetts   04-2870273
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
     
Office Address: 2036 Washington Street,
Hanover Massachusetts
Mailing Address: 288 Union Street,
Rockland, Massachusetts
(Address of principal executive offices)
  02339
02370
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:
(781) 878-6100
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
     
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
Common Stock, $.01 par value per share
  NASDAQ Global Select Market
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights
  NASDAQ Global Select Market
 
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:
 
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes o     No o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer þ Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o     No þ
 
The aggregate market value of the voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of such stock on June 30, 2010, was approximately $481,623,191.
 
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. January 31, 2011          21,255,620
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
List hereunder the following documents if incorporated by reference and the Part of the Form 10-K (e.g., Part I, Part II, etc.) into which the document is incorporated: (1) Any annual report to security holders; (2) Any proxy or information statement; and (3) Any prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) or (c) under the Securities Act of 1933. The listed documents should be clearly described for identification purposes (e.g., annual report to security holders for fiscal year ended December 24, 1980).
 
Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated into Part III, Items 10-13 of this Form 10-K.
 


Table of Contents

 
INDEPENDENT BANK CORP.
 
2010 ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
                 
        Page #
 
      Business     5  
        General     5  
        Market Area and Competition     6  
        Lending Activities     6  
        Investment Activities     11  
        Sources of Funds     12  
        Wealth Management     14  
        Regulation     15  
        Statistical Disclosure by Bank Holding Companies     21  
        Securities and Exchange Commission Availability of Filings on Company Website     21  
      Risk Factors     23  
      Unresolved Staff Comments     26  
      Properties     26  
      Legal Proceedings     26  
 
Part II
      Market for Independent Bank Corp.’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities     27  
      Selected Financial Data     30  
      Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     31  
            36  
            36  
            37  
            37  
            38  
            39  
            41  
            41  
            42  
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            44  
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            45  
            46  
            47  
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        Page #
 
            52  
            53  
            57  
            57  
            59  
      Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk     62  
      Financial Statements and Supplementary Data     63  
      Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     128  
      Controls and Procedures     128  
      Other Information     130  
 
Part III
      Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance     130  
      Executive Compensation     130  
      Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters     130  
      Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence     131  
      Principal Accounting Fees and Services     131  
 
Part IV
      Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules     131  
    134  
    136  
    137  
    138  
    139  


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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
A number of the presentations and disclosures in this Form 10-K, including, without limitation, statements regarding the level of allowance for loan losses, the rate of delinquencies and amounts of charge-offs, and the rates of loan growth, and any statements preceded by, followed by, or which include the words “may,” “could,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “hope,” “might,” “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “assume” or similar expressions constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
 
These forward-looking statements, implicitly and explicitly, include the assumptions underlying the statements and other information with respect to the beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, estimates, intentions, financial condition, results of operations, future performance and business, of the Company including the Company’s expectations and estimates with respect to the Company’s revenues, expenses, earnings, return on average equity, return on average assets, efficiency ratio, asset quality and other financial data and capital and performance ratios.
 
Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the Company’s forward-looking statements are reasonable, these statements involve risks and uncertainties that are subject to change based on various important factors (some of which are beyond the Company’s control). The following factors, among others, could cause the Company’s financial performance to differ materially from the Company’s goals, plans, objectives, intentions, expectations and other forward-looking statements:
 
  •  a weakening in the United States economy in general and the regional and local economies within the New England region and Massachusetts, which could result in a deterioration of credit quality, a change in the allowance for loan losses, or a reduced demand for the Company’s credit or fee-based products and services;
 
  •  adverse changes in the local real estate market could result in a deterioration of credit quality and an increase in the allowance for loan loss, as most of the Company’s loans are concentrated in eastern Massachusetts and Cape Cod, and to a lesser extent, Rhode Island, and a substantial portion of these loans have real estate as collateral;
 
  •  the effects of, and changes in, trade, monetary and fiscal policies and laws, including interest rate policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, could affect the Company’s business environment or affect the Company’s operations;
 
  •  the effects of, any changes in, and any failure by the Company to comply with tax laws generally and requirements of the federal New Markets Tax Credit program in particular could adversely affect the Company’s tax provision and its financial results;
 
  •  inflation, interest rate, market and monetary fluctuations could reduce net interest income and could increase credit losses;
 
  •  adverse changes in asset quality could result in increasing credit risk-related losses and expenses;
 
  •  changes in the deferred tax asset valuation allowance in future periods may adversely affect financial results;
 
  •  competitive pressures could intensify and affect the Company’s profitability, including continued industry consolidation, the increased financial services provided by non-banks and banking reform;
 
  •  a deterioration in the conditions of the securities markets could adversely affect the value or credit quality of the Company’s assets, the availability and terms of funding necessary to meet the Company’s liquidity needs, and the Company’s ability to originate loans and could lead to impairment in the value of securities in the Company’s investment portfolios, having an adverse effect on the Company’s earnings;
 
  •  the potential need to adapt to changes in information technology could adversely impact the Company’s operations and require increased capital spending;
 
  •  changes in consumer spending and savings habits could negatively impact the Company’s financial results;


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  •  acquisitions may not produce results at levels or within time frames originally anticipated and may result in unforeseen integration issues or impairment of goodwill and/or other intangibles;
 
  •  new laws and regulations regarding the financial services industry including but not limited to, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform & Consumer Protection Act, may have significant effects on the financial services industry in general, and/or the Company in particular, the exact nature and extent of which is uncertain;
 
  •  changes in laws and regulations (including laws and regulations concerning taxes, banking, securities and insurance) generally applicable to the Company’s business could adversely affect the Company’s operations; and
 
  •  changes in accounting policies, practices and standards, as may be adopted by the regulatory agencies as well as the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, and other accounting standard setters, could negatively impact the Company’s financial results.
 
If one or more of the factors affecting the Company’s forward-looking information and statements proves incorrect, then the Company’s actual results, performance or achievements could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, forward-looking information and statements contained in this Form 10-K. Therefore, the Company cautions you not to place undue reliance on the Company’s forward-looking information and statements.
 
The Company does not intend to update the Company’s forward-looking information and statements, whether written or oral, to reflect change. All forward-looking statements attributable to the Company are expressly qualified by these cautionary statements.


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PART I.
 
Item 1.   Business
 
General
 
Independent Bank Corp. (the “Company”) is a state chartered, federally registered bank holding company headquartered in Rockland, Massachusetts that was incorporated under Massachusetts law in 1985. The Company is the sole stockholder of Rockland Trust Company (“Rockland” or the “Bank”), a Massachusetts trust company chartered in 1907. Rockland is a community-oriented commercial bank. The community banking business is the Company’s only reportable operating segment. The community banking business is managed as a single strategic unit and derives its revenues from a wide range of banking services, including lending activities, acceptance of demand, savings, and time deposits, and wealth management. At December 31, 2010, the Company had total assets of $4.7 billion, total deposits of $3.6 billion, stockholders’ equity of $436.5 million, and 919 full-time equivalent employees.
 
The Company is currently the sponsor of Independent Capital Trust V (“Trust V”), a Delaware statutory trust, and Slade’s Ferry Statutory Trust I (“Slade’s Ferry Trust I”), a Connecticut statutory trust, each of which was formed to issue trust preferred securities. Trust V and Slade’s Ferry Trust I are not included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements in accordance with the requirements of the consolidation topic of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”).
 
Periodically, the Bank acts as Qualified Intermediary (“QI”) and/or Exchange Accommodation Titleholder (“EAT”) in connection with customers’ like-kind exchanges under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code through its subsidiary Compass Exchange Advisors, LLC. The Internal Revenue Service established a “safe harbor” procedure, Revenue Procedure 2000-37, that allows an EAT to hold title to property for up to 180 days. This Revenue Procedure also allows the customer to: lend the EAT all of the funds needed to acquire the property on a non-recourse basis, manage the property, and receive all of the economic benefit of the property while title is held by the EAT. Compass Exchange Advisors LLC may form various entities to act as EATs and take title to customer’s property in connection with the customer’s 1031 exchange. In each transaction in which an entity owned by the Bank acts as EAT, any funds borrowed are non-recourse to the EAT and Bank, no economic investment is made in the property and the EAT derives no profit or loss from the ownership or operation of the property (other than its fees for services). Accordingly, any property owned by an entity as EAT is not consolidated by the Bank.
 
As of December 31, 2010, the Bank had the following corporate subsidiaries, all of which were wholly-owned by the Bank and included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements:
 
  •  Three Massachusetts security corporations, namely Rockland Borrowing Collateral Securities Corp., Rockland Deposit Collateral Securities Corp., and Taunton Avenue Securities Corp., which hold securities, industrial development bonds, and other qualifying assets;
 
  •  Rockland Trust Community Development Corporation, which has two wholly-owned subsidiaries named Rockland Trust Community Development LLC and Rockland Trust Community Development Corporation II, and which also serves as the manager of two Limited Liability Company subsidiaries wholly-owned by the Bank named Rockland Trust Community Development III LLC and Rockland Trust Community Development IV LLC, all of which were all formed to qualify as community development entities under federal New Markets Tax Credit Program criteria;
 
  •  Rockland Trust Phoenix LLC, which was established to hold other real estate owned acquired during loan workouts;
 
  •  Compass Exchange Advisors LLC which provides like-kind exchange services pursuant to section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code; and
 
  •  Bright Rock Capital Management LLC, which was established to act as a registered investment advisor under the Investment Advisors Act of 1940.


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Market Area and Competition
 
The Bank contends with considerable competition both in generating loans and attracting deposits. The Bank’s competition for generating loans is primarily from other commercial banks, savings banks, credit unions, mortgage banking companies, insurance companies, finance companies, and other institutional lenders. Competitive factors considered for loan generation include interest rates, terms offered, loan fees charged, loan products offered, service provided, and geographic locations.
 
In attracting deposits, the Bank’s primary competitors are savings banks, commercial and co-operative banks, credit unions, internet banks, as well as other non-bank institutions that offer financial alternatives such as brokerage firms and insurance companies. Competitive factors considered in attracting and retaining deposits include deposit and investment products and their respective rates of return, liquidity, and risk, among other factors, such as convenient branch locations and hours of operation, personalized customer service, online access to accounts, and automated teller machines.
 
The Bank’s market area is attractive and entry into the market by financial institutions previously not competing in the market area may continue to occur which could impact the Bank’s growth or profitability.
 
Lending Activities
 
The Bank’s gross loan portfolio (loans before allowance for loan losses) amounted to $3.6 billion on December 31, 2010, or 75.7% of total assets. The Bank classifies loans as commercial, consumer real estate, or other consumer. Commercial loans consist of commercial and industrial loans, commercial real estate, commercial construction, and small business loans. Commercial and industrial loans consist of loans with credit needs in excess of $250,000 and revenue in excess of $2.5 million, for working capital and other business-related purposes and floor plan financing. Commercial real estate loans are comprised of commercial mortgages that are secured by non-residential properties, as well as mortgages for construction loans on non-residential properties. Small business loans, including real estate loans, consist primarily of loans to businesses with commercial credit needs of less than or equal to $250,000 and revenues of less than $2.5 million. Consumer real estate consists of residential mortgages and home equity loans and lines that are secured primarily by owner-occupied residences and mortgages for the construction of residential properties. Other consumer loans are mainly personal loans and automobile loans.
 
The Bank’s borrowers consist of small-to-medium sized businesses and retail customers. The Bank’s market area is generally comprised of eastern Massachusetts, including Cape Cod, and to a lesser extent, Rhode Island. Substantially all of the Bank’s commercial, consumer real estate, and other consumer loan portfolios consist of loans made to residents of and businesses located in the Bank’s market area. The majority of the real estate loans in the Bank’s loan portfolio are secured by properties located within this market area.
 
Interest rates charged on loans may be fixed or variable and vary with the degree of risk, loan term, underwriting and servicing costs, loan amount, and the extent of other banking relationships maintained with customers. Rates are further subject to competitive pressures, the current interest rate environment, availability of funds, and government regulations.
 
The Bank’s principal earning assets are its loans. Although the Bank judges its borrowers to be creditworthy, the risk of deterioration in borrowers’ abilities to repay their loans in accordance with their existing loan agreements is inherent in any lending function. Participating as a lender in the credit market requires a strict underwriting and monitoring process to minimize credit risk. This process requires substantial analysis of the loan application, an evaluation of the customer’s capacity to repay according to the loan’s contractual terms, and an objective determination of the value of the collateral. The Bank also utilizes the services of an independent third-party to provide loan review services, which consist of a variety of monitoring techniques performed after a loan becomes part of the Bank’s portfolio.
 
The Bank’s Controlled Asset and Consumer Collections departments are responsible for the management and resolution of nonperforming loans. Nonperforming loans consist of nonaccrual loans and loans that are more than 90 days past due but still accruing interest. In the course of resolving nonperforming loans, the Bank may choose to restructure the contractual terms of certain loans. Terms may be modified to fit the ability of the borrower to repay in


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line with its current financial status. It is the Bank’s policy to have any restructured loans which are on nonaccrual status prior to being modified remain on nonaccrual status for approximately six months before management considers its return to accrual status. If the restructured loan is on accrual status prior to being modified, it is reviewed to determine if the modified loan should remain on accrual status.
 
Other Real Estate Owned (“OREO”) includes properties controlled by the Bank. In order to facilitate the disposition of OREO, the Bank may finance the purchase of such properties at market rates if the borrower qualifies under the Bank’s standard underwriting guidelines. The Bank had sixteen properties held as OREO at December 31, 2010, with a net realizable value totaling $7.3 million.
 
Origination of Loans  Commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, and construction loan applications are obtained through existing customers, solicitation by Bank personnel, referrals from current or past customers, or walk-in customers. Small business loan applications are typically originated by the Bank’s retail staff, through a dedicated team of business officers, by referrals from other areas of the Bank, referrals from current or past customers, or through walk-in customers. Customers for consumer real estate loans are referred to Mortgage Loan Officers who will meet with the borrowers at the borrowers’ convenience. Residential real estate loan applications primarily result from referrals by real estate brokers, homebuilders, and existing or walk-in customers. Mortgage Loan Officers are compensated on a commission basis and provide convenient origination services during banking and non-banking hours. Other consumer loan applications are directly obtained through existing or walk-in customers who have been made aware of the Bank’s consumer loan services through advertising, direct mail, and other media.
 
Loans are approved based upon a hierarchy of authority, predicated upon the size of the loan. Levels within the hierarchy of lending authorities range from individual lenders to Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. In accordance with governing banking statutes, Rockland is permitted, with certain exceptions, to make loans and commitments to any one borrower, including related entities, in the aggregate amount of not more than 20% of the Bank’s stockholders’ equity, which is the Bank’s legal lending limit, or $97.0 million at December 31, 2010. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Bank has established a more restrictive limit of not more than 75% of the Bank’s legal lending limit, or $72.8 million at December 31, 2010, which may only be exceeded with the approval of the Board of Directors. There were no borrowers whose total indebtedness in aggregate exceeded the Bank’s self-imposed restrictive limit. The Banks largest relationship as of December 31, 2010 consisted of thirty-three loans which aggregates to $41.9 million in exposure.
 
Sale of Loans  The Bank’s residential mortgage loans are generally originated in compliance with terms, conditions and documentation which permit the sale of such loans to investors, such as the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”), Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”), and other investors in the secondary market. Loan sales in the secondary market provide funds for additional lending and other banking activities. The Bank sells the servicing on a majority of the sold loans for a servicing released premium, simultaneous with the sale of the loan. For the remainder of the sold loans for which the Company retains the servicing, a mortgage servicing asset is recognized. As part of its asset/liability management strategy, the Bank may retain a portion of the adjustable rate and fixed rate residential real estate loan originations for its portfolio. During 2010, the Bank originated $418.7 million in residential real estate loans of which $63.7 million were retained in its portfolio, and comprised primarily of fifteen or twenty year terms.


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Below is a discussion of the loan categories in the Company’s portfolio. The following table shows the balance of the loans, the percentage of the gross loan portfolio, and the percentage of total interest income that loans generated, by category, for the fiscal years indicated:
 
                                         
                % of Total Interest Income Generated
 
    As of
    % of Total
    For the Year Ended December 31,  
    December 31, 2010     Loans     2010     2009     2008  
    (Dollars in thousands)                          
 
Commercial
  $ 2,429,517       68.3 %     61.8 %     57.3 %     55.1 %
Consumer Real Estate
    1,057,389       29.8 %     22.2 %     22.5 %     23.3 %
Other Consumer
    68,773       1.9 %     3.4 %     5.1 %     7.5 %
                                         
Total
  $ 3,555,679       100.0 %                        
                                         
 
Commercial Loans  Commercial loans consist of commercial and industrial loans, commercial real estate loans, commercial construction loans and small business loans. The Bank offers secured and unsecured commercial loans for business purposes, including issuing letters of credit.
 
Commercial loans may be structured as term loans or as revolving lines of credit including overdraft protection, credit cards, automatic clearinghouse (“ACH”) exposure, owner and non-owner occupied commercial mortgages and standby letters of credit.
 
Commercial term loans generally have a repayment schedule of five years or less and, although the Bank occasionally originates some commercial term loans with interest rates which float in accordance with a designated index rate, the majority of commercial term loans have fixed rates of interest and are collateralized by equipment, machinery or other corporate assets. In addition, the Bank generally obtains personal guarantees from the principals of the borrower for virtually all of its commercial loans. At December 31, 2010, there were $246.8 million of term loans in the commercial loan portfolio.
 
The following pie chart shows the diversification of the commercial and industrial portfolio as of December 31, 2010:
 
C&I Loan Portfolio Composition as of 12/31/10
 
(PIE CHART)


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Collateral for commercial revolving lines of credit may consist of accounts receivable, inventory or both, as well as other business assets. Commercial revolving lines of credit generally are reviewed on an annual basis and usually require substantial repayment of principal during the course of a year. The vast majority of these revolving lines of credit have variable rates of interest. At December 31, 2010, there were $256.1 million of revolving lines of credit in the commercial loan portfolio.
 
The Bank’s standby letters of credit generally are secured, have terms of not more than one year, and are reviewed for renewal on an annualized basis. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had $21.5 million of commercial and standby letters of credit.
 
