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EX-32.2 - CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit32-2.htm
EX-32.1 - CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit32-1.htm
EX-23.1 - CONSENT OF GRANT THORNTON LLP - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit23-1.htm
EX-21.1 - LIST OF SUBSIDIARIES OF THE REGISTRANT - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit21-1.htm
EX-31.2 - CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14(A) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO RULE 13A-14(A) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT - SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL INCexhibit31-1.htm


 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
———————
FORM 10-K
———————
 
 
x  
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
-For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010
       
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Commission File Number: 0-21393
———————
SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
———————
 
Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)
04-3197974
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
 
50 Nagog Park, Acton, MA 01720
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
 
(978)-897-0100
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
Securities Registered Pursuant To Section 12(b) Of The Act:
 
Common Stock, $.01 par value
 
Securities Registered Pursuant To Section 12(g) Of The Act:
 
None
———————
 
     Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x
 
     Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o No x
 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o
 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes o No o
 


     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer x
 
Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company o
 
     Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x
 
     As of July 31, 2009, the aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based upon the closing price for the registrant’s Common Stock on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on such date was $260,485,787. The number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding as of the close of business on March 25, 2010 was 31,072,068.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:
 
     Portions of the definitive Proxy Statement (which is expected to be filed within 120 days after the Company’s fiscal year end) relating to the registrant’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on or about July 15, 2010 to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 

 

 

PART I
 
ITEM 1. Business
 
     SeaChange International, Inc. (“SeaChange”, “we” or “us”), a Delaware corporation founded on July 9, 1993, is a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of digital video systems and services. These products and services facilitate the aggregation, licensing, storage, management and distribution of video, television programming and advertising content. We sell our products and services worldwide to cable system operators, including Cablevision, Comcast, Cox Communications, Virgin Media, and Rogers; telecommunications companies, including Telekom Austria, Turk Telekom and Verizon Communications; and broadcast television companies, including ABC Disney, Ascent Media, Clear Channel, China Central Television and Viacom.
 
     Our digital video systems are designed to enable our customers to reduce subscriber turnover and access new revenue-generating opportunities from subscribers, advertisers and electronic commerce initiatives. Using our products and services, we believe our customers can increase their revenues by offering additional services such as on demand television, which allows, for example, the operator to offer a variety of programming for viewing whenever a subscriber chooses and incorporates the ability for subscribers to pause, rewind and fast-forward on demand content. Our systems also allow our customers to insert advertising into broadcast and on demand programming. Our advertising systems allow our customers to target advertising segments to specific subscribers in a particular geographic and/or demographic market. In addition, our systems enable broadband system operators to offer other interactive television services that allow subscribers to customize and/or dynamically interact with their television, enhancing their viewing experience.
 
     The primary thrust of our business has been supplying systems to deliver video assets in the evolving “On Demand” television environment. Through acquisitions and partnerships we have expanded our capabilities, products and services to address the needs of video content owners, broadcasters, and content aggregators, and to address the delivery of content to devices other than the television, such as mobile phones and PCs. Our products and services include hardware and software for content management and delivery systems, middleware that drives set top box applications such as games, advertising systems that help pay for content and services that involve the acquisition and distribution of video content. We believe that our strategy of expanding our product line will position SeaChange to support and maintain our existing customer base, take advantage of new customers entering the on demand marketplace and to enter adjacent markets.
 
     Our core technologies provide a foundation for products and services that can be deployed in next generation systems capable of increased levels of subscriber interactivity. We have received several awards for technological excellence, including Emmy Awards for our patented MediaCluster ® technology and for our role in the growth of video on demand.
 
Industry Background
 
     Cable System Operators and Telecommunications Companies
 
     According to SNL Kagan, the number of households paying for TV access today, such as cable subscription but excluding satellite, has been estimated at 111 million in the Americas and approximately 600 million worldwide. Over the last several years, cable system operators and telecommunications companies have spent billions of dollars to upgrade their networks from analog to digital, yielding a significant increase in available bandwidth, channel capacity and two-way interactive capability. We believe this investment reflects their intent to provide video on demand, advertising insertion, internet access and other value-added services to their customers that will differentiate them from competing service providers, including satellite delivery systems.
 
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     In 2001, North American cable system operators and telecommunications companies began the deployment of residential video on demand capability allowing subscribers to watch video programming at any time with pause, rewind, fast forward and a number of additional interactive capabilities. All of the major North American cable system operators have deployed video on demand services in one or more major residential markets. The various on demand applications offered by cable system operators and, increasingly, telecommunications operators, include movies-on-demand, subscription video on demand, such as Home Box Office (HBO), as well as news, sports, music videos, games, niche programming and time-shifted broadcast programming.
 
     Cable companies have also begun to market telephone services. In response, telecommunications operators, notably AT&T and Verizon in the U.S., are aggressively providing competitive digital television and video services. Elsewhere, international telecommunications companies with high-speed network capacity are actively exploring and launching similar television services.
 
     In addition, because cable television programming is transmitted over broadband (high bandwidth networks), cable system and telecom operators have the opportunity to segment and target their programming to viewers in selected geographies. In the future, we believe that the ability of operators to target viewers will extend to individual household-level targeting of advertisements in video on demand applications, generating revenue which may help support the worldwide deployment and growth of video on demand content and services.
 
     Increased demand for video and audio content over the internet will also require a substantial increase in storage capacity and bandwidth over time. We believe that cable system operators and telecommunications companies will play an integral role in providing these broadband internet applications. We also believe that in order to offer high quality video applications over the internet, cable system operators and telecommunications companies will need more storage and delivery systems capable of complex management and scheduling of video streams.
 
     Broadcast Television Companies
 
     Both domestically and internationally, broadcast television companies face a number of new challenges to their business. In digital broadcasting, changing ownership trends, new consumer alternatives (e.g., cable television, satellite television, or internet) and evolving viewership models (e.g., Personal Video Recorders (PVR), cell phones, Personal Digital Assistants (PDA), etc.) are creating a more complex competitive environment for our customers that calls for greater efficiencies and business innovation. We believe broadcast television companies are therefore turning away from their out-dated tape-based systems with robotic libraries, which are cumbersome and require high levels of maintenance and manual intervention.
 
     Some television broadcasters are using digital bandwidth to originate multiple program streams. As this application further develops, television broadcasters will require more video storage and delivery systems that can effectively manage and deliver these multiple television signals. As a result, we believe that television broadcasters will continue to automate their entire programming and advertising to reduce overall operating costs and improve reliability. We expect new opportunities to emerge for broadcasters and video on demand operators to create new business synergies that will likely require digital video storage and delivery systems.
 
SeaChange Business Segments
 
     In fiscal 2009, we realigned our business segments and financial reporting structure to better portray the Company’s strategic direction and potential areas for growth. The Company now reports its financial results within three segments: Software, Servers and Storage, and Media Services. Financial information about our business segments is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
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Year ended January 31,
2010 2009 2008
Amount      %      Amount      %      Amount      %
(in thousands, except percentages)
Revenues by segment:  
       Software $ 131,314 65 % $ 132,237   65 % $ 113,269 63 %
       Servers and Storage 50,557 25 %   53,640 27 % 48,997 27 %
       Media Services   19,794 10 % 15,959 8 %   17,627 10 %
Total $     201,665   $     201,836     $     179,893  
 

     Software
 
     In 2006, we began selling our SeaChange Axiom® On Demand software independent of our hardware and offering subscription services for the software in an effort to increase market share and enhance revenue stability through more recurring revenues. Additionally, by porting our software to other third party hardware platforms, we expect to increase our market share with opportunities at competitive vendors’ installations.
 
     We also develop, sell and support software products in the middleware and advertising categories. Our middleware and application business is focused on producing set-top box client middleware software products and end-to-end interactive television applications, and performing system integration and software customization services. Our client middleware solutions include the VODlink® Platform Suite built for and deployed on common North American cable set top boxes, and the TV Navigator™ platform deployed in Europe and Asia.
 
     Our advertising insertion software products are available for both the traditional analog environment (the way that video signals have been transmitted for the past 60 years), and for the digital environment, which provides the cable operator with a significant increase in available bandwidth, channel capacity and two-way capability. Based on currently available industry sources and our internal data, we believe our Spot System is the leading analog video insertion system in the United States in the multichannel television market for advertisements and other short-form video. Over the last several years, our customers have begun to migrate to digital video ad insertion, and we believe our digital video ad insertion system is establishing a strong market position as well. Our SeaChange AdPulse™ On Demand Advertising software platform allows operators to generate new advertising revenue from inserting ads, dynamically, in on demand content while it provides detailed tracking and reporting on views and usage of inserted ads.
 
     In September of 2009 we acquired a private software company, eventIS Group B.V. (“eventIS”), in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. eventIS is Europe’s leading provider of video on demand back-office software supporting operators in 25 countries. This software complements and extends the capabilities of our video on demand products.
 
     We expect that eventIS’s leading market position in Europe will foster increased revenue growth as VOD investments in Europe are forecasted to grow significantly over the next several years. According to SNL Kagan, there are 80 million cable television subscribers in Europe compared to 70 million in the United States. However, unlike in the U.S., digital cable penetration rates are quite low. Penetration rates in Europe are expected to rise with the increased investments in VOD products and services from European cable television providers.
 
     In February 2010, we acquired VividLogic Inc (“VividLogic”), a private California software provider. VividLogic’s products and services will allow the Company to expand its software product portfolio to participate more competitively in the middleware and home network markets. VividLogic provides applications and development services for Consumer Electronics (“CE”) manufacturers, cable television, equipment manufacturers and cable television providers. VividLogic’s software products and services focus on home networking applications and “tru2way” development. In the home networking area, VividLogic’s emphasis is on the development of software to meet the content protection requirements under the IEEE 1394 requirements. In addition, VividLogic is working with CE manufacturers and service providers to develop software to be used in next generation home media gateways. In the tru2way area, VividLogic provides products and services for CE and set top box manufacturers who are looking to migrate their hardware for tru2way capability. Tru2way is a technology software platform sponsored by the U.S. cable television industry that is expected to foster interactive television applications for consumers.
 
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     Revenue sources from the Software segment fall into two categories:
  • product revenues such as licensing, and software development for those products; and
     
  • related services such as subscriptions (annual software subscriptions for upgrades), professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, and technical support for those software products.
     Servers and Storage
 
     Combining the advantages of standards-based hardware with our patented MediaCluster® technology, our hardware products deliver high-density streaming, clustered ingest and scalable storage for video on demand, time-shifted TV, network PVR (Personal Video Recorder) applications, as well as broadcast play to air and archiving.
 
     Revenue sources for our Servers and Storage segment fall into several categories. New deployments are typically sold on a capacity basis and include one year of maintenance. As our customers add more content and more users, they return to purchase more streaming and storage capacity. The additional content usually also leads to increased usage levels by the subscribers which also translates in to add-on-sales. Recurring revenue consists of maintenance contracts after the first year.
 
     We offer several configurations of our MediaCluster video servers to meet the evolving needs of our customers for independently scalable ingest, streaming and storage.
 
     Servers and Storage segment includes:
  • product revenues from video on demand (“VOD”) and broadcast server product lines and
     
  • related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, and technical support for those products.
     Media Services
 
     Through the acquisitions of On Demand Group Limited (ODG), in fiscal 2006, and Mobix Interactive Ltd., in fiscal 2009, SeaChange expanded its media content services, consisting of content aggregation and distribution. ODG is a leader in Europe in the development and deployment of Pay TV services. This division specializes in aggregating content for video on demand and Pay-Per-View platforms, and provides marketing, promotional and production services to cable operators and telecommunications providers throughout Europe.
 
     As an example, we source, acquire, package, and market Virgin Media’s video on demand services by providing access to content from local and Hollywood studio providers in multiple formats including music, television programs and feature length movies. Through ODG, we have a content rights management system and a content preparation center for incorporating video content for VOD services from the major content suppliers around the world.
 
     Revenue from the Media Services segment is generated from customer contracts depending on the services rendered.
 
