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TABLE OF CONTENTS
GAMEFLY, INC. INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Table of Contents

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 9, 2010

Registration No. 333-164821

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



AMENDMENT NO. 5
TO
FORM S-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933



GAMEFLY, INC.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  7841
(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
  04-3700336
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

GameFly, Inc.
5340 Alla Road, Suite 110
Los Angeles, CA 90066
(310) 664-6400
(Address, including zip code and telephone number, including
area code, of Registrant's principal executive offices)

David Hodess
President and Chief Executive Officer
GameFly, Inc.
5340 Alla Road, Suite 110
Los Angeles, CA 90066
(310) 664-6400
(Name, address, including zip code and telephone number, including
area code, of agent for service)



Copies to

Glen R. Van Ligten, Esq.
Louis D. Soto, Esq.
Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP
1000 Marsh Road
Menlo Park, California 94025
Telephone: (650) 614-7400
Facsimile: (650) 614-7401

 

Mark Mihanovic, Esq.
McDermott Will & Emery LLP
2049 Century Park East, 3800
Los Angeles, California 90067
Telephone: (310) 277-4110
Facsimile: (310) 277-4730



Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:
As soon as practicable following the effectiveness of this Registration Statement.



                  If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.    o

                  If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act of 1933, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering:    o

                  If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering:    o

                  If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering:    o

                  Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer ý
(Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o



CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

       
 
Title of Securities
to be Registered

  Proposed Maximum
Aggregate
Offering Price(1)(2)

  Amount of
Registration Fee

 

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share

  $50,000,000   $3,565(3)

 

(1)
Estimated solely for the purpose of computing the amount of the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

(2)
Includes shares which the underwriters have the option to purchase to cover overallotments, if any.

(3)
Previously paid.

                  The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.


Table of Contents

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

Subject to Completion
Preliminary Prospectus dated                        , 2010

PROSPECTUS

                                    Shares

GAMEFLY INC. LOGO

GameFly, Inc.

Common Stock



              This is GameFly, Inc.'s initial public offering. We are selling                                    shares of our common stock and the selling stockholders are selling                                    shares of our common stock. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of shares to be offered by the selling stockholders.

              We expect the public offering price to be between $            and $            per share. Currently, no public market exists for the shares. After we determine the public offering price, we expect that the shares will trade on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol "GFLY."

              Investing in the common stock involves risks that are described in the "Risk Factors" section beginning on page 10 of this prospectus.



 
 
Per Share
 
Total
 
Public offering price   $     $    
Underwriting discount   $     $    
Proceeds, before expenses, to us   $     $    
Proceeds, before expenses, to the selling stockholders   $     $    

              The underwriters may also purchase up to an additional                                    shares from us, and up to an additional                                    shares from the selling stockholders, at the public offering price, less the underwriting discount, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus to cover overallotments, if any.

              Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

              The shares will be ready for delivery on or about                                    , 2010.



BofA Merrill Lynch   Piper Jaffray



Cowen and Company   William Blair & Company



The date of this prospectus is                                    , 2010.


Table of Contents

GRAPHIC


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
  Page

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

  1

THE OFFERING

  5

SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

  7

RISK FACTORS

  10

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

  28

USE OF PROCEEDS

  29

DIVIDEND POLICY

  29

CAPITALIZATION

  30

DILUTION

  32

SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

  34

MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

  37

BUSINESS

  72

MANAGEMENT

  82

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

  88

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

  107

PRINCIPAL AND SELLING STOCKHOLDERS

  108

DESCRIPTION OF CAPITAL STOCK

  111

SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE

  116

MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES TO NON-U.S. HOLDERS OF OUR COMMON STOCK

  118

UNDERWRITING

  122

LEGAL MATTERS

  128

EXPERTS

  128

WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  128

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

  F-1

              You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus or contained in any free writing prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Neither we, the selling stockholders nor the underwriters have authorized anyone to provide you with additional information or information different from that contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We and the selling stockholders are offering to sell, and seeking offers to buy, our common stock only in jurisdictions where offers and sales are permitted. The information contained in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of our common stock. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since such date.

              No action has been or will be taken in any jurisdiction by us or any underwriter that would permit a public offering of our common stock or the possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about and observe any restrictions relating to this offering and sale of our common stock and the distribution of this prospectus outside the United States. Unless otherwise expressly stated or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to "dollars" and "$" are to U.S. dollars.

              Market data used throughout this prospectus was obtained from internal surveys, market research, consultant surveys, publicly available information and industry publications and surveys. Consultant surveys and industry publications and surveys generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness

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of such information is not guaranteed. We have not independently verified any of the data from third-party sources nor have we ascertained the underlying economic assumptions relied upon therein. Similarly, internal surveys and market research, which we believe to be reliable, based upon our management's knowledge of the industry, have not been independently verified.

              "GameFly," "Game Answers," "Cheat Freak," "FileShack," "ShackNews," "CheatServer" and "GameStrata" and their respective logos are our trademarks. Solely for convenience, we refer to our trademarks in this prospectus without the ™ and ® symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights to our trademarks. Other service marks, trademarks and trade names referred to in this prospectus are the property of their respective owners.

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

              This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that you should consider in making your investment decision. Before investing in our common stock, you should carefully read this entire prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in this prospectus and the information set forth under the headings "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations."

Our Company

              We are a leading online video game rental subscription service with approximately 410,000 subscribers in the United States as of June 30, 2010. We provide our subscribers access to a comprehensive library of over 7,000 titles covering all major video game and handheld game consoles. We deliver video games to our subscribers via First-Class Mail. There are over 100 million people that play console video games in the United States, according to the 2009 Gamer Segmentation Report published by The NPD Group, or NPD. We believe that online rental subscriptions will constitute a growing percentage of total video game-related expenditures and that our subscription service presents a compelling alternative for video game players who have historically either purchased video games or rented them from traditional retailers.

              Our subscription service has grown rapidly since its launch in 2002. We believe our growth has been driven by the compelling value proposition of our subscription model, extensive selection of titles, high level of customer service and effective marketing programs, as well as the increase in the installed base of video game consoles. We purchase nearly every new title upon its initial release in the United States. In addition, we continue to carry in our inventory approximately 92% of all titles that have been released across multiple generations of the major video game platforms since the inception of our company. As evidence of the demand for video games well after their initial release dates, approximately 50% of the video games rented through our subscription service during the 12 months ended June 30, 2010 consisted of titles at least six months old.

              Our subscription service allows subscribers to have one or more video games out concurrently with no due dates, late fees or shipping charges for a fixed monthly fee. Subscribers select titles on our website, www.gamefly.com, receive video games via First-Class Mail and return them to us at their convenience using our prepaid mailers. Subscribers also have the option to purchase a video game they are currently renting through our "Keep" feature. Unless a subscriber decides to "Keep" a game, the subscriber can hold the game for as long as the subscriber desires without any obligation to purchase the game or pay any late fee or shipping charges. We offer our "Keep" feature for most of our newly released video games in our library. Upon confirmation that a video game has been returned or that a subscriber has elected to "Keep" a video game, we mail the next available game in a subscriber's GameQ, a subscriber's personal wish list of titles. We believe a significant value we offer to our subscribers is the ability to rent video games before they buy them. According to our August 2009 survey of subscribers, "try before you buy" ranks as the most important feature of the GameFly service. In addition to selling video games through our "Keep" feature, we also sell new and previously rented video games to our subscribers and others through www.gamefly.com.

              To complement our subscription service and video game sales, we operate a network of advertising-supported websites that provide video game content and information. Our network of websites currently attracts approximately 4.4 million monthly unique visitors, most of whom are not subscribers. We focus on providing these visitors with video game-specific content to enhance their video game experience, which we believe increases our subscriber satisfaction and enables us to attract new subscribers. We have attracted advertisers who seek to reach the 18-34-year-old male demographic.

              Our subscriber base increased from approximately 74,000 as of March 31, 2005 to approximately 410,000 as of June 30, 2010. Our revenues increased from $15.8 million in the fiscal year

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ended March 31, 2005 to $101.5 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010, rental revenues constituted 98% of our revenues and advertising and other revenues constituted 2% of our revenues. Our net income decreased from $4.1 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2009 to $0.5 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010 primarily due to an income tax benefit of $3.8 million in fiscal 2009 resulting primarily from the reversal of our valuation allowance for our deferred tax assets.

Industry Overview

              There are over 100 million people that play console video games in the United States, according to the 2009 Gamer Segmentation Report published by NPD. International Data Corporation, or IDC, estimates that there were approximately 200 million installed video game consoles (including handheld units) in North America at the end of 2009, a number that is estimated by IDC to increase to almost 260 million by the end of 2013. According to IDC, the installed base of Sony PlayStation 3, Microsoft Xbox 360 and Nintendo Wii video game consoles is expected to grow from over 44 million consoles in 2008 to approximately 131 million consoles in 2013. According to the Newzoo Games Market Report published by Newzoo BV, revenues from sales of new and used console video game software in 2009, including games for handheld units, represented 60% of the total United States video game software market, including PC, casual/social, massive multiplayer online and mobile games. According to a 2009 survey conducted by Frank N. Magid Associates, console gaming and Internet usage are the top two leisure activities for males in the United States between the ages of 18 and 34. North American video game hardware and software sales surpassed $29 billion in 2008 and are projected to grow at a rate of approximately 8% annually to $43 billion in 2013, according to IDC. Sales of video game software constituted approximately $20 billion, or 68%, of this market in 2008.

Subscriber Benefits

              Our solution provides the following benefits to our subscribers:

    Value.  We offer our video game rental service on a subscription basis, significantly reducing the consumer's up-front cost associated with buying a new game. Through our subscription plans, subscribers can have one or more titles out concurrently with no due dates, late fees or shipping charges, for prices starting at $15.95 per month, which is significantly less than the suggested retail price of a newly released video game. Using our service, a subscriber can try a video game for as long as he or she desires and then choose to return or purchase it. Our average subscriber rents approximately 22 video games per year from us at a cost less than the purchase price of five new video games at an average price of $60.

    Wide selection.  We offer over 7,000 video game titles for Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Xbox, Sony's PlayStation 3, PlayStation 2 and PSP, and Nintendo's Wii, GameCube, DS and Game Boy Advance consoles. Our library contains numerous copies of popular new releases, as well as many older "back-catalog" games that are generally less accessible in most video game rental and retail stores. We believe we are one of the few rental providers of console games that offers a broad selection of titles for previous generation platforms, giving us an advantage over traditional retailers and expanding our addressable market. Many of our subscribers play video games well after they have been released, leading us to believe that the availability of "back-catalog" games is an important differentiator of our service.

    Convenience.  Subscribers can easily select titles by building and modifying their GameQ, a personalized wish list or queue, of video game titles on our website. We create a unique experience for subscribers by personalizing our website to each subscriber's console type and selection history. Once selected, titles are sent to subscribers' homes through the U.S. Postal Service and returned to us in prepaid mailers. Subscribers also have the option to purchase a video game that they are currently renting through our "Keep" feature. Upon confirmation

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      that a title has been returned or that a subscriber has elected to "Keep" a video game, we automatically mail the next available game in his or her GameQ.

Strategy

              Our objective is to extend our position as a leading online video game rental subscription service and to become a premier provider of video game content and information. In order to achieve our objective, we intend to:

    Capitalize on a large and underpenetrated market.  We believe there is a large and untapped customer base for our subscription service and that an increased investment in marketing will allow us to further penetrate this market. According to the 2009 Gamer Segmentation Report published by NPD, there are over 100 million people who play console video games in the United States. There are two distinct segments within this market that we intend to target to drive our business:

      Core customers.  According to our August 2009 survey of subscribers, approximately 64% of our subscribers fall into the 18-34-year-old male demographic. According to NPD, there are more than 21 million console video game players in this segment. With our low 1% penetration rate, we believe that this segment continues to represent a large addressable market for our subscription service.

      Families.  A small portion of our subscribers are families. As a result of the introduction of new video games and video game consoles that appeal to families, such as the Nintendo Wii, we believe that this segment of the market is emerging as a potentially large subscriber base for us. To date, a relatively small portion of our marketing spending has been targeted toward families. We intend to increase our marketing expenditures targeted at this group.

    Further improve the subscriber experience.  We regularly add new features to make it easier for our subscribers to use our service. For example, we recently introduced our GameCenter application on the iPhone, which allows our subscribers to update their GameQ and access relevant video game-related content and information on their iPhones. We have also updated our e-commerce capability to enable visitors to purchase multiple new and previously rented video games in a single transaction. To help ensure our subscribers receive video games quickly, we utilize proprietary technology to manage the process and distribution of approximately 49,000 video games per day from our distribution centers. Our software automates the process of tracking and routing titles to and from each of our distribution centers and allocates order responsibilities among them. We regularly monitor, test and seek to improve the efficiency of our distribution, processing and inventory management systems. We intend to add additional distribution centers to enhance the efficiency of our distribution network and to decrease the delivery time of video games to our subscribers.

    Build our community.  In addition to serving approximately 410,000 subscribers, our website www.gamefly.com attracts an average of 2.7 million monthly unique visitors. In order to build a community among these visitors, we have developed and continue to add features and content that enable us and our community to post reviews, ratings and other video game-related content. We believe this community enables us to engage with visitors, enhances loyalty and retention among our current subscribers and attracts new subscribers.

    Expand GameFly Media.  In addition to www.gamefly.com, we operate a network of additional video game-related websites including www.shacknews.com, www.fileshack.com, www.cheatfreak.com, www.consolecheatcodes.com, www.cheatserver.com, www.gameanswers.com and www.ponged.com. Our websites provide relevant content and information, such as industry-specific news, video game tips and cheat codes, screenshots and trailers of new titles,

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      and game reviews and ratings to the video game community. Our websites are designed to enable our visitors to make informed decisions when purchasing or renting video games and enhance their overall video game experience. By developing or acquiring additional websites with video game-related content, we intend to grow our advertising revenue.

    Expand distribution and delivery channels. In November 2009, we started selling new video games on our website and we intend to grow this service. We also intend to expand the channels through which we deliver video games to subscribers. For example, we are currently piloting a kiosk program with two national retailers that enables consumers to rent or buy video games from kiosks located in retail outlets. We also intend to increase the number of games consumers can play online and download from our network of websites, including www.ponged.com and www.fileshack.com.

    Expand GameFly mobile presence.  In September 2008, we enabled our subscribers to access www.gamefly.com from their mobile devices in order to search for video games and manage their GameQ. In October 2009, we launched our GameCenter application on the iPhone, and subsequently on other mobile devices, which allows our subscribers to manage their subscriptions and enables any visitor to easily access relevant video game-related content, news and information on their mobile devices. Since the launch of our GameCenter application, total monthly page views to our mobile website and application increased from 1.5 million in October 2009 to 11.3 million in June 2010. We intend to continue the development of our GameCenter applications in order to grow our advertising revenue, increase our subscriber base and lower our churn rate.

Risk Factors

              Our business is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, as discussed more fully in the section entitled "Risk Factors" beginning on page 10 of this prospectus, which you should read in its entirety. We generate substantially all of our revenue from subscriptions to our service. If our efforts to attract and retain subscribers are not successful, our revenues and business will be adversely affected. We must minimize the rate of loss of existing subscribers. If we experience excessive rates of subscriber churn or our subscribers switch their subscriptions to a lower cost plan, our revenues and business will be harmed. We face competitive pricing pressure and competition from companies with longer operating histories, larger customer bases, greater brand recognition and greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do. For example, Blockbuster, Inc. recently expanded its "Games by Mail" service to all customers that participate in its online movie rental service. There can be no assurance we will be able to compete effectively against these competitors.

Corporate Information

              We were incorporated in the state of Delaware on April 15, 2002 under the name GameFly, Inc.

              Our principal executive offices are located at 5340 Alla Road, Suite 110, Los Angeles, CA 90066 and our telephone number is (310) 664-6400. Our website address is www.gamefly.com. The information contained on our website is not part of this prospectus and the inclusion of our website address in this prospectus is an inactive textual reference only. Unless the context requires otherwise, in this prospectus the words "GameFly," "Company," "we," "our" and "us" refer to GameFly, Inc.

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THE OFFERING

Common stock offered:

   
 

By GameFly, Inc. 

 

            shares

 

By the selling stockholders

 

            shares

 

Total offering

 

            shares

Common stock to be outstanding after this offering

 

            shares

Overallotment option

 

The underwriters have an option to purchase a maximum of            additional shares of common stock from us and the selling stockholders to cover overallotments. The underwriters can exercise this option at any time within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.

Use of proceeds

 

We expect the net proceeds to us from this offering, after expenses, to be approximately $             million based on an assumed initial public offering price of $             per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, including working capital, sales and marketing activities, general and administrative matters and capital expenditures. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds to acquire or invest in complementary technologies, solutions or businesses or to obtain rights to such complementary technologies, solutions or businesses. There are no agreements, understandings or commitments with respect to any such acquisition or investment at this time.

Directed share program

 

At our request, the underwriters have reserved for sale, at the initial public offering price, up to             shares offered by this prospectus for sale to some of our directors, officers, employees, distributors, dealers, business associates and related persons. If these persons purchase reserved shares, this will reduce the number of shares available for sale to the general public. Any reserved shares that are not so purchased will be offered by the underwriters to the general public on the same terms as the other shares offered by this prospectus.

Dividend policy

 

We do not anticipate paying any dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. See "Dividend Policy."

Risk factors

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See "Risk Factors" beginning on page 10 of this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common stock.

Proposed NASDAQ Global Market symbol

 

"GFLY"

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              The number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering is based on 15,419,838 shares outstanding as of June 30, 2010, and excludes:

    4,452,614 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of June 30, 2010 to purchase our common stock granted pursuant to the GameFly 2002 Stock Plan, as amended, or 2002 Stock Plan, at a weighted average exercise price of $2.64 per share;

    330,688 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of warrants outstanding as of June 30, 2010 at a weighted average exercise price of $2.37 per share;

    an aggregate of 157,559 shares of common stock available for issuance as of June 30, 2010 under the 2002 Stock Plan; and

    1,500,000 shares of common stock, subject to increase on an annual basis, reserved for issuance under our 2010 Omnibus Equity Incentive Plan, or 2010 Plan, which we plan to adopt in connection with this offering.