The Bank also provides automobile and, to a lesser extent, boat and other vehicle floor plan financing. Floor plan loans are secured by the automobiles, boats, or other vehicles, which constitute the dealer’s inventory. Upon the sale of a floor plan unit, the proceeds of the sale are applied to reduce the loan balance. In the event a unit financed under a floor plan line of credit remains in the dealer’s inventory for an extended period, the Bank requires the dealer to pay-down the outstanding balance associated with such unit. Contractors hired by the Bank make unannounced periodic inspections of each dealer to review the value and condition of the underlying collateral. At December 31, 2010, there were $35.9 million in floor plan loans, all of which have variable rates of interest.
 
Small business lending caters to all of the banking needs of businesses with commercial credit requirements and revenues typically less than or equal to $250,000 and $2.5 million, respectively, and uses partially automated loan underwriting capabilities. The small business team makes use of the Bank’s authority as a preferred lender with the U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”). At December 31, 2010, there were $5.2 million of SBA guaranteed loans in the small business loan portfolio.
 
The Bank’s commercial real estate portfolio, inclusive of commercial construction, is the Bank’s largest loan type concentration. This portfolio is well-diversified with loans secured by a variety of property types, such as owner-occupied and non-owner-occupied commercial, retail, office, industrial, warehouse, industrial development bonds, and other special purpose properties, such as hotels, motels, nursing homes, restaurants, churches, recreational facilities, marinas, and golf courses. Commercial real estate also includes loans secured by certain residential-related property types including multi-family apartment buildings, residential development tracts and condominiums. The following pie chart shows the diversification of the commercial real estate portfolio as of December 31, 2010:
 
Commercial Real Estate Portfolio by Property Type
as of 12/31/10
 
(PIE CHART)


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Although terms vary, commercial real estate loans may have maturities of five years or less, or rate resets every five years for longer duration loans. These loan may have amortization periods of 20 to 25 years, with interest rates that float in accordance with a designated index or that are fixed during the origination process. It is the Bank’s policy to obtain personal guarantees from the principals of the borrower on commercial real estate loans and to obtain financial statements at least annually from all actively managed commercial and multi-family borrowers.
 
Commercial real estate lending entails additional risks as compared to residential real estate lending. Commercial real estate loans typically involve larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers. Development of commercial real estate projects also may be subject to numerous land use and environmental issues. The payment experience on such loans is typically dependent on the successful operation of the real estate project, which can be significantly impacted by supply and demand conditions within the markets for commercial, retail, office, industrial/warehouse and multi-family tenancy.
 
Additionally, classified in the commercial real estate portfolio are industrial developmental bonds. The Bank owns certain bonds issued by various state agencies, municipalities and non-profit organizations that it classifies as loans and not securities on the basis that another entity (i.e. the Bank’s customer), not the issuing agency is responsible for the payment to the Bank of the principal and interest on the debt, credit underwriting is based solely on the credit of the customer (and guarantors, if any), the banking relationship is with the customer and not the agency, there is no secondary market for the bonds, and the bonds are not available for sale, but are intended to be held by the bank until maturity. Therefore, the Bank believes that such bonds are more appropriately characterized as loans, rather than securities.
 
Construction loans are intended to finance the construction of residential and commercial properties, including loans for the acquisition and development of land or rehabilitation of existing properties. Non-permanent construction loans generally have terms of at least six months, but not more than two years. They usually do not provide for amortization of the loan balance during the construction term. The majority of the Bank’s commercial construction loans have floating rates of interest based upon the Rockland base rate or the Prime or London interbank offered rate (“LIBOR”) which are published daily in the Wall Street Journal.
 
Construction loans are generally considered to present a higher degree of risk than permanent real estate loans and may be affected by a variety of factors, such as adverse changes in interest rates and the borrower’s ability to control costs and adhere to time schedules. Other construction-related risks may include market risk, that is, the risk that “for-sale” or “for-lease” units may or may not be absorbed by the market within a developer’s anticipated time-frame or at a developer’s anticipated price. When the Company enters into a loan agreement with a borrower on a construction loan, an interest reserve may be included in the amount of the loan commitment to the borrower and it allows the lender to periodically advance loan funds to pay interest charges on the outstanding balance of the loan. The interest is capitalized and added to the loan balance. Management actively tracks and monitors these accounts. At December 31, 2010 the amount of interest reserves relating to construction loans was approximately $1.6 million.
 
Consumer Real Estate Loans
 
The Bank’s consumer real estate loans consist of loans secured by one-to-four family residential properties, construction loans and home equity loans and lines.
 
Rockland originates both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate residential real estate loans. The Bank will lend up to 97% of the lesser of the appraised value of the residential property securing the loan or the purchase price, and generally requires borrowers to obtain private mortgage insurance when the amount of the loan exceeds 80% of the value of the property. The rates of these loans are typically competitive with market rates. The Bank’s residential real estate loans are generally originated only under terms, conditions and documentation which permit sale in the secondary market. The Bank generally requires title insurance protecting the priority of its mortgage lien, as well as fire, extended coverage casualty and flood insurance, when necessary, in order to protect the properties securing its residential and other real estate loans. Independent appraisers appraise properties securing all of the Bank’s first mortgage real estate loans, as required by regulatory standards.


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The Bank’s residential construction lending is related to residential development within the Bank’s market area and the portfolio amounted to $4.2 million at December 31, 2010. The Bank typically has focused its construction lending on relatively small projects and has developed and maintains relationships with developers and operative homebuilders in the Plymouth, Norfolk, Barnstable, Bristol, Middlesex, and Worcester Counties of Massachusetts, and, to a lesser extent, in the state of Rhode Island.
 
Home equity loans and lines may be made as a fixed rate term loan or under a variable rate revolving line of credit secured by a first or second mortgage on the borrower’s residence or second home. At December 31, 2010, 45% of the home equity loans were in first position and 55% of the loans were in second position. At December 31, 2010, $183.4 million, or 31.7%, of the home equity portfolio were term loans and $395.9 million, or 68.3%, of the home equity portfolio was comprised of revolving lines of credit. The Bank will originate home equity loans and lines in an amount up to 80.0%, and at the Banks discretion it may loan up to 89.9%, of the appraised value or on-line valuation, reduced for any loans outstanding which are secured by such collateral. Home equity loans and lines are underwritten in accordance with the Bank’s loan policy, which includes a combination of credit score, loan-to-value (“LTV”) ratio, employment history and debt-to-income ratio.
 
The Bank does supplement performance data with current Fair Isaac Corporation (“FICO”) and LTV estimates. Current FICO data is purchased and appended to all consumer loans on a quarterly basis. In addition, automated valuation services and broker opinions of value are used to supplement original value data for the residential and home equity portfolios. Use of re-score and re-value data enables the Bank to better understand the current credit risk associated with these loans, but is not the only factor relied upon in determining a borrower’s credit worthiness. The following table shows the weighted average FICO scores and the weighted average combined loan-to-value ratio for the periods indicated below:
 
                 
    As of December 31,
    2010   2009
 
Residential Portfolio
               
FICO Score (re-scored)
    738       740  
Combined Loan-to-Value (re-valued)
    64.0 %     67.0 %
Home Equity Portfolio
               
FICO Score (re-scored)
    760       760  
Combined Loan- to-Value (re-valued)
    55.0 %     61.0 %
 
The average FICO scores above for 2010 are based upon re-scores available from November 2010 and actual score data for loans booked between December 1 and December 31, the LTV ratios are based on updated automated valuations as of November 30. The 2009 LTV ratios are based upon re-score data available as of January 2010.
 
Other Consumer Loans  The Bank makes loans for a wide variety of personal needs. Consumer loans primarily consist of installment loans and overdraft protection.
 
The Bank’s consumer loans also include auto, unsecured loans, loans secured by deposit accounts, loans to purchase motorcycles, recreational vehicles, or boats. The lending policy allows lending up to 80% of the purchase price of vehicles other than automobiles, with terms of up to three years for motorcycles and up to fifteen years for recreational vehicles.
 
The Bank’s installment loans consist primarily of auto loans, which totaled $41.9 million, at December 31, 2010, or 1.2% of loans, a decrease from 2.3% of loans at year-end 2009. Effective August 1, 2009 the Company chose to exit the indirect automobile business and consequently no longer originates auto loans on an indirect basis. Prior to August 2009, a portion of the Bank’s automobile loans were originated indirectly by a network of new and used automobile dealers located within the Bank’s market area.
 
Investment Activities
 
The Bank’s securities portfolio consists of U.S. Treasury securities, agency mortgage-backed securities, agency collateralized mortgage obligations, private mortgage-backed securities, state, county, and municipal securities, single issuer trust preferred securities issued by banks, pooled trust preferred securities issued by banks


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and insurers, equity securities held for the purpose of funding supplemental executive retirement plan obligations, and equity securities comprised of an investment in a community development affordable housing mutual fund. The majority of these securities are investment grade debt obligations with average lives of five years or less. U.S. Treasury securities entail a lesser degree of risk than loans made by the Bank by virtue of the guarantees that back them, require less capital under risk-based capital rules than non-insured or non-guaranteed mortgage loans, are more liquid than individual mortgage loans, and may be used to collateralize borrowings or other obligations of the Bank. The Bank views its securities portfolio as a source of income and liquidity. Interest and principal payments generated from securities provide a source of liquidity to fund loans and meet short-term cash needs. The Bank’s securities portfolio is managed in accordance with the Rockland Trust Company Investment Policy adopted by the Board of Directors. The Chief Executive Officer or the Chief Financial Officer may make investments with the approval of one additional member of the Asset/Liability Management Committee, subject to limits on the type, size and quality of all investments, which are specified in the Investment Policy. The Bank’s Asset/Liability Management Committee, or its appointee, is required to evaluate any proposed purchase from the standpoint of overall diversification of the portfolio. The Company reviews its security portfolio to ensure collection of interest. If any securities are deferring interest payments, the Company would place securities on nonaccrual status and reverse accrued but uncollected interest. At December 31, 2010, securities totaled $587.8 million. Total securities generated interest and dividends of 12.2%, 14.6%, and 14.2% of total interest income for the fiscal years ended 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
Sources of Funds
 
Deposits  At December 31, 2010 total deposits were $3.6 billion. Deposits obtained through Rockland’s branch banking network have traditionally been the principal source of the Bank’s funds for use in lending and for other general business purposes. The Bank has built a stable base of in-market core deposits from consumers, businesses, and municipalities located in eastern Massachusetts, including Cape Cod. Rockland offers a range of demand deposits, interest checking, money market accounts, savings accounts, and time certificates of deposit. Interest rates on deposits are based on factors that include loan demand, deposit maturities, alternative costs of funds, and interest rates offered by competing financial institutions in the Bank’s market area. The Bank believes it has been able to attract and maintain satisfactory levels of deposits based on the level of service it provides to its customers, the convenience of its banking locations, and its interest rates, that are generally competitive with those of competing financial institutions. Rockland Trust also participates in the Certificate of Deposit Registry Service (“CDARS”) program, allowing the Bank to provide easy access to multi-million dollar Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insurance protection on Certificate of Deposit investments for consumers, businesses and public entities. As of December 31, 2010, CDARS deposits totaled $13.6 million. Rockland has a municipal banking department that focuses on providing core depository services to local municipalities. As of December 31, 2010, municipal deposits totaled $481.8 million.
 
The Federal Government’s Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (the “EESA”) introduced the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (“TLGP”) effective November 2008. One of the TLGP’s main components resulted in an increase, of deposit insurance coverage from $100,000 to $250,000, per depositor. The Dodd-Frank Act made the increase in the deposit insurance to $250,000 permanent. At December 31, 2010 there were $1.3 billion in deposits with balances over $250,000. Additionally, during 2010, amendments to the Federal Deposit Insurance Act were enacted, providing unlimited insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts beginning December 31, 2010, through December 31, 2012. These deposits amounted to $141.6 million at December 31, 2010. This coverage applies to all insured depository institutions and there are no separate assessments applicable on these covered accounts.
 
Rockland Trust’s seventy branch locations are supplemented by the Bank’s internet banking services as well as automated teller machine (“ATM”) cards and debit cards which may be used to conduct various banking transactions at ATMs maintained at each of the Bank’s full-service offices and five additional remote ATM locations. The ATM cards and debit cards also allow customers access to a variety of national and international ATM networks. The Bank recently added mobile banking services giving customers the ability to use a variety of mobile devices to check balances, track account activity, search transactions, and set up alerts for text or e-mail messages for changes in their account. They can also transfer funds between Rockland Trust accounts and identify


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the nearest branch or ATM directly from their phone. A new feature to the mobile banking suite is a capability called mDeposit, which allows the Bank’s customers to deposit a check into their account directly from their mobile device.
 
The chart below shows the categories of deposits at December 31, 2010:
 
(BAR CHART)
 
Borrowings  As of December 31, 2010, total borrowings were $565.4 million. Borrowings consist of short-term and long-term obligations. Short-term borrowings may consist of Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston (“FHLBB”) advances, federal funds purchased, treasury tax and loan notes and assets sold under repurchase agreements. The chart below shows the categories of borrowings at December 31, 2010:
 
(BAR CHART)
 
In 1994, Rockland became a member of the FHLBB. The primary reason for FHLBB membership is to gain access to a reliable source of wholesale funding, particularly term funding as a tool to manage interest rate risk. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had $302.4 million outstanding in FHLB borrowings with initial maturities ranging from 3 months to 20 years. In addition, the Bank had $370.4 million of borrowing capacity remaining with the FHLB at December 31, 2010.
 
As a member of the FHLBB, the Bank is required to purchase stock in the FHLBB. That stock amounted to $35.9 million at December 31, 2010. During 2010 the FHLBB continued the moratorium on excess stock repurchases that was put into effect during 2008, as the FHLBB’s board of directors have continued to focus on building retained earnings while delivering core solutions of liquidity and longer-term funding to their members. As a result of these efforts the FHLBB was able to restore a modest dividend as announced on February 22, 2011.


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In addition to borrowing from the FHLBB, the Company also has access to other forms of borrowing, such as securities repurchase agreements. In a security repurchase agreement transaction, the Bank will generally sell a security, agreeing to repurchase either the same or a substantially identical security on a specified later date, at a price greater than the original sales price. The difference in the sale price and purchase price is the cost of the proceeds recorded as interest expense. The securities underlying the agreements are delivered to counterparties as security for the repurchase obligation. Since the securities are treated as collateral and the agreement stipulates that the borrower has an obligation to pay back the cash in short order, the transaction does not meet the criteria to be classified as a sale and is therefore considered a secured borrowing transaction for accounting purposes. Payments on such borrowings are interest only until the scheduled repurchase date. Repurchase agreements represent a non-deposit funding source for the Bank and the Bank is subject to the risk that the purchaser may default at maturity and not return the securities underlying the agreements. In order to minimize this potential risk, the Bank either deals with established firms when entering into these transactions or with customers whose agreements stipulate that the securities underlying the agreement are not delivered to the customer, instead they are held in segregated safekeeping accounts by the Company’s safekeeping agents. At December 31, 2010, the Bank had $50.0 million and $118.1 million of repurchase agreements with investment brokerage firms and customers, respectively.
 
Also included in borrowings at December 31, 2010 were $61.8 million of junior subordinated debentures, and $30.0 million of subordinated debt. These instruments provide long-term fixed rate funding as well as regulatory capital benefits. The Bank has a line of credit with the FHLB and FRB giving the Bank access to additional funds if necessary. See Note 8, “Borrowings” within Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof for more information regarding borrowings.
 
Wealth Management
 
Investment Management  The Rockland Trust Investment Management Group provides investment management and trust services to individuals, institutions, small businesses, and charitable institutions throughout eastern Massachusetts, including Cape Cod, and Rhode Island.
 
Accounts maintained by the Rockland Trust Investment Management Group consist of “managed” and “non-managed” accounts. “Managed” accounts are those for which the Bank is responsible for administration and investment management and/or investment advice. “Non-managed” accounts are those for which the Bank acts solely as a custodian or directed trustee. The Bank receives fees dependent upon the level and type of service(s) provided. For the year ended December 31, 2010, the Investment Management Group generated gross fee revenues of $10.3 million. Total assets under administration as of December 31, 2010, were $1.6 billion, an increase of $295.8 million, or 23.2%, from December 31, 2009. This increase is largely due to strong sales results and general market appreciation.
 
The administration of trust and fiduciary accounts is monitored by the Trust Committee of the Bank’s Board of Directors. The Trust Committee has delegated administrative responsibilities to three committees, one for investments, one for administration, and one for operations, all of which are comprised of Investment Management Group officers who meet not less than monthly.
 
Additionally, during 2010, the Company established Bright Rock Capital Management, LLC, (“Bright Rock”) a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rockland Trust, to provide institutional quality investment management services to the institutional/intermediary marketplace. Bright Rock is a registered investment advisor with the SEC and employs a fundamentally based investment philosophy and a highly disciplined investment management process. At December 31, 2010 Bright Rock had $103.6 million of assets under administration.
 
Retail Wealth Management  The Bank has an agreement with LPL Financial (“LPL”) and its affiliates and their insurance subsidiary LPL Insurance Associates, Inc. to offer the sale of mutual fund shares, unit investment trust shares, general securities, fixed and variable annuities and life insurance. Registered representatives who are both employed by the Bank and licensed and contracted with LPL are onsite to offer these products to the Bank’s customer base. The Bank also has an agreement with Savings Bank Life Insurance of Massachusetts (“SBLI”) to enable appropriately licensed Bank employees to offer SBLI’s fixed annuities and life insurance to the Bank’s customer base. For the year ended December 31, 2010, the retail investments and insurance group generated gross fee revenues of $1.4 million.


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Regulation
 
The following discussion sets forth certain of the material elements of the regulatory framework applicable to bank holding companies and their subsidiaries and provides certain specific information relevant to the Company. To the extent that the following information describes statutory and regulatory provisions, it is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutory and regulatory provisions. A change in applicable statutes, regulations or regulatory policy, may have a material effect on the Company’s business. The laws and regulations governing the Company and the Bank generally have been promulgated to protect depositors and not for the purpose of protecting stockholders.
 
General  The Company is registered as a bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (“BHCA”), as amended, and as such is subject to regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve”). Rockland is subject to regulation and examination by the Commissioner of Banks of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts (the “Commissioner”) and the FDIC.
 
The Bank Holding Company Act  BHCA prohibits the Company from acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of any class of voting shares of any bank, or increasing such ownership or control of any bank, without prior approval of the Federal Reserve. The BHCA also prohibits the Company from, with certain exceptions, acquiring more than 5% of any class of voting shares of any company that is not a bank and from engaging in any business other than banking or managing or controlling banks.
 