Key Products and Services
 
     SeaChange Video On Demand System
 
     We have developed and are deploying a video on demand system to cable television companies and telecommunications companies. Our video on demand system consists of:
 
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  • MediaCluster video servers that reside at various points in a broadband network system and are used to ingest, store and play or stream videos as requested;
     
  • SeaChange Axiom® On Demand video software to manage and control the system and to support integration with third-party systems and applications;
     
  • Spot Advertising Systems hardware and software and AdPulse On Demand Advertising System;
     
  • Interactive middleware that enables operators to run multiple services, including video on demand and personal video recorders on multiple platforms;
     
  • Record System, a time-shifting television application that enables broadcasted programming to be automatically encoded by broadband operators, with complete trick-mode functionality (fast-forward, pause and rewind); and
     
  • Interfaces to digital headend modulators, control systems and subscriber management systems.
     Our video on demand system allows our customers to offer interactive services such as the following to their subscribers:
  • Video on demand. This interactive service allows residential users and commercial users (e.g., hotel guests) to review lists of available movies and/or programming content, order individual movies and/or programs and view them in real-time. Users have full control over the video stream.
     
  • Subscription Video on demand. This service provides premium channel offerings, such as those offered by HBO, Showtime or Starz, in an on-demand manner, as well as on a scheduled basis. Similar to our video on demand service, our subscription video on demand service allows subscribers to review lists of available premium channel content, order individual programs and watch them at home with full video player control.
     
  • Networked Digital Video Recording. This service provides users with interactive control over broadcasted television programming, enabling viewers to watch sports, news, and other program types with full video cassette recorder and personal video recorder-like (e.g., TiVo® recorders) control over the video stream. We enable the provision of this service through our servers and software located in broadband local transmission sites known as headends. We believe this service also has the potential to accommodate new advertising techniques, such as ad replacement or limited fast-forward functionality.
     
  • Targeted and Interactive Advertising. This service supports interactive advertising or advertising where the subscriber controls the path and delivery of an advertisement, in a video on demand service and in other forms of programming that result in a dedicated communications link between the subscribers’ set top box and the video on demand system itself. This service allows purchases over the television, such as one might do with a web browser over the internet.
     
  • DVD Now™ on Demand Service. This interactive service brings DVD functionality to video on demand applications and provides a common standard for distributing and presenting video content. Our software tools and applications provide the capability to transform DVDs, including their menus and content chapter and options, into video on demand applications.
     SeaChange Axiom® On Demand video software is the end-to-end business solution for video on demand services. Software modules act in unison to manage and automate every aspect of operations – streams, subscribers, billing, network load and more. The product is built on an open architecture, meaning it can be deployed by any service provider regardless of streaming, storage or network architectures. SeaChange Axiom On Demand video software is comprised of three components:
 
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  • On Demand Services manage and deliver rich media content to a variety of consumer devices.
     
  • Personalized Applications Platform enables operators to provide subscribers with innovative services such as games and movies on demand.
     
  • Advanced Management Tools give operators the ability to reduce their costs and garner operational efficiencies through sophisticated system management tools.
     SeaChange Axiom On Demand Services consist of the essential functions that manage core on demand network resources such as servers, bandwidth and storage. Modules administer network bandwidth through session and resource management to ensure efficient content delivery. Content propagation optimizes both network usage and storage by continually monitoring demand for content, and moving content to locations where it is needed most. The Connection Manager Service software mediates client requests, establishing the shortest path between the client and the requested content. Asset Management is responsible for managing the life cycle of content stored on the system. The Asset Manager provides full visibility into the location and state of the content in the system through a browser-based graphical user interface (GUI). Additional Axiom On Demand Services include the Recording System that captures broadcast programs and publishes them as VOD content and the Axiom Content Dynamics module that automates dynamic insertion of advertisement and other content into VOD streams.
 
     SeaChange Axiom Personalized Applications software provides a broad range of on-demand applications to enhance the viewer experience.
 
     SeaChange Axiom Advance Management Tools provide engineering and operations personnel with tools that aid in the control of the system. Problem identification and resolution, data warehouse management, subscriber management and a configuration suite all help in reducing operational costs while improving overall system efficiencies.
 
     Advertising Products
 
     Our family of Spot Systems automates the complex process of advertisement and other video insertion across multiple channels and geographic zones for cable system operators and telecommunications providers. Through our embedded proprietary software, our Spot System allows cable system and telecom operators to insert local and regional advertisements and other videos into a specific time allocated by television networks such as CNN, MTV, ESPN, BET, Discovery Channel and Nickelodeon. The Spot System is capable of inserting advertising into digital and analog channels including HD and delivering targeted advertising, as well as advertising with interactive links to content on video on demand systems, as well as to other interactive advertising systems.
 
     The Spot System is an integrated solution comprised of hardware platforms, software applications, data networks and easy to use graphical interfaces. Our Spot System is designed to be installed at local transmission sites, known as headends, and advertising sales business offices. Our video insertion process consists of six steps:
  • Encoding. The process begins with our encoding software, which in real time transforms and compresses analog to digital short- and long-form video.
     
  • Storage. Our Spot System organizes, manages and stores these video streams in a disk-based video library capable of storing thousands of advertisements.
     
  • Scheduling. Our advertising management software coordinates with the traffic and billing application to determine the designated time slot, channel and geographic zone for each video stream.
     
  • Distribution. Our strategic digital video software then copies the video files from the master video library and distributes them over the operator’s data network to appropriate headends, where they are stored in video servers for future play.
     
  • Insertion. Following a network cue, our video switch module automatically inserts the video stream into the network feed (initiating the analog conversion, if necessary), where they are then seen by television viewers.
     
  • Verification. After the video streams run, our proprietary software and hardware verifies the content, accuracy, timing and placement of these video streams to facilitate proper customer billing.
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SeaChange AdPulse™ On Demand Advertising System
 
     The SeaChange AdPulse System consists of an advertising and inventory management system called the SeaChange AdPulse On Demand Ad Manager and a package of enhancements for the core VOD system called SeaChange Axiom® Content Dynamics software that provide functions tailored to the special needs of managing, propagating, playing out and tracking of ads.
 
     Key features of the AdPulse On Demand Ad Manager include:
  • Inventory Management—the ability to define advertising avails (slots) in on demand content. The inventory is managed by creating an inventory definition that specifies a content group (by program, provider, or content category) to which the inventory definition will apply, then specifying the number and placement of ad breaks and the number of spots per break for programs in that content group.
     
  • Order Entry—the ability to specify the rules by which different ad copy will be inserted into on demand content by assigning advertising copy to defined inventory.
     
  • Dynamic Ad Placement Decisions—the ability to modify a playlist at run-time to add, delete, or change ads played with assets based on defined ad placement rules.
     
  • Interior Ad Breaks – ad insertion and /or replacement at ad breaks within an on demand content stream if interior ad breaks are marked with SCTE-35 descriptors.
     
  • Operational Reporting—the ability to view and track aspects of the overall operation of the SeaChange AdPulse Manager, such as whether advertising copy required to execute an order has been received and propagated.
     
  • Business Reporting—the ability to view and track specific business aspects of the SeaChange AdPulse Manager, such as which inventory has been sold and which is unsold, a summary of orders from a specific client, etc.
     
  • Verification Reporting—the ability to track and view data about execution of orders, views of ad copy, and user action during the ad views.
     This system allows operators to generate new advertising revenue inserting ads, dynamically, in on demand content while it provides detailed tracking and reporting on views and usage of inserted ads. During 2007, we saw the first commercial deployment of our SeaChange AdPulse On Demand advertising software platform. Since then, we have had successful trials and deployments with several operators including: Virgin Media, Cox Communications, and Sunflower Broadband.
 
     SeaChange Middleware Software Products
 
     Middleware provides seamless, access across devices made by different manufacturers to content across wired and/or wireless devices. We offer two middleware software products to operators and content developers: VODlink software and TV Navigator software.
 
     SeaChange VODlink software is comprised of three software modules that work together to enhance the user experience. The three components: VODlink Platform Suite, VODlink Portal and VODlink Games help operators jump-start their VOD offerings with a collection of games, a pop-up portal to ease navigation and provide marketing of content, and a suite of tools that allow easy development and integration of custom applications.
 
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     SeaChange TV Navigator software is a platform that incorporates an optional Electronic Program Guide (EPG – the user interface) that is completely customizable, communications applications such as TV-mail, chat, ticker display and messaging, and audience measurement tools that collect and report on usage statistics.
 
     SeaChange Servers and Storage
 
     Designed for enterprise-wide video system deployments the patented SeaChange MediaCluster architecture delivers massive, independently scalable, storage, streaming and ingest capabilities. MediaCluster dramatically reduces the cost of storing and delivering video assets. We offer several configurations of the MediaCluster to meet the demands of different video delivery applications.
 
     SeaChange Flash MediaServers
 
     Our flash memory-based servers provide 100% non-volatile, diskless edge streaming, stream expansion and time-shifted TV. These servers allow operators to deploy diskless streamers at the edge locations and locate centralized storage and storage management at the head-end locations in their networks. The Flash MediaServers also reduce operational costs. Compared to traditional spinning hard disk drives, flash memory has no moving parts, therefore it is more reliable and consumes less power.
 
     SeaChange MDS MediaServers
 
     Combining the advantages of standards-based hardware with the SeaChange patented MediaCluster technology, the MDS products provide high density streaming, clustered memory ingest and scalable storage. The MDS complements our widely deployed disk-based video servers while providing independent scalable streaming, storage and memory and can be deployed as a standalone system or a streaming booster for existing systems.
 
     Broadcast and Specialty Servers
 
     Additionally, we supply special function servers based on our MediaCluster technology for the broadcast industry. Our Broadcast MediaCluster System is composed of multiple individual video servers arranged in a cluster acting as one system. This system is designed to provide high-quality digital video storage and playback for use with automation systems in broadcast television stations. This product is intended to replace on-air tape decks used to store and play back advertising, movies and other programming from video tape cart systems and, in some cases, to replace the cart systems themselves. Our Broadcast MediaCluster System is designed for customers both in larger broadcast television markets, which use station automation systems, and in smaller markets, which use control software included in the system.
 
     As with the video on demand system, our Broadcast MediaCluster System is designed to simultaneously record, encode, store to a disk and play video content using compression and decompression hardware. These products seamlessly integrate into television broadcasters’ current tape-based operations and meet the high performance requirements of television broadcasters. Our Broadcast MediaCluster System has features that enable the television broadcaster to have end-to-end functionality and reliability, including the capability to schedule programming for a week of television content.
 
Media Services
 
     The Media Services segment encompasses the business activities of the On Demand Group and Mobix Interactive, U.K. based wholly-owned subsidiaries of SeaChange. The Media Services group focuses on the acquisition, licensing, preparation, management and marketing of content as well as custom consulting services. Virgin Media in the U.K. is ODG’s largest customer. In the past two years, ODG also added the Hellenic Telecommunication Organisation (OTE), Telekom Austria, TTnet, Du Telekom, and Neuf Telecom.
 
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     ODG also has established joint ventures to provide specialized content and services. In 2005, ODG launched FilmFlex in the U.K., a joint venture with Walt Disney and Sony Pictures to provide an on demand movie service to Virgin Media. In December of 2007, ODG sold its interest in the FilmFlex joint venture to the other investors for approximately $18 million.
 
     In Germany, ODG entered into a joint venture with the TeleMunchen Gruppe, a German media company whose activities include the production and acquisition of German-language feature films, television productions and classical music programs. This joint venture has launched a pay-per-view service for Kabel Deutschland Gruppe (KDG). KDG has approximately nine million subscribers and has begun to deploy digital services. We expect to transition the pay-per-view service to a full-fledged VOD service as the digital rollout occurs. In addition to providing pay-per-view services to KDG, the joint venture also provides pay-per-view services to Unity Media and Telekom Austria. The joint venture also announced that it will be providing VOD content and services in 2010 to Kabel BW, one of Germany’s largest cable television operators.
 