              Except as otherwise indicated, information in this prospectus reflects or assumes the following:

    that our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws, which will be in effect at or prior to completion of this offering, are in effect;

    the automatic conversion of all of our outstanding preferred stock into an aggregate of 9,933,711 shares of common stock upon completion of this offering;

    no exercise of the underwriters' overallotment option to purchase up to            additional shares of our common stock; and

    an initial public offering price of $            per share, the mid-point of the range set forth on the cover of this prospectus.

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SUMMARY CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

              The following tables summarize the consolidated financial data for our business. You should read this summary financial data in conjunction with "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our consolidated financial statements and related notes, all included elsewhere in this prospectus.

              We derived the consolidated statements of operations data for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2008, 2009 and 2010 from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated statements of operations data for the three months ended June 30, 2009 and 2010, and the unaudited consolidated balance sheet data as of June 30, 2010, are derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We have prepared the unaudited information on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements and have included all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, that we consider necessary for a fair presentation of the financial information set forth in those statements. Results for the three months ended June 30, 2010 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

              Pro forma basic net income (loss) per share has been calculated assuming the conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into 9,933,711 shares of common stock upon the completion of this offering. The balance sheet data as of June 30, 2010 is presented:

    on an actual basis;

    on a pro forma basis to reflect the automatic conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into 9,933,711 shares of common stock upon the completion of this offering; and

    on a pro forma as adjusted basis to reflect the pro forma adjustments and the sale by us of                        shares of common stock offered by this prospectus at the initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

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  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands, except share and per share data)
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

                               

Revenues:

                               
 

Base subscription

  $ 55,303   $ 71,756   $ 87,844   $ 20,723   $ 25,044  
 

Previously rented product

    9,171     10,786     11,111     2,452     2,735  
                       
   

Total rental revenues

    64,474     82,542     98,955     23,175     27,779  
 

Advertising and other

    1,672     2,128     2,511     575     726  
                       
   

Total revenues

    66,146     84,670     101,466     23,750     28,505  
                       

Cost of revenues:

                               
 

Rental(1)

    36,658     45,140     53,561     11,121     13,584  
 

Advertising and other

    238     202     976     144     245  
                       
   

Total cost of revenues

    36,896     45,342     54,537     11,265     13,829  
                       

Gross profit

    29,250     39,328     46,929     12,485     14,676  
                       

Operating expenses:

                               
 

Fulfillment(2)

    6,424     8,780     9,746     2,209     2,605  
 

Technology and development(2)

    3,636     6,542     7,409     1,823     2,032  
 

Marketing(2)

    13,526     17,521     19,105     4,157     4,438  
 

General and administrative(2)

    3,065     3,592     5,397     1,051     2,005  
 

Depreciation and amortization

    724     1,175     1,501     372     400  
 

Impairment of acquired website

        668              
 

Impairment of goodwill

        449     1,500          
                       
   

Total operating expenses

    27,375     38,727     44,658     9,612     11,480  
                       

Operating (loss) income

    1,875     601     2,271     2,873     3,196  
                       

Other income (expense):

                               
 

Interest income

    199     68     7     3      
 

Interest expense

    (329 )   (225 )   (233 )   (74 )   (36 )
 

Change in fair value of warrants

            (648 )   (121 )   (5 )
 

Other—net

    (57 )   (164 )   (28 )   (4 )   (12 )
                       
   

Total other income (expense)

    (187 )   (321 )   (902 )   (196 )   (53 )
                       

Income (loss) before income tax (provision) benefit

    1,688     280     1,369     2,677     3,143  

Income tax (provision) benefit

    (60 )   3,780     (916 )   (1,166 )   (1,550 )
                       

Net income (loss)

  $ 1,628   $ 4,060   $ 453   $ 1,511   $ 1,593  

Undistributed income attributable to preferred stockholders

    (1,628 )   (3,276 )   (453 )   (1,139 )   (1,178 )
                       

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

  $   $ 784   $   $ 372   $ 415  
                       

Net income (loss) per share:

                               
 

Basic

  $   $ 0.16   $   $ 0.07   $ 0.08  
                       
 

Diluted

  $   $ 0.10   $   $ 0.05   $ 0.05  
                       

Weighted average shares outstanding:

                               
 

Basic

    4,551,307     4,893,713     5,330,384     5,177,861     5,486,127  
 

Diluted

    4,551,307     7,824,282     8,433,383     8,077,741     8,772,593  

Pro forma net income (loss) per share (unaudited):

                               
 

Basic

              $ 0.03         $ 0.10  
                             
 

Diluted

              $ 0.02         $ 0.09  
                             

Pro forma weighted average shares outstanding used in calculating net income (loss) per share (unaudited):

                               
 

Basic

                15,226,293           15,419,838  
 

Diluted

                18,329,292           18,706,304  

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(1)
Components of cost of rental are shown below:

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
   
 

Amortization of video game library

  $ 11,817   $ 13,354   $ 20,286   $ 3,199   $ 5,536  

Carrying value of previously rented products sold

    9,346     11,517     11,001     2,470     2,485  

Carrying value of lost and damaged games expensed

    6,186     5,981     5,462     1,521     1,142  

Shipping and handling, packaging, and other cost of rental

    9,309     14,288     16,812     3,931     4,421  
                       
 

Total cost of rental

  $ 36,658   $ 45,140   $ 53,561   $ 11,121   $ 13,584  
                       
(2)
Stock-based compensation, including the impact of warrants and options, included in the above line items:

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
   
 

Fulfillment

  $ 69   $ 88   $ 74   $ 16   $ 21  

Technology and development

    109     478     325     93     124  

Marketing

    82     165     901     156     54  

General and administrative

    82     109     264     24     188  
                       
 

Total stock-based compensation expense

  $ 342   $ 840   $ 1,564   $ 289   $ 387  
                       

 

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  

Other Data:(1)

                               

Total subscribers(2)

    266,853     328,119     422,663     336,206     409,594  

Gross additions

    393,063     531,949     635,536     139,285     152,179  

Monthly churn

    7.3 %   7.7 %   7.8 %   8.2 %   8.3 %

Average monthly revenue per subscriber

  $ 21.27   $ 21.03   $ 20.54   $ 20.80   $ 20.06  

Subscriber acquisition cost

  $ 29.93   $ 29.29   $ 26.18   $ 26.16   $ 25.41  

(1)
The terms "total subscribers," "gross additions," "monthly churn," "subscriber acquisition cost" and "average monthly revenue per subscriber" are defined in the "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Key Business Metrics" section.
(2)
At end of period.

 
  As of
June 30, 2010
 
 
  Actual   Pro Forma   Pro Forma As
Adjusted
 
 
  (in thousands)
 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

                   

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 11,960   $ 11,960        

Total assets

    40,139     40,139        

Long term debt (including current portion)

    3,409     3,409        

Convertible preferred stock

    21,787            

Total stockholders' equity

    19,614     19,614        

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RISK FACTORS

              An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below and all of the other information contained in this prospectus before deciding whether to purchase our stock. Our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be materially and adversely affected by any of these risks. The trading price of our common stock could decline due to any of these risks, and you may lose all or part of your investment. In assessing the risks described below, you should also refer to the other information contained in the prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes, before deciding to purchase any shares of our common stock.


Risks Related to Our Business

If our efforts to attract and retain subscribers are not successful, our revenues will be adversely affected.

              We generate substantially all of our revenue from subscriptions to our service and we must continue to attract subscribers to our service. Our ability to attract subscribers will depend primarily on our ability to consistently provide our subscribers with a valuable and quality experience for selecting, playing, receiving and returning video games, including providing content and features to enhance our subscribers' selection and play. For example, if consumers do not perceive our subscription service to be valuable relative to the services of our competitors, if we fail to deliver video games in a timely manner or deliver damaged video games, if we do not regularly introduce new content and features, or if we introduce new content and features that are not favorably received by the market, we may not be able to attract or retain subscribers. If we do not handle subscriber complaints effectively, our brand and reputation may suffer, we may lose our subscribers' confidence, and they may choose not to renew their subscriptions. In addition, many of our subscribers originate from word-of-mouth advertising and are directly referred to our service from existing subscribers. If our efforts to satisfy our existing subscribers are not successful, we may not be able to attract new subscribers and, as a result, our business, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected.

If we experience excessive rates of subscriber churn or our subscribers switch their subscriptions to lower cost plans, our revenues and business will be harmed.

              We must minimize the rate of loss of existing subscribers and continually add new subscribers both to replace subscribers who choose not to renew their subscriptions and to grow our business beyond our current subscriber base. We describe the percentage of subscribers who elect not to renew their subscriptions as subscriber "churn." Subscribers choose not to renew their subscriptions for many reasons, including a desire to reduce discretionary spending or a perception that they do not use the service sufficiently, the service is a poor value, competitive services provide a better value or experience, or subscriber service issues are not satisfactorily resolved. Subscribers may choose not to renew their subscription at any time prior to the renewal date. If we are unable to attract new subscribers in numbers greater than our subscriber churn, our subscriber base will decrease and our business, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected. In addition, from time to time, we have experienced increases in the number of subscribers who switch their subscriptions to lower cost plans. Even if we are successful in minimizing churn, if significant numbers of our existing subscribers switch their subscriptions to lower cost plans, our business, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected.

              If our subscriber churn increases, we may be required to increase the rate at which we add new subscribers in order to maintain and grow our revenues. If excessive numbers of subscribers cancel our service or switch their subscriptions to lower cost plans, we may be required to incur significantly higher marketing and advertising expenses than we currently anticipate in order to offset this loss of revenue. A significant increase in our subscriber churn or in the number of subscribers who switch their subscriptions to lower cost plans would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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If we are unable to compete effectively or withstand competitive pricing pressures, our business will be materially and adversely affected.

              The market for in-home video game entertainment is intensely competitive and subject to rapid change. Many of our competitors have longer operating histories, larger customer bases, greater brand recognition and significantly greater financial, marketing and other resources than we do. For example, we compete against large retailers, such as Amazon, eBay, Blockbuster, Best Buy, GameStop, Target and Walmart, and other competitors that offer video game sales or rentals through retail stores, online or both. Blockbuster and Netflix have online rental subscription services for movies that are similar in nature to our online video game rental subscription service. Netflix subscribers and participants in Blockbuster's By Mail and Total Access Programs can rent movie DVDs online and have the DVDs delivered to their homes via First-Class Mail. Blockbuster and Netflix each have a greater number of online subscribers for movies than we do for video games. Each also has a much larger network of distribution centers and, in the case of Blockbuster, stores across the United States from which they offer DVDs to their subscribers. As such, these companies have a large and established subscriber base to which they can offer additional subscription services, such as the online rental of video games. Blockbuster began its "Games by Mail" pilot program in 2009 to expand its online movie rental service to include video games for customers in Cleveland, Ohio and Seattle, Washington. Starting in August 2010 Blockbuster expanded its "Games by Mail" service to all customers that participate in its online movie rental service. Blockbuster currently charges its online customers a fee ranging from $8.99 to $16.99 to rent concurrently one to three video games or, at the customer's option, movies for an unlimited period. Under our subscription plans, which range in price from $15.95 to $36.95 per month, subscribers can rent one to four games concurrently for an unlimited period. Netflix may in the future decide to include video games in its service offering. In addition, Netflix has significantly greater financial resources than we do. Also, alternative channels for online entertainment such as social networking sites, virtual worlds and massively multiplayer online games are growing in popularity and new technologies for delivery of in-home video game entertainment, such as Internet delivery of video game content, continue to receive considerable media and investor attention. There can be no assurance that we will be able to compete effectively against these competitors or against alternative channels of online entertainment delivery. To remain competitive, we must continue to provide relevant content and enhance and improve the functionality and features of our products and services. If competitors introduce new solutions that incorporate new technologies, our existing products and services may become obsolete. Our future success will depend on, among other things, our ability to:

    anticipate demand for new products and services;

    enhance our existing solutions;

    respond to technological advances on a cost-effective and timely basis; and

    decrease prices in response to pricing pressures from our competitors.

              Demand for our service is also sensitive to price. Many external factors, including our marketing and technology costs and our competitors' pricing and marketing strategies, can significantly affect our pricing strategies. Certain other online DVD rental subscription services receive rates and terms of service from the U.S. Postal Service which we believe enable them to incur lower costs for mailing DVDs to and from their subscribers than we incur and may potentially enable them to charge lower rates for comparable services than we charge for our services. In addition, our competitors may adopt aggressive pricing policies and devote substantially more resources to marketing, website and systems development than we do. There can be no assurance that we will be able to compete effectively against current or new competitors at our existing pricing levels or at lower price levels in the future. Furthermore, we may need to increase the level of service provided to our subscribers and/or incur significantly higher marketing expenditures than we currently anticipate, which would further impact our ability to respond to pricing pressures.

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              If we are unable to successfully compete with the programs, technologies, or pricing strategies of our current or future competitors, we may not be able to increase or maintain market share, revenues or profitability, and our business, financial condition and results of operations will be materially and adversely affected.

If digital download or other technologies are more widely adopted and supported as a method of content delivery or other forms of online entertainment continue to grow in popularity, our business could be adversely affected.

              Our rental subscription service currently depends on the distribution of physical video game media such as discs and cartridges. Existing and new technologies are continually being developed to enable consumers to download video game content from the Internet to a game console or a computer. Any of these technologies could become an alternative method of game content delivery that is widely supported by video game publishers and adopted by consumers. In addition, massively multiplayer online games, virtual worlds and other online games such as those offered by social networks are becoming increasingly popular. We currently do not offer our subscribers the ability to digitally download video games to a game console and have no current plans to offer this capability to our subscribers. If these technologies are adopted more quickly than we anticipate or more quickly than Internet delivery offerings that we may provide in the future, other providers are better able to meet video game publisher and consumer needs and expectations, or these forms of online entertainment grow in popularity more quickly than we anticipate, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our recent revenue growth rate may not be sustainable.

              Our revenues increased in each of the fiscal years ended March 31, 2005 through March 31, 2010. However, the rate of our revenue growth declined during each of the fiscal years during this period and our revenue growth rate may continue to decline. We may not be able to sustain our historical revenue growth rate in future periods and you should not rely on the revenue growth of any prior quarterly or annual period as an indication of our future performance. If our future growth fails to meet investor or analyst expectations, it could have a negative effect on our stock price. If our growth rate were to decline significantly or become negative, it would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If our marketing and advertising efforts fail to generate additional revenues on a cost-effective basis, or if we are unable to manage our marketing and advertising expenses, our business will suffer.

              We utilize a broad mix of marketing programs to promote our service to potential new subscribers. Significant increases in the pricing of one or more of our marketing and advertising channels would increase our marketing and advertising expense or cause us to choose less expensive but less effective marketing and advertising channels. As we implement new marketing and advertising strategies and phase out older strategies, we may need to expand into marketing and advertising channels with significantly higher costs than our current channels, which could adversely affect our profitability. Further, we may over time become disproportionately reliant on one channel or partner, which would limit our marketing and advertising flexibility and could increase our operating expenses. We may also incur marketing and advertising expenses significantly in advance of the time we anticipate recognizing revenue associated with such expenses, and our marketing and advertising expenditures may not result in increased revenue or generate sufficient levels of brand awareness. If we are unable to maintain our marketing and advertising channels on cost-effective terms or replace existing marketing and advertising channels with similarly effective channels, our marketing and advertising expenses could increase substantially, our subscriber levels could be adversely affected, and our business, financial condition and results of operations will suffer.

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If we are unable to improve market recognition of and loyalty to our brands, or if our reputation were to be harmed, our business may be adversely affected.

              We must continue to build and maintain strong brand identity. To succeed, we must continue to attract and retain a large number of subscribers who may have previously relied on other rental sources and persuade them to subscribe to our service. In addition, we compete for subscribers against other in-home entertainment brands which are well-established and have greater recognition than ours. We believe that the importance of brand loyalty will only increase in light of increasing competition, both for online subscription services and other means of distributing video game titles, such as digital download. From time to time, our subscribers express dissatisfaction with our service, including among other things, our inventory availability and shipping times. To the extent dissatisfaction with our service is widespread or not adequately addressed, our brand may be adversely impacted. Many of our subscribers are passionate about video games, and many of these subscribers may participate in blogs on this topic. If actions we take or changes we make to our service upset these subscribers, their blogging could negatively affect our brand and reputation. If we are unable to maintain and develop our brand and reputation, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected.

If we do not acquire sufficient video game titles or manage our inventory efficiently, our subscriber satisfaction and results of operations may be adversely affected.

              If we do not acquire sufficient video game titles, we may not appropriately satisfy subscriber demand, and our subscriber satisfaction and results of operations may be adversely affected. Conversely, if we attempt to mitigate this risk and, as a result, acquire more titles than needed to satisfy our subscriber demand, our inventory utilization would become less effective and our profitability would be adversely affected. Similarly, if we are unable to sell previously rented video games in a timely manner, and at prices that are acceptable to us, as part of our inventory management efforts, our profitability would be adversely affected. Additionally, market factors such as exclusive distribution arrangements may impact our ability to acquire appropriate quantities of certain titles.

Our operating results may fluctuate from quarter to quarter, which could make them difficult to predict.

              Our quarterly operating results are tied to certain financial and operational metrics that have fluctuated in the past and may fluctuate significantly in the future. As a result, you should not rely upon our past quarterly operating results as indicators of future performance. Our operating results depend on numerous factors, many of which are outside of our control. In addition to the other risks described in this "Risk Factors" section, the following risks could cause our operating results to fluctuate:

    our ability to retain existing subscribers and attract new subscribers;

    timing and amount of costs of new and existing marketing and advertising efforts;

    seasonal fluctuations in the number of our subscribers;

    timing and amount of inventory purchases in connection with the holiday season and the release of major video game titles;

    timing and amount of operating costs and capital expenditures relating to expansion of our business, operations and infrastructure;

    the cost and timing of the development and introduction of new product and service offerings by our competitors or by us;

    downward pressure on the pricing of our subscriptions; and

    system failures, security breaches or Internet downtime.

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              For these or other reasons, the results of any prior quarterly or annual periods should not be relied upon as indications of our future performance and our revenue and operating results in future quarters may differ materially from the expectations of management or investors.

Increases in the cost of delivering video games or other changes in U.S. Postal Service policies would adversely affect our profitability.