Under the BHCA, the Federal Reserve is authorized to approve the ownership by the Company of shares in any company, the activities of which the Federal Reserve has determined to be so closely related to banking or to managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. The Federal Reserve has, by regulation, determined that some activities are closely related to banking within the meaning of the BHCA. These activities include, but are not limited to, operating a mortgage company, finance company, credit card company, factoring company, trust company or savings association; performing data processing operations; providing some securities brokerage services; acting as an investment or financial adviser; acting as an insurance agent for types of credit-related insurance; engaging in insurance underwriting under limited circumstances; leasing personal property on a full-payout, non-operating basis; providing tax planning and preparation services; operating a collection agency and a credit bureau; providing consumer financial counseling and courier services. The Federal Reserve also has determined that other activities, including real estate brokerage and syndication, land development, property management and, except under limited circumstances, underwriting of life insurance not related to credit transactions, are not closely related to banking and are not a proper incident thereto.
 
Financial Services Modernization Legislation  In November 1999, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (“GLB”) was enacted. The GLB repeals provisions of the Glass-Steagall Act which restricted the affiliation of Federal Reserve member banks with firms “engaged principally” in specified securities activities, and which restricted officer, director, or employee interlocks between a member bank and any company or person “primarily engaged” in specified securities activities.
 
In addition, the GLB also contains provisions that expressly preempt any state law restricting the establishment of financial affiliations, primarily related to insurance. The general effect of the law is to establish a comprehensive framework to permit affiliations among commercial banks, insurance companies, securities firms and other financial service providers, by revising and expanding the BHCA framework to permit a holding company to engage in a full range of financial activities through a new entity known as a “financial holding company.” “Financial activities” is broadly defined to include not only banking, insurance and securities activities, but also merchant banking and additional activities that the Federal Reserve Board, in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, determines to be financial in nature, incidental to such financial activities or complementary activities that do not pose a substantial risk to the safety and soundness of depository institutions or the financial system generally.
 
The GLB also permits national banks to engage in expanded activities through the formation of financial subsidiaries. A national bank may have a subsidiary engaged in any activity authorized for national banks directly or any financial activity, except for insurance underwriting, insurance investments, real estate investment or development, or merchant banking, which may only be conducted through a subsidiary of a financial holding company. Financial activities include all activities permitted under new sections of the BHCA or permitted by regulation.


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To the extent that the GLB permits banks, securities firms and insurance companies to affiliate, the financial services industry may experience further consolidation. The GLB is intended to grant to community banks certain powers as a matter of right that larger institutions have accumulated on an ad hoc basis and which unitary savings and loan holding companies already possess. Nevertheless, the GLB may have the result of increasing the amount of competition that the Company faces from larger institutions and other types of companies offering financial products, many of which may have substantially more financial resources than the Company.
 
Interstate Banking  Pursuant to the Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 (the “Interstate Banking Act”), bank holding companies may acquire banks in states other than their home state without regard to the permissibility of such acquisitions under state law, but subject to any state requirement that the bank has been organized and operating for a minimum period of time, not to exceed five years, and the requirement that the bank holding company, after the proposed acquisition, controls no more than 10 percent of the total amount of deposits of insured depository institutions in the United States and no more than 30 percent or such lesser or greater amount set by state law of such deposits in that state.
 
Pursuant to Massachusetts law, no approval to acquire a banking institution, acquire additional shares in a banking institution, acquire substantially all the assets of a banking institution, or merge or consolidate with another bank holding company, may be given if the bank being acquired has been in existence for a period less than three years or, as a result, the bank holding company would control, in excess of 30%, of the total deposits of all state and federally chartered banks in Massachusetts, unless waived by the Commissioner. With the prior written approval of the Commissioner, Massachusetts also permits the establishment of de novo branches in Massachusetts to the full extent permitted by the Interstate Banking Act, provided the laws of the home state of such out-of-state bank expressly authorize, under conditions no more restrictive than those of Massachusetts, Massachusetts’ banks to establish and operate de novo branches in such state.
 
Capital Requirements  The Federal Reserve has adopted capital adequacy guidelines pursuant to which it assesses the adequacy of capital in examining and supervising a bank holding company and in analyzing applications to it under the BHCA. The Federal Reserve’s capital adequacy guidelines which generally require bank holding companies to maintain total capital equal to 8% of total risk-weighted assets, with at least one-half of that amount consisting of Tier 1, or core capital, and up to one-half of that amount consisting of Tier 2, or supplementary capital. Tier 1 capital for bank holding companies generally consists of the sum of common stockholders’ equity and perpetual preferred stock (subject in the latter case to limitations on the kind and amount of such stocks which may be included as Tier 1 capital), less net unrealized gains and losses on available for sale securities and on cash flow hedges, post retirement adjustments recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”), and goodwill and other intangible assets required to be deducted from capital. Tier 2 capital generally consists of perpetual preferred stock which is not eligible to be included as Tier 1 capital; hybrid capital instruments such as perpetual debt and mandatory convertible debt securities, and term subordinated debt and intermediate-term preferred stock; and, subject to limitations, the allowance for loan losses. Assets are adjusted under the risk-based guidelines to take into account different risk characteristics, with the categories ranging from 0% (requiring no additional capital), for assets such as cash, up to 1250%, which is a dollar-for-dollar capital charge on certain assets such as securities that are not eligible for the ratings based approach. The majority of assets held by a bank holding company are risk-weighted at 100%, including certain commercial real estate loans, commercial loans and consumer loans. Single family residential first mortgage loans which are not 90 days or more past due or nonperforming and which have been made in accordance with prudent underwriting standards are assigned a 50% level in the risk-weighting system, as are certain privately-issued mortgage-backed securities representing indirect ownership of such loans and certain multi-family housing loans. Off-balance sheet items also are adjusted to take into account certain risk characteristics.
 
In addition to the risk-based capital requirements, the Federal Reserve requires bank holding companies to maintain a minimum leverage capital ratio of Tier 1 capital to total assets of 3.0%. Total assets for this purpose do not include goodwill and any other intangible assets or investments that the Federal Reserve determines should be deducted from Tier 1 capital. The Federal Reserve has announced that the 3.0% Tier 1 leverage capital ratio requirement is the minimum for the top-rated bank holding companies without any supervisory, financial or operational weaknesses or deficiencies or those which are not experiencing or anticipating significant growth. Other


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bank holding companies (including the Company) are expected to maintain Tier 1 leverage capital ratios of at least 4.0% to 5.0% or more, depending on their overall condition.
 
The Company currently is in compliance with the above-described regulatory capital requirements. At December 31, 2010, the Company had Tier 1 capital and total capital equal to 10.28% and 12.37% of total risk-weighted adjusted assets, respectively, and Tier 1 leverage capital equal to 8.19% of total average assets. As of such date, the Bank complied with the applicable bank federal regulatory risked based capital requirements, with Tier 1 capital and total capital equal to 9.84% and 11.92% of total risk-weighted assets, respectively, and Tier 1 leverage capital equal to 7.83% of total average assets.
 
The FDIC has promulgated regulations and adopted a statement of policy regarding the capital adequacy of state-chartered banks, which, like the Bank, are not members of the Federal Reserve System. These requirements are substantially similar to those adopted by the Federal Reserve regarding bank holding companies, as described above. The FDIC’s capital regulations establish a minimum 3.0% Tier 1 leverage capital to total assets requirement for the most highly-rated state-chartered, non-member banks, with an additional cushion of at least 100 to 200 basis points for all other state-chartered, non-member banks, which effectively will increase the minimum Tier 1 leverage capital ratio for such banks to 4.0% or 5.0% or more.
 
Beginning in 2011, the Federal Reserve will limit the inclusion of restricted core capital elements, which include trust preferred securities, in tier 1 capital of bank holding companies. The inclusion of these elements will be limited to an amount equal to one-third of the sum of unrestricted core capital less goodwill net of deferred tax liabilities. Based on these limits, the Company does not anticipate excluding its trust preferred securities when calculating tier 1 capital.
 
Each federal banking agency has broad powers to implement a system of prompt corrective action to resolve problems of financial institutions that it regulates which are not adequately capitalized. The minimum levels are defined as follows:
 
                                                 
    Bank     Holding Company  
            Tier 1
                      Tier 1
 
    Total
  Tier 1
  Leverage
    Total
          Tier 1
    Leverage
 
    Risk-Based
  Risk-Based
  Capital
    Risk-Based
          Risk-Based
    Capital
 
Category
  Ratio   Ratio   Ratio     Ratio           Ratio     Ratio  
 
Well Capitalized
  ³ 10% and   ³ 6% and     ³ 5%       n/a               n/a       n/a  
Adequately Capitalized
  ³ 8% and   ³ 4% and     ³ 4% *     ³ 8 % and             ³ 4 % and     ³ 4 %
Undercapitalized
  < 8% or   < 4% or     < 4% *     < 8 % or             < 4 % or     < 4 %
Significantly Undercapitalized
  < 6% or   < 3% or     < 3%       n/a               n/a       n/a  
 
 
* 3% for institutions with a rating of one under the regulatory CAMELS or related rating system that are not anticipating or experiencing significant growth and have well-diversified risk.
 
A bank is considered critically undercapitalized if it has a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%. At December 31, 2010 the Company’s tangible equity ratio was 6.47%. The Company’s tangible equity ratio proforma to include the tax deductibility of goodwill was 6.89%. As of December 31, 2010, the Bank was deemed a “well-capitalized institution” as defined by federal banking agencies.
 
Commitments to Affiliated Institutions  Under Federal Reserve policy, the Company is expected to act as a source of financial strength to the Bank and to commit resources to support the Bank. This support may be required at times when the Company may not be able to provide such support. Similarly, under the cross-guarantee provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, in the event of a loss suffered or anticipated by the FDIC — either as a result of default of a banking or thrift subsidiary of a bank/financial holding company such as the Company or related to FDIC assistance provided to a subsidiary in danger of default — the other banking subsidiaries of such bank/financial holding company may be assessed for the FDIC’s loss, subject to certain exceptions.
 
Limitations on Acquisitions of Common Stock  The federal Change in Bank Control Act (“CBCA”) prohibits a person or group of persons from acquiring control of a bank holding company or bank unless the appropriate federal bank regulator has been given 60 days prior written notice of such proposed acquisition and within that time period such regulator has not issued a notice disapproving the proposed acquisition or extending for up to another


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30 days the period during which such a disapproval may be issued. The acquisition of 25% or more of any class of voting securities constitutes the acquisition of control under the CBCA. In addition, under a rebuttal presumption established under the CBCA regulations, the acquisition of 10% or more of a class of voting stock of a bank holding company or a FDIC insured bank, with a class of securities registered under or subject to the requirements of Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 would, under the circumstances set forth in the presumption, constitute the acquisition of control.
 
Any company would be required to obtain the approval of the Federal Reserve under the BHCA before acquiring 25% (5% in the case of an acquirer that is a bank holding company) or more of the outstanding common stock of, or such lesser number of shares as constitute control over the company. Such approval would be contingent upon, among other things, the acquirer registering as a bank holding company, divesting all impermissible holdings and ceasing any activities not permissible for a bank holding company. The Company does not own more than 5% voting stock in any banking institution other than Rockland.
 
FDIC Deposit Insurance  The majority of Rockland’s deposit accounts are insured to the maximum extent permitted by law by the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) which is administered by the FDIC. The FDIC offers insurance coverage on deposits up to the federally insured limit of $250,000. Additionally, during 2010, amendments to the Federal Deposit Insurance Act were enacted, providing unlimited insurance coverage for noninterest-bearing transaction accounts beginning December 31, 2010, for a two year period. This coverage applies to all insured depository institutions and there is no separate assessments applicable on these covered accounts.
 
The Bank currently pays deposit insurance premiums to the FDIC based upon a combination of financial ratios and supervisory factors. There are four established risk categories under the new assessment rules and accordingly the Bank has initial base assessment rates ranging from 12 to 16 basis points of the deposit assessment base, as defined by the FDIC. Effective April 2011, the assessment base will be defined as average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity. Additionally, as a result of these changes, the FDIC has proposed a change to the initial base assessment rates which will potentially range from 5 to 9 basis points of the newly defined assessment base.
 
During 2009, the FDIC voted to amend its assessment regulations to require all institutions to prepay the estimated risk-based assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 (which would have been due in March 2010) and for all of 2010, 2011, and 2012. As a result, the Bank was required to pay $20.4 million on December 30, 2009, of which approximately $13.1 million and $17.9 million reflected prepaid balances as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”)  Pursuant to the CRA and similar provisions of Massachusetts law, regulatory authorities review the performance of the Company and the Bank in meeting the credit needs of the communities served by the Bank. The applicable regulatory authorities consider compliance with this law in connection with applications for, among other things, approval of new branches, branch relocations, engaging in certain new financial activities under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (“GLB”), and acquisitions of banks and bank holding companies. The FDIC and the Massachusetts Division of Banks has assigned the Bank a CRA rating of outstanding as of the latest examination.
 
Bank Secrecy Act  The Bank Secrecy Act requires financial institutions to keep records and file reports that are determined to have a high degree of usefulness in criminal, tax and regulatory matters, and to implement counter-money laundering programs and compliance procedures.
 
USA Patriot Act of 2001  The Patriot Act strengthens U.S. law enforcement’s and the intelligence communities’ abilities to work cohesively to combat terrorism on a variety of fronts. The impact of the Patriot Act on financial institutions of all kinds is significant and wide ranging. The Patriot Act contains sweeping anti-money laundering and financial transparency laws and imposes various regulations, including standards for verifying client identification at account opening, and rules to promote cooperation among financial institutions, regulators and law enforcement entities in identifying parties that may be involved in terrorism or money laundering.
 
Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002  The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“SOX”) of 2002 includes very specific disclosure requirements and corporate governance rules, and the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and securities exchanges have adopted extensive disclosure, corporate governance and other related rules, due to SOX. The


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Company has incurred additional expenses in complying with the provisions of SOX and the resulting regulations. As the SEC provides any new requirements under SOX, management will review those rules, comply as required and may incur more expenses. However, management does not expect that such compliance will have a material impact on the results of operation or financial condition.
 
Regulation W  Transactions between a bank and its “affiliates” are quantitatively and qualitatively restricted under the Federal Reserve Act. The Federal Deposit Insurance Act applies Sections 23A and 23B to insured nonmember banks in the same manner and to the same extent as if they were members of the Federal Reserve System. The Federal Reserve Board has also issued Regulation W, which codifies prior regulations under Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and interpretative guidance with respect to affiliate transactions. Regulation W incorporates the exemption from the affiliate transaction rules, but expands the exemption to cover the purchase of any type of loan or extension of credit from an affiliate. Affiliates of a bank include, among other entities, the bank’s holding company and companies that are under common control with the bank. The Company is considered to be an affiliate of the Bank. In general, subject to certain specified exemptions, a bank and its subsidiaries are limited in their ability to engage in “covered transactions” with affiliates:
 
  •  to an amount equal to 10% of the bank’s capital and surplus, in the case of covered transactions with any one affiliate; and
 
  •  to an amount equal to 20% of the bank’s capital and surplus, in the case of covered transactions with all affiliates.
 
In addition, a bank and its subsidiaries may engage in covered transactions and other specified transactions only on terms and under circumstances that are substantially the same, or at least as favorable to the bank or its subsidiary, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with nonaffiliated companies. A “covered transaction” includes:
 
  •  a loan or extension of credit to an affiliate;
 
  •  a purchase of, or an investment in, securities issued by an affiliate;
 
  •  a purchase of assets from an affiliate, with some exceptions;
 
  •  the acceptance of securities issued by an affiliate as collateral for a loan or extension of credit to any party; and
 
  •  the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit on behalf of an affiliate.
 
In addition, under Regulation W:
 
  •  a bank and its subsidiaries may not purchase a low-quality asset from an affiliate;
 
  •  covered transactions and other specified transactions between a bank or its subsidiaries and an affiliate must be on terms and conditions that are consistent with safe and sound banking practices; and
 
  •  with some exceptions, each loan or extension of credit by a bank to an affiliate must be secured by collateral with a market value ranging from 100% to 130%, depending on the type of collateral, or the amount of the loan or extension of credit.
 
Regulation W generally excludes all non-bank and non-savings association subsidiaries of banks from treatment as affiliates, except to the extent that the Federal Reserve Board decides to treat these subsidiaries as affiliates.
 
Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008  In response to the financial crisis affecting the banking and financial markets, in October 2008, the “EESA” was signed into law. Pursuant to the EESA, the U.S. Treasury (the “Treasury”) has the authority to, among other things, purchase up to $700 billion of mortgages, mortgage-backed securities and certain other financial instruments from financial institutions for the purpose of stabilizing and providing liquidity to the U.S. financial markets.
 
The Treasury was authorized to purchase equity stakes in U.S. financial institutions. Under this program, known as the Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”), from the $700 billion authorized by the EESA, the Treasury made


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$250 billion of capital available to U.S. financial institutions through the purchase of preferred stock or subordinated debentures by the Treasury. In conjunction with the purchase of preferred stock from publicly-held financial institutions, the Treasury also received warrants to purchase common stock with an aggregate market price equal to 15% of the total amount of the preferred investment. Participating financial institutions are required to adopt the Treasury’s standards for executive compensation and corporate governance for the period during which the Treasury holds equity issued under the CPP and are restricted from increasing dividends to common shareholders or repurchasing common stock for three years without the consent of the Treasury.
 
The Company had initially elected to participate in the CPP in January of 2009 and subsequently returned the funds in April of 2009. For further details, see Note 11 “Capital Purchase Program” within Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
New Markets Tax Credit Program  The New Markets Tax Credit Program was created in December 2000 under federal law to provide federal tax incentives to induce private-sector, market-driven investment in businesses and real estate development projects located in low-income urban and rural communities across the nation. The New Markets Tax Credit Program is part of the United States Department of the Treasury Community Development Financial Institutions Fund. The New Markets Tax Credit Program enables investors to acquire federal tax credits by making equity investments for a period of at least seven years in qualified community development entities which have been awarded tax credit allocation authority by, and entered into an Allocation Agreement with, the United States Treasury. Community development entities must use equity investments to make loans to, or other investments in, qualified businesses and individuals in low-income communities in accordance with New Markets Tax Credit Program criteria. Investors receive an overall tax credit equal to 39% of their total equity investment, credited at a rate of 5% in each of the first 3 years and 6% in each of the final 4 years. More information on the New Markets Tax Credit Program may be obtained at www.cdfifund.gov.
 