     In November 2008, through ODG, we acquired Mobix Interactive Limited in the U.K. Mobix complements ODG’s television VOD services business by offering mobile VOD services to wireless network operators. Today, Mobix supports mobile subscribers for its customers 3 in the U.K. and Vodacom in South Africa.
 
     Service and Support
 
     We install, maintain and support our hardware and software products worldwide. We offer basic and advanced on-site training for customer employees. We currently provide installation, maintenance and technical support to all our customers. We offer maintenance and technical support to customers, agents and distributors of our hardware, software and systems on a 24-hour, seven-day a week basis. Generally, our systems sales include at least one year of free maintenance.
 
     A separate professional services group provides network design and architecture as well as systems integration services.
 
     Customer support centers worldwide provide 24/7 coverage. We have support centers in the U.S., the Netherlands, Philippines, China, Japan, U.K., France, Turkey and Ireland.
 
Strategy
 
     Our strategy is to be the leading provider of video solutions in the television industry. We develop, manufacture and market digital video systems and services that include the management, aggregation, licensing, storage, and distribution of video, television, gaming and advertising content. The key elements of our strategy are to:
  • Develop, Maintain and Extend Long-term Customer Relationships. We focus our product development, marketing and direct sales efforts on maintaining and extending long-term customer relationships with cable system operators, telecommunications companies and television broadcasters across the world. We have formed important relationships with customers that have grown from advertisement and other short-form video insertion to video on demand systems and other interactive television services, storage systems and streaming systems. We believe that the fundamental shift from broadcast to on demand applications and the growing emphasis on interactive technologies will continue to present opportunities for us to develop, market and support solutions to our existing customers as well as to new additional markets.
     
  • Offer Integrated Solutions. Our customers operate complex networks that require the delivery and management of video programming across multiple channels and target zones. We believe that our integrated solutions can provide advantages in cost and implementation for digital video applications while interoperating with existing and emerging third-party equipment and software. To continue to address these needs, we intend to provide and further develop, internally and with our partners, integrated applications and support services for our customers. We believe that providing complete integrated solutions has been a significant factor in our success in the advertising and video on demand markets to date.
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  • Establish and Maintain Technological Leadership. We believe our competitive position is dependent in large part on the features and performance of our systems. As a result, we focus our research and development efforts on introducing systems with improved hardware and software capabilities. We have been granted patents and have patents pending for our various technologies. We have received several awards for technological excellence, including Emmy Awards for our patented MediaCluster ® technology and for our role in the growth of video on demand. As of January 31, 2010, 41% of our employees were focused on research and product development efforts.
     
  • Provide Superior Customer Service and Support. Our products operate in customer environments where continuous operation is critical. As a result, we believe that providing a high level of service and support gives us a competitive advantage and is a differentiating factor in developing and maintaining key customer relationships. Our in-depth industry and application knowledge allows us to better understand the service needs of our customers. As of January 31, 2010, 37% of our employees were dedicated to customer service and support, including project design and implementation, maintenance, installation and training. Customers have access to service personnel via 24/7 telephone support. In addition, we believe that the acquisitions and investments that we have made in media services and in system integration and customization services have positioned us as an integral partner with our customers to ensure optimal performance of their systems.
Customers
 
     We currently sell our products primarily to cable system operators, broadcast and telecommunications companies.
 
     Our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, primarily due to the fact that the cable, movie, broadcast, and telecommunications industries in the United States are dominated by a limited number of large companies. A significant portion of our revenues across each of our segments in any given fiscal period have been derived from substantial orders placed by these large organizations. For the year ended January 31, 2010, Comcast and Virgin Media comprised 27% and 12%, respectively, of our total sales. We expect that we will continue to be dependent upon a limited number of customers for a significant portion of our revenues in future periods. As a result of this customer concentration, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by the failure of anticipated orders to materialize and by deferrals or cancellations of orders as a result of changes in customer requirements or new product announcements or introductions. In addition, the concentration of customers may cause variations in revenue, expenses and operating results on a quarterly basis due to seasonality of orders or the timing and relative size of orders received and shipped during a fiscal quarter.
 
     We do not believe that our backlog at any particular time is meaningful as an indicator of our future level of sales for any particular period. Because of the nature of our products and our use of standard components, substantially the entire backlog at the end of a quarter can be manufactured and shipped to the customer before the end of the following quarter. However, because of the requirements of particular customers these orders may not be shipped or, if shipped, the related revenues may not be recognized in the ensuing quarter. Therefore, there is no direct correlation between the backlog at the end of any quarter and our total sales for the following quarter or other periods.
 
Selling and Marketing
 
     We sell and market our products in the United States primarily through a direct sales organization and internationally through direct sales and independent agents and distributors, complemented by a coordinated marketing effort of our product marketing personnel. Direct sales activities in the United States are conducted from our Massachusetts headquarters and through sales representatives deployed across the country. We also market certain of our products to systems integrators and value-added resellers.
 
     In light of the complexity of our digital video products, we primarily employ a consultative direct sales process. Working closely with customers to understand and define their needs enables us to obtain better information regarding market requirements, enhance our expertise in our customers’ industries, and more effectively and precisely convey to customers how our solutions address the customer’s specific needs. In addition to the direct sales process, customer references and visits by potential customers to sites where our products are in place are often critical in the sales process.
 
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     We use several marketing programs focused on our targeted markets to support the sale and distribution of our products. We use exhibitions at a limited number of prominent industry trade shows and conferences and presentations at technology seminars to promote awareness of us and our products. We also publish articles in trade and technical journals and we produce promotional product literature.
 
Research and Product Development
 
     Our management believes that our success will depend to a substantial degree upon our ability to develop and introduce in a timely fashion new integrated solutions and enhancements to our existing products that meet changing customer requirements in our current and new markets. We have made, and intend to continue to make, substantial investments in product and technological development. Our direct sales and marketing groups closely monitor changes in customer needs, changes in the marketplace and emerging industry standards, and are therefore better able to focus our research and development efforts to address these evolving industry requirements.
 
     We believe that the experience of our product development personnel is an important factor in our success. We perform our research and product development activities at our headquarters and in offices in New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, California, the Netherlands, Philippines, and China.
 
Manufacturing
 
     Our manufacturing operation is located at our facility in Acton, Massachusetts. This manufacturing operation consists primarily of component and subassembly procurement, systems integration and final assembly, testing and quality control of the complete systems. We rely on independent contractors to manufacture components and subassemblies to our specifications. Each of our products undergoes testing and quality inspection at the final assembly stage.
 
Competition
 
     The markets in which we compete are characterized by intense competition, with a large number of suppliers providing different types of products to different segments of the markets. In new markets for our products, we compete principally based on price. In markets in which we have an established presence, we compete principally on the basis of the breadth of our products’ features and benefits, including the flexibility, scalability, professional quality, ease of use, reliability and cost effectiveness of our products, and our reputation and the depth of our expertise, customer service and support. While we believe that we currently compete favorably overall with respect to these factors and that our ability to provide integrated solutions to manage, store and distribute digital video differentiates us from our competitors, in the future we may not be able to continue to compete successfully with respect to these factors. In the market for long-form video products including video on demand, we compete with various companies offering video server platforms such as Concurrent Computer Corp., Arris Group Inc. (through its 2007 acquisition of C-Cor Corporation), Cisco Systems, Inc. (through its 2006 acquisition of Arroyo Video Solutions, Inc.), Motorola, Inc. (through its 2006 acquisition of Broadbus Technologies, Inc.) and Ericsson (through its 2007 acquisition of Tandberg Television). In the television broadcast market, we compete against Thomson, Omneon Video Networks, Sony Corporation and Harris Incorporated. In the digital advertisement insertion market, we generally compete with Ericsson and Arris Group Inc. We expect the competition in each of these markets to intensify in the future as existing and new competitors with significant market presence and financial resources, including computer hardware and software companies and television equipment manufacturers, enter these rapidly evolving markets.
 
     Many of our current and prospective competitors have significantly greater financial, technical, manufacturing, sales, marketing and other resources. As a result, these competitors may be able to devote greater resources to the development, promotion, sale and support of their products. Moreover, these companies may introduce additional products that are competitive with ours or enter into strategic relationships to offer complete solutions, and in the future our products may not be able to compete effectively with these products.
 
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Proprietary Rights
 
     Our success and our ability to compete are dependent, in part, upon our proprietary rights. We have been granted sixteen U.S. patents and have filed foreign patent applications related thereto for various technologies developed and used in our products. In addition, we rely on a combination of contractual rights, trademark laws, trade secrets and copyright laws to establish and protect our proprietary rights in our products. It is possible that in the future not all of these patent applications will be issued or that, if issued, the validity of these patents would not be upheld. It is also possible that the steps taken by us to protect our intellectual property will be inadequate to prevent misappropriation of our technology or that our competitors will independently develop technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our technology. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries in which our products are or may be distributed do not protect our proprietary rights to the same extent as do the laws of the United States. We have been involved in significant intellectual property litigation, and we may be a party to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights or as a result of an allegation that we infringe others’ intellectual property.
 
Employees
 
     As of January 31, 2010, we employed 1,223 persons, including 502 in research and development, 458 in customer service and support, 93 in selling and marketing, 31 in manufacturing and 139 in general and administration functions. We believe that our relations with our employees are good. None of our employees are represented by a collective bargaining agreement.
 
Geographic Information
 
     Geographic information is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
Available Information
 
     SeaChange is subject to the informational requirements pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). SeaChange files periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Such reports, proxy statements and other information may be obtained by visiting the Public Reference Room of the SEC at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549 or by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains an internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically.
 
     Financial and other information about SeaChange, including SeaChange’s Code of Ethics and Business Conduct and charters for SeaChange’s Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee, is available on our website (www.schange.com). We make available free of charge on our website our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. The information contained on our web site is not incorporated by reference into this document and should not be considered a part of this Annual Report. Our web site address is included in this document as an inactive textual reference only.
 
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ITEM 1A. Risk Factors
 
     Any statements contained in this Form 10-K that do not describe historical facts may constitute forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and are identified by words such as “may,” “will,” “could,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “seek,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “potential,” or “continue” or other comparable terms or the negative of those terms. Forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K include certain statements regarding the effect of certain accounting standards on our financial position and results of operations, the effect of certain legal claims against us, projected changes in our revenues, earnings and expenses, exchange rate sensitivity, interest rate sensitivity, liquidity, product introductions, industry changes and general market conditions. Our actual future results may differ significantly from those stated in any forward-looking statements. Any such forward-looking statements contained herein are based on current expectations, but are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. Factors that may cause such differences include, but are not limited to, the factors discussed below. Each of these factors, and others, are discussed from time to time in our filings with the SEC.
 
Our business is dependent on customers’ continued spending on video systems and services, and reductions by customers in spending adversely affect our business.
 
     Our performance is dependent on customers’ continued spending for video systems and services. Spending for these systems and services is cyclical and can be curtailed or deferred on short notice. A variety of factors affect the amount of spending, and, therefore, our sales and profits, including:
  • general economic conditions;
     
  • customer specific financial or stock market conditions;
     
  • availability and cost of capital;
     
  • governmental regulation;
     
  • demand for services;
     
  • competition from other providers of video systems and services;
     
  • acceptance of new video systems and services by our customers; and
     
  • real or perceived trends or uncertainties in these factors.
Any reduction in spending by our customers would adversely affect our business. We continue to have limited visibility into the capital spending plans of our current and prospective customers. Fluctuations in our revenue can lead to even greater fluctuations in our operating results. Our planned expense levels depend in part on our expectations of future revenue. Our planned expenses include significant investments, particularly within the research and development organization, which we believe are necessary to continue to provide innovative solutions to meet our current and prospective customers’ needs. As a result, it is difficult to forecast revenue and operating results. If our revenue and operating results are below the expectations of our investors and market analysts, it could cause a decline in the price of our common stock.
 