              Increases in postal delivery rates or increases in the cost of fuel or other transportation costs related to the delivery of our video games would adversely affect our profitability if we elect not to raise our subscription fees to offset the increase. The U.S. Postal Service increased the rate for first class postage in May 2009 and is expected to raise rates again in subsequent years in accordance with the powers granted to it in connection with the 2006 postal reform legislation. In addition, the U.S. Postal Service continues to focus on plans to reduce its costs and make its service more efficient. If the U.S. Postal Service were to change any policies relative to the requirements of First-Class Mail, including changes in size, weight or machinability qualifications of our envelopes, such changes could result in increased shipping costs or higher breakage rates for our video games, and our gross margin could be adversely affected. Also, if the U.S. Postal Service reduces its available services, such as by closing facilities or discontinuing Saturday delivery service, our ability to timely deliver video games could be impacted, and our subscriber satisfaction could be adversely affected.

Increases in payment processing fees or changes to operating rules that increase our costs would increase our operating expenses and adversely affect our business and results of operations, and the termination of our relationship with any major credit card company would have a material impact on our business.

              Our subscribers pay for our subscription services using credit cards or debit cards. Our acceptance of these payment methods requires that we pay certain processing fees for each credit card or debit card transaction. From time to time, these fees may increase, either as a result of rate changes by the payment processing companies or as a result of a change in our business practices which increases the fees on a cost-per-transaction basis. Such increases would adversely affect our business and results of operations.

              We are subject to rules, regulations and practices governing our accepted payment methods, which are predominately credit cards and debit cards. These rules, regulations and practices could change or be reinterpreted to make it difficult or impossible for us to comply. If we fail to comply with these rules or requirements, we may be subject to fines or higher transaction fees or lose our ability to accept these payment methods. In addition, our credit card fees may be increased by credit card companies if our chargeback rate, or the rate of payment refunds, exceeds certain minimum thresholds. If we are unable to maintain our chargeback rate at acceptable levels, our credit card fees for chargeback transactions, or for all credit card transactions, may be further increased, and, if the problem significantly worsens, credit card companies may terminate their relationship with us. Any increases in our credit card fees could adversely affect our results of operations, particularly if we elect not to raise our subscription rates to offset the increase. The termination of our ability to process payments on any major credit or debit card would have a material impact on our ability to operate our business.

If the sales prices of video games to retail customers decrease or the number of video game consoles purchased by retail consumers declines, or video game publishers charge our subscribers additional fees to access online features of our games, our ability to attract and retain new subscribers would be adversely affected.

              We believe that video game publishers have significant flexibility in pricing video games for retail sale. If the retail price of video games were to become significantly lower, customers may choose to purchase video games rather than subscribe to our service, which would adversely affect our business.

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              Video game publishers may charge our subscribers additional fees to access online features of games they rent from us. For example, EA Sports recently announced it will charge $9.99 to consumers using rented or used games to access online features, such as enhanced game content or multiplayer games. If more game publishers charge consumers of rented or used games additional fees to access online content or other privileges, our subscribers may decide to not use our service, which would adversely affect our business. The maintenance and growth of our subscriber base is dependent upon consumers continuing to purchase video game consoles as such purchases significantly drive the purchase and rental of video games. If there is a decline in the number of video game consoles purchased by consumers, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected.

Any significant disruption in service on our websites or in our computer systems could materially and adversely affect our business.

              Substantially all of our communications, network and computer hardware used to operate our websites are co-located at the facilities of a third-party provider in Irvine, California, our primary facility, and in Denver, Colorado, our secondary facility. We do not control the operation of these facilities. Hardware for our delivery systems is maintained in our shipping centers. Fires, floods, earthquakes, power losses, telecommunications failures, break-ins and similar events could damage these systems and hardware or cause them to fail completely. Our secondary facility in Denver, Colorado is not yet fully redundant. A disrupting event at the Irvine facility could result in downtime of our operations and could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

              Subscribers and potential subscribers access our service through our primary website, www.gamefly.com, where the title selection process is integrated with our delivery processing systems and software. Our reputation and ability to attract, retain and serve our subscribers is dependent upon the reliable performance of our websites, our network infrastructure and fulfillment processes. Interruptions in these systems, or with the Internet in general, could make our service unavailable and hinder our ability to receive and fulfill title requests. Much of our software is proprietary, and we rely on the expertise of our engineering and software development teams for the continued performance of our software and computer systems. Service interruptions or errors in our software, which result in the unavailability or impair usability of our website, could diminish the overall attractiveness of our subscription service to existing and potential subscribers. Additionally, problems faced by our third-party Web hosting provider, with the telecommunications network providers with which it contracts or with the systems by which it allocates capacity among its customers, including us, could adversely impact the experience of our subscribers.

              Our servers are also vulnerable to computer viruses, physical or electronic break-ins and similar disruptions, which could lead to interruptions and delays in our service and operations as well as loss, misuse or theft of data. Any attempts by hackers to disrupt our website service or our internal systems, if successful, could harm our business, be expensive to remedy and damage our reputation. Our insurance does not cover expenses related to direct attacks on our website or internal systems. Efforts to prevent hackers from entering our computer systems are expensive to implement and may limit the functionality of our services. Any significant disruption to our website or internal computer systems could result in a loss of subscribers and materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In the event of an earthquake, other natural or man-made disaster or loss of power, our operations could be adversely affected.

              Our executive offices are located in Los Angeles, California, our network and computer hardware used to operate our websites are hosted at co-location facilities in Irvine, California and

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Denver, Colorado, and we have shipping centers located throughout the United States, including in earthquake and hurricane-sensitive areas. Our business and operations could be adversely affected in the event of these natural disasters as well as from electrical blackouts, fires, floods, power losses, telecommunications failures, break-ins or similar events. We may not be able to effectively shift our fulfillment and delivery operations to handle disruptions in service arising from these events. Because Irvine and Los Angeles, California, are located in an earthquake-sensitive area, we are particularly susceptible to the risk of damage to, or total destruction of, our executive offices and primary co-location facility. We are not insured against any losses or expenses that arise from a disruption to our business due to earthquakes and may not have adequate insurance to cover losses and expenses from other natural disasters.

We rely heavily on our technology to process deliveries and returns of our video games and to manage other aspects of our operations, and the failure of this technology to operate effectively could adversely affect our business.

              We use complex proprietary and non-proprietary software technologies to process deliveries and returns of our video games and to manage other aspects of our operations. This technology is intended to allow our nationwide network of distribution centers to be operated on an integrated basis. We continually enhance or modify the technology used for our distribution operations. We cannot be sure that any enhancements or other modifications we make to our distribution operations will achieve the intended results or otherwise be of value to our subscribers. Future enhancements and modifications to our technology could consume considerable resources. If we are unable to maintain and enhance our technology to manage the processing of video games among our distribution centers in a timely and efficient manner, our ability to retain existing subscribers and to add new subscribers may be impaired.

If we experience delivery problems or if our subscribers or potential subscribers lose confidence in the U.S. Postal Service, we could lose subscribers, which would adversely affect our operating results.

              We rely exclusively on the U.S. Postal Service to deliver video games from our shipping centers and to return them to us from our subscribers. We are subject to risks associated with using the public mail system to meet our shipping needs, including delays or disruptions caused by inclement weather, natural disasters, labor activism, health epidemics or bioterrorism. Our video games are also subject to risks of breakage and theft during our processing of shipments as well as during delivery and handling by the U.S. Postal Service. The risk of breakage is also impacted by the materials and methods used to manufacture video game discs and cartridges. If the companies manufacturing our video games use materials and methods more likely to break during delivery and handling or we fail to timely deliver video games to our subscribers, our subscribers could become dissatisfied and cancel our service, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, increased breakage and theft rates for our video games will decrease our profitability.

The loss of any of our key personnel, or our failure to attract, assimilate and retain other highly qualified personnel in the future, could harm our business.

              We depend on the continued service and performance of our key personnel, including David Hodess, our President and Chief Executive Officer. We do not maintain key man insurance on any of our officers or key employees. We also do not have long-term employment agreements with any of our officers or key employees. In addition, much of our key technology and systems are custom-made for our business by our personnel. The loss of key personnel, including key members of our management team, as well as certain of our key marketing, sales, product development or technology personnel, could disrupt our operations and have an adverse effect on our ability to grow our business.

              In addition, to execute our growth plan, we must attract and retain highly qualified personnel. Competition for these employees is intense, and we may not be successful in attracting and retaining

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qualified personnel. We could also experience difficulty in hiring and retaining highly skilled employees with appropriate qualifications. Many of the companies with which we compete for experienced personnel have greater resources than we have. In addition, in making employment decisions, particularly in the Internet and high-technology industries, job candidates often consider the value of the stock options they are to receive in connection with their employment. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States relating to the expensing of stock options may discourage us from granting the size or type of stock option awards that job candidates may require to join our company. If we fail to attract new personnel, or fail to retain and motivate our current personnel, our business and future growth prospects could be severely harmed.

If we are not able to manage our growth, our business could be adversely affected.

              We have expanded rapidly since we launched our subscription service in 2002. Many of our systems and operational practices were implemented when we were at a smaller scale of operations. Our growth in operations has placed a strain on our management, administrative, technological, operational and financial infrastructure. Anticipated future growth, including growth related to the broadening of our service offering and the addition of new distribution centers, will continue to place similar strains on our personnel, technology and infrastructure. A sudden increase in the number of our subscribers and in the number of visitors to our websites could strain our capacity and result in website performance issues. Our success will depend largely upon our management team's ability to manage the expected growth of our operations and improving our operational, financial, technological and management controls and our reporting systems and procedures. Additional capital investments will increase our cost base, which will make it more difficult for us to offset any future revenue shortfalls by offsetting expense reductions in the short term. If we fail to successfully manage our growth, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we acquire any businesses or technologies in the future, they could prove difficult to integrate, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value or have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

              As part of our business strategy, we may engage in acquisitions of businesses or technologies to augment our organic or internal growth. While we have engaged in some acquisitions in the past, we do not have extensive experience with integrating and managing acquired businesses or assets. Acquisitions involve challenges and risks in negotiation, execution, valuation and integration. Moreover, we may not be able to find suitable acquisition opportunities on terms that are acceptable to us. Even if successfully negotiated, closed and integrated, certain acquisitions may not advance our business strategy, may fall short of expected return-on-investment targets or may fail. For example, we recently wrote off the goodwill and certain other intangible assets associated with GameStrata, Inc. ("GameStrata"), a company we acquired in October 2008. Any future acquisition could involve numerous risks including:

    difficulty integrating the operations and products of the acquired business;

    potential disruption of our ongoing business and distraction of management;

    use of cash to fund the acquisition or for unanticipated expenses;

    dilution to our current stockholders from the issuance of equity securities;

    limited market experience in new businesses;

    exposure to unknown liabilities, including litigation against the companies we may acquire;

    potential loss of key employees or customers of the acquired company;

    additional costs due to differences in culture, geographic locations and duplication of key talent; and

    acquisition-related accounting charges affecting our balance sheet and operations.

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              In the event we enter into any acquisition agreements, closing of the transactions could be delayed or prevented by regulatory approval requirements, including antitrust review, or other conditions. We may not be successful in addressing these risks or any other problems encountered in connection with any attempted acquisitions, and we could assume the economic risks of such failed or unsuccessful acquisitions.

We are exposed to risks associated with credit card and payment fraud and with credit card processing, which could cause us to lose revenue.

              Our subscribers use credit cards or debit cards to pay for our products and services. We have suffered losses, and may continue to suffer losses, as a result of fraudulent credit cards or other fraudulent payment data used on www.gamefly.com to obtain our subscription service and access to our video game inventory, as well as new and previously rented video games. For example, under current credit card practices, we may be liable for fraudulent credit card transactions if we do not obtain a cardholder's signature, a frequent practice in Internet sales. Currently, we do not carry insurance against the risk of fraudulent credit card transactions. We employ technology solutions to help us detect fraudulent transactions. However, the failure to detect or control payment fraud could cause us to lose revenue.

Our reputation and relationships with subscribers would be harmed if our subscriber data, particularly billing data, were to be accessed by unauthorized persons.

              We maintain personal data regarding our subscribers, including names and mailing addresses. With respect to billing data, such as credit card numbers, we rely on licensed encryption and authentication technology to secure such information. If we, or our payment processing service, experience any unauthorized intrusion into our subscribers' data, current and potential subscribers may become unwilling to provide us with the information necessary for them to remain as or become subscribers, we could face legal claims, and our business could be adversely affected. Similarly, if a well-publicized breach of the consumer data security of any other major consumer website were to occur, there could be a general public loss of confidence in the use of the Internet for commerce transactions which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may seek additional capital and we cannot be certain that additional financing will be available.

              From time to time, we may seek to obtain additional capital, either through equity, equity-linked or debt securities. The decision to obtain additional capital will depend on, among other things, our development efforts, business plans, operating performance and condition of the capital markets. If we are unable to obtain adequate financing on terms satisfactory to us when we require it, our ability to service our outstanding indebtedness, to continue to support our business growth and to respond to business challenges could be significantly limited.

Changes in the economy could impact our business.

              We provide an entertainment service and the success of our business depends to a significant extent upon discretionary consumer spending, which is subject to a number of factors, including general economic conditions, consumer confidence, employment levels, business conditions, interest rates, availability of credit, inflation and taxation. The United States remains in an economic downturn. Continued weak economic conditions and further adverse trends in any of these economic indicators may cause consumer spending to decline further, which could impact our business as subscribers choose either to leave our service or reduce their service levels. Also, efforts to attract new subscribers may be adversely impacted. In addition, media prices may increase in a period of economic growth, which could significantly increase our marketing and advertising expenses. As a result, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be significantly affected by changes in the economy generally.

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A material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting was identified in connection with our 2009 fiscal year audit, and if we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls in the future, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results.

              Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. In October 2009, in connection with our 2009 fiscal year audit, our independent registered accounting firm communicated to our board of directors a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting related to our lack of expertise and knowledge of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP, reporting requirements and the financial close process. A material weakness is a control deficiency or combination of control deficiencies that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. We have taken steps to address this material weakness, including hiring a Chief Financial Officer and other permanent and temporary accounting personnel, forming an audit committee and implementing additional financial accounting controls and procedures. As of March 31, 2010, we had remediated the material weakness identified in our 2009 fiscal year audit. Although we believe we have addressed the staffing and internal control deficiencies that led to the material weaknesses, we may not be able to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future. If in the future our internal controls over financial reporting are determined to be ineffective, investors could lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. This could result in a decrease in the value of our common stock.

The requirements of being a public company may strain our resources, divert management's attention and affect our ability to attract and retain qualified board members.

              After the closing of this offering, we will be a public company and subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the NASDAQ Stock Market rules, including those promulgated in response to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We have never operated as a public company and the requirements of these rules and regulations will likely increase our legal and financial compliance costs, make some activities more difficult, time-consuming or costly and increase demand on our systems and resources. The Exchange Act requires, among other things, that we file annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls for financial reporting. For example, Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires that our management report on, and our independent auditors attest to, the effectiveness of our internal controls structure and procedures for financial reporting. Section 404 compliance may divert internal resources and will take a significant amount of time and effort to complete. We may not be able to successfully complete the procedures and certification and attestation requirements of Section 404 by the time we will be required to do so. If we fail to do so, or if in the future our chief executive officer, chief financial officer or independent registered public accounting firm determines that our internal controls over financial reporting are not effective as defined under Section 404, we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by the NASDAQ Stock Market, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, or other regulatory authorities. Furthermore, investor perceptions of our company may suffer, and this could cause a decline in the market price of our stock. Irrespective of compliance with Section 404, any failure of our internal controls could have a material adverse effect on our stated results of operations and harm our reputation. If we are unable to implement these changes effectively or efficiently, it could harm our operations, financial reporting or financial results and could result in an adverse opinion on internal controls from our independent auditors. We may need to hire a number of additional employees with public accounting and disclosure experience in order to meet our ongoing obligations as a public company, which will increase costs. Our management team and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to new

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compliance initiatives and to meeting the obligations that are associated with being a public company, which may divert attention from other business concerns, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, because our management team has limited experience managing a public company, we may not successfully or efficiently manage our transition into a public company.

              The rules and regulations applicable to publicly traded companies could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified independent members of our board of directors. Additionally, we expect these rules and regulations to make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance. We may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage.

Our reported financial results may be adversely affected by changes in accounting principles applicable to us.

              Generally accepted accounting principles in the United States are subject to interpretation by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the SEC and various bodies formed to promulgate and interpret appropriate accounting principles. A change in these principles or interpretations could have a significant effect on our reported financial results, and could affect the reporting of transactions completed before the announcement of a change. In addition, the SEC has announced a multi-year plan that could ultimately lead to the use of International Financial Reporting Standards by U.S. issuers in their SEC filings. Any such change could have a significant effect on our reported financial results.

We face the risk of future litigation that could cause us to incur unforeseen expenses and could occupy a significant amount of our management's time and attention.

              From time to time, we may be engaged in legal proceedings or subject to litigation or claims that could negatively affect our business operations and financial position. Litigation disputes could cause us to incur unforeseen expenses, could occupy a significant amount of our management's time and attention and could negatively affect our business operations and financial position. For example, we are currently engaged in a legal proceeding with the U.S. Postal Service for which we are incurring significant legal expenses (see "Business—Legal Proceedings"). Any claims or litigation may be time-consuming and costly, divert management resources, require us to change our services, or have other adverse effects on our business. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and could require us to pay significant monetary damages.

Privacy concerns could limit our ability to utilize our subscriber data.

              In the ordinary course of business, we collect and utilize data supplied by our subscribers. We currently face certain legal obligations regarding the manner in which we treat such information. Other businesses have been criticized by privacy groups and governmental bodies for attempts to link personal identities and other information to data collected on the Internet regarding users' browsing and other habits. Increased regulation of data utilization practices, including self-regulation as well as increased enforcement of existing laws, could have an adverse effect on our business. In addition, if unauthorized access to our subscriber data were to occur or if we were to disclose data about our subscribers in a manner that was objectionable to them, our business reputation could be adversely affected and we could face potential legal claims that could impact our operating results.

              We will also face additional privacy issues if privacy protections become more stringent in the United States. We have incurred, and will continue to incur, expenses to comply with privacy and security standards and protocols imposed by law, regulation, industry standards or contractual obligations. Increased domestic or international regulation of data utilization and distribution practices, including self-regulation, could require us to modify our operations and incur significant expense, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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If government regulation of the Internet or other areas of our business changes or if consumer attitudes toward use of the Internet change, we may need to change the manner in which we conduct our business or incur greater operating expenses.