The United States Treasury has honored the Bank’s qualified community development entity subsidiaries on multiple occasions with awards of tax credit allocation authority pursuant to the New Markets Tax Credit Program. For further details about the Bank’s New Markets Tax Credit Program, see the paragraph entitled “Income Taxes” included in Item 7 below.
 
Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act  During 2010, Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”). This new law will significantly change the current bank regulatory structure and affect the lending, deposit, investment, trading and operating activities of financial institutions and their holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act requires various federal agencies to adopt a broad range of new implementing rules and regulations, and to prepare numerous studies and reports for Congress. The federal agencies are given significant discretion in drafting the implementing rules and regulations, and consequently, many of the details and much of the impact of the Dodd-Frank Act may not be known for many months or years.
 
Effective July 1, 2011, the Dodd-Frank Act eliminates the federal prohibitions on paying interest on demand deposits, thus allowing businesses to have interest bearing checking accounts. Depending on competitive responses, this significant change to existing law could have an adverse impact on the Company’s interest expense.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act also broadens the base for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance assessments. Assessments will now be based on the average consolidated total assets less tangible equity capital of a financial institution. The Dodd-Frank Act also permanently increases the maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks, savings institutions and credit unions to $250,000 per depositor, retroactive to January 1, 2009, and non-interest bearing transaction accounts have unlimited deposit insurance through December 31, 2012.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act requires publicly traded companies to give stockholders a non-binding vote on executive compensation and so-called “golden parachute” payments, and authorizes the Securities and Exchange Commission to promulgate rules that would allow stockholders to nominate their own candidates using a company’s proxy materials. The legislation also directs the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate rules prohibiting excessive compensation paid to bank holding company executives, regardless of whether the company is publicly traded or not.


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The Dodd-Frank Act creates a new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau with broad powers to supervise and enforce consumer protection laws. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has broad rule-making authority for a wide range of consumer protection laws that apply to all banks and savings institutions, including the authority to prohibit “unfair, deceptive or abusive” acts and practices. Banks and savings institutions with $10 billion or less in assets will continue to be examined for compliance with consumer laws by their primary bank regulators.
 
The Company is actively reviewing the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and assessing its probable impact on its business, financial condition, and results of operations. However, the ultimate effect of the Dodd-Frank Act on the financial services industry in general, and on the Company in particular, is uncertain at this time.
 
Regulation E  Federal Reserve Board Regulation E governs electronic fund transfers and provides a basic framework that establishes the rights, liabilities, and responsibilities of participants in electronic fund transfer systems such as automated teller machine transfers, telephone bill-payment services, point-of-sale terminal transfers in stores, and preauthorized transfers from or to a consumer’s account (such as direct deposit and social security payments). The term “electronic fund transfer” generally refers to a transaction initiated through an electronic terminal, telephone, computer, or magnetic tape that instructs a financial institution either to credit or to debit a consumer’s asset account. Regulation E describes the disclosures which financial institutions are required to make to consumers who engage in electronic fund transfers and generally limits a consumer’s liability for unauthorized electronic fund transfers, such as those arising from loss or theft of an access device, to $50 for consumers who notify their bank in a timely manner.
 
Employees  As of December 31, 2010, the Bank had 919 full time equivalent employees. None of the Company’s employees are represented by a labor union and management considers relations with its employees to be good.
 
Miscellaneous  The Bank is subject to certain restrictions on loans to the Company, investments in the stock or securities thereof, the taking of such stock or securities as collateral for loans to any borrower, and the issuance of a guarantee or letter of credit on behalf of the Company. The Bank also is subject to certain restrictions on most types of transactions with the Company, requiring that the terms of such transactions be substantially equivalent to terms of similar transactions with non-affiliated firms. In addition, under state law, there are certain conditions for and restrictions on the distribution of dividends to the Company by the Bank.
 
The regulatory information referenced briefly summarizes certain material statutes and regulations affecting the Company and the Bank and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutory and regulatory provisions.
 
Statistical Disclosure by Bank Holding Companies
 
For information regarding borrowings, see Note 8, “Borrowings” within Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof, which includes information regarding short-term borrowings.
 
For information regarding the Company’s business and operations, see Selected Financial Data in Item 6 hereof, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Item 7 hereof and the Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8 hereof and incorporated by reference herein.
 
Securities and Exchange Commission Availability of Filings on Company Web Site
 
Under Section 13 and 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 the Company must file periodic and current reports with the SEC. The public may read and copy any materials filed with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street N.E. Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Public Reference Room at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Company electronically files the following reports with the SEC: Form 10-K (Annual Report), Form 10-Q (Quarterly Report), Form 11-K (Annual Report for Employees’ Savings, Profit Sharing and Stock Ownership Plan), Form 8-K (Report of Unscheduled Material Events), Forms S-4, S-3 and 8-A (Registration Statements), and Form DEF 14A (Proxy Statement). The Company may file additional forms. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, at www.sec.gov, in which all forms filed electronically may be accessed. Additionally, the Company’s annual


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report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company electronically files such material with, or furnishes to, the SEC and additional shareholder information are available free of charge on the Company’s website: www.RocklandTrust.com (within the investor relations tab). Information contained on the Company’s website and the SEC website is not incorporated by reference into this Form 10-K. The Company has included the web address and the SEC website address only as inactive textual references and does not intend them to be active links to our website or the SEC website. The Company’s Code of Ethics and other Corporate Governance documents are also available on the Company’s website in the Investor Relations section of the website.


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Item 1A.   Risk Factors
 
Changes in interest rates could adversely impact the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.  The Company’s ability to make a profit, like that of most financial institutions, substantially depends upon its net interest income, which is the difference between the interest income earned on interest earning assets, such as loans and investment securities, and the interest expense paid on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings. However, certain assets and liabilities may react differently to changes in market interest rates. Further, interest rates on some types of assets and liabilities may fluctuate prior to changes in broader market interest rates, while rates on other types of assets may lag behind. Additionally, some assets such as adjustable-rate mortgages have features, such as rate caps and floors, which restrict changes in their interest rates.
 
Factors such as inflation, recession, unemployment, money supply, global disorder, instability in domestic and foreign financial markets, and other factors beyond the Company’s control, may affect interest rates. Changes in market interest rates will also affect the level of voluntary prepayments on loans and the receipt of payments on mortgage-backed securities, resulting in the receipt of proceeds that may have to be reinvested at a lower rate than the loan or mortgage-backed security being prepaid.
 
The state of the financial and credit markets may severely impact the global and domestic economies and may lead to a significantly tighter environment in terms of liquidity and availability of credit. Economic growth may slow down and the national economy may experience additional recession periods. Market disruption, government, and central bank policy actions intended to counteract the effects of recession, changes in investor expectations regarding compensation for market risk, credit risk and liquidity risk and changing economic data could continue to have dramatic effects on both the volatility of and the magnitude of the directional movements of interest rates. Although the Company pursues an asset/liability management strategy designed to control its risk from changes in interest rates, changes in market interest rates can have a material adverse effect on the Company’s profitability.
 
If the Company has higher than anticipated loan losses than it has modeled, its earnings could materially decrease.  The Company’s loan customers may not repay loans according to their terms, and the collateral securing the payment of loans may be insufficient to assure repayment. The Company may therefore experience significant credit losses which could have a material adverse effect on its operating results and capital ratios. The Company makes various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of its loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of loans. In determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses, the Company relies on its experience and its evaluation of economic conditions. If its assumptions prove to be incorrect, its current allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover losses inherent in its loan portfolio and an adjustment may be necessary to allow for different economic conditions or adverse developments in its loan portfolio. Consequently, a problem with one or more loans could require the Company to significantly increase the level of its provision for loan losses. In addition, federal and state regulators periodically review the Company’s allowance for loan losses and may require it to increase its provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs. Material additions to the allowance would materially decrease the Company’s net income.
 
A significant amount of the Company’s loans are concentrated in Massachusetts, and adverse conditions in this area could negatively impact its operations.  Substantially all of the loans the Company originates are secured by properties located in, or are made to businesses which operate in Massachusetts. Because of the current concentration of the Company’s loan origination activities in Massachusetts, in the event of continued adverse economic conditions, including, but not limited to, increased unemployment, continued downward pressure on the value of residential and commercial real estate, political or business developments, that may affect Massachusetts and the ability of property owners and businesses in Massachusetts to make payments of principal and interest on the underlying loans, the Company would likely experience higher rates of loss and delinquency on its loans than if its loans were more geographically diversified, which could have an adverse effect on its results of operations or financial condition.
 
The Company operates in a highly regulated environment and may be adversely impacted by changes in law and regulations.  The Company is subject to extensive regulation, supervision and examination. See “Regulation” in Item 1 hereof, Business. Any change in the laws or regulations and failure by the Company to comply with applicable law and regulation, or a change in regulators’ supervisory policies or examination procedures, whether


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by the Massachusetts Commissioner of Banks, the FDIC, the Federal Reserve Board, other state or federal regulators, the United States Congress, or the Massachusetts legislature could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.
 
The Company has strong competition within its market area which may limit the Company’s growth and profitability.  The Company faces significant competition both in attracting deposits and in the origination of loans. See “Market Area and Competition” in Item 1 hereof, Business. Commercial banks, credit unions, savings banks, savings and loan associations operating in the Company’s primary market area have historically provided most of its competition for deposits. Competition for the origination of real estate and other loans come from other commercial banks, thrift institutions, credit unions, insurance companies, finance companies, other institutional lenders and mortgage companies.
 
The success of the Company is dependent on hiring and retaining certain key personnel.  The Company’s performance is largely dependent on the talents and efforts of highly skilled individuals. The Company relies on key personnel to manage and operate its business, including major revenue generating functions such as loan and deposit generation. The loss of key staff may adversely affect the Company’s ability to maintain and manage these functions effectively, which could negatively affect the Company’s revenues. In addition, loss of key personnel could result in increased recruiting and hiring expenses, which could cause a decrease in the Company’s net income. The Company’s continued ability to compete effectively depends on its ability to attract new employees and to retain and motivate its existing employees.
 
The Company’s business strategy of growth in part through acquisitions could have an impact on its earnings and results of operations that may negatively impact the value of the Company’s stock.  In recent years, the Company has focused, in part, on growth through acquisitions. From time to time in the ordinary course of business, the Company engages in preliminary discussions with potential acquisition targets. The consummation of any future acquisitions may dilute stockholder value.
 
Although the Company’s business strategy emphasizes organic expansion combined with acquisitions, there can be no assurance that, in the future, the Company will successfully identify suitable acquisition candidates, complete acquisitions and successfully integrate acquired operations into our existing operations or expand into new markets. There can be no assurance that acquisitions will not have an adverse effect upon the Company’s operating results while the operations of the acquired business are being integrated into the Company’s operations. In addition, once integrated, acquired operations may not achieve levels of profitability comparable to those achieved by the Company’s existing operations, or otherwise perform as expected. Further, transaction-related expenses may adversely affect the Company’s earnings. These adverse effects on the Company’s earnings and results of operations may have a negative impact on the value of the Company’s stock.
 
Difficult market conditions have adversely affected the industry in which the Company operates.  Dramatic declines in the housing market with falling real estate values and increasing foreclosures and unemployment, have negatively impacted the credit performance of mortgage loans and resulted in significant write-downs of asset values by financial institutions, including government-sponsored entities as well as major commercial and investment banks. These write-downs, initially of mortgage-backed securities but spreading to credit default swaps and other derivative and cash securities, in turn, have caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to merge with larger and stronger institutions and, in some cases to fail. Reflecting concern about the stability of the financial markets generally and the strength of counterparties, many lenders and institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to borrowers, including to other financial institutions. This market turmoil and tightening of credit have led to an increased level of commercial and consumer delinquencies, lack of consumer confidence, increased market volatility and widespread reduction of business activity generally. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and lack of confidence in the financial markets could materially affect the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations. A worsening of these conditions would likely exacerbate the adverse effects of these difficult market conditions on the Company and others in the financial services industry. In particular, the Company may face the following risks in connection with these events:
 
  •  The Company may expect to face increased regulation of its industry. Compliance with such regulation may increase its costs and limit its ability to pursue business opportunities.


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  •  Market developments may affect customer confidence levels and may cause increases in loan delinquencies and default rates, which the Company expects could impact its loan charge-offs and provision for loan losses.
 
  •  Continued illiquidity in the capital markets for certain types of investment securities may cause additional credit related other-than-temporary impairment charges to the Company’s income statement.
 
  •  The Company’s ability to borrow from other financial institutions or to access the debt or equity capital markets on favorable terms or at all could be adversely affected by further disruptions in the capital markets or other events, including actions by rating agencies and deteriorating investor expectations.
 
  •  Competition in the industry could intensify as a result of the increasing consolidation of financial services companies in connection with current market conditions.
 
  •  The Company may be required to pay significantly higher FDIC premiums because market developments have significantly depleted the insurance fund of the FDIC and reduced the ratio of reserves to insured deposits.
 
  •  It may become necessary or advisable for the Company, due to changes in regulatory requirements, change in market conditions, or for other reasons, to hold more capital or to alter the forms of capital it currently maintains.
 
The Company’s securities portfolio performance in difficult market conditions could have adverse effects on the Company’s results of operations.  Under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the Company is required to review the Company’s investment portfolio periodically for the presence of other-than-temporary impairment of its securities, taking into consideration current market conditions, the extent and nature of changes in fair value, issuer rating changes and trends, volatility of earnings, current analysts’ evaluations, the Company’s ability and intent to hold investments until a recovery of fair value, as well as other factors. Adverse developments with respect to one or more of the foregoing factors may require the Company to deem particular securities to be other-than-temporarily impaired, with the credit related portion of the reduction in the value recognized as a charge to the Company’s earnings. Recent market volatility has made it extremely difficult to value certain of the Company’s securities. Subsequent valuations, in light of factors prevailing at that time, may result in significant changes in the values of these securities in future periods. Any of these factors could require the Company to recognize further impairments in the value of the Company’s securities portfolio, which may have an adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations in future periods.
 
Impairment of goodwill and/or intangible assets could require charges to earnings, which could result in a negative impact on our results of operations.  Goodwill arises when a business is purchased for an amount greater than the net fair value of its assets. The Bank has recognized goodwill as an asset on the balance sheet in connection with several recent acquisitions (see Note 6 “Goodwill and Identifiable Intangible Assets” within Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof). When an intangible asset is determined to have an indefinite useful life, it shall not be amortized, and instead is evaluated for impairment. The Company evaluates goodwill and intangibles for impairment at least annually by comparing fair value to carrying amount. Although the Company determined that goodwill and other intangible assets were not impaired during 2010, a significant and sustained decline in the Company’s stock price and market capitalization, a significant decline in the Companys expected future cash flows, a significant adverse change in the business climate, slower growth rates or other factors could result in impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets. If the Company were to conclude that a future write-down of the goodwill or intangible assets is necessary, then the Company would record the appropriate charge to earnings, which could be materially adverse to the results of operations and financial position.
 
Deterioration in the Federal Home Loan Bank Boston’s (“FHLBB”) capital might restrict the FHLBB’s ability to meet the funding needs of its members, cause a suspension of its dividend, and cause its stock to be determined to be impaired.  Significant components of the Bank’s liquidity needs are met through its access to funding pursuant to its membership in the FHLBB. The FHLBB is a cooperative that provides services to its member banking institutions. The primary reason for joining the FHLBB is to obtain funding from the FHLBB. The purchase of stock in the FHLBB is a requirement for a member to gain access to funding. Any deterioration in the FHLBB’s


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performance may affect the Companys access to funding and/or require the Company to deem the required investment in FHLBB stock to be impaired.
 
Reductions in the value of the Company’s deferred tax assets could affect earnings adversely.  A deferred tax asset is created by the tax effect of the differences between an asset’s book value and its tax basis. The Company assesses the deferred tax assets periodically to determine the likelihood of the Company’s ability to realize their benefits. These assessments consider the performance of the associated business and its ability to generate future taxable income. If the information available to the Company at the time of assessment indicates there is a greater than 50% chance that the Company will not realize the deferred tax asset benefit, the Company is required to establish a valuation allowance for it and reduce its future tax assets to the amount the Company believes could be realized in future tax returns. Recording such a valuation allowance could have a material adverse effect on the results of operations or financial position.
 
Item 1B.   Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None
 
Item 2.   Properties
 
At December 31, 2010, the Bank conducted its business from its main office located at 288 Union Street, Rockland, Massachusetts and sixty-nine banking offices located within Barnstable, Bristol, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth and Worcester Counties in eastern Massachusetts. In addition to its main office, the Bank leased fifty-two of its branches and owned the remaining seventeen branches. In addition to these branch locations, the Bank had five remote ATM locations all of which were leased.
 
The Bank’s executive administration offices are located in Hanover, while the remaining administrative and operations locations are housed in several different campuses. Additionally, there are a number of sales offices not associated with a branch location throughout the Bank’s footprint.
 
For additional information regarding the Company’s premises and equipment and lease obligations, see Notes 5, “Bank Premises and Equipment” and 18, “Commitments and Contingencies,” respectively, within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
Item 3.   Legal Proceedings
 
The Company is not involved in any legal proceedings other than routine legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business. Management believes that those routine legal proceedings involve, in the aggregate, amounts that are immaterial to the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.


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PART II
 
Item 5.   Market for Independent Bank Corp.’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
(a.) Independent Bank Corp.’s common stock trades on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System (“NASDAQ”) under the symbol INDB. The Company declared cash dividends of $0.72 per share in 2010 and in 2009. The ratio of dividends paid to earnings in 2010 and 2009 was 37.9% and 82.8%, respectively.
 
Payment of dividends by the Company on its common stock is subject to various regulatory restrictions and guidelines. Since substantially all of the funds available for the payment of dividends are derived from the Bank, future dividends will depend on the earnings of the Bank, its financial condition, its need for funds, applicable governmental policies and regulations, and other such matters as the Board of Directors deem appropriate. Management believes that the Bank will continue to generate adequate earnings to continue to pay common dividends on a quarterly basis.
 
On January 9, 2009, as part of the CPP established by the U.S. Department of Treasury (“Treasury”) under the EESA of 2008, the Company entered into a Letter Agreement with the Treasury pursuant to which the Company issued and sold to the Treasury 78,158 shares of the Company’s Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series C, par value $0.01 per share, having a liquidation preference of $1,000 per share and a ten-year warrant to purchase up to 481,664 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.01 per share.
 