Our future success is dependent on the continued development of the video-on-demand market and if video-on-demand does not continue to gain broad market acceptance, our business may not continue to grow.
 
     An increasing portion of our revenue in the last year has come from sales and services related to our video-on-demand products. However, the video-on-demand market continues to develop as a commercial market, both within and outside North America, and may not gain broad market acceptance. The potential size of the video-on-demand market and the timing of its development are uncertain. The success of this market requires that broadband system operators continue to upgrade their cable networks to support digital two-way transmission service and successfully market video-on-demand and similar services to their cable television subscribers. Some cable system operators, particularly outside of North America, are still in the early stages of commercial deployment of video-on-demand service to major residential cable markets and, accordingly, to date our digital video systems have been commercially available only to a limited number of subscribers. Also, the telecommunications companies have also begun to adapt their networks to support digital two-way transmission and begun marketing video-on-demand services. If cable system operators and telecommunications companies fail to make the capital expenditures necessary to upgrade their networks or determine that broad deployment of video-on-demand services is not viable as a business proposition or if our digital video systems cannot support a substantial number of subscribers while maintaining a high level of performance, our revenues will not grow as we have planned.
 
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Our business is impacted by worldwide economic cycles, which are difficult to predict.
 
     The global economy and financial markets experienced disruption in 2009, including, among other things, extreme volatility in security prices, severely diminished liquidity and credit availability, rating downgrades of certain investments and declining valuations of others. Governments have taken historic actions intended to address extreme market conditions that include severely restricted credit. There may be a further deterioration in financial markets and confidence in major economies. We are unable to predict the likely duration and severity of the current disruptions in financial markets, credit availability, and adverse economic conditions throughout the world. These economic developments affect businesses such as ours and those of our customers and vendors in a number of ways that could result in unfavorable consequences to us. Further disruption and deterioration in economic conditions may reduce customer purchases of our products and services, thereby reducing our revenues and earnings. In addition, such adverse decline in economic conditions may, among other things, result in increased price competition for our products and services, increased risk in the collectability of our accounts receivable from our customers, increased risk in potential reserves for doubtful accounts and write-offs of accounts receivable, and higher operating costs as a percentage of revenues. In 2009 and 2010, we have taken actions to address the effects of the economic crisis, including implementing cost control and reduction measures. It is possible that we may need to take further cost control and reduction measures. We cannot predict whether these measures will be sufficient to offset certain of the negative trends that might affect our business.
 
We have taken measures to address slowdowns in the market for our products and services, which could have long-term negative effects on our business or impact our ability to adequately address a rapid increase in customer demand.
 
     We have taken measures to address slowdowns in the market for our products and services. These measures include shifting more of our operations to lower cost regions, outsourcing manufacturing processes, implementing cost reduction programs, reducing the number of our employees, and reducing planned capital expenditures and expense budgets. We cannot ensure that the measures we have taken will not impair our ability to effectively develop and market products and services, to remain competitive in the industries in which we compete, to operate effectively, to operate profitably during slowdowns or to effectively meet a rapid increase in customer demand. These measures may have long-term negative effects on our business by reducing our pool of technical talent, decreasing or slowing improvements in our products and services, making it more difficult to hire and retain talented individuals and to quickly respond to customers or competitors in an upward cycle.
 
     Because our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, the loss of or reduced demand of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
     Our customer base is highly concentrated among a limited number of large customers, and, therefore, a limited number of customers account for a significant percentage of our revenues in any year. We generally do not have written agreements that require customers to purchase fixed minimum quantities of our products. Our sales to specific customers tend to vary significantly from year to year depending upon these customers’ budgets for capital expenditures and our new product introductions. We believe that a significant amount of our revenues will continue to be derived from a limited number of large customers in the future. The loss of, or reduced demand for products or related services from, any of our major customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
     In addition, the industry has experienced consolidation among our customers which may cause delays or reductions in capital expenditure plans and/or increased competitive pricing pressures as the number of available customers decline and their relative purchasing power increases in relation to suppliers. Any of these factors could adversely affect our business.
 
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Cancellation or deferral of purchases of our products could cause our operating results to be below the expectations of the public market stock analysts who cover our stock, resulting in a decrease in the market price of our common stock.
 
     We derive a substantial portion of our revenues from purchase orders that exceed $1.0 million in value. Therefore, any significant cancellation or deferral of purchases of our products could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations in any particular quarter due to the resulting decrease in revenue and gross margin and our relatively fixed costs. In addition, to the extent significant sales occur earlier than expected, operating results for subsequent quarters may be adversely affected because our operating costs and expenses are based, in part, on our expectations of future revenues, and we may be unable to adjust spending in a timely manner to compensate for any revenue shortfall. Because of these factors, in some future quarter our operating results may be below the expectations of public market analysts and investors which may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
 
Timing of significant customer orders may cause our quarterly operating results to fluctuate, making period-to-period comparisons of our operating results less meaningful.
 
     We have experienced significant variations in the revenue, expenses and operating results from quarter to quarter and these variations are likely to continue. We believe that fluctuations in the number and size of orders being placed from quarter to quarter are principally attributable to the buying patterns and budgeting cycles of broadband system operators, including telecommunications companies, and broadcast companies, the primary buyers of the digital video-on-demand, advertising and broadcast systems, respectively. We expect that there will continue to be fluctuations in the number and value of orders received. As a result, our results of operations have in the past and likely will, at least in the near future, fluctuate in accordance with this purchasing activity making period-to-period comparisons of our operating results less meaningful. In addition, because these factors are difficult for us to forecast, our business, financial condition and results of operations for one quarter or a series of quarters may be adversely affected and below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, resulting in a decrease in the market price of our common stock.
 
Due to the lengthy sales cycle involved in the sale of our products, our quarterly results may vary and should not be relied on as an indication of future performance.
 
     Digital video-on-demand, advertising, movie and broadcast products are relatively complex and their purchase generally involve a significant commitment of capital, with attendant delays frequently associated with large capital expenditures and implementation procedures within an organization. Moreover, the purchase of these products typically requires coordination and agreement among a potential customer’s corporate headquarters and its regional and local operations. For these and other reasons, the sales cycle associated with the purchase of our digital video-on-demand, advertising, movie and broadcast products is typically lengthy and subject to a number of significant risks, including customers’ budgetary constraints and internal acceptance reviews, over which we have little or no control. Based upon all of the foregoing, we believe that our quarterly revenues and operating results are likely to vary significantly in the future, that period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and that these comparisons should not be relied upon as indications of future performance.
 
If there were a decline in demand or average selling prices for our products, including our Video-On-Demand Systems and Advertising Systems, our revenues and operating results would be materially affected.
 
     We expect our VOD and advertising products to continue to account for a significant portion of our revenues. Accordingly, a decline in demand or average selling prices for these products, whether as a result of new product introductions by others, price competition, technological change, inability to enhance the products in a timely fashion, or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
If we are unable to manage our growth and the related expansion in our operations effectively, our business may be harmed through a diminished ability to monitor and control effectively our operations, and a decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees.
 
     Our ability to successfully offer new products and services and implement our business plan in a rapidly evolving market requires effective planning and management. We are also continuing to transition towards greater reliance on our video-on-demand products and services for an increased portion of our total revenue. In light of the growing complexities in managing our expanding portfolio of products and services, our anticipated future operations will continue to strain our operational and administrative resources. To manage future growth effectively, we must continue to improve our operational controls and internal controls over financial reporting, and to integrate the businesses we have acquired and our new personnel and to manage our expanding international operations. A failure to manage our growth may harm our business through a decreased ability to monitor and control effectively our operations, and a decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees upon which our business is dependent.
 
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     Because our business is susceptible to risks associated with international operations, we may not be able to maintain or increase international sales of our products, and we may not realize the full amount of the anticipated savings in connection with our continued trend towards the manufacture and assembly of our products outside of North America and EMEA.
 
     Our international operations are expected to continue to account for a significant portion of our business in the future. However, in the future we may be unable to maintain or increase international sales of our products and services. Our international operations are subject to a variety of risks, including:
  • difficulties in establishing and managing international distribution channels;
     
  • difficulties in selling, servicing and supporting overseas products and in translating products into foreign languages;
     
  • the uncertainty of laws and enforcement in certain countries relating to the protection of intellectual property;
     
  • multiple and possibly overlapping tax structures;
     
  • negative tax consequences such as withholding taxes and employer payroll taxes;
     
  • changes in labor laws and regulations affecting our ability to hire and retain employees; and
     
  • economic or political changes in international markets.
We are exposed to fluctuations in currency exchange rates that could negatively impact our financial results and cash flows.
 
     To date, most of our revenues have been denominated in U.S. dollars, while a significant portion of our international expenses are incurred in the local currencies of countries in which we operate. Because a portion of our business is conducted outside the United States and the post-closing-payments to the former shareholders of eventIS Group B.V. are partially denominated in Euros, we face exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve, and they could have a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flows. An increase in the value of the dollar could increase the real cost to our customers of our products in those markets outside the United States where we often sell in dollars, and a weakened dollar could increase local currency operating costs.
 
Currency exchange rate fluctuations could reduce our overall profits.
 
     With the exception of On Demand Group (and its wholly-owned subsidiaries), eventIS Group B.V. and SeaChange B.V. the United States dollar is the functional currency for our international subsidiaries; therefore, all foreign translation currency gains and losses are included in our Consolidated Statements of Operations. In preparing our consolidated financial statements, certain financial information is required to be translated from foreign currencies to the United States dollar using either the spot rate or the weighted-average exchange rate. If the United States dollar changes relative to applicable local currencies, there is a risk our reported sales, operating expenses, and net income could significantly fluctuate. We are not able to predict the degree of exchange rate fluctuations, nor can we estimate the effect any future fluctuations may have upon our future operations.
 
Our ability to compete could be jeopardized if we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights from third-party challenges.
 
     Our success and ability to compete depends upon our ability to protect our proprietary technology that is incorporated into our products. We rely on a combination of patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws and restrictions on disclosure to protect our intellectual property rights. Although we have issued patents, we cannot assure that any additional patents will be issued or that the issued patents will not be invalidated. We also enter into confidentiality or license agreements with our employees, consultants and corporate partners, and control access to and distribution of our software, documentation and other proprietary information. Despite these precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise misappropriate and use our products or technology without authorization, particularly in foreign countries where the laws may not protect our proprietary rights as fully as in the United States. We may need to resort to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. If competitors are able to use our technology, our ability to compete effectively could be harmed.
 
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We have been and in the future could become subject to litigation regarding intellectual property rights, which could seriously harm our business and require us to incur significant legal costs to defend our intellectual property rights.
 
     The industry in which we operate is characterized by vigorous protection and pursuit of intellectual property rights or positions, which on occasion, have resulted in significant and often protracted litigation. We have from time to time received, and may in the future receive, communications from third parties asserting infringements on patent or other intellectual property rights covering our products or processes. We have been involved in significant intellectual property litigation, and we may be a party to litigation in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights or as a result of an allegation that we infringe others’ intellectual property. Any parties asserting that our products infringe upon their proprietary rights would force us to defend ourselves and possibly our customers or manufacturers against the alleged infringement, as many of our commercial agreements require us to defend and/or indemnify the other party against intellectual property infringement claims brought by a third party with respect to our products. These claims and any resulting lawsuit, if successful, could subject us to significant liability for damages and invalidation of our proprietary rights. This possibility of multiple damages serves to increase the incentive for plaintiffs to bring such litigation. In addition, these lawsuits, regardless of their success, would likely be time-consuming and expensive to resolve and would divert management time and attention away from our operations.
 
     Although we carry general liability insurance, our insurance may not cover potential claims of this type or may not be adequate to indemnify us for all liability that may be imposed. In addition, any potential intellectual property litigation also could force us to stop selling, incorporating or using the products that use the infringed intellectual property or obtain from the owner of the infringed intellectual property right a license to sell or use the relevant technology, although this license may not be available on reasonable terms, or at all, or redesign those products that use the infringed intellectual property. If we are forced to take any of the foregoing actions, our business may be seriously harmed.
 