              The adoption, modification or interpretation of laws or regulations relating to the Internet or other areas of our business could adversely affect the manner in which we conduct our business or the overall popularity or growth in use of the Internet. Such laws and regulations may cover automatic subscription renewal, credit card processing procedures, sales and other procedures, tariffs, user privacy, data protection, pricing, content, copyrights, distribution, electronic contracts, consumer protection, broadband residential Internet access and the characteristics and quality of services. It is not clear how existing laws governing issues such as property ownership, sales and other taxes, libel and personal privacy apply to the Internet. If we are required to comply with new regulations or legislation or new interpretations of existing regulations or legislation, this compliance could cause us to incur additional expenses, make it more difficult to retain existing subscribers and attract new subscribers or otherwise alter our business model. Any of these outcomes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we become subject to liability for content that we produce, publish or distribute through our service, our business could be adversely affected.

              As a producer, publisher and distributor of video game-related content, we face potential liability for negligence, copyright, patent or trademark infringement or other claims based on the nature and content of materials that we produce, publish or distribute. We also may face liability for content uploaded from our users in connection with our community-related content or video game reviews. If we become liable, then our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. Litigation to defend these claims could be costly and the expenses and damages arising from any liability could harm our results of operations. We cannot assure that we are adequately insured or indemnified to cover claims of these types or liability that may be imposed on us.

If U.S. Copyright law were altered to amend or eliminate the First Sale Doctrine or if publishers were to release or distribute titles in a manner that attempts to circumvent or limit the affects of the First Sale Doctrine, our business could be adversely affected.

              Under U.S. Copyright Law, once a copyright owner sells a copy of a console video game, the copyright owner relinquishes all further rights to sell or otherwise dispose of that copy of the video game. While the owner of a U.S. copyright in a console video game retains the underlying copyright to the expression fixed in the work, the copyright owner gives up his ability to control the sale or disposition of a particular copy of the work once that copy has been sold. As such, once a copy of a console video game is sold into the U.S. market, those obtaining that copy of the video game are permitted to re-sell it, rent it or otherwise dispose of it. If Congress or the courts were to change or substantially limit this First Sale Doctrine, our ability to obtain video games and then rent them could be adversely affected. Likewise, if video game publishers agree to limit the sale or distribution of their content in ways that attempt to limit the effects of the First Sale Doctrine, our business could be adversely affected. If such agreements were to become commonplace or if additional impediments to obtaining video games were created (such as an exclusive rental window), our ability to obtain video games could be impacted and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

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Risks Related to Intellectual Property

If our intellectual property and technologies are not adequately protected to prevent use or appropriation by our competitors, the value of our brand and other intangible assets may be diminished, and our business may be materially and adversely affected.

              Our future success and competitive position depends in part on our ability to protect our proprietary technologies and intellectual property. We rely and expect to continue to rely on a combination of confidentiality and license agreements with our employees, consultants and third parties with whom we have relationships, and trademark, copyright, patent and trade secret protection laws, to protect our proprietary technologies and intellectual property. GameFly is among our registered trademarks and we own the corresponding domain name www.gamefly.com. In addition, we have filed various trademark applications in the United States and abroad. However, we have also elected not to file applications with respect to certain of our trademarks.

              There can be no assurance that the steps we have taken or will take will be adequate to protect our technologies and intellectual property, that our patent and trademark applications will lead to issued patents and registered trademarks, that others will not develop or patent similar or superior technologies, products or services, or that our patents, trademarks and other intellectual property will not be challenged, invalidated or circumvented by others. Furthermore, the intellectual property laws of other countries at which our websites are or may in the future be directed may not protect our products and intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. The legal standards relating to the validity, enforceability and scope of protection of intellectual property rights in Internet-related industries are uncertain and still evolving, both in the United States and in other countries. In addition, third parties may knowingly or unknowingly infringe our trademarks and other intellectual property rights, and litigation may be necessary to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights. Any such litigation could be very costly and could divert management attention and resources. If the protection of our technologies and intellectual property is inadequate to prevent use or appropriation by third parties, the value of our brand and other intangible assets may be diminished and competitors may be able to more effectively mimic our products and methods of operation. Any of these events may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

              We also expect that the more successful we are, the more likely it will become that competitors will try to develop services that are similar to ours, which may infringe on our proprietary rights. It may also be more likely that competitors will claim that our products infringe on their proprietary rights. If we are unable to protect our proprietary rights or if third parties independently develop or gain access to our or similar technologies, our business, revenue, reputation and competitive position could be harmed.

If we are unable to protect our domain names, our reputation and brand could be adversely affected.

              We currently own registrations for various domain names relating to our brand, including www.gamefly.com, www.shacknews.com and www.consolecheatcodes.com. Failure to protect our domain names could adversely affect our reputation and brand and make it more difficult for users to find our website and our service. Domain names similar to ours have been registered in the United States and elsewhere. The acquisition and maintenance of domain names generally are regulated by various agencies and their designees. However, the relationship between regulations governing domain names and laws protecting trademarks and similar proprietary rights varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and is unclear in some jurisdictions. The regulation of domain names in the United States and elsewhere may change in the near future. Governing bodies may establish additional top-level domains, appoint additional domain name registrars or modify the requirements for holding domain names. As a result, we may be unable to acquire or maintain relevant domain names. Furthermore, the relationship between policies governing domain names and laws protecting trademarks and similar proprietary rights

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is unclear. We may be unable, without significant cost or at all, to prevent third parties from acquiring domain names that are similar to, infringe upon or otherwise decrease the value of our trademarks and other proprietary rights.

Confidentiality agreements with employees and others may not adequately prevent disclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary information.

              A substantial amount of our tools and technologies are protected by trade secret laws. In order to protect our proprietary technologies and processes, we rely in part on security measures, as well as confidentiality agreements with our employees, licensees, independent contractors and other advisors. These measures and agreements may not effectively prevent disclosure of confidential information, including trade secrets, and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. We could potentially lose future trade secret protection if any unauthorized disclosure of such information occurs. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets and proprietary information, and in such cases we could not assert any trade secret rights against such parties. Laws regarding trade secret rights in certain markets in which we operate may afford little or no protection to our trade secrets. The loss of trade secret protection could make it easier for third parties to compete with our products by copying functionality. In addition, any changes in, or unexpected interpretations of, the trade secret and other intellectual property laws in any country in which we operate may compromise our ability to enforce our trade secret and intellectual property rights. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our business, revenue, reputation and competitive position.

Intellectual property claims against us could be costly and result in the loss of significant rights related to, among other things, our websites and marketing and advertising activities.

              Trademark, patent, copyright and other intellectual property rights are important to us and other companies. Our intellectual property rights extend to our technologies, business processes and the content on our websites. We use intellectual property licensed from third parties in marketing and advertising our service. From time to time, third parties may allege that we have violated their intellectual property rights. If there is a claim against us for infringement, misappropriation, misuse or other violation of third-party intellectual property rights, and we are unable to obtain sufficient rights or develop non-infringing intellectual property or otherwise alter our business practices on a timely basis, our business and competitive position may be adversely affected. Other companies may be devoting significant resources to obtaining patents that could potentially affect many aspects of our business. There are numerous patents that broadly claim means and methods of conducting business on the Internet. We have not searched patents relevant to our technologies and business. If we are forced to defend ourselves against intellectual property infringement claims, whether they are with or without merit or are determined in our favor, we may face costly litigation, diversion of technical and management personnel, limitations on our ability to use our websites or inability to market or provide our service. As a result of any such dispute, we may have to develop non-infringing technology, pay damages, enter into royalty or licensing agreements, cease providing certain products or services, adjust our merchandizing or marketing and advertising activities or take other actions to resolve the claims. These actions, if required, may be costly or unavailable on terms acceptable to us. In addition, many of our co-branding, distribution and other partnering agreements require us to indemnify our partners for third-party intellectual property infringement claims, which could increase the cost to us of an adverse ruling in such an action.

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Risks Related to this Offering and our Common Stock

An active, liquid and orderly trading market for our common stock may not develop, our share price may be volatile and you may be unable to sell your shares at or above the offering price.

              Prior to this offering, there has not been a public market for our common stock. We cannot predict the extent to which a trading market will develop or how liquid that market might become. The initial public offering price for our shares will be determined by negotiations between us and representatives of the underwriters and may not be indicative of prices that will prevail in the trading market. The market price of shares of our common stock could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to many risk factors listed in this section and others beyond our control, including:

    actual or anticipated fluctuations in our key operating metrics, financial condition and operating results;

    a greater than expected loss of existing subscribers;

    a negative change in one or more of our key metrics;

    actual or anticipated changes in our growth rate;

    issuance of new or updated research or reports by securities analysts;

    our announcement of actual results for a fiscal period that are higher or lower than projected or expected results or our announcement of revenue or earnings guidance that is higher or lower than expected;

    fluctuations in the valuation of companies perceived by investors to be comparable to us;

    share price and volume fluctuations attributable to inconsistent trading volume levels of our shares;

    sales or expected sales of additional common stock;

    announcements from, or operating results of, our competitors; or

    general economic and market conditions.

              Furthermore, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. These fluctuations often have been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. These broad market and industry fluctuations, as well as general economic, political and market conditions such as recessions, interest rate changes or international currency fluctuations, may cause the market price of shares of our common stock to decline. If the market price of shares of our common stock after this offering does not exceed the initial public offering price, you may not realize any return on your investment in us and may lose some or all of your investment. In the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been subject to securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future. Securities litigation against us could result in substantial costs and divert our management's attention from other business concerns, which could seriously harm our business.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they change their recommendations regarding our stock adversely, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

              The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. We do not currently have any and may never obtain research coverage by industry or financial analysts. If no or few analysts commence coverage of us, the trading price of our stock would likely decrease. Even if we do obtain analyst coverage, if one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our stock, our stock price would

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likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

Substantial future sales of our common stock in the public market could cause our stock price to fall.

              Additional sales of our common stock in the public market after this offering, or the perception that these sales could occur, could cause the market price of our common stock to decline. Upon completion of this offering, we will have            shares of common stock outstanding. All shares sold in this offering, including any shares disposed of upon exercise of the underwriters' over-allotment option, will be freely transferable without restriction or additional registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"). The remaining 15,419,838 shares of common stock outstanding as of June 30, 2010 will be available for sale after this offering as follows:

Date of Availability for Sale
  Number of Shares  

180 days after the date of this prospectus (subject to extension upon the occurrence of specified events) due to the release of the lock-up agreement these stockholders have with GameFly or the underwriters

       

At some point after the date that is 180 days after the date of this prospectus, subject to vesting requirements and the requirements of Rule 144 (subject, in the case of affiliates, to volume limitations) or Rule 701

       

              In addition, the 4,610,173 shares underlying options that are either subject to the terms of our equity compensation plans or reserved for future issuance under our equity compensation plans as of June 30, 2010, as well as 1,500,000 additional shares of common stock reserved for issuance under the 2010 Plan, which we plan to adopt in connection with this offering, will become eligible for sale in the public market to the extent permitted by the provisions of various option agreements, the lock-up agreements and Rules 144 and 701 under the Securities Act. At any time and without public notice, any or all of the shares subject to the lock-up may be released prior to expiration of the 180-day lock-up period at the discretion of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated. As resale restrictions end, the market price of our common stock could decline if the holders of those shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them. In addition, after this offering, the holders of 9,933,711 shares of common stock will be entitled to rights to cause us to register the sale of those shares under the Securities Act. All of these shares are subject to the 180-day lock-up period. Registration of these shares under the Securities Act would result in these shares becoming freely tradable without restriction under the Securities Act immediately upon the effectiveness of such registration.

Our directors, executive officers and principal stockholders will continue to have substantial control over us after this offering and could delay or prevent a change in corporate control.

              After this offering, our directors, executive officers and holders of more than 5% of our common stock, together with their affiliates, will beneficially own, in the aggregate, approximately             % of our outstanding common stock, assuming no exercise of the underwriters' option to purchase additional shares of our common stock in this offering and assuming the purchase of an aggregate of            shares of common stock in this offering by members of our board of directors. As a result, these stockholders, acting together, would have the ability to control the outcome of matters submitted to our stockholders for approval, including the election of directors and any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. In addition, these stockholders,

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acting together, would have the ability to control the management and affairs of our company. Accordingly, this concentration of ownership might harm the market price of our common stock by:

    delaying, deferring or preventing a change in corporate control;

    impeding a merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination involving us; or

    discouraging a potential acquirer from making a tender offer or otherwise attempting to obtain control of us.

As a new investor, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution in tangible book value per share of common stock.

              Purchasers in this offering will immediately experience substantial dilution in net tangible book value. Because our common stock has in the past been sold at prices substantially lower than the initial public offering price that you will pay, you will suffer immediate dilution of $            per share in net tangible book value, based on an assumed initial offering price of $            per share of common stock. The exercise of outstanding options, 3,155,215 of which are outstanding and exercisable as of June 30, 2010, may result in further dilution. See "Dilution."

We may seek additional capital that may result in stockholder dilution or that may have rights senior to those of our common stockholders.

              From time to time, we may seek to obtain additional capital, either through equity, equity-linked or debt securities. The decision to obtain additional capital will depend, among other things, on our development efforts, business plans, operating performance and condition of the capital markets. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity, equity-linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to the rights of our common stock, and our stockholders may experience dilution.

Management may apply our net proceeds from this offering to uses that do not increase our market value or improve our operating results.

              We intend to use an as yet undetermined amount of the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, including working capital, sales and marketing activities, general and administrative matters and capital expenditures. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds to acquire or invest in complementary technologies, solutions or businesses or to obtain rights to such complementary technologies, solutions or businesses. Our management will have considerable discretion in applying our net proceeds and you will not have the opportunity, as part of your investment decision, to assess whether we are using our net proceeds appropriately. Until the net proceeds we receive are used, they may be placed in investments that do not produce income or that lose value. We may use our net proceeds for purposes that do not result in any increase in our results of operations, which could cause the price of our common stock to decline. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the shares of our common stock by the selling stockholders.

We do not currently intend to pay dividends on our common stock and, consequently, your ability to achieve a return on your investment will depend on appreciation in the price of our common stock.

              We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not intend to do so for the foreseeable future. We currently intend to invest our future earnings, if any, to fund our growth. In addition, the provisions of our credit facility prohibit us from paying cash dividends. Therefore, you are not likely to receive any dividends on your common stock for the foreseeable future and the success of an investment in shares of our common stock will depend upon any future appreciation in their value. There is no guarantee that shares of our common stock will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which our stockholders have purchased their shares.

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Delaware law and our corporate charter and bylaws will contain anti-takeover provisions that could delay or discourage takeover attempts that stockholders may consider favorable.

              Provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, that we intend to adopt before the completion of this offering, may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control or changes in our management. For example, our board of directors will have the authority to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock in one or more series and to fix the powers, preferences and rights of each series without stockholder approval. The ability to issue preferred stock could discourage unsolicited acquisition proposals or make it more difficult for a third party to gain control of our company, or otherwise could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation will require that any action to be taken by stockholders must be taken at a duly called meeting of stockholders, which may only be called by our board of directors, the chairperson of our board of directors or the chief executive officer with the concurrence of a majority of our board of directors, and may not be taken by written consent. Our amended and restated bylaws will require that any stockholder proposals or nominations for election to our board of directors must meet specific advance notice requirements and procedures, which make it more difficult for our stockholders to make proposals or director nominations. In addition, we will have a classified board of directors with three-year staggered terms, which could delay the ability of stockholders to change membership of a majority of our board of directors. For additional information, please see "Description of Capital Stock."

              Furthermore, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law. These provisions may prohibit or restrict large stockholders, in particular those owning 15% or more of our outstanding voting stock, from merging or combining with us. These provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws and under Delaware law could discourage potential takeover attempts and could reduce the price that investors might be willing to pay for shares of our common stock in the future and result in our market price being lower than it would without these provisions.

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

              This prospectus, including the sections entitled "Prospectus Summary," "Risk Factors," "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and "Business," contains forward-looking statements. We may, in some cases, use words such as "project," "believe," "anticipate," "plan," "expect," "estimate," "intend," "should," "would," "could," "potentially," "will" or "may," or other words that convey uncertainty of future events or outcomes to identify these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements in this prospectus include statements about:

    our future financial performance, including our revenues, cost of revenues, operating expenses and ability to sustain profitability;

    our ability to attract and retain subscribers;

    our ability to compete effectively or withstand competitive pricing pressures;

    our rate of revenue growth;

    our ability to generate additional revenues on a cost-effective basis;

    our plans regarding expansion of our marketing initiatives;

    the success of our promotional programs and new products and services;

    disruptions in our services;

    our ability to retain and hire necessary employees;

    success with respect to any future acquisitions;

    our ability to adequately protect our intellectual property;

    our liquidity and working capital requirements;

    the cost associated with being a public company; and

    the effect of laws applying to our business.

              You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements in this prospectus. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, level of activity, performance or achievements. There are a number of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results anticipated by these forward-looking statements, which statements apply only as of the date of this prospectus and involve risks and uncertainties. These important factors include, but are not limited to, those described under the caption "Risk Factors" and elsewhere. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and you should read these factors and the other cautionary statements made in this prospectus as being applicable to all related forward-looking statements wherever they appear in this prospectus. If one or more of these factors materialize, or if any underlying assumptions prove incorrect, our actual results, performance or achievements may vary materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

              This prospectus contains various estimates related to the Internet, e-commerce and the video game industry. These estimates have been included in studies published or produced by market researchers and other firms, including The NPD Group, International Data Corporation and Frank N. Magid Associates. These estimates have been produced by industry analysts based on trends to date, their knowledge of technologies and markets, and customer research, but these are forecasts only and are subject to inherent uncertainty.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

              We estimate that the net proceeds from the sale of the shares of common stock that we are offering will be approximately $            million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses and assuming an initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus). If the underwriters' overallotment option is exercised in full, we estimate that the net proceeds to us will be approximately $             million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of common stock by the selling stockholders.