Subsequently, on April 22, 2009 the Company repaid with regulatory approval, the preferred stock issued to the Treasury pursuant to the Capital Purchase Program. As a result, during the second quarter of 2009 the Company recorded a $4.4 million non-cash deemed dividend charged to earnings, amounting to $0.22 per diluted share, associated with the repayment of the preferred stock and an additional preferred stock dividend of $141,000 for the second quarter of 2009. The Company and the Bank remained well capitalized following this event. The Company also repurchased the common stock warrant issued to the Treasury for $2.2 million, the cost of which was recorded as a reduction in capital during 2009, in accordance with the United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“U.S. GAAP”).
 
On April 10, 2009 the Company completed its acquisition of Ben Franklin, the parent of Benjamin Franklin Bank. The transaction qualified as a tax-free reorganization for federal income tax purposes, and former Ben Franklin shareholders received 0.59 shares of the Company’s common stock for each share of Ben Franklin common stock which they owned. Under the terms of the merger, cash was issued in lieu of fractional shares. Based upon the Company’s $18.27 per share closing price on April 9, 2009, the transaction was valued at $10.7793 per share of Ben Franklin common stock or approximately $84.5 million in the aggregate. As a result of the acquisition, the Company’s outstanding shares increased by 4,624,948 shares.
 
The following schedule summarizes the closing price range of common stock and the cash dividends paid for the fiscal years 2010 and 2009:
 
Price Range of Common Stock
 
                         
2010
  High     Low     Dividend  
 
4th Quarter
  $ 28.09     $ 22.35     $ 0.18  
3rd Quarter
    25.55       20.91       0.18  
2nd Quarter
    28.09       23.21       0.18  
1st Quarter
    26.76       21.00       0.18  
 


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2009
  High     Low     Dividend  
 
4th Quarter
  $ 22.80     $ 20.06     $ 0.18  
3rd Quarter
    24.34       19.19       0.18  
2nd Quarter
    21.75       14.93       0.18  
1st Quarter
    26.26       10.94       0.18  
 
As of December 31, 2010 there were 21,220,801 shares of common stock outstanding which were held by approximately 2,751 holders of record. The closing price of the Company’s stock on December 31, 2010 was $27.05. The number of record holders may not reflect the number of persons or entities holding stock in nominee name through banks, brokerage firms, and other nominees.
 
The information required by S-K Item 201(d) is incorporated by reference from Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters hereof.

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Comparative Stock Performance Graph
 
The stock performance graph below and associated table compare the cumulative total shareholder return of the Company’s common stock from December 31, 2005 to December 31, 2010 with the cumulative total return of the NASDAQ Composite Index (U.S. Companies) and the SNL Bank NASDAQ Index. The lines in the graph and the numbers in the table below represent monthly index levels derived from compounded daily returns that include reinvestment or retention of all dividends. If the monthly interval, based on the last day of a fiscal year, was not a trading day, the preceding trading day was used. The index value for all of the series was set to 100.00 on December 31, 2005 (which assumes that $100.00 was invested in each of the series on December 31, 2005).
 
Independent Bank Corp.
Total Return Performance
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
                                                 
    Period Ending
Index
  12/31/05   12/31/06   12/31/07   12/31/08   12/31/09   12/31/10
 
Independent Bank Corp. 
    100.00       128.80       99.52       98.23       81.31       108.54  
NASDAQ Composite
    100.00       110.39       122.15       73.32       106.57       125.91  
SNL Bank NASDAQ
    100.00       112.27       88.14       64.01       51.93       61.27  
 
Source: SNL Financial LC
 
(b.) Not applicable
 
(c.) Not applicable


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Item 6.   Selected Financial Data
 
The selected consolidated financial and other data of the Company set forth below does not purport to be complete and should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified in its entirety by, the more detailed information, including the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes, appearing elsewhere herein.
 
                                         
    As of or for the Years Ended December 31,
    2010   2009   2008   2007   2006
        (Dollars in thousands, except per share data)    
 
FINANCIAL CONDITION DATA:
                                       
Securities available for sale
  $ 377,457     $ 508,650     $ 575,688     $ 427,998     $ 395,378  
Securities held to maturity
    202,732       93,410       32,789       45,265       76,747  
Loans
    3,555,679       3,395,515       2,652,536       2,031,824       2,013,050  
Allowance for loan losses
    46,255       42,361       37,049       26,831       26,815  
Goodwill and core deposit intangibles
    141,956       143,730       125,710       60,411       56,535  
Total assets
    4,695,738       4,482,021       3,628,469       2,768,413       2,828,919  
Total deposits
    3,627,783       3,375,294       2,579,080       2,026,610       2,090,344  
Total borrowings
    565,434       647,397       695,317       504,344       493,649  
Stockholders’ equity
    436,472       412,649       305,274       220,465       229,783  
Non-performing loans
    23,108       36,183       26,933       7,644       6,979  
Non-performing assets
    31,493       41,245       29,883       8,325       7,169  
OPERATING DATA:
                                       
Interest income
  $ 202,724     $ 202,689     $ 175,440     $ 158,524     $ 166,298  
Interest expense
    38,763       51,995       58,926       63,555       65,038  
Net interest income
    163,961       150,694       116,514       94,969       101,260  
Provision for loan losses
    18,655       17,335       10,888       3,130       2,335  
Non-interest income
    46,906       38,192       29,032       33,265       28,039  
Non-interest expenses
    139,745       141,815       104,143       87,932       79,354  
Net income
    40,240       22,989       23,964       28,381       32,851  
Preferred stock dividend
          5,698                    
Net income available to the common shareholder
    40,240       17,291       23,964       28,381       32,851  
PER SHARE DATA:
                                       
Net income — basic
  $ 1.90     $ 0.88     $ 1.53     $ 2.02     $ 2.20  
Net income — diluted
    1.90       0.88       1.52       2.00       2.17  
Cash dividends declared
    0.72       0.72       0.72       0.68       0.64  
Book value(1)
    20.57       19.58       18.75       16.04       15.65  
OPERATING RATIOS:
                                       
Return on average assets
    0.88 %     0.40 %     0.73 %     1.05 %     1.12 %
Return on average common equity
    9.46 %     4.29 %     8.20 %     12.93 %     14.60 %
Net interest margin (on a fully tax equivalent basis)
    3.95 %     3.89 %     3.95 %     3.90 %     3.85 %
Equity to assets
    9.30 %     9.21 %     8.41 %     7.96 %     8.12 %
Dividend payout ratio
    37.93 %     82.79 %     48.95 %     33.41 %     29.10 %
ASSET QUALITY RATIOS:
                                       
Non-performing loans as a percent of gross loans
    0.65 %     1.07 %     1.02 %     0.38 %     0.35 %


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    As of or for the Years Ended December 31,
    2010   2009   2008   2007   2006
        (Dollars in thousands, except per share data)    
 
Non-performing assets as a percent of total assets
    0.67 %     0.92 %     0.82 %     0.30 %     0.25 %
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of total loans
    1.30 %     1.25 %     1.40 %     1.32 %     1.33 %
Allowance for loan losses as a percent of non-performing loans
    200.17 %     117.07 %     137.56 %     351.01 %     384.22 %
CAPITAL RATIOS:
                                       
Tier 1 leverage capital ratio
    8.19 %     7.87 %     7.55 %     8.02 %     8.05 %
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio
    10.28 %     9.83 %     9.50 %     10.27 %     11.05 %
Total risk-based capital ratio
    12.37 %     11.92 %     11.85 %     11.52 %     12.30 %
 
 
(1) Calculated by dividing total stockholders’ equity by the total outstanding shares as of the end of each period.
 
Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
The Company is a state chartered, federally registered bank holding company, incorporated in 1985. The Company is the sole stockholder of Rockland Trust, a Massachusetts trust company chartered in 1907. For a full list of corporate entities see Item 1 “Business — General” hereto.
 
All material intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. When necessary, certain amounts in prior year financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current year’s presentation. The following should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes thereto.
 
Executive Level Overview
 
During 2010, the Company experienced strong origination volumes across each of its primary business lines and continued strength and stability in asset quality measures. The Company achieved strong growth in the commercial and industrial portfolio which increased by 34.7% in 2010. Additionally, the commercial real estate portfolio and home equity portfolio experienced significant growth, increasing by 6.4% and 22.8%, respectively, during 2010. This growth is a result of the Company’s continual relationship building efforts and by capitalizing on marketplace opportunities. The following table illustrates key performance measures for the periods indicated, highlighting these positive results:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended
 
    December 31,  
    2010     2009  
 
Diluted Earnings Per Share
  $ 1.90     $ 0.88  
Return on Average Assets
    0.88 %     0.40 %
Return on Average Common Equity
    9.46 %     4.29 %
Net Interest Margin
    3.95 %     3.89 %

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The Company’s continued stability in asset quality was marked by a decrease in nonperforming loans. Total nonperforming loans decreased to 0.65% of total loans at December 31, 2010 compared to 1.07% at December 31, 2009.
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
 
Shown in the table presented below is a reconcilement of the change in the Company’s nonperforming assets:
 
         
    For the Year
 
    Ending
 
    December 31,
 
    2010  
 
Nonperforming Assets Beginning Balance
  $ 41,245  
New to Nonperforming
    47,220  
Loans Charged-Off
    (16,187 )
Loans Paid-Off
    (20,484 )
Loans Transferred to Other Real Estate Owned/Other Assets
    (10,836 )
Loans Restored to Accrual Status
    (11,878 )
New to Other Real Estate Owned
    10,836  
Sale of Other Real Estate Owned
    (7,500 )
Other
    (923 )
         
Nonperforming Assets Ending Balance
  $ 31,493  
         


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Loan delinquency, both early and late stage improved in 2010 due to focused loan workout efforts and a relatively stable economy.
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
Net loan charge-offs increased modestly to 0.43% of loans in 2010 as compared to 0.38% of
loans in 2009.
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
The allowance for loan losses increased modestly in 2010 to 1.30% of loans from 1.25% of loans in 2009 largely due to shifts in the composition of loan portfolio mix.
 
Despite the weak economic conditions, the Company was able to achieve several significant accomplishments during 2010:
 
  •  Strong loan growth.
 
  •  Strong growth realized in the commercial and industrial portfolio as the Bank continued to add high-quality corporate customers across a variety of industries.


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  •  Home equity portfolio origination remained strong driven by refinancing volume and promotional campaigns.
 
  •  Residential real estate portfolio balances declined as loans refinanced into longer-term, fixed-rate loans, which are not commonly held in portfolio by the Company.
 
  •  Commercial real estate origination volumes maintained a healthy pace as the Company took advantage of opportunities in the marketplace.
 
  •  Commercial construction portfolio balances declined as projects transitioned to permanent financing, with the Company or elsewhere.
 
  •  Higher fee revenue was a result of improved deposit fee revenue and wealth management revenue, as assets under administration reached $1.6 billion.
 
  •  Deposits grew significantly in 2010 as a result of the Company’s strategy to grow the municipal and commercial banking business. In addition, improving the deposit mix and focusing on lower cost core deposits has driven a steady decline in overall funding costs.
 
The Company continues to generate adequate levels of capital internally to fund future growth. The Company’s tangible common equity ratio is 6.89%, pro forma to include the tax deductibility of certain goodwill. Regulatory capital levels exceeded prescribed thresholds, and the Company maintained a common stock dividend of $0.72 per share for the year ended December 31, 2010.
 
Key items affecting comparative earnings are as follows:
 
Net Interest Income
 
Although interest rates remained at historically low levels in 2010, the Company effectively managed its loan portfolio yield and deposit cost to maintain strong net interest income.
 
Provision for Loan Losses
 
Net charge-off activity increased modestly on a year-to-year basis reflecting general economic weakness. Net charge-offs amounted to $14.8 million, or 0.43% on an annualized basis of average loans for the year ended December 31, 2010, compared to $12.0 million or 0.38% for the year ended December 31, 2009. The provision for loan losses was $18.7 million and $17.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively.
 
A number of non-core items in 2009, as described in the table below, contributed to the improvement in earnings in 2010. The following table summarizes the impact of non-core items recorded for the time periods indicated below and reconciles them in accordance with GAAP:
 
                                 
    For the Years Ended December 31,  
    Net Income
       
    Available to Common
    Diluted
 
    Shareholders     Earnings Per Share  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
AS REPORTED (GAAP)
                               
Net Income
  $ 40,240     $ 22,989     $ 1.90     $ 1.17  
Preferred Stock Dividend
          (5,698 )           (0.29 )
                                 
Net Income available to Common Shareholders (GAAP)
  $ 40,240     $ 17,291     $ 1.90     $ 0.88  


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    For the Years Ended December 31,  
    Net Income
       
    Available to Common
    Diluted
 
    Shareholders     Earnings Per Share  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Non-GAAP Measures:
                               
Non-Interest Income Components
                               
Net Gain on Sale of Securities, net of tax
    (271 )     (880 )     (0.01 )     (0.04 )
Gain Resulting from Early Termination of Hedging Relationship, net of tax
          (2,456 )           (0.12 )
Non-Interest Expense Components
                               
Merger & Acquisition Expenses, net of tax
          9,706             0.49  
Fair Value Mark on a Terminated Hedging Relationship, net of tax
    328             0.01        
Deemed Preferred Stock Dividend
          4,384             0.22  
                                 
TOTAL IMPACT OF NON-CORE ITEMS
    57       10,754             0.55  
                                 
AS ADJUSTED (NON-GAAP)
  $ 40,297     $ 28,045     $ 1.90     $ 1.43  
                                 
 
When management assesses the Company’s financial performance for purposes of making day-to-day and strategic decisions, it does so based upon the performance of its core banking business, which is primarily derived from the combination of net interest income and non-interest or fee income, reduced by operating expenses, the provision for loan losses, and the impact of income taxes. The Company’s financial performance is determined in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”) which sometimes includes gain or loss due to items that management does not believe are related to its core banking business, such as gains or losses on the sales of securities, merger and acquisition expenses, and other items. Management, therefore, also computes the Company’s non-GAAP operating earnings, which excludes these items, to measure the strength of the Company’s core banking business and to identify trends that may to some extent be obscured by gains or losses which management deems not to be core to the Company’s operations. Management believes that the financial impact of the items excluded when computing non-GAAP operating earnings will disappear or become immaterial within a near-term finite period.
 
Management’s computation of the Company’s non-GAAP operating earnings are set forth above because management believes it may be useful for investors to have access to the same analytical tool used by management to evaluate the Company’s core operational performance so that investors may assess the Company’s overall financial health and identify business and performance trends that may be more difficult to identify and evaluate when non-core items are included. Management also believes that the computation of non-GAAP operating earnings may facilitate the comparison of the Company to other companies in the financial services industry.
 
Non-GAAP operating earnings should not be considered a substitute for GAAP operating results. An item which management deems to be non-core and excludes when computing non-GAAP operating earnings can be of substantial importance to the Company’s results for any particular quarter or year. The Company’s non-GAAP operating earnings set forth above are not necessarily comparable to non-GAAP information which may be presented by other companies.
 
Financial Position
 
Securities Portfolio  The Company’s securities portfolio consists of trading assets, securities available for sale, and securities which management intends to hold until maturity. Securities decreased by $20.4 million, or 3.4%, at December 31, 2010 as compared to December 31, 2009. The ratio of securities to total assets as of December 31, 2010 was 12.5%, compared to 13.6% at December 31, 2009.

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The Company continually reviews investment securities for the presence of other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”). Further analysis of the Company’s OTTI can be found in Note 3 “Securities” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
The Company’s trading assets were $7.6 million and $6.2 million at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Trading assets are comprised of securities which are held solely for the purpose of funding certain executive non-qualified retirement obligations and equity securities which are entirely comprised of a fund whose investment objective is to invest in geographically specific private placement debt securities designed to support underlying economic activities such as community development and affordable housing.
 
The following table sets forth the fair value and percentage distribution of securities available for sale at the dates indicated:
 
Table 1 — Fair Value of Securities Available for Sale
 
                                                 
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
U.S. Treasury Securities
  $ 717       0.2 %   $ 744       0.1 %   $ 710       0.1 %
Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities
    313,302       83.0 %     451,909       88.9 %     475,083       79.1 %
Agency Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    46,135       12.2 %     32,022       6.3 %     56,784       9.5 %
Corporate Debt Securities
                            25,852       4.3 %
Private Mortgage-Backed Securities
    10,254       2.7 %     14,289       2.8 %     15,513       2.6 %
State, County and Municipal Securities
                4,081       0.8 %     18,954       3.2 %
Single Issuer Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks
    4,221       1.1 %     3,010       0.6 %     2,202       0.4 %
Pooled Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks and Insurers
    2,828       0.7 %     2,595       0.5 %     5,193       0.8 %
                                                 
Total
  $ 377,457       100.0 %   $ 508,650       100.0 %   $ 600,291       100.0 %
                                                 
 
The following table sets forth the amortized cost and percentage distribution of securities held to maturity at the dates indicated:
 
Table 2 — Amortized Cost of Securities Held to Maturity
 
                                                 
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $ 95,697       47.2 %   $ 54,064       57.9 %   $ 3,470       10.6 %
Agency Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
    89,823       44.3 %     14,321       15.3 %            
State, County and Municipal Securities
    10,562       5.2 %     15,252       16.3 %     19,517       59.5 %
Single Issuer Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks
    6,650       3.3 %     9,773       10.5 %     9,803       29.9 %
                                                 
Total
  $ 202,732       100.0 %   $ 93,410       100.0 %   $ 32,790       100.0 %
                                                 


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The following two tables set forth contractual maturities of the Bank’s securities portfolio at December 31, 2010. Actual maturities will differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.
 