If content providers, such as movie studios, limit the scope of content licensed for use in the digital video-on-demand market, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be negatively affected because the potential market for our products would be more limited than we currently believe and have communicated to the financial markets.
 
     The success of the video-on-demand market is contingent on content providers, such as movie studios, permitting their content to be licensed for use in this market. Content providers may, due to concerns regarding either or both marketing and illegal duplication of the content, limit the extent to which they provide content to the video-on-demand market. A limitation of content for the video-on-demand market would indirectly limit the market for our video-on-demand system which is used in connection with that market.
 
If we are unable to successfully introduce new products or enhancements to existing products, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected by a decrease in sales of our products.
 
     Because our business plan is based on technological development of new products and enhancements to our existing products, our future success is dependent on our successful introduction of these new products and enhancements. In the future we may experience difficulties that could delay or prevent the successful development, introduction and marketing of these and other new products and enhancements, or find that our new products and enhancements do not adequately meet the requirements of the marketplace or achieve market acceptance. Announcements of currently planned or other new product offerings may cause customers to defer purchasing our existing products. Moreover, despite testing by us and by current and potential customers, errors or failures may be found in our products, and, even if discovered, may not be successfully corrected in a timely manner. These errors or failures could cause delays in product introductions and shipments, or require design modifications that could adversely affect our competitive position. Our inability to develop new products or enhancements on a timely basis or the failure of these new products or enhancements to achieve market acceptance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
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Because we purchase certain material components used in manufacturing our products from sole suppliers and we use a limited number of third party manufacturers to manufacture our products, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by a failure of these suppliers or manufacturers.
 
     Certain key components of our products are currently purchased from a sole supplier, including computer chassis, switching gear, an interface controller video transmission board, encoder and decoder hardware, and operating system and applications software. We have in the past experienced quality control problems, where products did not meet specifications or were damaged in shipping, and delays in the receipt of these components. These problems were generally of short duration and did not have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. However, we may in the future experience similar types of problems which could be more severe or more prolonged. While we believe that there are alternative suppliers available for these components, we believe that the procurement of these components from alternative suppliers could take up to a year. In addition, these alternative components may not be functionally equivalent or may be unavailable on a timely basis or on similar terms. The inability to obtain sufficient key components as required, or to develop alternative sources if and as required in the future, could result in delays or reductions in product shipments which, in turn, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
     In addition, we rely on a limited number of third parties who manufacture certain components used in our products. While to date there has been suitable third party manufacturing capacity readily available at acceptable quality levels, in the future there may not be manufacturers that are able to meet our future volume or quality requirements at a price that is favorable to us. Any financial, operational, production or quality assurance difficulties experienced by these third party manufacturers that result in a reduction or interruption in supply to us could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
If we are not able to obtain necessary licenses or distribution rights for third-party technology at acceptable prices, or at all, our products could become obsolete or we may not be able to deliver certain product offerings.
 
     We have incorporated third-party licensed technology into our current products and our product lines. From time to time, we may be required to license additional technology from third parties to develop new products or product enhancements or to provide specific solutions. Third-party licenses may not be available or continue to be available to us on commercially reasonable terms. The inability to maintain or re-license any third-party licenses required in our current products or to obtain any new third-party licenses necessary to develop new products and product enhancements or provide specific solutions could require us to obtain substitute technology of lower quality or performance standards or at greater cost. Such inabilities could delay or prevent us from making these products or enhancements or providing specific solutions, which could seriously harm the competitiveness of our products.
 
If we are unable to successfully compete in our marketplace, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected.
 
     We currently compete against both computer companies offering video server platforms and more traditional analog video playback systems. In the digital advertisement insertion market, we compete against suppliers of both analog tape-based and digital systems. In addition, a number of well-funded companies have been discussing broadband internet VOD services for home television viewing. If these products are developed, they may be more cost effective than our VOD solutions, which could result in cable system operators and telecommunications companies discontinuing purchases of our on-demand products.
 
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     Due to the rapidly evolving markets in which we compete, additional competitors with significant market presence and financial resources, including computer hardware and software companies and television equipment manufacturers, may enter those markets, thereby further intensifying competition. Increased competition could result in price reductions and loss of market share which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Many of our current and potential competitors have greater financial, selling and marketing, technical and other resources than we do. Moreover, our competitors may also foresee the course of market developments more accurately than we. Although we believe that we have certain technological and other advantages over our competitors, realizing and maintaining these advantages will require a continued high level of investment by us in research and product development, marketing and customer service and support. In the future we may not have sufficient resources to continue to make these investments or to make the technological advances necessary to compete successfully with our existing competitors or with new competitors.
 
     If we are unable to compete effectively, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results would be materially adversely affected because of the difference in our operating results from the assumptions on which our business model is based.
 
If we fail to respond to rapidly changing technologies related to digital video, our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially adversely affected because the competitive advantage of our products relative to those of our competitors would decrease.
 
     The markets for our products are characterized by rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards and frequent new product introductions and enhancements. Future technological advances in the television and video industries may result in the availability of new products or services that could compete with the solutions provided by us or reduce the cost of existing products or services, any of which could enable our existing or potential customers to fulfill their video needs better and more cost efficiently than with our products. Our future success will depend on our ability to enhance our existing digital video products, including the development of new applications for our technology, and to develop and introduce new products to meet and adapt to changing customer requirements and emerging technologies. In the future, we may not be successful in enhancing our digital video products or developing, manufacturing and marketing new products which satisfy customer needs or achieve market acceptance. In addition, there may be services, products or technologies developed by others that render our products or technologies uncompetitive, unmarketable or obsolete, or announcements of currently planned or other new product offerings either by us or our competitors that cause customers to defer or fail to purchase our existing solutions.
 
Our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by the performance of the companies in which we have made and may in the future make equity investments.
 
     We have made non-controlling equity investments in complementary companies, including On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, Casa Systems, Inc., Minerva Networks, Inc. and InSite One, Inc., and we may in the future make additional investments in these and/or other companies. These investments may require additional capital and may not generate the expected rate of return that we believed possible at the time of making the investment. This may adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. Also, investments in development-stage companies may generate other than temporary declines in fair value of our investment that would result in impairment charges.
 
We may not fully realize the benefits of our acquisitions of eventIS Group B.V or VividLogic, Inc., and these and future acquisitions may be difficult to integrate, disrupt our business, dilute stockholder value or divert management attention.
 
     As part of our business strategy, we have acquired and may in the future seek to acquire or invest in new businesses, products or technologies that we believe could complement or expand our business, augment our market coverage, enhance our technical capabilities or otherwise offer growth opportunities. Acquisitions, including our acquisitions of eventIS Group B.V. and VividLogic, Inc. could create risks for us, including:
  • difficulties in assimilation of acquired personnel, operations, technologies or products which may affect our ability to develop new products and services and compete in our rapidly changing marketplace due to a resulting decrease in the quality of work and innovation of our employees upon which our business is dependent; and
     
  • adverse effects on our existing business relationships with suppliers and customers, which may be of particular importance to our business because we sell our products to a limited number of large customers, we purchase certain components used in manufacturing our products from sole suppliers and we use a limited number of third party manufacturers to manufacture our product.
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     In addition, if we consummate acquisitions through an exchange of our securities, our existing stockholders could suffer significant dilution. Acquisitions, even if successfully completed, may not generate any additional revenue or provide any benefit to our business.
 
We may make future acquisitions or enter into joint ventures that are not successful, which could seriously harm our business.
 
     Historically, we have acquired technology or businesses to supplement and expand our product offerings. In the future, we could acquire additional products, technologies or businesses, or enter into joint venture arrangements, for the purpose of complementing or expanding our business as occurred with VividLogic Inc. in fiscal 2011, eventIS Group B.V. in fiscal 2010, Mobix Interactive Ltd. in fiscal 2009 and On Demand Deutschland GMBH in fiscal 2007. Negotiation of potential acquisitions or joint ventures and our integration of acquired products, technologies or businesses could divert management’s time and resources. Future acquisitions could cause us to issue equity securities that would dilute existing stockholders, incur contingent liabilities, amortize intangible assets, or write off in-process research and development and other acquisition-related expenses that could have a material adverse affect on our business, results of operations, cash flow and financial condition. We may not be able to properly integrate acquired products, technologies or businesses with our existing products and operations, train, retain and motivate personnel from the acquired businesses, or combine potentially different corporate cultures. Failure to do so could deprive us of the intended benefits of those acquisitions. In addition, we may be required to write-off acquired research and development if further development of purchased technology becomes unfeasible, which may adversely affect our business, results of operations, cash flow and financial condition.
 
If our goodwill or intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.
 
     Under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, we review our intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Goodwill is required to be tested for impairment at least annually. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our goodwill or other intangible assets may not be recoverable include declines in our stock price and market capitalization, or future cash flows projections. Our valuation methodology for assessing impairment requires management to make judgments and assumptions based on projections of future operating performance. We operate in highly competitive environments and projections of future operating results and cash flows may vary significantly from actual results. We may be required to record a significant noncash charge to earnings in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or other intangible assets is determined.
 
We may experience risks in our investments due to changes in the market, which could adversely affect the value or liquidity of our investments.
 
     We maintain a portfolio of cash equivalents and short-term and long-term investments in a variety of securities which may include commercial paper, certificates of deposit, money market funds and government debt securities. These available-for-sale investments are subject to interest rate risk and may decline in value if market interest rates increase. These investments are subject to general credit, liquidity, market and interest rate risks. As a result, we may experience a reduction in value or loss of liquidity of our investments. In addition, should any investment cease paying or reduce the amount of interest paid to us, our interest income would suffer. These market risks associated with our investment portfolio may have a negative adverse effect on our results of operations, liquidity and financial condition.
 
The success of our business model could be influenced by changes in the regulatory environment, such as changes that either would limit capital expenditures by television, cable or telecommunications operators or reverse the trend towards deregulation in the industries in which we compete.
 
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     The telecommunications and television industries are subject to extensive regulation which may limit the growth of our business, both in the United States and other countries. The growth of our business internationally is dependent in part on deregulation of the telecommunications industry abroad similar to that which has occurred in the United States and the timing and magnitude of which is uncertain. Broadband system operators are subject to extensive government regulation by the Federal Communications Commission and other federal and state regulatory agencies. These regulations could have the effect of limiting capital expenditures by broadband system operators and thus could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The enactment by federal, state or international governments of new laws or regulations, changes in the interpretation of existing regulations or a reversal of the trend toward deregulation in these industries could adversely affect our customers, and thereby materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
We may not be able to hire and retain highly skilled employees, particularly which could affect our ability to compete effectively because our business is technology-based.
 
     Our success depends to a significant degree upon the continued contributions of our key personnel, many of whom would be difficult to replace. We believe that our future success will also depend in large part upon our ability to attract and retain highly skilled managerial, engineering, customer service, selling and marketing, finance, administrative and manufacturing personnel, as our business is technology-based. Because competition for these personnel is intense, we may not be able to attract and retain qualified personnel in the future. The loss of the services of any of the key personnel, the inability to attract or retain qualified personnel in the future or delays in hiring required personnel, particularly software engineers and sales personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations because our business is technology-based.
 
We may have additional tax liabilities.
 
     We are subject to income taxes in both the United States and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of our business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. We are regularly under audit by tax authorities. Although we believe our tax estimates are reasonable, the final determination of tax audits and any related litigation could be materially different from our historical income tax provisions and accruals. The results of an audit or litigation could have a material effect on our income tax provision, net income, or cash flows in the period or periods for which that determination is made.
 
     In addition, we are subject to sales, use and similar taxes in many countries, jurisdictions and provinces, including those states in the United States where we maintain a physical presence or have a substantial nexus. These taxing regimes are complex. For example, in the United States, each state and local taxing authority has its own interpretation of what constitutes a sufficient physical presence or nexus to require the collection and remittance of these taxes. Similarly, each state and local taxing authority has its own rules regarding the applicability of sales tax by customer or product type.
 