              We intend to use the net proceeds to us from this offering primarily for general corporate purposes, including working capital, sales and marketing activities, general and administrative matters and capital expenditures. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds to acquire or invest in complementary technologies, solutions or businesses or to obtain rights to such complementary technologies, solutions or businesses. We have no present understandings, commitments or agreements to enter into any acquisitions of or investments in other businesses. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not determined all of the anticipated uses for the proceeds of this offering or the amounts that we will actually spend on the uses set forth above. The amount and timing of actual expenditures may vary significantly depending upon a number of factors, including the amount of cash generated from our operations, competitive and technological developments and the rate of growth, if any, of our business. Accordingly, our management will have significant flexibility in applying the net proceeds of this offering. Pending these uses, we intend to invest the net proceeds from this offering in short-term, investment-grade interest-bearing securities such as money market accounts, certificates of deposit, commercial paper and guaranteed obligations of the U.S. government. We cannot predict whether the net proceeds invested will yield a favorable return.

              The primary purposes of this offering are to raise capital, create a public market for our common stock, allow us easier and quicker access to public markets should we need more capital in the future, increase the profile and prestige of our company with existing and possible future subscribers, vendors and strategic partners, and make our stock more valuable and attractive to our employees and potential employees for compensation purposes.


DIVIDEND POLICY

              We have never declared or paid, and do not anticipate declaring or paying, any cash dividends on our common stock. We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our capital stock in the foreseeable future and intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings for use in the operation and expansion of our business. We have an existing credit facility that contains financial covenants restricting our ability to declare and pay dividends. Any future determination as to the declaration and payment of dividends, if any, will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on then existing conditions, including our financial condition, operating results, general business conditions, contractual restrictions, capital requirements, business prospects, restrictions on the payment of dividends under Delaware law and any other factors our board of directors may deem relevant.

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CAPITALIZATION

              The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents and capitalization as of June 30, 2010:

    on an actual basis;

    on a pro forma basis, giving effect to the automatic conversion upon the completion of this offering of all outstanding preferred stock into an aggregate of 9,933,711 shares of common stock as if such conversion upon the completion of this offering had occurred on June 30, 2010; and

    on a pro forma as adjusted basis, giving effect to the sale by us of                        shares of common stock in this offering, at an initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

You should read this table in conjunction with the sections titled "Use of Proceeds," "Selected Historical Consolidated Financial Data," "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our historical consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere.

 
  As of June 30, 2010  
 
  Actual   Pro Forma   Pro Forma As
Adjusted(1)
 
 
  (in thousands)
 

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 11,960   $ 11,960   $    
               

Long-term liabilities (including current portion):

                   
 

Obligations under credit facility

    1,250     1,250        
 

Other long-term liabilities

    2,159     2,159        
               
 

Total long term liabilities (including current portion)

    3,409     3,409        
               

Stockholders' equity:

                   
 

Convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par value; 10,077,679 shares authorized (actual); 9,933,711 shares issued and outstanding (actual); 5,000,000 shares authorized (pro forma and pro forma as adjusted); no shares issued and outstanding (pro forma and pro forma as adjusted)

    21,787            
 

Common stock, $0.0001 par value; 20,380,699 shares authorized (actual); 5,486,127 shares issued and outstanding (actual); 100,000,000 shares authorized (pro forma and pro forma as adjusted); 15,419,838 shares issued and outstanding (pro forma) and            shares issued and outstanding (pro forma as adjusted)

    1     2        
 

Additional paid-in capital

    4,949     26,735        
 

Accumulated deficit

    (7,123 )   (7,123 )      
               
 

Total stockholders' equity

    19,614     19,614        
               
 

Total capitalization

  $ 23,023   $ 23,023   $    
               

(1)
A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) the amount of additional paid-in capital, total stockholders' equity and total capitalization by approximately $             million, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

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              The outstanding share information set forth above is as of June 30, 2010 and excludes:

    4,452,614 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding options as of June 30, 2010 to purchase our common stock granted pursuant to our 2002 Stock Plan at a weighted average exercise price of $2.64 per share;

    330,688 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants as of June 30, 2010 at a weighted average exercise price of $2.37 per share;

    an aggregate of 157,559 shares of common stock available for issuance as of June 30, 2010 under our 2002 Stock Plan; and

    1,500,000 shares of common stock, subject to increase on an annual basis, reserved for issuance under our 2010 Plan, which we plan to adopt in connection with this offering.

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DILUTION

              If you invest in our common stock, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution to the extent of the difference between the public offering price per share of our common stock and the pro forma net tangible book value per share of our common stock immediately after the offering.

              The historical net tangible book value of our common stock as of June 30, 2010 was $17.2 million, or $3.13 per share. Historical net tangible book value per share represents our total tangible assets less our total liabilities, divided by the number of shares of outstanding common stock. Dilution in net tangible book value per share represents the difference between the amount per share that you pay in this offering and the net tangible book value per share immediately after this offering. Dilution results from the fact that the initial public offering price is substantially in excess of the net tangible book value per share attributable to historical stockholders.

              After giving effect to the (i) automatic conversion of our outstanding preferred stock into common stock in connection with this offering and (ii) receipt of the net proceeds from our sale of                        shares of common stock in this offering at the initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of June 30, 2010 would have been approximately $             million, or $            per share. This represents an immediate increase in pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value of $            per share to existing stockholders and an immediate dilution of $            per share to new investors purchasing common stock in this offering.

              The following table illustrates this dilution on a per share basis:

Assumed initial public offering price per share

        $    

Net tangible book value per share as of June 30, 2010

      $ 3.13  

Decrease in net tangible book value per share attributable to conversion of preferred stock

      $ (2.02 )

Pro forma net tangible book value per share before this offering

      $ 1.11  

Increase in pro forma net tangible book value per share attributable to this offering

  $        

Pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share

        $  
             

Dilution per share to new investors

        $  
             

              A $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) would increase (decrease) our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of June 30, 2010 by approximately $             million, the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value after this offering by $            per share and the dilution in pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share to new investors in this offering by $             per share, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and other estimated offering expenses payable by us.

              The table below summarizes as of June 30, 2010, on a pro forma as adjusted basis, the number of shares of our common stock we issued and sold, the total consideration we received and the average price per share (i) paid to us by existing stockholders, (ii) to be paid by new investors purchasing our common stock in this offering at the initial public offering price of $            per share (the mid-point of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus) before deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions payable by us of $             million and estimated offering expenses of

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approximately $             million, and (iii) the average price per share paid by existing stockholders and by new investors who purchase shares of common stock in this offering.

 
  Shares Purchased   Total Consideration    
 
 
  Average
Price
Per Share
 
 
  Number   Percent   Amount   Percent  
 
   
  (in thousands)
   
 

Existing stockholders

    15,419,838       $ 26,737       $ 1.73  

New investors

                           

Total

        100.0%   $     100.0%   $    

              The above discussion and tables are based on 15,419,838 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2010 on a pro forma as adjusted basis and excludes:

    4,452,614 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding options as of June 30, 2010 to purchase our common stock granted pursuant to our 2002 Stock Plan at a weighted average exercise price of $2.64 per share;

    330,688 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of outstanding warrants as of June 30, 2010 at a weighted average exercise price of $2.37 per share;

    an aggregate of 157,559 additional shares of common stock available for issuance as of June 30, 2010 under our 2002 Stock Plan; and

    1,500,000 shares of common stock, subject to increase on an annual basis, reserved for issuance under our 2010 Plan, which we plan to adopt in connection with this offering.

              Sales by the selling stockholders in this offering will cause the number of shares held by existing stockholders to be reduced to                        shares or        % of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering. If the underwriters' overallotment option is exercised in full, the number of shares held by the existing stockholders after this offering would be reduced to        % of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering, and the number of shares held by new investors would increase to                         or        % of the total number of shares of our common stock outstanding after this offering.

              To the extent that any outstanding options or warrants are exercised, new investors will experience further dilution.

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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

              You should read the following selected historical consolidated financial data below in conjunction with "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our consolidated financial statements, related notes and other financial information included in this prospectus. The selected consolidated financial data in this section is not intended to replace the consolidated financial statements and is qualified in its entirety by the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in this prospectus.

              The consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended March 31, 2008, 2009 and 2010 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of March 31, 2009 and 2010 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus. The consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended March 31, 2006 and 2007 and the consolidated balance sheet data as of March 31, 2006, 2007 and 2008 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this prospectus. The unaudited consolidated statements of operations data for the three-month periods ended June 30, 2009 and 2010, and the unaudited consolidated balance sheet data as of June 30, 2010, are derived from our unaudited consolidated financial statements that are included elsewhere in this prospectus. We have prepared the unaudited information on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements and have included, in our opinion, all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, that we consider necessary for a fair presentation of the financial information set forth in those statements. Results for the three months ended June 30, 2010 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011. Historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

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              Pro forma basic net income (loss) per share has been calculated assuming the conversion of all outstanding shares of our preferred stock into 9,933,711 shares of common stock upon the completion of this offering.

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended June 30,  
 
  2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands, except share and per share data)
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

                                           

Revenues:

                                           
 

Base subscription

  $ 25,232   $ 38,942   $ 55,303   $ 71,756   $ 87,844   $ 20,723   $ 25,044  
 

Previously rented product

    5,713     6,851     9,171     10,786     11,111     2,452     2,735  
                               
     

Total rental revenues

    30,945     45,793     64,474     82,542     98,955     23,175     27,779  
 

Advertising and other

        220     1,672     2,128     2,511     575     726  
                               
     

Total revenues

    30,945     46,013     66,146     84,670     101,466     23,750     28,505  
                               

Cost of revenues:

                                           
 

Rental

    21,019     27,384     36,658     45,140     53,561     11,121     13,584  
 

Advertising and other

            238     202     976     144     245  
                               
     

Total cost of revenues

    21,019     27,384     36,896     45,342     54,537     11,265     13,829  
                               

Gross profit

    9,926     18,629     29,250     39,328     46,929     12,485     14,676  
                               

Operating expenses:

                                           
 

Fulfillment(1)

    3,558     4,382     6,424     8,780     9,746     2,209     2,605  
 

Technology and development(1)

    1,844     2,863     3,636     6,542     7,409     1,823     2,032  
 

Marketing(1)

    8,182     9,274     13,526     17,521     19,105     4,157     4,438  
 

General and administrative(1)

    1,371     2,179     3,065     3,592     5,397     1,051     2,005  
 

Depreciation and amortization

    248     191     724     1,175     1,501     372     400  
 

Impairment of acquired website

                668              
 

Impairment of goodwill

                449     1,500          
                               
   

Total operating expenses

    15,203     18,889     27,375     38,727     44,658     9,612     11,480  
                               

Operating (loss) income

    (5,277 )   (260 )   1,875     601     2,271     2,873     3,196  
                               

Other income (expense):

                                           
 

Interest income

    65     250     199     68     7     3      
 

Interest expense

    283     (353 )   (329 )   (225 )   (233 )   (74 )   (36 )
 

Change in fair value of warrants

                    (648 )   (121 )   (5 )
 

Other—net

    (231 )   (30 )   (57 )   (164 )   (28 )   (4 )   (12 )
                               
   

Total other income (expense)

    117     (133 )   (187 )   (321 )   (902 )   (196 )   (53 )
                               

Income (loss) before income tax (provision) benefit

    (5,160 )   (393 )   1,688     280     1,369     2,677     3,143  

Income tax (provision) benefit

    (1 )   (1 )   (60 )   3,780     (916 )   (1,166 )   (1,550 )
                               

Net income (loss)

  $ (5,161 ) $ (394 ) $ 1,628   $ 4,060   $ 453   $ 1,511     1,593  

Undistributed income attributable to preferred stockholders

            (1,628 )   (3,276 )   (453 )   (1,139 )   (1,178 )
                               

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

  $ (5,161 ) $ (394 )     $ 784   $   $ 372   $ 415  
                               

Net income (loss) per share:

                                           
 

Basic

  $ (1.21 ) $ (0.09 )     $ 0.16   $   $ 0.07   $ 0.08  
                               
 

Diluted

  $ (1.21 ) $ (0.09 )     $ 0.10   $   $ 0.05   $ 0.05  
                               

Weighted average shares outstanding:

                                           
 

Basic

    4,279,669     4,192,622     4,551,307     4,893,713     5,330,384     5,177,861     5,486,127  
 

Diluted

    4,279,669     4,192,622     4,551,307     7,824,282     8,433,383     8,077,741       8,772,593  

Pro forma net income per share (unaudited):

                   
 

Basic

  $ 0.03         $ 0.10  
                                         
 

Diluted

  $ 0.02         $ 0.09  
                                         

Pro forma weighted average shares outstanding used in calculating net income (loss) per share (unaudited)

                   
 

Basic

    15,226,293           15,419,838  
 

Diluted

    18,329,292           18,706,304  

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(1)
Stock-based compensation, including the impact of warrants and options, included in the above line items:

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Fulfillment

  $ 4   $ 43   $ 69   $ 88   $ 74   $ 16   $ 21  

Technology and development

    20     30     109     478     325     93     124  

Marketing

    20     36     82     165     901     156     54  

General and administrative

    30     15     82     109     264     24     188  
                               

Total stock-based compensation expense

  $ 74   $ 124   $ 342   $ 840   $ 1,564   $ 289   $ 387  
                               

 

 
  As of March 31,   As of June 30,  
 
  2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
 

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

                                           
 

Cash and cash equivalents

  $ 6,518   $ 2,974   $ 3,700   $ 6,114   $ 11,773   $ 8,690   $ 11,960  
 

Total assets

    16,947     16,901     22,077     34,601     39,971     36,825     40,139  
 

Long term liabilities (including current portion)

    3,500     3,500     3,500     6,116     3,446     6,136     3,409  
 

Convertible preferred stock

    21,520     21,520     21,520     21,594     21,787     21,249     21,787  
 

Total stockholders' equity

    7,623     7,412     9,503     15,451     17,634     16,520     19,614  

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MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF
FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

              You should read the following discussion together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. This discussion contains forward-looking statements about our business and operations. Our actual results may differ materially from those we currently anticipate as a result of many factors, including those we describe under "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this prospectus. See "Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements."

Company Overview

              We are a leading online video game rental subscription service with approximately 410,000 subscribers in the United States as of June 30, 2010. We provide our subscribers access to a comprehensive library of over 7,000 video game titles covering all major video game and handheld game consoles. We deliver video games to our subscribers via First-Class Mail.

              Our subscription service has grown rapidly since its launch in 2002. We believe our growth has been driven by the compelling value proposition of our subscription model, extensive selection of titles, high level of customer service and effective marketing programs, as well as the increase in the installed base of video game consoles. Our subscription service allows subscribers to have one or more video games out concurrently with no due dates, late fees or shipping charges for a fixed monthly fee. Subscribers select titles on our website, www.gamefly.com, receive video games via First-Class Mail and return them to us at their convenience using our prepaid mailers.

              We sell new and previously rented video games to our subscribers and others through our website. Our subscribers can also purchase previously rented video games through our "Keep" feature, which enables them to purchase a game they are renting. We offer our "Keep" feature for most of our newly released video games in our library. Unless a subscriber decides to "Keep" a game, the subscriber can hold the game for as long as the subscriber desires without any obligation to purchase the game or pay any late fee or shipping charges.

              To complement our subscription service and video game sales, we operate a network of advertising-supported websites that provide video game content and information. Our network of websites currently attracts approximately 4.4 million monthly unique visitors, most of whom are not subscribers. We have attracted advertisers who seek to reach the 18-34-year-old male demographic.

              Our subscriber base increased from approximately 74,000 as of March 31, 2005 to approximately 410,000 as of June 30, 2010. Our revenues increased from $15.8 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2005 to $101.5 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010, rental revenues constituted 98% of our revenues and advertising and other revenues constituted 2% of our revenues. Our net income decreased from $4.1 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2009 to $0.5 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010 primarily due to an income tax benefit of $3.8 million in fiscal 2009 resulting primarily from the reversal of our valuation allowance for our deferred tax assets.

Business Trends

              Our revenue, operating expenses and number of subscribers have generally increased on a sequential basis from quarter to quarter. However, we experience effects of seasonality due to increases in consumer spending during the holiday season, including the purchases of video games and video game consoles. Accordingly, our revenues and the number of our new subscribers generally increase at a higher rate during the fiscal quarters ending December 31 and March 31. In anticipation of an increase in new subscribers, we increase our inventory of video games at a higher rate during these quarters, which results in relatively greater amortization expense in these quarters and, to a lesser degree, in subsequent quarters. We also increase our sales and marketing expenses during these quarters in order to attract more subscribers. From time to time, we also experience a decline in our

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number of subscribers during the fiscal quarters ended June 30 or September 30 as compared to prior quarters. For example, we experienced a quarterly decrease in subscribers during the three months ended September 30, 2009 and the three months ended June 30, 2010. Subscriber decreases that have historically occurred during these two fiscal quarters were due to a combination of factors, including macroeconomic conditions, less video game play during the summer months, fewer video game consoles sold and virtually no releases of major new video games during those periods. In addition, the decrease in subscribers during the three months ended June 30, 2010 as compared to the increase in the same period of our prior fiscal year was due to higher churn of customers we acquired during the quarter ended March 31, 2010 from certain marketing tests conducted by us during that quarter, which we subsequently terminated.

              Our business may also be impacted by the initial release of major video game titles, which occur throughout the year, and we often experience an increase in subscribers in anticipation of popular title releases. We may purchase a larger number of these newly released major video game titles in order to accommodate an anticipated demand increase which results in relatively greater amortization expense during the period of these purchases and, to a lesser degree, subsequent periods. We may also increase our sales and marketing expenditures to correspond with the release of these titles.

Key Business Metrics

              Our management regularly reviews a number of financial and operating metrics, including the following key figures, to evaluate our business, allocate resources, make decisions regarding corporate strategies and evaluate forward-looking projections.

    Total subscribers.  A subscriber is an individual who pays for monthly access to our online video game rental subscription service. Total subscribers is defined as the number of subscribers at the end of the relevant period.

    Gross addition.  Gross addition is a new customer who joins our subscription service, including a new customer who joins on a trial basis.

    Monthly churn.  Monthly churn is a measure representing the number of subscribers that cancel in the quarter divided by the sum of beginning subscribers and gross subscriber additions during the quarter, divided by three. Monthly churn (annualized) is the average monthly churn for the four quarters of each respective fiscal year. Management uses this measure to determine the level of satisfaction of our subscriber base.

    Average monthly revenue per subscriber.  Average monthly revenue per subscriber is measured as total subscription revenues earned in the quarter from our online video game rental subscription service divided by the average number of subscribers in the quarter, divided by three. The average number of subscribers for the quarter is calculated by taking the average of the beginning and ending number of subscribers in the quarter. The average monthly revenue per subscriber (annualized) is the average of the quarterly average monthly revenue per subscriber for each respective fiscal year.