Table 3 — Fair Value of Securities Available for Sale Amounts Maturing
 
                                                                                                                         
                Weighted
    One Year
          Weighted
                Weighted
                Weighted
                Weighted
 
    Within
    %
    Average
    to Five
    %
    Average
    Five Years
    %
    Average
    Over
    % of
    Average
          % of
    Average
 
    One Year     of Total     Yield     Years     of Total     Yield     to Ten Years     of Total     Yield     Ten Years     Total     Yield     Total     Total     Yield  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
U.S. Treasury Securities
  $ 717       0.2 %     0.9 %   $       0.0 %     0.0 %   $       0.0 %     0.0 %   $       0.0 %     0.0 %   $ 717       0.2 %     0.9 %
Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities
          0.0 %     0.0 %     24,204       6.4 %     4.2 %     70,372       18.7 %     4.5 %     218,726       58.0 %     5.0 %     313,302       83.1 %     4.8 %
Agency Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     19,395       5.1 %     3.9 %     26,740       7.1 %     1.0 %     46,135       12.2 %     2.2 %
Private Mortgage-Backed Securities
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     10,254       2.7 %     6.0 %     10,254       2.7 %     6.0 %
Single Issuer Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     4,221       1.1 %     7.7 %     4,221       1.1 %     7.7 %
Pooled Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks and Insurers
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     2,828       0.7 %     0.9 %     2,828       0.7 %     0.9 %
                                                                                                                         
Total
  $ 717       0.2 %     0.9 %   $ 24,204       6.4 %     4.2 %   $ 89,767       23.8 %     4.4 %   $ 262,769       69.6 %     4.6 %   $ 377,457       100.0 %     4.6 %
                                                                                                                         
 
Table 4 — Amortized Cost of Securities Held to Maturity Amounts Maturing
 
                                                                                                                         
                Weighted
                Weighted
                Weighted
                Weighted
                Weighted
 
    Within
    %
    Average
    One Year
    %
    Average
    Five Years
    %
    Average
    Over
    % of
    Average
          % of
    Average
 
    One Year     of Total     Yield     to Five Years     of Total     Yield     to Ten Years     of Total     Yield     Ten Years     Total     Yield     Total     Total     Yield  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Agency Mortgage-Backed Securities
  $       0.0 %     0.0 %   $       0.0 %     0.0 %   $ 1,849       0.9 %     5.5 %   $ 93,848       46.3 %     3.6 %   $ 95,697       47.2 %     3.6 %
Agency Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     89,823       44.3 %     2.9 %     89,823       44.3 %     2.9 %
State, County and Municipal Securities
    1,483       0.7 %     4.0 %     5,008       2.5 %     4.3 %     2,975       1.5 %     4.7 %     1,096       0.5 %     5.0 %     10,562       5.2 %     4.4 %
Single Issuer Trust Preferred Securities Issued by Banks
          0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %           0.0 %     0.0 %     6,650       3.3 %     7.4 %     6,650       3.3 %     7.4 %
                                                                                                                         
Total
  $ 1,483       0.7 %     4.0 %   $ 5,008       2.5 %     4.3 %   $ 4,824       2.4 %     5.0 %   $ 191,417       94.4 %     3.4 %   $ 202,732       100.0 %     3.5 %
                                                                                                                         
 
At December 31, 2010 and 2009, the Bank had no investments in obligations of individual states, counties or municipalities which exceeded 10% of stockholders’ equity.
 
Residential Mortgage Loan Sales  The Company’s primary loan sale activity arises from the sale of government sponsored enterprise eligible residential mortgage loans to other financial institutions. During 2010 and 2009, the Bank originated residential loans with the intention of selling them in the secondary market. Loans are sold with servicing rights released and with servicing rights retained. The amounts of loans originated and sold with servicing rights released were $331.1 million and $338.5 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. The amounts of loans originated and sold with servicing rights retained were $11.4 million and $11.6 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively. The Company recognizes a mortgage servicing assets when it sells a loan with servicing rights retained. When the Company sells a loan with servicing rights released the Company enters into agreements that contain representations and warranties about the characteristics of the loans sold and their origination. The Company may be required to either repurchase mortgage loans or to indemnify the purchaser from losses if representations and warranties are breached. The Company has not at this time established a reserve for loan repurchases as it believes material losses are not probable.
 
Forward sale contracts of mortgage loans, considered derivative instruments for accounting purposes, are utilized by the Company in its efforts to manage risk of loss associated with its mortgage loan commitments and mortgage loans held for sale. Prior to closing and funding certain single-family residential mortgage loans, an interest rate lock commitment is generally extended to the borrower. During the period from commitment date to closing date, the Company is subject to the risk that market rates of interest may change. If market rates rise, investors generally will pay less to purchase such loans resulting in a reduction in the gain on sale of the loans or, possibly, a loss. In an effort to mitigate such risk, forward delivery sales commitments are executed, under which the Company agrees to deliver whole mortgage loans to various investors. See Note 12, “Derivative and Hedging Activities” within Notes to Consolidated Financial statements included in Item 8 hereof for more information on mortgage loan commitments and forward sales agreements.


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Effective July 1, 2010, pursuant to FASB ASC Topic No. 825, “Financial Instruments,” the Company elected to carry newly originated closed loans held for sale at fair value. Changes in fair value relating to loans held for sale and forward sale commitments are recorded in earnings and are offset by changes in fair value relating to interest rate lock commitments. Gains and losses on loan sales (sales proceeds minus carrying amount) are recorded in mortgage banking income.
 
Loan Portfolio  Management has been focusing on changing the overall composition of the balance sheet by emphasizing the growth in commercial and home equity lending categories, while placing less emphasis on the other lending categories. Although changing the composition of the Company’s loan portfolio has led to a slower growth rate, management believes the change to be prudent, given the prevailing interest rate and economic environment. At December 31, 2010, the Bank’s loan portfolio amounted to $3.6 billion, an increase of $160.2 million, or 4.7%, from December 31, 2009. The total commercial loan category, which includes small business loans, increased by $183.6 million, or 8.2%, with commercial and industrial comprising most of the change with an increase of $129.4 million, or 34.7%, and an increase in the commercial real estate category of $102.6 million, or 6.4%, while the commercial construction and small business categories decreased by $45.9 million, or 26.2%, and $2.5 million, or 3.1%, respectively. Home equity loans increased $107.4 million, or 22.8%, during the year ended December 31, 2010. Consumer loans decreased $43.0 million, or 38.4%, and residential real estate loans decreased $87.9 million, or 15.5%, during the year ended December 31, 2010, as loans refinanced into longer-term, fixed-rate loans, which are not commonly held in portfolio by the Company. The following table sets forth information concerning the composition of the Bank’s loan portfolio by loan type at the dates indicated:
 
Table 5 — Loan Portfolio Composition
 
                                                                                 
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Commercial and Industrial
  $ 502,952       14.1 %   $ 373,531       11.0 %   $ 270,832       10.2 %   $ 190,522       9.4 %   $ 174,356       8.7 %
Commercial Real Estate
    1,717,118       48.4 %     1,614,474       47.5 %     1,126,295       42.4 %     797,416       39.2 %     740,517       36.7 %
Commercial Construction
    129,421       3.6 %     175,312       5.2 %     171,955       6.5 %     133,372       6.6 %     119,685       5.9 %
Small Business
    80,026       2.3 %     82,569       2.4 %     86,670       3.3 %     69,977       3.4 %     59,910       3.0 %
Residential Real Estate
    473,936       13.3 %     555,306       16.4 %     413,024       15.6 %     323,847       15.9 %     378,368       18.8 %
Residential Construction
    4,175       0.1 %     10,736       0.3 %     10,950       0.4 %     6,115       0.3 %     7,277       0.4 %
Home Equity
    579,278       16.3 %     471,862       13.9 %     406,240       15.3 %     308,744       15.2 %     277,015       13.8 %
Consumer — Other
    68,773       1.9 %     111,725       3.3 %     166,570       6.3 %     201,831       10.0 %     255,922       12.7 %
                                                                                 
Gross Loans
    3,555,679       100.0 %     3,395,515       100.0 %     2,652,536       100.0 %     2,031,824       100.0 %     2,013,050       100.0 %
                                                                                 
Allowance for Loan Losses
    46,255               42,361               37,049               26,831               26,815          
                                                                                 
Net Loans
  $ 3,509,424             $ 3,353,154             $ 2,615,487             $ 2,004,993             $ 1,986,235          
                                                                                 
 
The following table sets forth the scheduled contractual amortization of the Bank’s loan portfolio at December 31, 2010. Loans having no schedule of repayments or no stated maturity are reported as due in one


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year or less. Adjustable rate mortgages are included in the adjustable rate category. The following table also sets forth the rate structure of loans scheduled to mature after one year:
 
Table 6 — Scheduled Contractual Loan Amortization At December 31, 2010
 
                                                                                 
          Commercial
    Commercial
    Small
    Residential
    Residential
    Consumer
    Consumer
             
    Commercial     Real Estate     Construction     Business     Real Estate     Construction     Home Equity     Other     Total        
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Amounts due in:
                                                                               
One year or less
  $ 222,911     $ 345,021     $ 57,875     $ 26,533     $ 20,598     $ 4,175     $ 11,434     $ 29,714     $ 718,261          
After one year through five years
    207,642       872,774       38,986       31,153       80,940             49,600       32,197       1,313,292          
Beyond five years
    72,399       499,323       32,560       22,340       372,398             518,244       6,862       1,524,126          
                                                                                 
Total
  $ 502,952     $ 1,717,118     $ 129,421 (1)   $ 80,026     $ 473,936     $ 4,175     $ 579,278     $ 68,773     $ 3,555,679          
                                                                                 
Interest rate terms on amounts due after one year:
                                                                               
Fixed Rate
  $ 101,013     $ 561,593     $ 24,350     $ 24,437     $ 272,340     $     $ 172,460     $ 39,059     $ 1,195,252          
Adjustable Rate
    179,028       810,504       47,196       29,056       180,998             395,384             1,642,166          
 
 
(1) Includes certain construction loans that convert to commercial mortgages. These loans are reclassified to commercial real estate upon the completion of the construction phase.
 
As of December 31, 2010, $3.8 million of loans scheduled to mature within one year were nonperforming.
 
Generally, the actual maturity of loans is substantially shorter than their contractual maturity due to prepayments and, in the case of real estate loans, due-on-sale clauses, which generally gives the Bank the right to declare a loan immediately due and payable in the event that, among other things, the borrower sells the property subject to the mortgage and the loan is not repaid. The average life of real estate loans tends to increase when current real estate loan rates are higher than rates on mortgages in the portfolio and, conversely, tends to decrease when rates on mortgages in the portfolio are higher than current real estate loan rates. Under the latter scenario, the weighted average yield on the portfolio tends to decrease as higher yielding loans are repaid or refinanced at lower rates. Due to the fact that the Bank may, consistent with industry practice, renew a significant portion of commercial and commercial real estate loans at or immediately prior to their maturity by renewing the loans on substantially similar or revised terms, the principal repayments actually received by the Bank are anticipated to be significantly less than the amounts contractually due in any particular period. In other circumstances, a loan, or a portion of a loan, may not be repaid due to the borrower’s inability to satisfy the contractual obligations of the loan.
 
Asset Quality  The Company continually monitors the asset quality of the loan portfolio using all available information. Based on this information, loans demonstrating certain payment issues or other weaknesses may be categorized as delinquent, impaired, nonperforming and/or put on nonaccrual status. Additionally, in the course of resolving such loans, the Company may choose to restructure the contractual terms of certain loans to match the borrower’s ability to repay the loan based on their current financial condition. If a restructured loan meets certain criteria, it may be categorized as a troubled debt restructuring (“TDR”).
 
Delinquency  The Bank’s philosophy toward managing its loan portfolios is predicated upon careful monitoring, which stresses early detection and response to delinquent and default situations. The Bank seeks to make arrangements to resolve any delinquent or default situation over the shortest possible time frame. Generally, the Bank requires that a delinquency notice be mailed to a borrower upon expiration of a grace period (typically no longer than 15 days beyond the due date). Reminder notices may be sent and telephone calls may be made prior to the expiration of the grace period. If the delinquent status is not resolved within a reasonable time frame following the mailing of a delinquency notice, the Bank’s personnel charged with managing its loan portfolios, contacts the borrower to ascertain the reasons for delinquency and the prospects for payment. Any subsequent actions taken to resolve the delinquency will depend upon the nature of the loan and the length of time that the loan has been delinquent. The borrower’s needs are considered as much as reasonably possible without jeopardizing the Bank’s position. A late charge is usually assessed on loans upon expiration of the grace period.
 
Nonaccrual Loans  As permitted by banking regulations, certain consumer loans past due 90 days or more continue to accrue interest. In addition, certain commercial and real estate loans that are more than 90 days past due may be kept on an accruing status if the loan is well secured and in the process of collection. As a general rule,


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within commercial, real estate, or home equity categories, loans more than 90 days past due with respect to principal or interest are classified as a nonaccrual loan. Income accruals are suspended on all nonaccrual loans and all previously accrued and uncollected interest is reversed against current income. A loan remains on nonaccrual status until it becomes current with respect to principal and interest (and in certain instances remains current for up to six months), when the loan is liquidated, or when the loan is determined to be uncollectible and is charged-off against the allowance for loan losses.
 
Troubled Debt Restructurings  In the course of resolving nonperforming loans, the Bank may choose to restructure the contractual terms of certain loans. The Bank attempts to work-out an alternative payment schedule with the borrower in order to avoid foreclosure actions. Any loans that are modified are reviewed by the Bank to identify if a TDR has occurred, which is when, for economic or legal reasons related to a borrower’s financial difficulties, the Bank grants a concession to the borrower that it would not otherwise consider. Terms may be modified to fit the ability of the borrower to repay in line with its current financial status and the restructuring of the loan may include the transfer of assets from the borrower to satisfy the debt, a modification of loan terms, or a combination of the two. If such efforts by the Bank do not result in a satisfactory arrangement, the loan is referred to legal counsel, at which time foreclosure proceedings are initiated. At any time prior to a sale of the property at foreclosure, the Bank may terminate foreclosure proceedings if the borrower is able to work-out a satisfactory payment plan.
 
It is the Bank’s policy to have any restructured loans which are on nonaccrual status prior to being modified remain on nonaccrual status for approximately six months, subsequent to being modified, before management considers its return to accrual status. If the restructured loan is on accrual status prior to being modified, it is reviewed to determine if the modified loan should remain on accrual status. Loans that are considered TDRs are classified as performing, unless they are on nonaccrual status or greater than 90 days delinquent. All TDRs are considered impaired by the Company, unless it is determined that the borrower is performing under modified terms and the restructuring agreement specified an interest rate greater than or equal to an acceptable rate for a comparable new loan. The Company individually reviews all material loans to determine if a loan meets both of these criteria and smaller balance loans are reviewed for a performance period of six months before the Company will consider the TDR loan to no longer be impaired.
 
Nonperforming Assets  Nonperforming assets are comprised of nonperforming loans, nonperforming securities, Other Real Estate Owned (“OREO”), and other assets in possession. Nonperforming loans consist of loans that are more than 90 days past due but still accruing interest and nonaccrual loans.
 
Nonperforming securities consist of securities that are on nonaccrual status. The Company holds six collateralized debt obligation securities (“CDOs”) comprised of pools of trust preferred securities issued by banks and insurance companies, which are currently deferring interest payments on certain tranches within the bonds’ structures including the tranches held by the Company. The bonds are anticipated to continue to defer interest until cash flows are sufficient to satisfy certain collateralization levels designed to protect more senior tranches. As a result the Company has placed the six securities on nonaccrual status and has reversed any previously accrued income related to these securities.
 
OREO  When a property is deemed to be in control, it is recorded at fair value less cost to sell at the date control is established, resulting in a new cost basis. The amount by which the recorded investment in the loan exceeds the fair value (net of estimated cost to sell) of the foreclosed asset is charged to the allowance for loan losses. Subsequent declines in the fair value of the foreclosed asset below the new cost basis are recorded through the use of a valuation allowance. Subsequent increases in the fair value are recorded as reductions in the allowance, but not below zero. All costs incurred thereafter in maintaining the property are charged to non-interest expense. In the event the real estate is utilized as a rental property, rental income and expenses are recorded as incurred and included in non-interest income and non-interest expense, respectively.
 
Other assets in possession reflect the estimated discounted cash flow value of retention payments from the sale of a customer list associated with a troubled borrower.


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The following table sets forth information regarding nonperforming assets held by the Bank at the dates indicated:
 
Table 7 — Nonperforming Assets
 
                                         
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Loans past due 90 days or more but still accruing
                                       
Home Equity
  $ 4     $     $     $     $  
Consumer — Other
    273       292       275       500       389  
                                         
Total
  $ 277     $ 292     $ 275     $ 500     $ 389  
                                         
Loans accounted for on a nonaccrual basis (1)
                                       
Commercial and Industrial
  $ 3,123     $ 4,205     $ 1,942     $ 306     $ 872  
Small Business
    887       793       1,111       439       74  
Commercial Real Estate
    9,836       18,525       12,370       2,568       2,346  
Residential Real Estate
    6,728       10,829       9,394       2,380       2,318  
Home Equity
    1,752       1,166       1,090       872       358  
Consumer — Other
    505       373       751       579       622  
                                         
Total
  $ 22,831     $ 35,891     $ 26,658     $ 7,144     $ 6,590  
                                         
Total nonperforming loans
  $ 23,108     $ 36,183     $ 26,933     $ 7,644     $ 6,979  
                                         
Nonaccrual securities
    1,051       920       910              
Other assets in possession
    61       148       231              
Other real estate owned
    7,273       3,994       1,809       681       190  
                                         
Total nonperforming assets
  $ 31,493     $ 41,245     $ 29,883     $ 8,325     $ 7,169  
                                         
Nonperforming loans as a percent of gross loans
    0.65 %     1.07 %     1.02 %     0.38 %     0.35 %
                                         
Nonperforming assets as a percent of total assets
    0.67 %     0.92 %     0.82 %     0.30 %     0.25 %
                                         
 
 
(1) There were $4.0 million, $3.4 million, and $74,000 TDRs on nonaccrual at December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and none at December 31, 2007 and 2006.
 
Potential problem loans are any loans which are not included in nonaccrual or nonperforming loans and which are not considered TDRs, where known information about possible credit problems of the borrowers causes management to have concerns as to the ability of such borrowers to comply with present loan repayment terms. The table below shows the potential problem commercial loans at the time periods indicated:
 
Table 8 — Potential Problem Commercial Loans
 
                 
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Number of Loan Relationships
    62       102  
Aggregate Outstanding Balance
  $ 126,167     $ 122,140  
 
At December 31, 2010, these potential problem loans continued to perform with respect to payments. Management actively monitors these loans and strives to minimize any possible adverse impact to the Bank.