System errors, failures, or interruptions could cause delays in shipments, require design modifications or replacements which may have a negative impact on our business and damage our reputation and customer relationships.
 
     System errors or failures may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Despite our testing and testing by current and potential customers, not all errors or failures may be found in our products or, if discovered, successfully corrected in a timely manner. These errors or failures could cause delays in product introductions and shipments or require design modifications that could adversely affect our competitive position. Further, some errors may not be detected until the systems are deployed. In such a case, we may have to undertake major replacement programs to correct the problem. Our reputation may also suffer if our customers view our products as unreliable, whether based on actual or perceived errors or failures in our products.
 
     Further, a defect, error or performance problem with our on-demand systems could cause our customers’ VOD offerings to fail for a period of time or be degraded. Any such failure would cause customer service and public relations problems for our customers. As a result, any failure of our customers’ systems caused by our technology, including the failure of third party technology incorporated therein or therewith, could result in delayed or lost revenue due to adverse customer reaction, negative publicity regarding us and our products and services and claims for substantial damages against us, regardless of our responsibility for such failure. Any claim could be expensive and require us to spend a significant amount of resources. In circumstances where third party technology incorporated with or in our systems includes a defect, error or performance problem or fails for any reason, we may have to replace such third party technology at our expense and be responsible to our customers for their corresponding claims. Such replacements or claims could be expensive and could require us to spend a significant amount of resources.
 
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Our stock price may be volatile.
 
     Historically, the market for technology stocks has been extremely volatile. Our common stock has experienced, and may continue to experience, substantial price volatility. The occurrence of any one or more of the factors noted above could cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate. In addition, during 2008 and 2009 the stock market in general, and the NASDAQ Stock Market and technology companies in particular, have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of such companies. These broad market and industry factors may materially adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against such companies.
 
Any weaknesses identified in our system of internal controls by us and our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 could have an adverse effect on our business.
 
     Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires that companies evaluate and report on their systems of internal control over financial reporting. In addition, our independent registered public accounting firm must report on its evaluation of those controls. In future periods, we may identify deficiencies, including as a result of the loss of the services of one or more of our key personnel, in our system of internal controls over financial reporting that may require remediation. There can be no assurances that any such future deficiencies identified may not be significant deficiencies or material weaknesses that would be required to be reported in future periods.
 
ITEM 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
 
     None
 
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ITEM 2. Properties
 
      Lease/                      
Location Own Principal Use Segment Square
Acton, Massachusetts   Own Corporate Headquarters, video software engineering
and manufacturing
Software, Servers and Storage 1
Greenville, New Hampshire Own Video Storage engineering, logistics
and services
Servers and Storage
Greenville, New Hampshire Lease Video Servers and broadcast
product engineering
Servers and Storage
Fort Washington, Pennsylvania Lease Software Development, digital video
and interactive television
Software
London, United Kingdom Own ODG head corporate offices and
video content processing services
Media Services

     In addition, we also lease research and development and/or sales and support offices in Illinois, Nevada, California, France, Ireland, Singapore, Germany, Japan, India, Turkey, Philippines, UK, Russia, Mexico, the Netherlands, and China. We believe that existing facilities are adequate to meet our foreseeable requirements.
 
ITEM 3. Legal Proceedings
 
     On July 31, 2009, Arris Corporation (“Arris”) filed a contempt motion in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware against SeaChange International relating to U.S. Patent No 5,805,804 (the “804 patent”), a patent owned by Arris. In its motion, Arris is seeking further patent royalties and the enforcement of the permanent injunction entered by the Court on April 6, 2006 against certain SeaChange products. On August 3, 2009, SeaChange filed a complaint seeking a declaratory judgment from the Court that its products do not infringe the ‘804 patent and asserting certain equitable defenses. SeaChange also filed a motion to consolidate the Arris contempt motion with the declaratory judgment action and requested a status conference on SeaChange’s declaratory judgment action. On August 25, 2009, Arris filed 1) an answer to SeaChange’s complaint that included a counterclaim of patent infringement under the ‘804 patent; and 2) a motion to stay the declaratory judgment action until the resolution of the contempt motion. On January 13, 2010 the parties filed proposed scheduling orders for SeaChange’s declaratory judgment action. The Court has not yet entered a schedule in either action. SeaChange believes that Arris’ contempt motion is without merit, and that SeaChange products do not infringe the remaining claims under the ‘804 patent.
 
     SeaChange enters into agreements in the ordinary course of business with customers, resellers, distributors, integrators and suppliers. Most of these agreements require SeaChange to defend and/or indemnify the other party against intellectual property infringement claims brought by a third party with respect to SeaChange’s products. From time to time, SeaChange also indemnifies customers and business partners for damages, losses and liabilities they may suffer or incur relating to personal injury, personal property damage, product liability, and environmental claims relating to the use of SeaChange’s products and services or resulting from the acts or omissions of SeaChange, its employees, authorized agents or subcontractors. For example, SeaChange has received requests from several of its customers for indemnification of patent litigation claims asserted by Acacia Media Technologies, USA Video Technology Corporation, Multimedia Patent Trust, Microsoft Corporation and VTran Media Technologies. Management performed an analysis of these requests, evaluating whether any potential losses were probable and estimable.
 
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PART II
 
ITEM 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters
 
Market Information
 
     Our common stock (symbol, “SEAC”) began trading on NASDAQ on November 5, 1996 and currently trades on the Nasdaq Global Select Market.
 
     On March 25, 2010, the last reported sale price of our common stock on NASDAQ was $7.37 per share and there were approximately 132 holders of record of our common stock. We believe that the number of beneficial holders of our common stock exceeds 5,683.
 
     The following table sets forth the quarterly high and low closing sales prices per share reported on NASDAQ for our last two fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009.
 
  Fiscal Year 2010 Fiscal Year 2009
High       Low       High       Low
Three Month Period Ended:              
              First Quarter $      6.81 $      4.32 $      7.48 $      5.50
              Second Quarter 9.23 6.06 8.32 6.60
              Third Quarter 9.85 6.77 9.70 6.46
              Fourth Quarter 6.97 5.50 8.17 5.92

Dividend Policy
 
     We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock, since inception, and do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings for use in operations and to finance the expansion of our business.
 
Equity Compensation Plan Information
 
     The following table provides information about the common stock that may be issued upon the exercise of options, warrants and rights under all of SeaChange’s existing equity compensation plans as of January 31, 2010, including the Amended and Restated 2005 Equity Compensation Incentive Plan, the Amended and Restated 1995 Stock Option Plan, the 1996 Non-Employee Director Stock Option Plan and the Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan.
 
                    Number of securities
remaining available
Weighted- for future issuance
Number of securities average exercise under equity
to be issued upon price of compensation plans
exercise of outstanding outstanding (excluding securities
options, warrants and options, warrants reflected
Plan category rights and rights in column (a))
(a) (b) (c)
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders(1) 3,934,973 (2) $ 15.41 (4) 2,202,596 (3)

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____________________
 
(1)       Consists of the Amended and Restated 2005 Equity Compensation Incentive Plan, the Amended and Restated 1995 Stock Option Plan, the 1996 Non-Employee Director Stock Option Plan and the Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan.
 
(2) Excludes the shares to be issued for the period ended May 31, 2009 under the Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, because the number of shares to be issued upon exercise of currently outstanding options there under cannot be determined, as it will be determined on May 31, 2010, the last day of the payment period, and will be for a maximum of 1,125 shares per eligible participant.
 
(3) As of January 31, 2010, 2,202,596 shares remained available for issuance under the Amended and Restated 2005 Equity Compensation Incentive Plan and no shares remained available for grant under the Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan.
 
(4) Excludes the weighted average exercise price for shares to be issued under the Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as amended, because the weighted average exercise price of currently outstanding options there under cannot be determined, as it will be equal to 85% of the lower of the average market price of the common stock on December 1, 2009 and May 28, 2010, the first and last business day of the applicable payment period.
 
Repurchase of our Equity Securities
 
     On March 11, 2009, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $20 million of SeaChange’s common stock, par value $.01 per share, through a share repurchase program. As authorized by the program, shares were purchased in the open market or through privately negotiated transactions in a manner consistent with applicable securities laws and regulations, including pursuant to a Rule 10b5-1 plan maintained by the Company.
 
PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Period Total Number of Shares Average Price Paid per Total Number of Shares Maximum Number
(or Units) Purchased Share (Or Units) (1) (Or Units) Purchased as (or Approximate
Part of Publicly Announced Dollar Value) of
Plans or Programs Shares (Or Units) that
May Yet Be
Purchased Under the
Plans or Programs
November 1, 2009 to
November 30, 2009 - $ - - $ 18,279,693
December 1, 2009 to
December 31, 2009 175,000 5.99 175,000 17,231,687
January 1, 2010 to
January 31, 2010 - - - 17,231,687
Total 175,000 $ 5.99 175,000 $ 17,231,687

     The repurchase program terminated on January 31, 2010. During the three months ended January 31, 2010, the Company repurchased 175,000 shares at a cost of $1.0 million. During the year ended January 31, 2010, the Company repurchased 473,415 shares at a cost of $2.8 million. The Company did not repurchase any shares from its management or other insiders.
 
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STOCK PERFORMANCE GRAPH
 
     The following graph compares the change in the cumulative total stockholder return on SeaChange’s common stock during the period from the close of trading on January 31, 2005 through January 31, 2010, with the cumulative total return on the Center for Research in Securities Prices (“CRSP”) Index for the Nasdaq Stock Market (U.S. Companies) and a SIC Code Index based on SeaChange’s SIC Code. The comparison assumes $100 was invested on January 31, 2005 in SeaChange’s common stock at the $16.42 closing price on January 31, 2005 and in each of the foregoing indices and assumes reinvestment of dividends, if any.
 
     The following graph is not “soliciting material,” is not deemed filed with the SEC and is not to be incorporated by reference in any filing of SeaChange under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filing. The stock price performance shown on the following graph is not necessarily indicative of future price performance. Information used on the graph was obtained from a third party provider, a source believed to be reliable, but SeaChange is not responsible for any errors or omissions in such information.
 
 
Notes:
 
      A.       The lines represent monthly index levels derived from compounded daily returns that include all dividends.
 
B. If the monthly interval, based on the fiscal year-end, is not a trading day, the preceding trading day is used.
 
C. The Index level for all series was set to 100 on January 31, 2005.
 
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ITEM 6. Selected Financial Data
 
     The following consolidated selected financial data should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The selected financial data for the years ended January 31, 2008, 2007 and 2006 have been recast to reflect the reclassification of foreign currency gain (loss) from operating expenses to other income (expense), net below operating income.
 