    Subscriber acquisition cost.  Subscriber acquisition cost is defined as external marketing and advertising expense, divided by gross additions in the period. Management uses this metric to determine the efficiency of our marketing and advertising programs in acquiring new subscribers.

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              The following represents our performance highlights for the periods presented:

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  

Total subscribers(1)

    266,853     328,119     422,663     336,206     409,594  

Gross additions

    393,063     531,949     635,536     139,285     152,179  

Monthly churn

    7.3 %   7.7 %   7.8 %   8.2 %   8.3 %

Average monthly revenue per subscriber

    $21.27     $21.03     $20.54     $20.80     $20.06  

Subscriber acquisition cost

    $29.93     $29.29     $26.18     $26.16     $25.41  

(1)
At period end.

Components of Consolidated Statements of Operations

Revenues

              Rental.    We generate rental revenues from renting video games and selling previously rented video games from our video game library. The first component of rental revenues is base subscription ("subscription") revenues, which we generate by charging our subscribers a monthly subscription fee to access our full video game library. We charge each subscriber's credit card for the full monthly price of their subscription at the commencement of their subscription period and at each renewal date unless they cancel before the renewal date. We recognize subscription revenues ratably over each subscriber's monthly subscription period. Refunds to subscribers are recorded as reductions of revenues. When users sign up for trial subscriptions, we automatically charge their credit cards for a subscription at the end of the trial period unless they cancel before the end of the trial period. No revenue is recognized or allocated to the free trial period. We generate all of our subscription revenues in the United States. As a service to our subscribers, we engage a third-party vendor to operate a trade-in program for used video games under which we issue trade-in credits to our subscribers for used video games sent to our vendor. Upon confirmation from the vendor that a video game has been received and accepted, the applicable trade-in credits are applied as a reduction to the subscriber's next monthly subscription fee. We invoice the vendor monthly for the amount of trade-in credits and record such amount as subscription revenue.

              The second component of rental revenue is previously rented product ("PRP") revenues, which are derived from the sales of previously rented video games. Revenues from sales of video games are recognized upon shipment of the video game or, in the case of rented video games purchased through our "Keep" feature, upon shipment of the game case and manual. We offer our "Keep" feature for most of our newly released video games in our library. PRP revenues are subject to variability due to the fact that from time to time we change the prices of previously rented video games in our library, or conduct bulk sales of such video games, as a way to manage inventory. To reward and retain our current subscribers, we have a customer loyalty program under which we issue discounts towards purchases of previously rented video games to our subscribers based on their tenure, which we record as a reduction of PRP revenues.

              Advertising and other.    Advertising and other revenues primarily consist of advertising revenue that is recognized upon the delivery of advertising impressions on our network of websites and our mailers. In November 2009, we started selling new video games on our website. The revenue from the sales of new video games is included in other revenue. Revenues from new video game sales were immaterial from November through June 30, 2010.

Cost of Revenues

              Rental.    Cost of rental revenues primarily consists of the amortization of our video game library, postage and packaging expenses related to shipping video games to and from subscribers,

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carrying value of previously rented video games that have been sold and, to a lesser extent, write-offs of the carrying value of video games associated with items included in our video game library that are lost or damaged during the rental or sales process, net of a recovery allowance based on historical experience.

              Advertising and other.    Cost of advertising and other revenues consists primarily of expenses paid to firms that help us manage the placement of third-party advertisements on our network of websites and our mailers. In November 2009, we started selling new video games on our website. The cost of revenues associated with new video game sales is included in other cost of revenues. The cost of revenues associated with new video game sales was immaterial for November through June 30, 2010.

Operating Expenses

              Fulfillment.    Fulfillment expenses represent costs incurred in operating and staffing our distribution and customer service centers, including costs attributable to receiving, inspecting and warehousing our video game library. Fulfillment expenses also include credit card transaction fees.

              Technology and development.    Technology and development expenses consist of payroll and related costs incurred in testing, maintaining and modifying our network of websites, telecommunications systems, infrastructure, and other internal use software systems.

              Marketing.    Marketing expenses consist of payroll and related costs, advertising, public relations, and other costs related to promotional activities. We expense these costs as incurred.

              General and administrative.    General and administrative expenses consist principally of personnel-related expenses for our executive, finance, legal, human resources and other administrative personnel, as well as accounting and legal professional fees and other general corporate expenses, including settlement of legal claims.

              Depreciation and amortization.    Depreciation and amortization includes depreciation of property and equipment as well as amortization of intangible assets.

              Impairment of acquired website.    Impairment of acquired website is the difference between the carrying value and the fair value of the acquired website. We review acquired websites for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable.

              Impairment of goodwill.    We classify the difference between the purchase price and the fair value of net assets acquired in a business combination as goodwill. Impairment of goodwill represents the amount by which the carrying value of a reporting unit's goodwill exceeds its implied fair value.

Other Income (Expense)

              Interest income.    Interest income includes interest earned on cash and cash equivalents.

              Interest expense.    Interest expense includes the interest expense associated with our revolving line of credit and any other debt instruments we may have outstanding.

              Change in fair value of warrants.    Change in fair value of warrants represents the change in the fair value of our warrant liability from period to period.

              Other—net.    Other—net includes the amortization of debt issuance costs associated with our revolving line of credit and any other debt instruments we may have outstanding.

Income Tax Provision

              Income tax expense consists of federal and state income taxes in the United States.

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

              Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, costs and expenses, and related disclosures. These estimates and assumptions are often based on judgments that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances at the time made, but all such estimates and assumptions are inherently uncertain and unpredictable. Actual results may differ from those estimates and assumptions, and it is possible that other professionals, applying their own judgment to the same facts and circumstances, could develop and support alternative estimates and assumptions that would result in material changes to our operating results and financial condition. We evaluate our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Our estimates are based on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances.

              We consider the assumptions and estimates associated with revenue recognition, the period of amortization and estimated residual value of our video game library, recoverability of intangible assets, stock-based compensation and income taxes to be our critical accounting policies and estimates. For further information on our significant accounting policies, see Note 2 of the accompanying notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

              Our revenues include monthly subscription fees, revenues from sales of video games and revenues from advertising. We recognize subscription revenues ratably during each subscriber's monthly subscription period. In accordance with GAAP, we recognize revenue when the following criteria have been met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, no significant company obligations remain, collection of the related receivable is reasonably assured and the fees are fixed or determinable. Refunds to subscribers are recorded as a reduction of revenues. Through a third-party vendor, we offer our subscribers the ability to trade in used video games for credit towards subscription fees. Upon confirmation from the vendor that a video game has been received and accepted, the applicable trade-in credits are applied as a reduction to the subscriber's next monthly subscription fee. We invoice the vendor monthly for the amount of trade-in credits and record such amount as subscription revenue.

              Revenue from sales of video games are recognized upon shipment of the video game or, in the case of rented video games purchased through our "Keep" feature, upon shipment of the game case and manual. We offer our "Keep" feature for most of our newly released video games in our library. Under our customer loyalty program, GameFly Rewards, subscribers receive dollar reward coupons or discounts, after a specified number of consecutive months of membership, that can be applied to the purchase of previously rented video games. We record discounts for sales of previously rented video games related to GameFly Rewards as a reduction of PRP revenues upon redemption of the reward. The difference between recording discounts as a reduction of PRP revenues upon redemption of dollar reward coupons rather than establishing deferred revenue for the discount during the period that the subscriber earns the reward is not material. Advertising and other revenue is primarily comprised of advertising revenue that is recognized upon the delivery of advertising impressions on our network of websites and our mailers.

Amortization of Video Game Library

              Our video game library is amortized in a manner that most closely allows for the matching of product costs with the related rental revenues generated by the utilization of the video game library. In establishing the estimated residual value and useful life for our video game library, we consider the historical sales prices and the periods over which titles historically have been rented. We periodically evaluate the estimates surrounding the residual value and useful life used in amortizing our video game library. We also periodically review the carrying value of our video game library to ensure that the future expected cash flows exceed the current carrying value. Changes to these estimates resulting from

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changes in consumer demand, changes in our product offering or the price or availability of retail video games may materially impact the carrying value of our video game library and our gross margins.

              We changed the residual value estimate of our video game library as of and for the quarter ended December 31, 2009 from 49.5% to 37.0% because we experienced a 10.5% decrease in the weighted average of net sales price of previously rented video games sold in that quarter compared to the quarter ended December 31, 2008. The price decrease resulted from more efficient management of our video game library, which enables us to hold a lower number of video games relative to our subscriber base than in prior periods. Consequently, we rented games longer during this period, resulting in a larger proportion of previously rented games being sold toward the end of our estimated useful life of eight months. This resulted in a lower weighted average sales price and led us to change the residual value estimate from 49.5% to 37.0%. This change reduced the carrying value of the video game library and increased the cost of rental revenues by $2.1 million in the quarter ended December 31, 2009.

              For the fiscal years ending March 31, 2008 and 2009, and the nine months ended December 31, 2009, the cost of each video game in the video game library, less an estimated residual value, was amortized over an estimated life, using an accelerated sum-of-the-month digits method with a half-month convention. Effective January 1, 2010, the beginning of the quarter ended March 31, 2010, we revised our amortization method such that the carrying value of any video games remaining in the video game library beyond the initial estimated life are fully amortized to zero on a straight-line basis continuing with a half-month convention over the next sixteen months, for a total amortization period of twenty-four months. This change was implemented to better reflect the rental of video games beyond eight months. As a result of the change in estimate, we reduced the carrying value of the video game library and increased the cost of rental revenues by $1.8 million in the quarter ended March 31, 2010.

Recoverability of Intangible Assets, Including Goodwill

              We review our indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment at least annually or as indicators of impairment exist based on comparing the fair value of the asset to the carrying value of the asset. Intangible assets not subject to amortization are comprised of goodwill and certain Internet domain names. As of June 30, 2010, intangible assets not subject to amortization were comprised of $0.7 million related to goodwill and $0.5 million related to certain Internet domain names. We perform our annual impairment test as of January 1st of each year.

              We test goodwill for impairment using a two-step impairment test. Under the first step of the goodwill impairment test, the fair value of a reporting unit to which the goodwill has been assigned is estimated and compared to the carrying amount of such reporting unit, including goodwill. We assign the goodwill and indefinite-lived intangibles to our advertising reporting unit. If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its carrying amount, goodwill of such reporting unit is not considered impaired and the second step is not performed. If the results of the first step indicate that the fair value of the reporting unit does not exceed its carrying amount, then the second step of the goodwill impairment test is performed. The second step of the goodwill impairment test compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. The impairment loss is measured by the excess of the carrying amount of the reporting unit goodwill over the implied fair value of that goodwill. As of January 1, 2010, we tested our goodwill and determined that goodwill was impaired as the carrying value of goodwill exceeded its implied fair value. As a result of the test, a goodwill impairment charge of $1.5 million was recorded in our consolidated statements of operations for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010.

              Our goodwill impairment test requires the use of fair-value techniques, which are inherently subjective. In step one of the impairment test, we estimated the fair value of a reporting unit as of January 1, 2010 using a combination of the income and market value approaches for the reporting unit in which the goodwill resides. Under the income approach, we calculated the fair value of the reporting unit based on the present value of estimated future cash flows. Under the market approach, we

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estimated the fair value based on market multiples of revenue and earnings for comparable publicly-traded companies or comparable sales transactions of similar companies. In step two of the impairment test, we compared the fair value of such reporting unit estimated in step one to the estimated fair value of the net assets of the reporting unit to derive the implied fair value of goodwill. The net assets of the reporting unit included intangible assets, principally websites and domain names. We estimated the fair value of these assets using a combination of the replacement cost approach and the excess earnings method. The estimates and assumptions used in our calculations included revenue growth rates, expense growth rates, expected capital expenditures to determine projected cash flows, expected tax rates, and an estimated discount rate to determine present value of expected cash flows. These estimates are based on historical experiences, our projections of future operating activity, and our weighted average cost of capital based on returns on interest-bearing debt and common stock.

              We estimated the fair value of our Internet domain names, which are not subject to amortization as of January 1, 2010 based on the excess earnings method. The estimated fair value of the Internet domain names exceeded their carrying value. For the evaluation of intangible assets not subject to amortization, if events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable, we compare the fair value of these intangible assets to their carrying value. We recognize impairment, if any, in the period of identification to the extent the carrying value of an asset exceeds the fair value of such asset.

              Long-lived assets, primarily consisting of property and equipment and intangible assets, such as websites, that are subject to amortization are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset group may not be recoverable. Recoverability of asset groups to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying value of an asset group to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset group. If the carrying value of an asset group exceeds its estimated future cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized by the amount by which the carrying value of an asset group exceeds the fair value of the asset group.

Stock-Based Compensation

              Prior to April 1, 2006, we elected to account for stock-based compensation related to employee stock option grants using the minimum value method for recognition purposes. Under this method, stock option awards issued to employees are accounted for using the Black-Scholes option-pricing method with a 0% volatility assumption. The expense associated with stock-based compensation was amortized over the periods the employee performs the related services, generally the vesting period. Effective April 1, 2006, we adopted new principles for share-based payment transactions, which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all stock-based awards issued to employees and directors based on estimated fair values.

              We adopted the new share-based payment principles using the prospective method, which requires the application of the accounting standard as of April 1, 2006, the first day of our fiscal year. In addition, we continue to amortize the compensation expense recorded under the minimum value method as those awards continue to vest. Effective April 1, 2006, stock-based compensation expense includes both the compensation expense for stock-based compensation awards based on the grant-date minimum value estimations as those awards continue to vest and the compensation expense for all stock-based compensation awards granted after April 1, 2006 will be based on the grant-date fair value estimations.

              Under both the current and prior methods for share-based payment transactions, we selected the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the estimated fair value and minimum value, respectively, at the date of grant for stock options. For awards granted prior to our adoption of the new method, the expense associated with stock-based compensation is amortized on an accelerated basis over the periods the employee performs the related services, generally the vesting period, consistent with the multiple option method. For awards granted after April 1, 2006, we made a

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one-time election to amortize compensation expense using the straight-line attribution method, under which stock-based compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the period the employee performs the related services, generally the vesting period of four years, net of estimated forfeitures. We have estimated forfeitures based on historical experience and will update the rates, as necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from initial estimates.

              The Black-Scholes option-pricing model requires management assumptions regarding various factors that require extensive use of accounting judgment and financial estimates. The fair value of the common stock underlying stock option grants is a significant input into the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. In the absence of a public trading market for our common stock, the exercise price per share for our stock option grants equal the estimated fair market value of our common stock on the grant date as determined by our board of directors in good faith using factors it considered appropriate, including the price at which shares of our common stock and preferred stock had previously been issued, the rights associated with our preferred stock and our business prospects, and which beginning in September 2007 included written reports periodically prepared by an independent valuation firm retained by our board of directors. In determining the fair value of our common stock, we estimated the aggregate fair value of the entire company (referred to as Business Enterprise Value or BEV) using a combination of the income approach and the market approach at each valuation date: September 30, 2008, December 31, 2008, March 31, 2009, June 30, 2009, September 30, 2009, December 1, 2009, March 31, 2010 and June 30, 2010. The income approach is an estimate of the present value of the future monetary benefits expected to flow to the owners of a business. It requires a projection of the cash flows that the business is expected to generate over a forecast period and an estimate of the present value of cash flows beyond that period, which is referred to as the terminal value. These cash flows are converted to present value by means of discounting, using a rate of return that accounts for the time value of money and the appropriate degree of risks inherent in the business. The market approach considers multiples of financial metrics based on both acquisitions and trading multiples of a group of guideline public companies. These multiples are then applied to our financial metrics to derive an indication of value.

              Our indicated BEV at each valuation date was then allocated to the then outstanding shares of convertible preferred stock, warrants and options to purchase shares of convertible preferred stock and common stock, and common stock, using a probability-weighted expected return methodology ("PWERM") for valuation dates up to and including December 1, 2009 and a combination of the PWERM and the option-pricing methodology ("OPM") for valuations beginning March 31, 2010. Under a PWERM, the value of our common stock is estimated based upon an analysis of future values for the enterprise assuming various future outcomes. Share value is based upon the probability-weighted present value of expected future investment returns, considering each of the possible future outcomes available to the enterprise, as well as the rights of each share class. The OPM treats the various components of our capital structure as a series of call options on the proceeds expected from the sale of our company or the liquidation of our assets at some future date. These call options are then valued using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. This model defines the securities' fair values as functions of the current fair value of our company and assumptions based on the securities' rights and preferences. As a result, the option-pricing method requires assumptions regarding the anticipated timing of a potential liquidity event, such as an initial public offering, and the estimated volatility of our equity securities. The anticipated timing of a liquidity event utilized in these valuations was based on then current plans and estimates of our board of directors and management. Estimates of the volatility of our stock used in these valuations were based on available information on the volatility of capital stock of comparable publicly traded companies.

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              We granted stock options with the following exercise prices during the 12 months ended June 30, 2010:

 
Option Grant Dates
  Number of
Shares
Underlying
Options
  Exercise Price
Per Share
 
 

August 20, 2009

    55,000   $ 3.61  
 

January 4, 2010

    393,000   $ 8.34  
 

January 13, 2010

    245,000   $ 8.34  
 

February 5, 2010

    60,000   $ 8.34  
 

February 23, 2010

    30,000   $ 8.34  
 

June 24, 2010

    236,000   $ 8.70  

              In determining the fair value of our BEV and common stock, we conducted current valuations using the approaches mentioned above. These estimates of the fair value of our common stock were made on information from the following valuation dates:

 
Valuation Date
  Fair
Value
Per
Share
 
 

March 31, 2009

  $ 2.94  
 

June 30, 2009

  $ 3.61  
 

September 30, 2009

  $ 6.52  
 

December 1, 2009

  $ 8.34  
 

March 31, 2010

  $ 8.70  
 

June 30, 2010

  $ 8.77  

              Following this offering, we expect the exercise price of our options to be based on the closing price of our common stock on the date of grant or the date immediately prior to the date of grant.

              Other significant inputs used by us in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model are as follows:

    Volatility.  We computed the expected volatility using multiple guideline public companies for a period approximating the expected term.

    Expected term.  We estimate the expected term for options granted after April 1, 2006, using the simplified method, which utilizes the weighted average expected life of each tranche of the stock option, determined based on the sum of each tranche's vesting period plus one-half of the period from the vesting date of each tranche to the stock option's expiration.