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Income accruals are suspended on all nonaccrual loans and all previously accrued and uncollected interest is reversed against current income. The table below shows interest income that was recognized or collected on nonaccrual and performing TDRs as of the dates indicated:
 
Table 9 — Interest Income Recognized/Collected on Nonaccrual and Troubled Debt Restructurings
 
                         
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Interest income that would have been recognized if nonaccruing loans had been performing
  $ 2,749     $ 2,004     $ 890  
Interest income recognized on TDRs still accruing
    1,425       330       21  
Interest collected on these nonaccrual and TDRs and included in interest income
  $ 1,874     $ 359     $ 198  
 
A loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Bank will be unable to collect the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Factors considered by management in determining impairment include payment status, collateral value, and the probability of collecting scheduled principal and interest payments when due. Loans that experience insignificant payment delays and payment shortfalls generally are not classified as impaired. Management determines the significance of payment delays and payment shortfalls on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration all of the circumstances surrounding the loan and the borrower, including the length of the delay, the reasons for the delay, the borrower’s prior payment record, and the amount of the shortfall in relation to the principal and interest owed.
 
Impairment is measured on a loan by loan basis for commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, and commercial construction categories by either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s obtainable market price, or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent.
 
For impaired loans deemed collateral dependent, where impairment is measured using the fair value of the collateral, the Bank will either order a new appraisal or use another available source of collateral assessment such as a broker’s opinion of value to determine a reasonable estimate of the fair value of the collateral.
 
At December 31, 2010, impaired loans included all commercial and industrial loans, commercial real estate loans, commercial construction, and small business loans that are on nonaccrual status, TDRs, and other loans that have been categorized as impaired. Total impaired loans at December 31, 2010 and 2009 were $47.4 million and $42.7 million, respectively. For additional information regarding the Bank’s asset quality, including delinquent loans, nonaccruals, TDRs, and impaired loans, see Note 4, “Loans, Allowance for Loan Losses, and Credit Quality” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
Allowance for Loan Losses   The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level that management considers adequate to provide for probable loan losses based upon evaluation of known and inherent risks in the loan portfolio. The allowance is increased by providing for loan losses through a charge to expense and by recoveries of loans previously charged-off and is reduced by loans being charged-off.
 
While management uses available information to recognize losses on loans, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on increases in nonperforming loans, changes in economic conditions, or for other reasons. Additionally, various regulatory agencies, as an integral part of the Bank’s examination process, periodically assess the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses and may require it to increase its provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs.
 
As of December 31, 2010, the allowance for loan losses totaled $46.3 million, or 1.30% of total loans as compared to $42.4 million, or 1.25% of total loans, at December 31, 2009. The increase in allowance was due to a combination of factors including shifts in the composition of the loan portfolio mix, changes in asset quality and loan growth.


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The following table summarizes changes in the allowance for loan losses and other selected statistics for the periods presented:
 
Table 10 — Summary of Changes in the Allowance for Loan Losses
 
                                         
    Year Ending December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Average Total Loans
  $ 3,434,769     $ 3,177,949     $ 2,489,028     $ 1,994,273     $ 2,041,098  
Allowance for Loan Losses, Beginning of Year
  $ 42,361     $ 37,049     $ 26,831     $ 26,815     $ 26,639  
Charged-Off Loans:
                                       
Commercial and Industrial
    5,170       1,663       595       498       185  
Commercial Real Estate
    3,448       834                    
Commercial Construction
    1,716       2,679                    
Small Business
    2,279       2,047       1,350       789       401  
Residential Real Estate
    557       829       362              
Residential Construction
                             
Home Equity
    939       1,799       1,200       122        
Consumer — Other
    2,078       3,404       3,631       2,459       2,594  
                                         
Total Charged-Off Loans
    16,187       13,255       7,138       3,868       3,180  
                                         
Recoveries on Loans Previously Charged-Off:
                                       
Commercial and Industrial
    361       27       168       63       219  
Commercial Real Estate
    1                         1  
Commercial Construction
                             
Small Business
    217       204       159       26       92  
Residential Real Estate
    59       105                    
Residential Construction
                             
Home Equity
    131       41       5              
Consumer — Other
    657       855       612       665       709  
                                         
Total Recoveries
    1,426       1,232       944       754       1,021  
                                         
Net Loans Charged-Off
                                       
Commercial and Industrial
    4,809       1,636       427       435       (34 )
Commercial Real Estate
    3,447       834                   (1 )
Commercial Construction
    1,716       2,679                    
Small Business
    2,062       1,843       1,191       763       309  
Residential Real Estate
    498       724       362              
Residential Construction
                             
Home Equity
    808       1,758       1,195       122        
Consumer — Other
    1,421       2,549       3,019       1,794       1,885  
                                         
Total Net Loans Charged-Off
    14,761       12,023       6,194       3,114       2,159  
                                         
Allowance Related to Business Combinations
                5,524              
Provision for Loan Losses
    18,655       17,335       10,888       3,130       2,335  
                                         
Total Allowances for Loan Losses, End of Year
  $ 46,255     $ 42,361     $ 37,049     $ 26,831     $ 26,815  
                                         
Net Loans Charged-Off as a Percent of Average Total Loans
    0.43 %     0.38 %     0.25 %     0.16 %     0.11 %
Allowance for Loan Losses as a Percent of Total Loans
    1.30 %     1.25 %     1.40 %     1.32 %     1.33 %
Allowance for Loan Losses as a Percent of Nonperforming Loans
    200.17 %     117.07 %     137.56 %     351.01 %     384.22 %
Net Loans Charged-Off as a Percent of Allowance for Loan Losses
    31.91 %     28.38 %     16.72 %     11.61 %     8.05 %
Recoveries as a Percent of Charge-Offs
    8.81 %     9.29 %     13.22 %     19.49 %     32.11 %
 
For purposes of the allowance for loan losses, management segregates the loan portfolio into the portfolio segments detailed in the table below. The allocation of the allowance for loan losses is made to each loan category using the analytical techniques and estimation methods described herein. While these amounts represent management’s best estimate of the distribution of probable losses at the evaluation dates, they are not necessarily indicative of either the categories in which actual losses may occur or the extent of such actual losses that may be recognized within each category. Each of these loan categories possess unique risk characteristics that are considered when determining the appropriate level of allowance for each segment. The total allowance is available to absorb losses from any segment of the loan portfolio.


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The following table sets forth the allocation of the allowance for loan losses by loan category at the dates indicated:
 
Table 11 — Summary of Allocation of Allowance for Loan Losses
 
                                                                                 
    At December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
          Percent of
          Percent of
          Percent of
          Percent of
          Percent of
 
          Loans
          Loans
          Loans
          Loans
          Loans
 
    Allowance
    In Category
    Allowance
    In Category
    Allowance
    In Category
    Allowance
    In Category
    Allowance
    In Category
 
    Amount     To Total Loans     Amount     To Total Loans     Amount     To Total Loans     Amount     To Total Loans     Amount     To Total Loans  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Allocated Allowance:
                                                                               
Commercial and Industrial
  $ 10,423       14.1 %   $ 7,545       11.0 %   $ 5,532       10.2 %   $ 3,850       9.4 %   $ 3,615       8.7 %
Commercial Real Estate
    21,939       52.0 %     19,451       47.5 %     15,942       42.4 %     13,939       39.2 %     13,136       36.7 %
Commercial Construction
    2,145       0.1 %     2,457       5.5 %     4,203       6.9 %     3,408       6.9 %     2,955       6.3 %
Small Business
    3,740       2.3 %     3,372       2.4 %     2,170       3.3 %     1,265       3.4 %     1,340       3.0 %
Residential Real Estate(1)
    2,915       13.3 %     2,840       16.4 %     2,447       15.6 %     741       15.9 %     566       18.8 %
Home Equity
    3,369       16.3 %     3,945       13.9 %     3,091       15.3 %     1,326       15.2 %     1,024       13.8 %
Consumer — Other
    1,724       1.9 %     2,751       3.3 %     3,664       6.3 %     2,302       10.0 %     2,718       12.7 %
Imprecision Allowance
          N/A             N/A             N/A             N/A       1,461       N/A  
                                                                                 
Total Allowance for Loan Losses
  $ 46,255       100.0 %   $ 42,361       100.0 %   $ 37,049       100.0 %   $ 26,831       100.0 %   $ 26,815       100.0 %
                                                                                 
 
 
(1) Includes residential construction.
 
When available information confirms that specific loans or financing receivables, or portions thereof, are uncollectible, these amounts are promptly charged-off against the allowance for loan losses. All charge-offs of loans or financing receivables are charged directly to the allowance for loan losses and any recoveries of such previously charged-off amounts are credited to the allowance.
 
Loans whose collectability is sufficiently questionable that management can no longer justify showing the receivable as an asset on the balance sheet are charged-off. To determine if a loan should be charged-off, all possible sources of repayment are analyzed. Possible sources of repayment include the potential for future cash flows, the value of the Bank’s collateral, and the strength of co-makers or guarantors.
 
Regardless of whether a loan is unsecured or collateralized, the Company charges off the amount of any confirmed loan loss in the period when the loans, or portions of loans, are deemed uncollectible. For troubled, collateral-dependent loans, loss-confirming events may include an appraisal or other valuation that reflects a shortfall between the value of the collateral and the book value of the loan or receivable, or a deficiency balance following the sale of the collateral. During 2010, allocated allowance amounts increased by approximately $3.9 million to $46.3 million at December 31, 2010.
 
For additional information regarding the Bank’s allowance for loan losses, see Note 1, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” and Note 4, “Loans, Allowance for Loan Losses, and Credit Quality” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock   The Bank held an investment in Federal Home Loan Bank Boston (“FHLBB”) of $35.9 million at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. The FHLBB is a cooperative that provides services to its member banking institutions. The primary reason for the FHLBB membership is to gain access to a reliable source of wholesale funding, particularly term funding, as a tool to manage interest rate risk. The purchase of stock in the FHLBB is a requirement for a member to gain access to funding. The Company purchases FHLBB stock proportional to the volume of funding received and views the purchases as a necessary long-term investment for the purposes of balance sheet liquidity and not for investment return.
 
During 2010 the FHLBB continued the moratorium on excess stock repurchases that was put into effect during 2008, as the FHLBB’s board of directors have continued to focus on building retained earnings while delivering core solutions of liquidity and longer-term funding to their members. As a result of these efforts the FHLBB was able to restore a modest dividend as announced on February 22, 2011.


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Goodwill and Identifiable Intangible Assets   Goodwill and Identifiable Intangible Assets were $142.0 million and $143.7 million at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. For additional information regarding the goodwill and identifiable intangible assets, see Note 6, “Goodwill and Identifiable Intangible Assets” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof.
 
Bank Owned Life Insurance   The bank holds Bank Owned Life Insurance (“BOLI”) for the purpose of offsetting the Bank’s future obligations to its employees under its retirement and benefits plans. The value of BOLI was $82.7 and $79.3 million at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. The bank recorded tax exempt income from BOLI of $3.2 million in 2010, $2.9 million in 2009, and $2.6 million in 2008.
 
Deposits   As of December 31, 2010, deposits of $3.6 billion were $252.5 million, or 7.5%, higher than the prior year-end. Core deposits increased by $477.1 million, or 19.4%, during 2010 and now comprise 80.9% of total deposits.
 
The following table sets forth the average balances of the Bank’s deposits for the periods indicated:
 
Table 12 — Average Balances of Deposits
 
                                                 
    2010     2009     2008  
    Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent     Amount     Percent  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Demand Deposits
  $ 773,718       22.0 %   $ 659,916       21.0 %   $ 533,543       21.9 %
Savings and Interest Checking
    1,183,247       33.7 %     913,881       29.2 %     688,336       28.3 %
Money Market
    739,264       21.1 %     639,231       20.4 %     472,065       19.4 %
Time Certificates of Deposits
    814,462       23.2 %     921,787       29.4 %     740,779       30.4 %
                                                 
Total
  $ 3,510,691       100.0 %   $ 3,134,815       100.0 %   $ 2,434,723       100.0 %
                                                 
 
The Bank’s time certificates of deposit in an amount of $100,000 or more totaled $219.5 million at December 31, 2010. The maturity of these certificates is as follows:
 
Table 13 — Maturities of Time Certificate of Deposits Over $100,000
 
                 
    Balance     Percentage  
    (Dollars in thousands)        
 
1 to 3 months
  $ 66,494       30.3 %
4 to 6 months
    61,407       28.0 %
7 to 12 months
    58,364       26.6 %
Over 12 months
    33,215       15.1 %
                 
Total
  $ 219,480       100.0 %
                 
 
The Bank also participates in the Certificate of Deposit Registry Service (“CDARS”) program, allowing the Bank to provide easy access to multi-million dollar FDIC deposit insurance protection on certificate of deposits investments for consumers, businesses and public entities. The economic downturn and subsequent flight to safety makes CDARS an attractive product for customers and as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, CDARS deposits totaled $13.6 million and $52.9 million, respectively.
 
Borrowings   The Company’s borrowings amounted to $565.4 million at December 31, 2010, a decrease of $82.0 million from year-end 2009. At December 31, 2010, the Bank’s borrowings consisted primarily of FHLBB borrowings totaling $302.4 million, a decrease of $60.5 million from the prior year-end. The remaining borrowings consisted of federal funds purchased, assets sold under repurchase agreements, junior subordinated debentures and other borrowings. These borrowings totaled $263.0 million at December 31, 2010, a decrease of $21.4 million from the prior year-end. See Note 8, “Borrowings” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof for a schedule of borrowings outstanding, their interest rates, and other information related to the Company’s borrowings.


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The following table shows the balance of borrowings at the periods indicated:
 
Table 14 — Borrowings by Category
 
                         
    December 31,  
    2010     2009     %Change  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Federal Home Loan Bank Advances
  $ 302,414     $ 362,936       −16.7 %
Fed Funds Purchased and Assets Sold
                       
Under Repurchase Agreements
    168,119       190,452       −11.7 %
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    61,857       61,857       0.0 %
Subordinated Debentures
    30,000       30,000       0.0 %
Other Borrowings
    3,044       2,152       41.4 %
                         
Total Borrowings
  $ 565,434     $ 647,397       −12.7 %
                         
 
Capital Resources   The Federal Reserve, the FDIC, and other regulatory agencies have established capital guidelines for banks and bank holding companies. Risk-based capital guidelines issued by the federal regulatory agencies require banks to meet a minimum Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 4.0% and a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0%. A minimum requirement of 4.0% Tier 1 leverage capital is also mandated. At December 31, 2010, the Company and the Bank exceeded the minimum requirements for Tier 1 risk-based, total risk-based capital, and Tier 1 leverage capital. See Note 19, “Regulatory Capital Requirements” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof for more information regarding capital requirements.
 
Capital Purchase Program   On January 9, 2009, the Company participated in the CPP established by the Treasury and subsequently exited the program on April 22, 2009. See Note 11, “Capital Purchase Program” within Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 hereof for more information regarding the Capital Purchase Program.
 
Wealth Management
 
Investment Management   As of December 31, 2010, the Rockland Trust Investment Management Group had assets under administration of $1.6 billion which represents approximately 3,181 trust, fiduciary, and agency accounts. At December 31, 2009, assets under administration were $1.3 billion, representing approximately 2,922 trust, fiduciary, and agency accounts. Revenue from the Investment Management Group amounted to $10.3 million, $8.6 million, and $9.9 million for 2010, 2009, and 2008, respectively. Additionally, during 2010 the Company established Bright Rock Capital Management, LLC, a registered investment advisor to provide institutional quality investment management services to the institutional/intermediary marketplace. At December 31, 2010 Bright Rock had $103.6 million of assets under administration.
 
Retail Investments and Insurance   For the years ending December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, retail investments and insurance revenue was $1.4 million, $1.4 million, and $1.2 million, respectively. Retail investments and insurance includes revenue from LPL Financial (“LPL”) and its affiliates, LPL Insurance Associates, Inc., Savings Bank Life Insurance of Massachusetts (“SBLI”), Independent Financial Market Group, Inc. (“IFMG”) and their insurance subsidiary IFS Agencies, Inc. (“IFS”).
 
Mortgage Banking
 
Servicing assets are recorded at fair value and recognized as separate assets when rights are acquired through sale of loans with servicing rights retained. Mortgage servicing assets are amortized into non-interest income in proportion to, and over the period of, the estimated net servicing income. The principal balance of loans serviced by the Bank on behalf of investors amounted to $279.7 million at December 31, 2010 and $350.5 million at December 31, 2009. Upon sale, the mortgage servicing asset (“MSA”) is established, which represents the then current estimated fair value based on market prices for comparable mortgage servicing contracts, when available or alternatively, is based on a valuation model that calculates the present value of estimated future net servicing


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income. The valuation model incorporates assumptions that market participants would use in estimating future net servicing income, such as the cost to service, the discount rate, an inflation rate, ancillary income, prepayment speeds and default rates and losses. Impairment is determined by stratifying the rights based on predominant characteristics, such as interest rate, loan type and investor type. Impairment is recognized through a valuation allowance, to the extent that fair value is less than the capitalized amount. If the Company later determines that all or a portion of the impairment no longer exists, a reduction of the allowance may be recorded as an increase to income. Servicing rights are recorded in other assets and are amortized in proportion to, and over the period of estimated net servicing income and are assessed for impairment based on fair value at each reporting date. MSAs are reported in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets. The following table shows fair value of the servicing rights associated with these loans and the changes for the periods indicated:
 
Table 15 — Mortgage Servicing Asset
 
                 
    2010     2009  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Balance as of January 1,
  $ 2,195     $ 1,498  
Additions
    77       1,642 (1)
Amortization
    (652 )     (802 )
Change in Valuation Allowance
    (1 )     (143 )
                 
Balance as of December 31,
  $ 1,619     $ 2,195  
                 
 
 
(1) Included in this number is a mortgage servicing asset of $1.2 million acquired as part of the Ben Franklin acquisition.
 
The Bank’s mortgage banking revenue consists primarily of premiums received on loans sold with servicing released, origination fees, and gains and losses on sold mortgages which are recorded as mortgage banking income. The gains and losses resulting from the sales of loans with servicing retained are adjusted to recognize the present value of future servicing fee income over the estimated lives of the related loans.
 
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
The following table provides a summary of results of operations:
 
Table 16 — Summary of Results of Operations
 
                 
    As of December 31,  
    2010     2009  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Net Income
  $ 40,240     $ 22,989  
Preferred Stock Dividend
  $     $ 5,698  
Net Income Available to Common Shareholders
  $ 40,240     $ 17,291  
Diluted Earnings Per Share
  $ 1.90     $ 0.88  
Return on Average Assets
    0.88 %     0.40 %
Return on Average Equity
    9.46 %     4.29 %
Stockholders’ Equity as % of Assets
    9.30 %     9.21 %
 
Results of operations for 2009 were impacted by the Company’s recording of several large expenses associated with the Ben Franklin acquisition, as well as costs associated with the recession including loan workout costs, loss provisions, and deposit insurance assessment fees. In addition, the cost of entering and exiting the U.S. Treasury CPP program were significant.
 