Year ended January 31,
2010       2009       2008       2007       2006
(in thousands, except per share data)
Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:
Revenues:
              Products $ 101,941 $ 117,372 $ 105,769 $ 95,000 $ 73,516
              Services 99,724 84,464 74,124 66,334 52,748
                     Total revenues 201,665 201,836 179,893 161,334 126,264
Costs of revenues:
              Products 38,961 46,533 52,464 48,334 45,555
              Services 59,451 52,007 46,465 37,189 28,315
                     Total cost of revenue 98,412 98,540 98,929 85,523 73,870
              Gross profit 103,253 103,296 80,964 75,811 52,394
Operating expenses:
              Research and development 50,664 43,042 42,699 40,917 34,475
              Selling and marketing 25,842 27,506 23,073 22,383 18,681
              General and administrative 21,719 20,979 20,240 18,873 13,915
              Amortization of intangibles 2,826 1,575 2,952 5,664 2,201
                     Total operating expenses 101,051 93,102 88,964 87,837 69,272
              Income (loss) from operations 2,202 10,194 (8,000 ) (12,026 ) (16,878 )
Interest income, net 607 2,050 1,927 1,355 2,038
Other (expense), net (462 ) (925 ) (43 ) (320 ) (339 )
Impairment on investment in affiliate - - - (150 ) -
Gain on sale of investment in affiliate - - 10,031 - -
Income (loss) before income taxes and equity income
       (loss) in earnings of affiliates 2,347 11,319 3,915 (11,141 ) (15,179 )
Income tax expense (benefit) 371 575 2,156 (1,632 ) (2,941 )
Equity (loss) income in earnings of affiliate, net of tax (653 ) (770 ) 1,143 1,272 39
              Net income (loss) $ 1,323 $ 9,974 $ 2,902 $ (8,237 ) $ (12,199 )
Earnings (loss) per share:
              Basic $ 0.04 $ 0.32 $ 0.10 $ (0.29 ) $ (0.43 )
              Diluted $ 0.04 $ 0.32 $ 0.10 $ (0.29 ) $ (0.43 )
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data (as of January 31):
              Working capital $ 60,887 $ 89,549 $ 88,344 $ 57,820 $ 45,759
              Total assets 267,147 233,983 217,896 199,296 207,797
              Deferred revenue 46,793 32,974 19,103 21,806 20,045
              Long-term liabilities 15,808 3,745 3,391 1,121 1,353
              Total liabilities 89,225 61,747 52,494 42,876 54,053
              Total stockholders’ equity      177,922      172,236      165,402      156,420      153,744

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ITEM 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
     You should read the following discussion and analysis together with our consolidated financial statements, related notes and other financial information appearing elsewhere in this report. In addition to historical information, the following discussion and other parts of this report contain forward-looking information that involves risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated by such forward-looking information due to a number of factors including risks discussed in Item 1A. “Risk Factors,” and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These risks could cause our actual results to differ materially from any future performance suggested below.
 
Overview
 
     We are a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of digital video systems and services including, the aggregation, licensing, storage, management and distribution of video, television programming, and advertising content to cable system operators, telecommunications companies and broadcast television companies.
 
     On November 19, 2008, On Demand Group (“ODG”), a subsidiary of SeaChange, acquired all the outstanding capital stock of Mobix Interactive Limited (“Mobix”) a London, England based company that provides software and content services related to the deployment of mobile video services for wireless network operators. Under the terms of the Share Purchase Agreement, ODG paid the shareholders of Mobix $3.0 million in cash. On March 16, 2009, ODG paid $700,000 upon achieving one of the performance goals within the share purchase agreement. In addition, on September 16, 2009, the Company and the former shareholders of Mobix amended the original share purchase agreement to provide for the satisfaction of any future contingent consideration with a payment of $1.8 million.
 
     On September 1, 2009, the Company completed its acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. (”eventIS”). eventIS, based in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, provides video on demand (“VOD”) and linear broadcast software and related services to cable television and telecommunications companies primarily in Europe. The Company acquired eventIS to expand its VOD solutions into the European market. At the closing, the Company made a cash payment to the former shareholder of eventIS of $34.4 million plus $2.2 million based on an estimated working capital adjustment in accordance with the eventIS Share Purchase Agreement. In addition, in January 2010 the Company made a payment of $395,000 for final settlement of the working capital adjustment. On each of the first, second and third anniversaries of the closing date, the Company is obligated to make additional fixed payments of deferred purchase price under the eventIS Share Purchase Agreement (the “Deferred Fixed Purchase Price Payments”), each such payment to be in an aggregate amount of $2.8 million with $1.7 million payable in cash and $1.1 million payable by the issuance of restricted shares of SeaChange common stock, which will vest in equal installments over three years starting on the first anniversary of the date of issuance. Under the earnout provisions of the eventIS Share Purchase Agreement, if certain performance goals are met over each of the three periods ending January 31, 2013, the Company will be obligated to make additional cash payments to the former shareholder of eventIS. Acquisition-related costs recognized include legal, accounting, valuation and other professional services of $1.0 million for fiscal 2010. The transaction costs were expensed and recorded in general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations.
 
     On February 1, 2010, the Company completed its acquisition of VividLogic, Inc. (”VividLogic”). VividLogic, based in Fremont, California, provides in-home infrastructure software for high definition televisions, home gateways, and set-top boxes to cable television service providers, set-top box manufacturers and consumer electronics (CE) suppliers. The Company acquired VividLogic to expand its in home solutions. At the closing, the Company made a cash payment of $12.0 million, of which $1.2 million was deposited in escrow with respect to certain indemnification matters. In addition, VividLogic shareholders are entitled to $8.5 million in cash from working capital at the time of the closing. Of this amount $3.5 million was paid at closing. Of the balance, $1.5 million will be paid on May 1, 2010 and August 1, 2010 and $2 million will be paid on the one year anniversary of the closing. Fixed deferred cash payments of $1.0 million will be paid on February 1, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Under the earnout provisions of the purchase agreement, the Company will be obligated to make additional payments based upon the operating results of VividLogic over the three one-year periods following the closing. Acquisition-related costs recognized include legal, accounting, valuation and other professional services of $400,000 for fiscal 2010. The transaction costs were expensed and recorded in general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statement of Operations.
 
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     During the first quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company initiated actions to lower its cost structure as it strives to generate increased profitability for this fiscal year. The first quarter of fiscal 2011 will include pre-tax restructuring charges to its income statement totaling approximately $1.7 million related to the termination of approximately 47 employees.
 
     Until the end of fiscal 2008, the Company was managed and operated as three segments, Broadcast, Broadband and Services. In its first quarter of fiscal 2009, the Company realigned its previously reported segments into three new reporting segments: Software, Servers and Storage, and Media Services as segments defined by the authoritative accounting guidance. The Company believes this reorganization better reflects the increasing importance and magnitude of its software products and services as well as the scale of its ODG subsidiary. A description of the three reporting segments is as follows:
  • Software segment includes product revenues from the Company’s Advertising, VOD, Middleware and Broadcast software, related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, technical support and software development for those software products, and operating expenses relating to the Software segment such as research and development, selling and marketing and amortization of intangibles. The Software segment includes the results of eventIS from the date of the acquisition on September 1, 2009.
     
  • Servers and Storage segment includes product revenues from VOD and Broadcast server product lines and related services such as professional services, installation, training, project management, product maintenance, and technical support for those products and operating expenses relating to the Servers and Storage segment, such as research and development and selling and marketing.
     
  • Media Services segment includes the operations of ODG, and commencing in fiscal 2009 the operations of Mobix Interactive, activities which include content acquisition and preparation services for television and wireless service providers and related operating expenses.
     Under this revised reporting structure, the Company determined there are significant functions, and therefore costs considered corporate expenses that are not allocated to the reportable segments for the purposes of assessing performance and making operating decisions. These unallocated costs include general and administrative expenses, other than general and administrative expenses related to Media Services, interest and other income, net, taxes and equity losses in affiliates, which are managed separately at the corporate level.
 
     The segment data for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008 has been recast to reflect the realignment of the new segments. Prior to fiscal 2009, services revenues, which included ODG revenues, were reported in the Services segment and the Company did not separately track these service revenues and costs by these new segments, except for ODG. Accordingly, management has made certain assumptions to determine the amount of service revenues and service costs attributed to the Software and Servers and Storage reporting segments for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. The basis of the assumptions for all such revenues, costs and expenses includes significant judgments and estimations. There are no inter-segment revenues for the periods. The Company does not separately track all assets by operating segments nor are the segments evaluated under this criterion.
 
     We have experienced fluctuations in our product revenues from quarter to quarter due to the timing of the receipt of customer orders and the shipment of those orders. The factors that impact the timing of the receipt of customer orders include among other factors:
  • the customer’s receipt of authorized signatures on their purchase orders;
     
  • the budgetary approvals within the customer’s company for capital purchases; and
     
  • the ability to process the purchase order within the customer’s organization in a timely manner.
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Factors that may impact the shipment of customer orders include:
  • the availability of material to produce the product;
     
  • the time required to produce and test the product before delivery; and
     
  • the customer’s required delivery date.
     During these economic times, many customers may delay or reduce capital expenditures. This could result in reductions in sales of our products, longer sales cycles, difficulties in collection of accounts receivable, excess and obsolete inventory, gross margin deterioration, slower adoption of new technologies, increased price competition and supplier difficulties. We believe that the recent global economic slowdown caused certain customers to reduce or delay capital spending plans in fiscal 2010 primarily in our Advertising and Broadcast products, and expect that these conditions could persist into fiscal 2011. In addition, we have experienced increased price-based competition from our competitors, which resulted in the reduction of the prices of some of our products, which reduced our revenues and adversely affected our gross margin.
 
     The delay in the timing of receipt and shipment of any one customer order can result in significant fluctuations in our revenue reported on a quarterly basis.
 
     Our operating results are significantly influenced by a number of factors, including the mix of products sold and services provided, pricing, costs of materials used in our products and the expansion of our operations during the fiscal year. We price our products and services based upon our costs and consideration of the prices of competitive products and services in the marketplace. The costs of our products primarily consist of the costs of components and subassemblies that have generally declined from product introduction to product maturity. As a result of the growth of our business, our operating expenses have historically increased in the areas of research and development, selling and marketing and administration. In the current state of the economy, we currently expect that customers may still have limited capital spending budgets as we believe they are dependent on advertising revenues to fund their capital equipment purchases. Accordingly, we expect our financial results to vary from quarter to quarter and our historical financial results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. In light of the higher proportion of our international business, we expect movements in foreign exchange rates to have a greater impact on our operating results and the equity section of our balance sheet in the future.
 
     Our ability to continue to generate revenues within the markets that our products are sold and to generate cash from operations and net income is dependent on several factors which include:
  • market acceptance of the products and services offered by our customers and increased subscriber usage and demand for these products and services;
     
  • selection by our customers of our products and services versus the products and services being offered by our competitors;
     
  • our ability to introduce new products to the market in a timely manner and to meet the demands of the market for new products and product enhancements;
     
  • our ability to maintain gross margins from the sale of our products and services at a level that will provide us with cash to fund our operations given the pricing pressures within the market and the costs of materials to manufacture our products;
     
  • our ability to control operating costs given the fluctuations that we have experienced with revenues from quarter to quarter; and
     
  • our ability to successfully integrate businesses acquired by us, including eventIS, VividLogic, Inc and Mobix Interactive, Ltd.
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Summary of Critical Accounting Policies; Significant Judgments and Estimates
 
     Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make significant estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. These items are regularly monitored and analyzed by management for changes in facts and circumstances, and material changes in these estimates could occur in the future. Changes in estimates are recorded in the period in which they become known. We base our estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from our estimates if past experience or other assumptions do not turn out to be substantially accurate.
 
     We believe that the accounting policies described below are critical to understanding our business, results of operations and financial condition because they involve significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements. An accounting policy is deemed to be critical if it requires a judgment or accounting estimate to be made based on assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain, and if different estimates that could have been used, or if changes in the accounting estimates that are reasonably likely to occur periodically, could materially impact our consolidated financial statements. Other significant accounting policies, primarily those with lower levels of uncertainty than those discussed below, are also critical to understanding our consolidated financial statements. The notes to our consolidated financial statements contain additional information related to our accounting policies and should be read in conjunction with this discussion.
 
     Principles of Consolidation. The Company consolidates the financial statements of its wholly-owned subsidiaries and all inter-company accounts are eliminated in consolidation. SeaChange also holds minority investments in the capital stock of certain private companies having product offerings or customer relationships that have strategic importance. The Company evaluates its equity and debt investments and other contractual relationships with affiliate companies in order to determine whether the guidelines regarding the consolidation of variable interest entities (“VIE”) should be applied in the financial statements. Consolidation guidelines address consolidation by business enterprises of variable interest entities that possess certain characteristics. A VIE is defined as an entity in which equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support. The primary beneficiary is required to consolidate the financial position and results of the VIE. The Company has concluded that it is not the primary beneficiary for any variable interest entities as of January 31, 2010.
 