    Risk free rate.  The risk free interest rate is based on the yields of U.S. Treasury securities with maturities similar to the expected term of the options for each option group.

    Dividend yield.  We have never declared or paid any cash dividends and do not presently plan to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Consequently, we used an expected dividend yield of zero.

              We also account for stock-based instruments and awards issued to nonemployees and warrants to purchase convertible preferred stock at fair value using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Management believes that the fair value of the stock-based awards is more reliably measured than the fair value of the services received. The fair value of each nonemployee award is remeasured each period until a commitment date is reached, which is generally the vesting date. Effective April 1, 2009, we adopted authoritative guidance issued by the FASB on contracts in an entity's own equity that requires the convertible preferred stock warrants to be classified as liabilities at their estimated fair value with changes in fair value at each reporting date recognized in the statement of operations regardless of whether the convertible preferred stock purchase warrants are vested. The FASB guidance

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requires this treatment since the warrants are exercisable into preferred stock with provisions that protect holders from a decline in the stock price.

Income Taxes

              Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to the differences between the financial statement carrying values of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. In evaluating our ability to recover our deferred tax assets, in full or in part, we consider available positive and negative evidence, including our history of achieving operating objectives; the achievement of cumulative pre-tax income on a trailing twelve quarter basis; our established subscriber base; future projections of pre-tax income and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies. The assumptions utilized in determining future taxable income require significant judgment and are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses.

              We operate within the tax jurisdictions of the U.S. federal government and various states and are subject to audit by the corresponding tax authorities. We provide for tax contingencies whenever it is deemed probable that a tax asset has been impaired or a tax liability has been incurred for events such as tax claims or changes in tax laws. Tax contingencies are based upon their technical merits, relative tax law, and the specific facts and circumstances as of each reporting period. Changes in facts and circumstances could result in material changes to the amounts recorded for such tax contingencies.

              On April 1, 2007, we adopted authoritative guidance issued by the FASB on accounting for uncertainty in income taxes, by defining the confidence level that a tax position must meet in order to be recognized in the financial statements. This guidance requires that the tax effects of a position be recognized only if it is "more-likely-than-not" to be sustained based solely on its technical merits as of the reporting date. We consider many factors when evaluating and estimating its tax positions and tax benefits, which may require periodic adjustments and which may not accurately anticipate actual outcomes.

              With the adoption of this guidance, companies are required to adjust their financial statements to reflect only those tax positions that are more-likely-than-not to be sustained. Any necessary adjustment would be recorded directly to retained earnings and reported as a change in accounting principle as of the date of adoption. This guidance prescribes a comprehensive model for the financial statement recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in income tax returns. We did not have any unrecognized tax benefits as of the date of adoption. Our policy is to recognize interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense. See Note 12 of "Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements" for additional information, including the effects of adoption on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.

              As of June 30, 2010, we had net deferred tax assets of $4.3 million. Should we determine that we will not be able to realize all or part of our net deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the net deferred tax assets would reduce income in the period such determination was made. Our effective tax rates have differed from the U.S. federal statutory tax rate primarily due to changes in our deferred income tax valuation allowance, state taxes, warrant liability, impairment of goodwill, and certain benefits realized related to stock option activity. Effective April 1, 2009, we adopted authoritative guidance issued by the FASB on contracts in an entity's own equity that requires our convertible preferred stock warrants outstanding on April 1, 2009 and each reporting date thereafter to be classified as liabilities at their estimated fair value with changes in fair value at each reporting date recognized in the statement of operations. The portion of any change in fair value of the warrant liability classified as "change in fair value of warrants" in the consolidated statement of operations will not be deductible for tax purposes and will therefore impact our effective tax rate. Our future effective

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tax rates could be adversely affected by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets or liabilities, or changes in tax laws, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations thereof. In addition, we are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes.

Internal Control over Financial Reporting

              Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. In October 2009, in connection with our 2009 fiscal year audit, our independent registered accounting firm communicated to our board of directors a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting related to our lack of expertise and knowledge of U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, or GAAP, reporting requirements and the financial close process. A material weakness is a control deficiency or combination of control deficiencies that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. We have taken steps that remediate this material weakness, including hiring a Chief Financial Officer, hiring a Financial Reporting Manager as well as additional permanent and temporary accounting personnel, forming an audit committee and implementing controls within the financial close process. These controls include establishing formalized duties and responsibilities for accounting personnel, implementing an accounting close checklist, requiring at least two levels of review for significant account analysis and all journal entries, and enhanced documentation of account reconciliations and analysis. We have also designed and implemented a disclosure control process and disclosure committee, comprised of our officers, including members of management responsible for critical functional areas. These controls were designed and operated effectively to remediate the material weakness as of March 31, 2010.

              We have completed our remediation efforts with respect to the material weakness, and we believe that our actions in this regard have strengthened our internal controls over financial reporting. Our management will continue to evaluate the effectiveness of the control environment and will continue to refine existing controls. For a description of risks associated with our internal controls, please see "Risk Factors—A material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting was identified in connection with our 2009 fiscal year audit, and if we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls in the future, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results."

Other Events

              In June 2007, we acquired preferred stock representing a 9.7% interest in GameStrata, an online networking community for video game players. In October 2008, we purchased the remaining outstanding shares of common stock of GameStrata. The aggregate purchase price for both transactions amounted to $1.0 million and was allocated to the net assets acquired, which included $0.4 million allocated to goodwill and $0.8 million allocated to the website acquired. The results of the operations of GameStrata have been consolidated with our results since October 2008. Subsequent to the acquisition, GameStrata did not perform as expected and we terminated the acquired workforce and shut down the website. As such, we determined that the goodwill and website acquired were fully impaired as of March 31, 2009. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2009, we recorded an impairment loss of $1.1 million related to these assets, of which $0.7 million was included in "impairment of acquired website" and $0.4 million was included in "impairment of goodwill" in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

              In January 2009, we acquired ShackNews Ltd. ("ShackNews"), a business dedicated to providing news, reviews and services related to video games, for $3.1 million. ShackNews includes www.shacknews.com, a website that provides video game news and reviews, and www.fileshack.com, a website that allows users to download and store video game-related files, including patches and demos. ShackNews also offers subscription-based premium content and download service for its users. The results of the operations of ShackNews have been consolidated with our results since the acquisition.

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Results of Operations

              The following table sets forth, for the periods presented, our consolidated statements of operations. In the table below and throughout this "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations", consolidated statements of operations data for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2008, 2009 and 2010 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements, and the consolidated statements of operations data for the three-month periods ended June 30, 2009 and 2010 have been derived from our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements. The information contained in the table below should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes beginning on page F-1 of this prospectus.

 
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months
Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands, except share and per share data)
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

                               

Revenues:

                               
 

Base subscription

  $ 55,303   $ 71,756   $ 87,844   $ 20,723   $ 25,044  
 

Previously rented product

    9,171     10,786     11,111     2,452     2,735  
                       
   

Total rental revenues

    64,474     82,542     98,955     23,175     27,779  
 

Advertising and other

    1,672     2,128     2,511     575     726  
                       
   

Total revenues

    66,146     84,670     101,466     23,750     28,505  

Cost of revenues:

                               
 

Rental(1)

    36,658     45,140     53,561     11,121     13,584  
 

Advertising and other

    238     202     976     144     245  
                       
   

Total cost of revenues

    36,896     45,342     54,537     11,265     13,829  
                       

Gross profit

    29,250     39,328     46,929     12,485     14,676  
                       

Operating expenses:

                               
 

Fulfillment(2)

    6,424     8,780     9,746     2,209     2,605  
 

Technology and development(2)

    3,636     6,542     7,409     1,823     2,032  
 

Marketing(2)

    13,526     17,521     19,105     4,157     4,438  
 

General and administrative(2)

    3,065     3,592     5,397     1,051     2,005  
 

Depreciation and amortization

    724     1,175     1,501     372     400  
 

Impairment of acquired website

        668              
 

Impairment of goodwill

        449     1,500          
                       
   

Total operating expenses

    27,375     38,727     44,658     9,612     11,480  
                       

Operating (loss) income

    1,875     601     2,271     2,873     3,196  
                       

Other income (expense):

                               
 

Interest income

    199     68     7     3      
 

Interest expense

    (329 )   (225 )   (233 )   (74 )   (36 )
 

Change in fair value of warrants(3)

            (648 )   (121 )   (5 )
 

Other—net

    (57 )   (164 )   (28 )   (4 )   (12 )
                       
   

Total other income (expense)

    (187 )   (321 )   (902 )   (196 )   (53 )
                       

Income (loss) before income tax (provision) benefit

    1,688     280     1,369     2,677     3,143  

Income tax (provision) benefit(4)

    (60 )   3,780     (916 )   (1,166 )   (1,550 )
                       

Net income (loss)

  $ 1,628   $ 4,060   $ 453   $ 1,151   $ 1,593  

Undistributed income attributable to preferred stockholders

    (1,628 )   (3,276 )   (453 )   (1,139 )   (1,178 )
                       

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

      $ 784   $   $ 372   $ 415  
                       

Net income (loss) per share:

                               
 

Basic

      $ 0.16   $   $ 0.07   $ 0.08  
                       
 

Diluted

      $ 0.10   $   $ 0.05   $ 0.05  
                       

Weighted average shares outstanding:

                               
 

Basic

    4,551,307     4,893,713     5,330,384     5,177,861     5,486,127  
 

Diluted

    4,551,307     7,824,282     8,433,383     8,077,741     8,772,593  

Pro forma net income per share (unaudited):

                               
 

Basic

              $ 0.03         $ 0.10  
                             
 

Diluted

              $ 0.02         $ 0.09  
                             

Pro forma weighted average shares outstanding used in calculating net income per share (unaudited)

                               
 

Basic

                15,226,293           15,419,838  
 

Diluted

                18,329,292           18,706,304  

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Table of Contents


(1)
Components of cost of rental are shown below:

   
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,   Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
   
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
 
 

Amortization of video game library

  $ 11,817   $ 13,354   $ 20,286   $ 3,199   $ 5,536  
 

Carrying value of previously rented products sold

    9,346     11,517     11,001     2,470     2,485  
 

Carrying value of lost and damaged games expensed

    6,186     5,981     5,462     1,521     1,142  
 

Shipping and handling, packaging, and other cost of rental

    9,309     14,288     16,812     3,931     4,421  
                         
   

Total cost of rental

  $ 36,658   $ 45,140   $ 53,561   $ 11,121   $ 13,584  
                         
(2)
Stock-based compensation, including the impact of warrants and options, included in the above line items:

   
  Fiscal Year Ended
March 31,
  Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
   
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
 
 

Fulfillment

  $ 69   $ 88   $ 74   $ 16   $ 21  
 

Technology and development

    109     478     325     93     124  
 

Marketing

    82     165     901     156     54  
 

General and administrative

    82     109     264     24     188  
                         
   

Total stock-based compensation expense

  $ 342   $ 840   $ 1,564   $ 289   $ 387  
                         
(3)
Effective April 1, 2009, we adopted authoritative guidance issued by the FASB that requires our convertible preferred stock warrants to be classified as liabilities at their estimated fair value, with changes in fair value at each reporting date recognized in the consolidated statement of operations. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010 and the three months ended June 30, 2009 and 2010, we recorded an expense for the change in the fair value of our warrant liability.

(4)
The income tax benefit recognized in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2009 is primarily the result of us reversing all of the previously established valuation allowance.

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Table of Contents

              The following table sets forth, for the periods presented, our consolidated statements of operations as a percentage of total revenues. The information contained in the table below should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and the related notes beginning on page F-1 of this prospectus.

 
  Fiscal Year Ended
March 31,
  Three Months Ended
June 30,
 
 
  2008   2009   2010   2009   2010  

Consolidated Statements of Operations:

                               

Revenues:

                               
 

Base subscription

    83.6 %   84.8 %   86.6 %   87.3 %   87.9 %
 

Previously rented product

    13.9     12.7     10.9     10.3     9.6  
                       
   

Total rental revenues

    97.5     97.5     97.5     97.6     97.5  
 

Advertising and other

    2.5     2.5     2.5     2.4     2.5  
                       
   

Total revenues

    100.0     100.0     100.0     100.0     100.0  
                       

Cost of revenues:

                               
 

Rental

    55.4     53.3     52.8     46.8     47.7  
 

Advertising and other

    0.4     0.2     1.0     0.6     0.9  
                       
   

Total cost of revenues

    55.8     53.5     53.8     47.4     48.6  
                       

Gross profit

    44.2     46.5     46.2     52.6     51.4  
                       

Operating expenses:

                               
 

Fulfillment

    9.7     10.4     9.6     9.3     9.1  
 

Technology and development

    5.5     7.7     7.3     7.7     7.1  
 

Marketing

    20.4     20.7     18.8     17.5     15.6  
 

General and administrative

    4.6     4.2     5.3     4.4     7.0  
 

Depreciation and amortization

    1.1     1.4     1.5     1.6     1.4  
 

Impairment of acquired website

    0.0     0.8     0.0     0.0     0.0  
 

Impairment of goodwill

    0.0     0.5     1.5     0.0     0.0  
                       
   

Total operating expenses

    41.3     45.7     44.0     40.5     40.2  
                       

Operating (loss) income

    2.9     0.8     2.2     12.1     11.2  
                       

Other income (expense):

                               
 

Interest income

    0.3     0.1     0.0     0.0     0.0  
 

Interest expense

    (0.5 )   (0.3 )   (0.2 )   (0.3 )   (0.1 )
 

Change in fair value of warrants

    0.0     0.0     (0.7 )   (0.5 )   0.0  
 

Other—net

    (0.1 )   (0.2 )   (0.0 )   0.0     0.0  
                       
   

Total other income (expense)

    (0.3 )   (0.4 )   (0.9 )   (0.8 )   (0.1 )
                       

Income (loss) before income tax (provision) benefit

    2.6     0.4     1.3     11.3     11.1  

Income tax (provision) benefit

    (0.1 )   4.5     (0.9 )   (4.9 )   (5.4 )
                       

Net income (loss)

    2.5     4.9     0.4     6.4     5.7  

Undistributed income attributable to preferred stockholders

    (2.5 )   (3.9 )   (0.4 )   (4.8 )   (4.1 )
                       

Net income (loss) available to common stockholders

    0.0     1.0         1.6     1.6  
                       

50


Three Months Ended June 30, 2009 and 2010

Revenues

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Base subscription

  $ 20,723   $ 25,044     20.9 %

Previously rented product

    2,452     2,735     11.5 %
                 
 

Total rental revenues

    23,175     27,779     19.9 %

Advertising and other

    575     726     26.3 %
                 
 

Total revenues

  $ 23,750   $ 28,505     20.0 %
                 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                   
 

Base subscription

    87.3 %   87.9 %      
 

Previously rented product

    10.3 %   9.6 %      
   

Total rental revenues

    97.6 %   97.5 %      
 

Advertising and other

    2.4 %   2.5 %      

Other data:

                   
 

Total subscribers

    336,206     409,594     21.8 %
 

Average monthly revenue per subscriber

  $ 20.80   $ 20.06     (3.6 )%

              Base subscription.    Our subscription revenues increased $4.3 million, or 20.9%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. This increase was primarily driven by the 21.8% growth in our total subscribers resulting from increased marketing efforts and brand awareness. The growth in our base subscription revenues, driven by the increase in the number of our subscribers, was offset by a 3.6% decline in our average monthly revenue per subscriber due to a greater percentage of our subscribers participating in our lower-priced subscription plans than in the prior period.

              Previously rented product.    Our PRP revenues increased $0.3 million, or 11.5%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. This increase was due to 34.0% growth in the number of previously rented video games sold, offset by a 16.7% decrease in the average sales price of previously rented video games. This increase in the number of previously rented video games sold resulted from an increase in the number of games in our video game library available for sale associated with the growth in our subscriber base. The price decrease resulted from more efficient management of our video game library, which enabled us to hold a lower number of video games relative to our subscriber base than in prior periods. Consequently, we rented games longer during this period, leading to a lower weighted average price realized upon sale. During the three months ended June 30, 2010, our base subscription revenue grew at a faster rate than PRP revenue compared to the three months ended June 30, 2009, primarily due to a lower number of games in our video game library available for sale relative to the number of our subscribers in our subscriber base. We expect this downward trend in PRP revenues as a percentage of total revenues to continue but at a lesser rate in future periods as we manage our video game library more efficiently and grow other components of revenue such as advertising and other revenues, which will affect our total revenue mix.

              Advertising and other.    Our advertising and other revenues increased $0.2 million, or 26.3%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. Advertising revenue grew primarily due to the increase in average revenue per impression delivered. The increase also reflects the ramp-up of our new game sales business, initiated in November 2009, which is included in other revenue.

51


Cost of Revenues

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Rental

  $ 11,121   $ 13,584     22.1 %

Advertising and other

    144     245     70.1 %
                 
 

Total cost of revenues

  $ 11,265   $ 13,829     22.8 %
                 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                   
 

Rental

    46.8 %   47.7 %      
 

Advertising and other

    0.6 %   0.9 %      
 

Total cost of revenues

    47.4 %   48.5 %      

Components of cost of rental:

                   
 

Amortization of video game library

  $ 3,199   $ 5,536        
 

Carrying value of previously rented products sold

    2,470     2,485        
 

Carrying value of lost and damaged games expensed

    1,521     1,142        
 

Shipping and handling, packaging, and other cost of rental

    3,931     4,421        
                 
 

Total cost of rental

  $ 11,121   $ 13,584        
                 

              Cost of rental.    Our cost of rental revenues increased $2.5 million, or 22.1%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. The increase was primarily due to increases in amortization expense, shipping and handling costs, and packaging expenses, slightly offset by decreases in the costs of lost and damaged games expensed. Amortization expense increased $2.3 million, which was partly attributable to changes in our residual value estimate and amortization schedule for our video game library made subsequent to the three months ended June 30, 2009. These changes, as well as increases in purchases of video games to support our larger subscriber base, resulted in increased amortization expense for the three months ended June 30, 2010 compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year. The $2.3 million increase in amortization expense was partly offset by a $0.4 million decrease in the costs of lost and damaged games expensed. In addition, higher shipping and handling and packaging expenses totaling $0.5 million resulted from serving our larger subscriber base, offset by lower shipments per subscriber due to a greater number of our subscribers participating in rental plans with fewer games than in the three months ended June 30, 2009.