Net Interest Income   The amount of net interest income is affected by changes in interest rates and by the volume, mix, and interest rate sensitivity of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities.
 
On a fully tax-equivalent basis, net interest income was $165.1 million in 2010, an 8.8% increase from 2009 net interest income of $151.7 million.


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The following table presents the Company’s average balances, net interest income, interest rate spread, and net interest margin for 2010, 2009, and 2008. Non-taxable income from loans and securities is presented on a fully tax-equivalent basis whereby tax-exempt income is adjusted upward by an amount equivalent to the prevailing income taxes that would have been paid if the income had been fully taxable.
 
Table 17 — Average Balance, Interest Earned/Paid & Average Yields
 
                                                                         
    Years Ended December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
          Interest
                Interest
                Interest
       
    Average
    Earned/
    Average
    Average
    Earned/
    Average
    Average
    Earned/
    Average
 
    Balance     Paid     Yield     Balance     Paid     Yield     Balance     Paid     Yield  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Interest-Earning Assets:
                                                                       
Interest Bearing Cash, Federal Funds Sold, and Short Term Investments
  $ 132,019     $ 337       0.26 %   $ 67,296     $ 290       0.43 %   $ 5,908     $ 148       2.51 %
Securities:
                                                                       
Trading Assets
    7,225       262       3.63 %     12,126       239       1.97 %     3,060       140       4.58 %
Taxable Investment Securities
    569,069       23,722       4.17 %     605,453       28,456       4.70 %     447,343       22,359       5.00 %
Non-Taxable Investment Securities(1)
    15,877       1,138       7.17 %     22,671       1,457       6.43 %     41,203       2,597       6.30 %
Total Securities
    592,171       25,122       4.24 %     640,250       30,152       4.71 %     491,606       25,096       5.10 %
                                                                         
Loans Held for Sale
                                                                       
Loans(2)
    16,266       666       4.09 %     14,320       629       4.39 %     6,242       325       5.21 %
                                                                         
Commercial and Industrial
    427,004       19,457       4.56 %     336,776       15,955       4.74 %     246,500       14,574       5.91 %
Commercial Real Estate
    1,646,419       94,217       5.72 %     1,418,997       86,016       6.06 %     1,026,190       67,652       6.59 %
Commercial Construction
    155,524       7,507       4.83 %     193,498       9,502       4.91 %     160,330       9,275       5.78 %
Small Business
    81,091       4,829       5.96 %     85,567       5,143       6.01 %     81,459       5,771       7.08 %
                                                                         
Total Commercial
    2,310,038       126,010       5.45 %     2,034,838       116,616       5.73 %     1,514,479       97,272       6.42 %
Residential Real Estate
    525,203       25,235       4.80 %     542,758       27,333       5.04 %     406,565       21,329       5.25 %
Residential Construction
    6,565       334       5.09 %     12,798       805       6.29 %     9,637       631       6.55 %
Consumer — Home Equity
    504,886       19,369       3.84 %     447,890       17,523       3.91 %     367,825       18,857       5.13 %
                                                                         
Total Consumer Real Estate
    1,036,654       44,938       4.33 %     1,003,446       45,661       4.55 %     784,027       40,817       5.21 %
                                                                         
Total Other Consumer
    88,077       6,799       7.72 %     139,665       10,338       7.40 %     184,280       13,158       7.14 %
Total Loans
    3,434,769       177,747       5.17 %     3,177,949       172,615       5.43 %     2,482,786       151,247       6.09 %
                                                                         
Total Interest-Earning Assets
  $ 4,175,225     $ 203,872       4.88 %   $ 3,899,815     $ 203,686       5.22 %   $ 2,986,542     $ 176,816       5.92 %
                                                                         
Cash and Due from Banks
    62,103                       65,509                       65,992                  
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock
    35,854                       33,135                       23,325                  
Other Assets
    316,234                       278,057                       219,517                  
                                                                         
Total Assets
  $ 4,589,416                     $ 4,276,516                     $ 3,295,376                  
                                                                         
Interest-Bearing Liabilities:
                                                                       
Deposits:
                                                                       
Savings and Interest Checking Accounts
  $ 1,183,247     $ 4,397       0.37 %   $ 913,881     $ 4,753       0.52 %   $ 688,336     $ 6,229       0.90 %
Money Market
    739,264       4,565       0.62 %     639,231       6,545       1.02 %     472,065       9,182       1.95 %
Time Certificates of Deposits
    814,462       11,292       1.39 %     921,787       19,865       2.16 %     740,779       23,485       3.17 %
                                                                         
Total Interest Bearing Deposits
    2,736,973       20,254       0.74 %     2,474,899       31,163       1.26 %     1,901,180       38,896       2.05 %
Borrowings:
                                                                       
Federal Home Loan Bank Borrowings
    318,151       9,589       3.01 %     409,551       11,519       2.81 %     312,451       10,714       3.43 %
Federal Funds Purchased and Assets Sold Under
                                                                       
Repurchase Agreements
    182,467       3,084       1.69 %     180,632       3,396       1.88 %     154,440       4,663       3.02 %
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    61,857       3,666       5.93 %     61,857       3,739       6.04 %     60,166       3,842       6.39 %
Subordinated Debt
    30,000       2,170       7.23 %     30,000       2,178       7.26 %     10,410       750       7.20 %
Other Borrowings
    2,802             0.00 %     2,054             0.00 %     2,381       61       2.56 %
                                                                         
Total Borrowings
    595,277       18,509       3.11 %     684,094       20,832       3.05 %     539,848       20,030       3.71 %
                                                                         
Total Interest-Bearing Liabilities
  $ 3,332,250     $ 38,763       1.16 %   $ 3,158,993     $ 51,995       1.65 %   $ 2,441,028     $ 58,926       2.41 %
                                                                         
Demand Deposits
    773,718                       659,916                       533,543                  
Other Liabilities
    58,199                       54,697                       28,692                  
                                                                         
Total Liabilities
  $ 4,164,167                     $ 3,873,606                     $ 3,003,263                  
Stockholders’ Equity
    425,249                       402,910                       292,113                  
                                                                         
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
  $ 4,589,416                     $ 4,276,516                     $ 3,295,376                  
                                                                         
Net Interest Income(1)
          $ 165,109                     $ 151,691                     $ 117,890          
                                                                         
Interest Rate Spread(3)
                    3.72 %                     3.58 %                     3.51 %
                                                                         
Net Interest Margin(4)
                    3.95 %                     3.89 %                     3.95 %
                                                                         
Supplemental Information:
                                                                       
Total Deposits, Including Demand Deposits
  $ 3,510,691     $ 20,254             $ 3,134,815     $ 31,163             $ 2,434,723     $ 38,896          
Cost of Total Deposits
                    0.58 %                     0.99 %                     1.60 %
Total Funding Liabilities, Including Demand Deposits
  $ 4,105,968     $ 38,763             $ 3,818,909     $ 51,995             $ 2,974,571     $ 58,926          
Cost of Total Funding Liabilities
                    0.94 %                     1.36 %                     1.98 %


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(1) The total amount of adjustment to present interest income and yield on a fully tax-equivalent basis is $1,148, $997 and $1,376 in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
(2) Average nonaccruing loans are included in loans.
 
(3) Interest rate spread represents the difference between the weighted average yield on interest-earning assets and the weighted average costs of interest-bearing liabilities.
 
(4) Net interest margin represents net interest income as a percentage of average interest-earning assets.
 
The following table presents certain information on a fully-tax equivalent basis regarding changes in the Company’s interest income and interest expense for the periods indicated. For each category of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, information is provided with respect to changes attributable to (1) changes in rate (change in rate multiplied by prior year volume), (2) changes in volume (change in volume multiplied by prior year rate) and (3) changes in volume/rate (change in rate multiplied by change in volume) which is allocated to the change due to rate column.
 
Table 18 — Volume Rate Analysis
 
                                                                         
    Year Ended December 31,  
    2010 Compared To 2009     2009 Compared To 2008     2008 Compared To 2007  
    Change
    Change
          Change
    Change
          Change
    Change
       
    Due to
    Due to
    Total
    Due to
    Due to
    Total
    Due to
    Due to
    Total
 
    Rate(1)     Volume     Change     Rate(1)     Volume     Change     Rate(1)     Volume     Change  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Income on Interest-Earning Assets:
                                                                       
Interest Bearing Cash, Federal Funds Sold and Short Term Investments
  $ (232 )   $ 279     $ 47     $ (1,396 )   $ 1,538     $ 142     $ (178 )   $ (1,142 )   $ (1,320 )
Securities:
                                                                       
Trading Assets
    120       (97 )     23       (316 )     415       99       53       39       92  
Taxable Securities
    (3,024 )     (1,710 )     (4,734 )     (1,806 )     7,903       6,097       822       1,791       2,613  
Non-Taxable Securities(2)
    118       (437 )     (319 )     28       (1,168 )     (1,140 )     (50 )     (641 )     (691 )
                                                                         
Total Securities
    (2,786 )     (2,244 )     (5,030 )     (2,094 )     7,150       5,056       825       1,189       2,014  
Loans Held for Sale
    (48 )     85       37       (117 )     421       304       26       (34 )     (8 )
Loans(2)(3)
    (8,818 )     13,950       5,132       (20,980 )     42,348       21,368       (18,037 )     33,743       15,706  
                                                                         
Total
  $ (11,884 )   $ 12,070     $ 186     $ (24,587 )   $ 51,457     $ 26,870     $ (17,364 )   $ 33,756     $ 16,392  
                                                                         
Expense of Interest-Bearing Liabilities:
                                                                       
Deposits:
                                                                       
Savings and Interest Checking Accounts
  $ (1,757 )   $ 1,401     $ (356 )   $ (3,517 )   $ 2,041     $ (1,476 )   $ (3,021 )   $ 1,519     $ (1,502 )
Money Market
    (3,004 )     1,024       (1,980 )     (5,888 )     3,251       (2,637 )     (4,894 )     287       (4,607 )
Time Certificates of Deposits
    (6,260 )     (2,313 )     (8,573 )     (9,359 )     5,739       (3,620 )     (7,371 )     8,737       1,366  
Total Interest-Bearing Deposits
    (11,021 )     112       (10,909 )     (18,764 )     11,031       (7,733 )     (15,286 )     10,543       (4,743 )
Borrowings:
                                                                       
Federal Home Loan Bank Borrowings
    641       (2,571 )     (1,930 )     (2,525 )     3,330       805       (3,178 )     2,576       (602 )
Federal Funds Purchased and Assets Sold Under Repurchase Agreements
    (346 )     34       (312 )     (2,058 )     791       (1,267 )     (132 )     1,400       1,268  
Junior Subordinated Debentures
    (73 )           (73 )     (211 )     108       (103 )     (1,224 )     18       (1,206 )
Subordinated Debt
    (8 )           (8 )     17       1,411       1,428       750             750  
Other Borrowings
                      (53 )     (8 )     (61 )     (81 )     (15 )     (96 )
                                                                         
Total Borrowings
    214       (2,537 )     (2,323 )     (4,830 )     5,632       802       (3,865 )     3,979       114  
                                                                         
Total
  $ (10,807 )   $ (2,425 )   $ (13,232 )   $ (23,594 )   $ 16,663     $ (6,931 )   $ (19,151 )   $ 14,522     $ (4,629 )
                                                                         
Change in Net Interest Income
  $ (1,077 )   $ 14,495     $ 13,418     $ (993 )   $ 34,794     $ 33,801     $ 1,787     $ 19,234     $ 21,021  
                                                                         
 
 
(1) The changes for each category of interest income and expense are divided between the portion of change attributable to the variance in volume and the portion of the change attributable to the variances in rate for that category. The unallocated change in rate or volume variance has been allocated to the rate variances.
 
(2) The total amount of adjustment to present interest income and yield on a fully tax-equivalent basis is $1,148, $997 and $1,376 in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.


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(3) Loans include portfolio loans and nonaccrual loans, however unpaid interest on nonaccrual loans has not been included for purposes of determining interest income.
 
The increase in net interest income is driven mainly by reductions in the Company’s overall cost of funding, stemming from the Company’s strategy to create a funding mix that focuses on core deposits. Although loan balances (including held for sale) increased by $174.6 million, a decline in the size of and yield on the securities portfolio, as well as a reduction in loan yields, reduced overall growth in interest income.
 
Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2010 decreased to $38.8 million from the $52.0 million recorded in 2009, a decrease of $13.2 million, or 25.4%, of which $11.0 million is due to the decrease in rates on deposits. The total cost of funds decreased 42 basis points to 0.94% for 2010 as compared to 1.36% for 2009. Average interest-bearing deposits increased $262.1 million, or 10.6%, over the prior year while the cost of these deposits decreased from 1.26% to 0.74% primarily attributable to the active management of deposit costs.
 
Average borrowings decreased in 2010 by $88.8 million, or 13.0%, from the 2009 average balance. The average cost of borrowings increased to 3.11% from 3.05%.
 
Provision For Loan Losses   The provision for loan losses represents the charge to expense that is required to maintain an adequate level of allowance for loan losses. The provision for loan losses totaled $18.7 million in 2010, compared with $17.3 million in 2009, an increase of $1.3 million. The Company’s allowance for loan losses, as a percentage of total loans, was 1.30%, as compared to 1.25% at December 31, 2009. For the year ended December 31, 2010, net loan charge-offs totaled $14.8 million, an increase of $2.7 million from the prior year.
 
The increase in the amount of the provision for loan losses is the result of a combination of factors including: shifting growth rates among various components of the Bank’s loan portfolio with differing facets of risk; higher levels of net loan charge-offs; and continued uncertainty with respect to the economic environment. While the total loan portfolio increased by 4.7% for the year ended December 31, 2010, as compared to 2.1% organic growth, excluding the impact of acquisition, for 2009, growth among the commercial components of 8.2% continued to outpace the consumer lending components which decreased 2.0%. These lending categories each exhibit different credit risk characteristics.
 
While the economic environment remains challenging, regional and local general economic conditions showed improvement during 2010, as measured in terms of employment levels, statewide economic activity, and other regional economic indicators. Local residential real estate markets fundamentals weakened toward the end of the year, resulting from the expiration of the Federal Housing Tax Credit earlier in 2010. Additionally, Massachusetts foreclosures increased in 2010 compared to 2009, although activity slowed toward the end of the year. Regional commercial real estate market conditions were mixed during 2010, with some areas experiencing a slow recovery, while others were characterized by higher vacancy rates and negative absorption. Leading economic indicators signal continued economic improvement in 2011, however uncertainty persists and growth is expected to be slow.
 
Management’s periodic evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses considers past loan loss experience, known and inherent risks in the loan portfolio, adverse situations which may affect the borrowers’ ability to repay, the estimated value of the underlying collateral, if any, and current and prospective economic conditions. Substantial portions of the Bank’s loans are secured by real estate in Massachusetts. Accordingly, the ultimate collectability of a substantial portion of the Bank’s loan portfolio is susceptible to changes in property values within the state.


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Non-Interest Income   The following table sets forth information regarding non-interest income for the periods shown:
 
Table 19 — Non-Interest Income
 
                         
    Years Ended December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Service charges on deposit accounts
  $ 18,708     $ 17,060     $ 15,595  
Wealth management
    11,723       10,047       11,133  
Mortgage banking
    5,041       4,857       3,072  
Bank owned life insurance
    3,192       2,939       2,555  
Net gain/(loss) on sales of securities
    458       1,354       (609 )
Gain resulting from early termination of hedging relationship
          3,778        
Loan level derivatives
    3,000       5,436        
Gross change on write-down of certain investments to fair value
    497       (7,382 )     (7,211 )
Less: non-credit related other-than-temporary impairment(1)
    (831 )     (1,576 )      
                         
Net loss on write-down of certain investments to fair value
    (334 )     (8,958 )     (7,211 )
Other non-interest income
    5,118       1,679       4,497  
                         
Total
  $ 46,906     $ 38,192     $ 29,032  
                         
 
 
(1) Represents losses previously recognized in other comprehensive income not determined to be credit related.
 
Non-interest income, which is generated by deposit account service charges, investment management services, mortgage banking activities, BOLI, and miscellaneous other sources, amounted to $46.9 million in 2010, a $8.7 million, or 22.8%, increase from the prior year.
 
Service charges on deposit accounts, which represented 39.9% of total non-interest income in 2010, increased from $17.1 million in 2009 to $18.7 million in 2010, mainly due to service charges related to debit card usage and overdraft privileges on checking accounts.
 
Wealth management revenue increased by $1.7 million, or 16.7%, for the year ended December 31, 2010, as compared to the same period in 2009. Assets under administration at December 31, 2010 were $1.6 billion, an increase of $295.8 million, or 23.2%, as compared to December 31, 2009. This increase is largely due to strong sales results and general market appreciation.
 
Mortgage banking revenue of $5.0 million in 2010, increased by 3.8% from the $4.9 million recorded in 2009. Capitalized servicing rights are reported as mortgage servicing rights and are amortized into non-interest income in proportion to, and over the period of, the estimated future servicing of the underlying financial assets. The Bank’s assumptions with respect to prepayments, which affect the estimated average life of the loans, are adjusted periodically to consider market consensus loan prepayment predictions at that date. At December 31, 2010 the mortgage servicing rights asset totaled $1.6 million, or 0.63% of the serviced loan portfolio. At December 31, 2009 the mortgage servicing rights asset totaled $2.2 million, or 0.63%, of the serviced loan portfolio.
 
A $458,000 net gain on the sale of securities was recorded for the year ended December 31, 2010 as compared to a $1.4 million net gain on the sale of securities for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
The Company recorded total credit related impairment charges on certain pooled trust preferred securities and one private mortgage-backed securities of $334,000 and $9.0 million, pre-tax, for the years ended December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively.
 
Other non-interest income increased by $1.0 million, or 14.1%, for the year ended December 31, 2010, as compared to the same period in 2009, largely attributable to increases in income from the Company’s loan level derivatives program.


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Non-Interest Expense   The following table sets forth information regarding non-interest expense for the periods shown:
 
Table 20 — Non-Interest Expense
 
                         
    Years Ended December 31,  
    2010     2009     2008  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Salaries and employee benefits
  $ 76,983     $ 68,257     $ 58,275  
Occupancy and equipment expenses
    16,011       15,673       12,757  
Data processing and facilities management
    5,773