              Cost of advertising and other.    Our cost of advertising and other revenues increased by $0.1 million, or 70.1%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. This increase primarily resulted from additional costs due to the introduction of video game kiosks and the initiation of our new games business.

52


Gross Profit and Margin

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Gross profit:

                   
 

Rental

  $ 12,054   $ 14,195     17.8 %
 

Advertising and other

    431     481     11.6 %
                 
 

Total gross profit

  $ 12,485   $ 14,676     17.6 %
                 

Gross margin:

                   
 

Rental

    52.0 %   51.1 %      
 

Advertising and other

    75.0 %   66.3 %      
 

Total gross margin

    52.6 %   51.4 %      

              Rental.    Our gross profit from rental increased $2.2 million, or 17.8%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010 while gross margin from rental decreased from 52.0% to 51.1% during the respective periods. This decrease in gross margin resulted primarily from changes in our residual value estimate and amortization schedule for our video game library made subsequent to the three months ended June 30, 2009. These changes resulted in increased amortization expense, partially offset by lower carrying value of previously rented products sold and lost and damaged games expensed, for the three months ended June 30, 2010 compared to the same period in the prior fiscal year. This increase in amortization expense was also partially offset by improved management of the number of games in our video game library.

              Advertising and other.    Our gross profit from advertising and other increased $0.1 million, or 11.6%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010 while gross margin from advertising and other decreased from 75.0% to 66.3% during the respective periods. This decline in gross margin resulted primarily from the additional costs related to the introduction of our video game kiosks and the launch of our new games business.

Operating Expenses

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Fulfillment

  $ 2,209   $ 2,605     17.9 %

Technology and development

    1,823     2,032     11.5 %

Marketing

    4,157     4,438     6.8 %

General and administrative

    1,051     2,005     90.8 %

Depreciation and amortization

    372     400     7.5 %
                 
 

Total operating expenses

  $ 9,612   $ 11,480     19.4 %
                 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                   
 

Fulfillment

    9.3 %   9.1 %      
 

Technology and development

    7.7 %   7.1 %      
 

Marketing

    17.5 %   15.6 %      
 

General and administrative

    4.4 %   7.0 %      
 

Depreciation and amortization

    1.6 %   1.4 %      
 

Total operating expenses

    40.5 %   40.2 %      

53


              Fulfillment.    Our fulfillment expenses increased $0.4 million, or 17.9%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. The increase was primarily the result of a $0.3 million increase in credit card fees due to a greater number of transactions associated with the growth in our subscriber base from period-to-period.

              Technology and development.    Our technology and development expenses increased $0.2 million, or 11.5%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. Of this increase, less than $0.1 million resulted from an increase in the number of technology and development personnel and $0.2 million resulted from additional third-party services and licenses related to expanding our technological infrastructure to support the growth in our subscriber base.

              Marketing.    Our marketing expenses increased $0.3 million, or 6.8%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. The growth in marketing expenses was primarily attributable to a $0.3 million increase in external marketing spending. The decrease in our marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue from 17.5% to 15.6% from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010 was due to a more efficient and effective marketing channel mix which is also reflected in the 2.9% decrease in subscriber acquisition cost during the three months ended June 30, 2010.

              General and administrative.    Our general and administrative expenses increased $1.0 million, or 90.8%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. This increase was primarily the result of a $0.7 million increase in professional fees, including legal fees related to the U.S. Postal Service dispute. An additional $0.3 million increase was the result of an increase in the number of general and administrative personnel. We expect our general and administrative expenses to increase when we become a public company as a result of increasing accounting, legal, personnel and other costs. This will result from instituting and monitoring a more comprehensive compliance and board governance function, maintaining and reviewing internal controls over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and preparing and distributing periodic reports.

              Depreciation and amortization.    Our depreciation and amortization expenses increased less than $0.1 million, or 7.5%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. This increase was primarily the result of a greater amount of depreciable equipment and intangible assets to support growth in our subscriber base and advertising business.

Other Income (Expense)

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Interest income

  $ 3   $     (100.0 )%

Interest expense

    (74 )   (36 )   (51.4 )%

Change in fair value of warrants

    (121 )   (5 )   (95.9 )%

Other—net

    (4 )   (12 )   200.0 %
                 
 

Total other income (expense)

  $ (196 ) $ (53 )   (73.0 )%
                 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                   
 

Interest income

    0.0 %   0.0 %      
 

Interest expense

    (0.3 )%   (0.1 )%      
 

Change in fair value of warrants

    (0.5 )%   (0.0 )%      
 

Other—net

    0.0 %   0.0 %      
 

Total other income (expense)

    (0.8 )%   (0.2 )%      

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Table of Contents

              Interest income.    Our interest income decreased by less than $0.1 million, or (100.0)%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010 due to a decrease in our effective interest rate that was partially offset by additional interest generated from our higher cash balances.

              Interest expense.    Our interest expense decreased by less than $0.1 million, or (51.4)%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. The increase in interest expense was primarily due to the additional imputed interest expense for the notes payable related to the acquisition of ShackNews, which increase was partially offset by decreased expense associated with the lower outstanding balance of our credit facility and a lower effective interest rate, which declined from 6.1% to 5.2% over the period.

              Change in fair value of warrants.    Our change in fair value of warrants decreased by $0.1 million, or (95.9)%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. The change was due to a decrease in outstanding convertible preferred stock warrants in addition to a smaller increase in the estimated fair value of the capital stock into which the warrants may be exercised.

              Other—net.    Net other expenses increased by less than $0.1 million, or 200.0%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010 primarily due to the increase of other income.

Income Tax (Provision) Benefit

 
  Three Months
Ended June 30,
   
 
 
  %
Change
 
 
  2009   2010  
 
  (in thousands)
   
 

Income tax (provision) benefit

  $ 1,166   $ 1,550     32.9 %

As a percentage of revenues

    (4.9 )%   (5.4 )%      

              Our income tax expense increased by $0.4 million, or 32.9%, from the three months ended June 30, 2009 to the three months ended June 30, 2010. Our effective income tax rate increased from 44.0% to 49.3%. Our effective income tax rate differs from the federal statutory rate of 35% primarily due to state taxes and expenses that are not deductible for income tax purposes such as stock-based compensation related to stock options designated as incentive stock options under the Internal Revenue Service tax code and changes in the fair value of our warrant liability that are recorded in our consolidated statements of operations.

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Fiscal Years Ended March 31, 2008, 2009 and 2010

Revenues

   
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,    
   
 
   
  2008 to 2009
% Change
  2009 to 2010
% Change
 
   
  2008   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
   
   
 
 

Base subscription

  $ 55,303   $ 71,756   $ 87,844     29.8 %   22.4 %
 

Previously rented product

    9,171     10,786     11,111     17.6 %   3.0 %
                             
   

Total rental revenues

    64,474     82,542     98,955     28.0 %   19.9 %
 

Advertising and other

    1,672     2,128     2,511     27.3 %   18.0 %
                             
   

Total revenues

  $ 66,146   $ 84,670   $ 101,466     28.0 %   19.8 %
                             
 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                               
   

Base subscription

    83.6 %   84.8 %   86.6 %            
   

Previously rented product

    13.9 %   12.7 %   10.9 %            
     

Total rental revenues

    97.5 %   97.5 %   97.5 %            
   

Advertising and other

    2.5 %   2.5 %   2.5 %            
 

Other data:

                               
   

Total subscribers

    266,853     328,119     422,663     23.0 %   28.8 %
   

Average monthly revenue per subscriber

  $ 21.27   $ 21.03   $ 20.54     (1.1 )%   (3.0 )%

      Base subscription

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our subscription revenues increased $16.1 million, or 22.4%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. This increase was primarily driven by the 28.8% growth in our total subscribers resulting from increased marketing efforts and brand awareness. The growth in our base subscription revenues, driven by the increase in the number of our subscribers, was slightly offset by a 2.3% decline in our average monthly revenue per subscriber due to a greater percentage of our subscribers participating in our lower-priced subscription plans than in fiscal year 2009.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our subscription revenues increased $16.5 million, or 29.8%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was primarily driven by the 23.0% growth in our total number of subscribers due to our increased brand awareness and marketing efforts. The average monthly revenue per subscriber remained roughly constant over these periods.

      Previously rented product

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our PRP revenues increased $0.3 million, or 3.0%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. This increase was due to 13.8% growth in the number of previously rented video games sold, offset by a 9.4% decrease in the average sales price of previously rented video games. This increase in the number of previously rented video games sold resulted from an increase in the number of games in our video game library available for sale associated with the growth in our subscriber base. The price decrease resulted from more efficient management of our video game library, which enabled us to hold a lower number of video games relative to our subscriber base than in prior periods. Consequently, we rented games longer during this period, leading to a lower weighted average price realized upon sale. During fiscal year 2010, our base subscription revenue grew at a faster rate than PRP revenue compared to fiscal year 2009, primarily due to a lower number of games in our video game library available for sale relative to the number of our subscribers in our subscriber base. We expect this downward trend in PRP revenues as a percentage of total revenues to continue but at a

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lesser rate in future periods as we manage our video game library more efficiently and grow other components of revenue such as advertising and other revenues, which will affect our total revenue mix.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our PRP revenues increased $1.6 million, or 17.6%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was due to 19.2% growth in the number of previously rented video games sold, offset by a 1.3% decrease in the average sales price of previously rented video games. This increase in the number of previously rented video games sold resulted from an increase in the number of games in our video game library available for sale associated with the growth in our subscriber base. Base subscription revenue grew at a faster rate than PRP revenue primarily due to a lower number of games in our video game library available for sale relative to the number of our subscribers in our subscriber base resulting from improved management of the library.

      Advertising and other

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our advertising and other revenues increased $0.4 million, or 18.0%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. This revenue growth was primarily due to an increase in visitor traffic and resulting impressions delivered as well as the addition of more advertising-focused websites, including properties associated with our ShackNews acquisition. The traffic increase was partially offset by a decrease in average revenue per impression due to lower rates in the online advertising market. The increase also reflects the ramp-up of our new game sales business, initiated in November 2009, which is included in other revenue.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our advertising and other revenues increased $0.5 million, or 27.3%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was primarily due to a 16.l% increase in visitor traffic to our websites as well as the addition of more advertising-focused websites.

Cost of Revenues

   
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,    
   
 
   
  2008 to 2009
% Change
  2009 to 2010
% Change
 
   
  2008   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
   
   
 
 

Rental

  $ 36,658   $ 45,140   $ 53,561     23.1 %   18.7 %
 

Advertising and other

    238     202     976     (15.1 )%   383.2 %
                             
   

Total cost of revenues

  $ 36,896   $ 45,342   $ 54,537     22.9 %   20.3 %
                             
 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                               
   

Rental

    55.4 %   53.3 %   52.8 %            
   

Advertising and other

    0.4 %   0.2 %   1.0 %            
   

Total cost of revenues

    55.8 %   53.5 %   53.8 %            
 

Components of cost of rental:

                               
   

Amortization of video game library

  $ 11,817   $ 13,354   $ 20,286     13.0 %   51.9 %
   

Carrying value of previously rented products sold

    9,346     11,517     11,001     23.2 %   (4.5 )%
   

Carrying value of lost and damaged games expensed

    6,186     5,981     5,462     (3.3 )%   (8.7 )%
   

Shipping and handling, packaging, and other cost of rental

    9,309     14,288     16,812     53.5 %   17.7 %
                             
   

Total cost of rental

  $ 36,658   $ 45,140   $ 53,561     23.1 %   18.7 %
                             

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      Cost of rental

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our cost of rental revenues increased $8.4 million, or 18.7%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. The increase was primarily due to increases in amortization expense, shipping and handling costs, and packaging expenses, offset by decreases in the cost of previously rented video games sold and the costs of lost and damaged games expensed. Amortization expense increased $6.9 million and was offset by a $0.5 million decrease in the cost of previously rented video games sold and a $0.5 million decrease in the cost of lost and damaged games, resulting in a net increase of $5.9 million in video game related costs. Of such $5.9 million net increase, $3.9 million was attributable to adjustments resulting from changes in residual value estimates and the amortization schedule for the video game library during fiscal year 2010 and $2.0 million was attributable to increases in purchases of video games to support our larger subscriber base. In addition, higher shipping and handling and packaging expenses totaling $2.5 million resulted from serving our larger subscriber base, partially offset by lower shipments per subscriber due to a greater number of our subscribers participating in rental plans with fewer games than in fiscal year 2009.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our cost of rental revenues increased $8.5 million, or 23.1%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was largely due to the $5.0 million growth in shipping, packaging, and other costs as a result of serving a larger subscriber base and, to a lesser extent, an increase in postage rates. Other expense drivers included a $1.5 million increase in inventory amortization expense and a $2.2 million increase in the cost of the previously rented video games sold related to our higher video game rental and sales volumes.

      Cost of advertising and other

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our cost of advertising and other revenues increased by $0.8 million, or 383.2%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. This increase primarily resulted from additional costs due to the introduction of video game kiosks, the increase in our costs associated with our acquisition of ShackNews and the initiation of our new games business.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our cost of advertising and other revenues decreased by less than $0.1 million, or 15.1%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This decrease was primarily due to lower expenses paid to firms that help us manage the placement of third-party advertisements on our network of websites.

Gross Profit and Margin

   
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,    
   
 
   
  2008 to 2009
% Change
  2009 to 2010
% Change
 
   
  2008   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
   
   
 
 

Rental

  $ 27,816   $ 37,402   $ 45,394     34.5 %   21.4 %
 

Advertising and other

    1,434     1,926     1,535     34.3 %   (20.3 )%
                             
   

Total gross profit

  $ 29,250   $ 39,328   $ 46,929     34.5 %   19.3 %
                             
 

Gross margin:

                               
   

Rental

    43.1 %   45.3 %   45.9 %            
   

Advertising and other

    85.8 %   90.5 %   61.1 %            
   

Total gross margin

    44.2 %   46.5 %   46.2 %            

      Rental

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our gross profit from rental increased $8.0 million, or 21.4%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010 while gross margin from rental increased from 45.3% to 45.9% during the respective periods. Without expenses attributable to the changes in residual value estimates and the amortization schedule for the video game library during fiscal year 2010, gross

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margin in fiscal year 2010 would have been 49.8%. This increase in overall gross margin resulted from our rental revenue growing faster than the associated costs due primarily to improved management of the number of games in our video game library and the lower carrying values expensed upon sale of previously rented video games.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our gross profit from rental increased $9.6 million, or 34.5%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009 while gross margin from rental increased from 43.1% to 45.3% during the respective periods. This increase in gross margin resulted from our rental revenue growing faster than the associated costs due primarily to improved management of the number of games in our video game library, partially offset by higher carrying values expensed upon sale of previously rented video games.

      Advertising and other

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our gross profit from advertising and other decreased $0.4 million, or 20.3%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010 while gross margin from advertising and other decreased from 90.5% to 61.1% during the respective periods. This decline in gross margin resulted primarily from the additional costs related to the introduction of our video game kiosks and increased costs associated with our acquisition of ShackNews.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our gross profit from advertising and other increased $0.5 million, or 34.3%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009 while gross margin from advertising and other increased from 85.8% to 90.5% during the respective periods. This increase in gross margin was primarily due to an increase in advertising revenues, which grew at a faster rate than the related costs.

Operating Expenses

   
  Fiscal Year Ended March 31,    
   
 
   
  2008 to 2009
% Change
  2009 to 2010
% Change
 
   
  2008   2009   2010  
   
  (in thousands)
   
   
 
 

Fulfillment

  $ 6,424   $ 8,780   $ 9,746     36.7 %   11.0 %
 

Technology and development

    3,636     6,542     7,409     79.9 %   13.3 %
 

Marketing

    13,526     17,521     19,105     29.5 %   9.0 %
 

General and administrative

    3,065     3,592     5,397     17.2 %   50.3 %
 

Depreciation and amortization

    724     1,175     1,501     62.3 %   27.7 %
 

Impairment of acquired website

        668         NA     NA  
 

Impairment of goodwill

        449     1,500     NA     234.1 %
                             
   

Total operating expenses

  $ 27,375   $ 38,727   $ 44,658     41.5 %   15.3 %
                             
 

As a percentage of total revenues:

                               
   

Fulfillment

    9.7 %   10.4 %   9.6 %            
   

Technology and development

    5.5 %   7.7 %   7.3 %            
   

Marketing

    20.4 %   20.7 %   18.8 %            
   

General and administrative

    4.6 %   4.2 %   5.3 %            
   

Depreciation and amortization

    1.1 %   1.4 %   1.5 %            
   

Impairment of acquired website

        0.8 %                
   

Impairment of goodwill

        0.5 %   1.5 %            
   

Total operating expenses

    41.3 %   45.7 %   44.0 %            

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      Fulfillment

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our fulfillment expenses increased $1.0 million, or 11.0%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. The increase was primarily the result of a $0.9 million increase in credit card fees due to a greater number of transactions associated with the growth in our subscriber base from period-to-period.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our fulfillment expenses increased $2.4 million, or 36.7%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was primarily due to a $1.5 million increase in personnel-related expenses resulting from an increase in the number of fulfillment employees and a $0.6 million increase in credit card fees due to greater transaction volume associated with the growth in our subscriber base. There was also an increase in fulfillment expenses due to the additional regional distribution and customer service center opened in Austin, Texas during fiscal year 2009.

      Technology and development

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our technology and development expenses increased $0.9 million, or 13.3%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. Of this increase, approximately $0.5 million resulted from an increase in the number of technology and development personnel and $0.3 million from additional third-party services and licenses related to expanding our technological infrastructure to support the growth in our subscriber base.

              Fiscal 2008 compared to Fiscal 2009.    Our technology and development expenses increased $2.9 million, or 79.9%, from fiscal year 2008 to fiscal year 2009. This increase was primarily due to a $2.4 million increase in personnel-related expenses resulting from additions in technology and development personnel related to our advertising business, including the addition of employees due to our GameStrata and ShackNews acquisitions in fiscal 2009.

      Marketing

              Fiscal 2009 compared to Fiscal 2010.    Our marketing expenses increased $1.6 million, or 9.0%, from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010. The growth in marketing expenses was primarily attributable to a $0.8 million increase in external marketing spending and a $0.8 million increase in personnel-related expenses. The decrease of our marketing expenses as a percentage of revenue from 20.7% to 18.8% from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2010 was due to a more efficient and effective marketing channel mix which is also reflected in the 10.6% decrease