     The Company’s investments in affiliates include investments accounted for under the cost method and the equity method of accounting. The investments that represent less than a 20% ownership interest of the common shares of the affiliate are carried at cost. Under the equity method of accounting, which generally applies to investments that represent 20% to 50% ownership of the common shares of the affiliate, SeaChange’s proportionate ownership share of the earnings or losses of the affiliate are included in equity loss in earnings of affiliates in the consolidated statement of operations.
 
     We periodically review indicators of the fair value of our investments in affiliates in order to assess whether available facts or circumstances, both internally and externally, may suggest an other than temporary decline in the value of the investment. The carrying value of an investment in an affiliate may be affected by the affiliate’s ability to obtain adequate funding and execute its business plans, general market conditions, industry considerations specific to the affiliate’s business, and other factors. The inability of an affiliate to obtain future funding or successfully execute its business plan could adversely affect our equity earnings of the affiliate in the periods affected by those events. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the affiliates could result in equity losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the investments in affiliates that may not be reflected in an investment’s current carrying value, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. We record an impairment charge when we believe an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other-than-temporary.
 
     Revenue Recognition and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts. The accounting related to revenue recognition is complex and affected by interpretations of the rules and an understanding of industry practices. As a result, revenue recognition accounting rules require us to make significant judgments. Revenues from sales of hardware, software and systems that do not require significant modification or customization of the underlying software are recognized when title and risk of loss has passed to the customer, there is evidence of an arrangement, fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the related receivable is considered probable. Customers are billed for installation, training, project management and at least one year of product maintenance and technical support at the time of the product sale. Revenue from these activities are deferred at the time of the product sale and recognized ratably over the period these services are performed. Revenue from ongoing product maintenance and technical support agreements are recognized ratably over the period of the related agreements. Revenue from software development contracts that include significant modification or customization, including software product enhancements, is recognized based on the percentage of completion contract accounting method using labor efforts expended in relation to estimates of total labor efforts to complete the contract. For contracts, where some level of profit is assured but the Company is only able to estimate ranges of amounts of total contract revenue and total contract cost, the Company uses the lowest probable level of profits in accounting for the contract revenues and costs. Accounting for contract amendments and customer change orders are included in contract accounting when executed. Revenue from shipping and handling costs and other out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed by customers are included in revenues and cost of revenues. Our share of inter-company profits associated with sales and services provided to affiliated companies is eliminated in consolidation in proportion to our equity ownership.
 
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     Our transactions frequently involve the sales of hardware, software, systems and services in multiple element arrangements. Revenues under multiple element arrangements are recorded based on the residual method of accounting. Under this method, the total arrangement value is allocated first to undelivered elements, based on their fair values, with the remainder being allocated to the delivered elements. Where fair value of undelivered service elements has not been established, the total arrangement value is recognized over the period during which the services are performed. The amounts allocated to undelivered elements, which may include project management, training, installation, maintenance and technical support and hardware and software components, are based upon the price charged when these elements are sold separately and unaccompanied by the other elements. The amount allocated to installation, training and project management revenue is based upon standard hourly billing rates and the estimated time required to complete the service. These services are not essential to the functionality of systems as these services do not alter the equipment’s capabilities, are available from other vendors and the systems are standard products. For multiple element arrangements that include software development with significant modification or customization and systems sales where vendor-specific objective evidence of the fair value does not exist for the undelivered elements of the arrangement (other than maintenance and technical support), percentage of completion accounting is applied for revenue recognition purposes to the entire arrangement with the exception of maintenance and technical support.
 
     We recognize revenue for product and services only in those situations where collection from the customer is probable. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of customers’ financial condition but generally does not require collateral. For some international customers, the Company may require an irrevocable letter of credit to be issued by the customer before the purchase order is accepted. The Company monitors payments from customers and assesses any collection issues. The Company maintains allowances for specific doubtful accounts and other risk categories of accounts based on estimates of losses resulting from the inability of the Company’s customers to make required payments and records these allowances as a charge to general and administrative expenses. The Company bases its allowances for doubtful accounts on historical collections and write-off experience, current trends, credit assessments, and other analysis of specific customer situations. While such credit losses have historically been within our expectations and the allowances established, we cannot guarantee that we will continue to experience the same credit loss rates that we have in the past. If the financial condition of our customers were to change, additional allowances may be required or established allowances may be considered unnecessary. Judgment is required in making these determinations and our failure to accurately estimate the losses for doubtful accounts and ensure that payments are received on a timely basis could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
     Service revenue from content processing provided to our customers is recognized when services are provided, based on contracted rates. Upfront fees received for services are recognized ratably over the period earned, whichever is the longer of the contract term or the estimated customer relationship.
 
     Any taxes assessed by a governmental authority related to revenue-producing transactions (e.g. sales or value-added taxes) are reported on a net basis and excluded from revenues.
 
     Inventories and Reserves. Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Inventories consist primarily of components and subassemblies and finished products held for sale. All of SeaChange’s hardware components are purchased from outside vendors. The value of inventories is reviewed quarterly to determine that the carrying value is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. SeaChange records charges to reduce inventory to its net realizable value when impairment is identified through the quarterly review process. The obsolescence evaluation is based upon assumptions and estimates about future demand and possible alternative uses and involves significant judgments. For the years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, we recorded inventory write-downs of $600,000, $1.0 million, and $2.1 million, respectively.
 
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     Accounting for Business Combinations In our business combinations, we are required to recognize the assets acquired, liabilities assumed, contractual contingencies, and contingent consideration at their fair value on the acquisition date. The purchase price allocation process requires management to make significant estimates and assumptions, especially at acquisition date with respect to intangible assets, estimated contingent consideration payments and pre-acquisition contingencies. Although we believe the assumptions and estimates we have made have been reasonable and appropriate, they are based in part on historical experience and information obtained from the management of the acquired company and are inherently uncertain. Examples of critical estimates in accounting for acquisitions include but are not limited to:
  • the estimated fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration, which is calculated using a probability-weighted discounted cash flow model based upon the forecasted achievement of post acquisition bookings targets;
     
  • the future expected cash flows from product sales, support agreements, consulting contracts, other customer contracts and acquired developed technologies and patents; and
     
  • the relevant discount rates.
     Unanticipated events and circumstances may occur which may affect the accuracy or validity of such assumptions, estimates or actual results. Additionally, any change in the fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration subsequent to the acquisition date, including changes from events after the acquisition date, such as changes in our estimate of the bookings that are expected to be achieved, will be recognized in earnings in the period of the estimated fair value change. A change in fair value of the acquisition-related contingent consideration could have a material effect on the statement of operations and financial position in the period of the change in estimate.
 
     Goodwill. In connection with acquisitions of operating entities, we recognize the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net assets acquired as goodwill. Goodwill is not amortized, but is evaluated for impairment, at the reporting unit level, annually in our third quarter as of August 1. Goodwill of a reporting unit also is tested for impairment on an interim basis in addition to the annual evaluation if an event occurs or circumstances change which would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. Changes in operating performance, market conditions and other factors may adversely impact estimates of expected future cash flows. Any impairment indicated by this analysis would be measured as the amount by which the carrying value exceeds estimated fair value based on forecasted cash flows, discounted at a rate commensurate with the risks involved.
 
     Goodwill is evaluated at the reporting unit level, which is equivalent to our business segments. We have three reporting segments, the Software segment, Servers and Storage segment and Media Services segment. The goodwill balance as of January 31, 2010 is as follows:
 
Servers & Media
     Software      Storage      Services      Totals
(in thousands )
Goodwill $      35,536 $      754 $      19,586 $      55,876
 

     On August 1, 2009, we performed our annual impairment testing of goodwill for each of the reporting units with goodwill balances. We first calculated the fair value of each reporting unit using a discounted cash flow methodology. We then performed “Step 1” and compared the fair value of each reporting unit of accounting to its carrying value as of August 1, 2009.
 
     The process of evaluating goodwill for impairment requires several judgments and assumptions to be made to determine the fair value of the reporting units, including the method used to determine fair value, discount rates, expected levels of cash flows, revenues and earnings, and the selection of comparable companies used to develop market based assumptions. Consistent with prior years, we employed a five year discounted cash flow methodology to arrive at the fair value of each reporting unit. In calculating the fair value, we derived the standalone projected five year cash flows for all three reporting units. This process starts with the projected cash flows of each of the three reporting units and then the cash flows are discounted. We use the discounted cash flow methodology as our principal technique as we believe that the discounted cash flows approach provides greater detail and opportunity to reflect facts, circumstances and economic conditions for each reporting unit.
 
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     We determined that based on our annual goodwill test, the reporting fair values of all three of our reporting units containing goodwill balances exceeded their carrying values. In aggregate, there was excess fair value over the carrying value of the net assets ranging from $53-$73 million. Below is a summary of the fair values ranges calculated by the company as of August 1, 2009:
 
     Premium Ranges over
Carrying Value
Software 102%-138%
Servers and Storage 67%-102%
Media Services 15%

     Key data points included in the market capitalization calculation were as follows:
  • Shares outstanding as of August 1, 2009: 30.9 million; and
     
  • Trailing 32 day average closing price as of August 1, 2009: $8.30 per share.
     Accordingly, as no impairment indicator existed as of August 1, 2009, our annual impairment test date, and the implied fair value of goodwill exceeded the carrying value of any of our three reporting units, we determined that goodwill was not at risk of failing “Step 1” and was appropriately stated as of August 1, 2009.
 
     To validate our conclusions and determine the reasonableness of our annual impairment test, we also performed the following:
  • Reconciled our estimated enterprise value to market capitalization comparing the aggregate, calculated fair value of our reporting units to our market capitalization as of August 1, 2009, our annual impairment test date. As compared with the market capitalization value of $256 million as of August 1, 2009, the aggregate carrying values of our three reporting units was approximately $178 million;
     
  • Prepared a “reporting unit” fair value calculation using discounted cash flows;
     
  • Reviewed the historical operating performance of each reporting unit for the current fiscal year;
     
  • Performed a sensitivity analysis on key assumptions such as weighted-average cost of capital and terminal growth rates; and
     
  • Reviewed market participant assumptions.
     The discounted cash flows used to estimate fair values were based on assumptions regarding each reporting unit’s estimated projected future cash flows and estimated weighted-average cost of capital that a market participant would use in evaluating the reporting unit in a purchase transaction. We employed one weighted-average cost of capital rate for all our reporting units. The estimated weighted-average cost of capital was based on the risk-free interest rate and other factors such as equity risk premiums and the ratio of total debt to equity capital. In performing the annual impairment tests, we took steps to ensure appropriate and reasonable cash flow projections and assumptions were used. The average rate used to discount the estimated future cash flows for each of the reporting units was 18%.
 
     Our projections for the next five years included increased revenue and operating expenses, in line with the expected revenue growth over the next five years based on current market and economic conditions and our historical knowledge of the reporting units. Historical growth rates served as only one input to the projected future growth used in the goodwill impairment analysis. These historical growth rates were adjusted based on other inputs from management regarding anticipated customer contracts. We projected growth for each reporting unit ranging from 8% to 17% annually for the Software and Servers and Storage segments, and from 11% to 26% annually for the Media Services segment. The higher projected growth for the Media Services segment is due to the recent contract wins by ODG and Mobix. We estimated the operating expenses based on a rate consistent with the current experience for each reporting unit and estimated revenue growth over the next five years. The failure of any of our reporting units to execute as forecasted over the next five years could have an adverse affect on our annual impairment test. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the reporting unit could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the investments in reporting units, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. We record an impairment charge when we believe an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other-than-temporary.
 
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     We also monitor economic, legal and other factors as a whole and for each reporting unit between annual impairment tests to ensure that there are no indicators that make it more likely than not that there has been a decline in the fair value of the reporting unit below its carrying value. Specifically, we monitor industry trends, our market capitalization, recent and forecasted financial performance of our reporting units and the timing and nature of any restructuring activities. If these estimates or the related assumptions change, we may be required to record non-cash impairment charges for these assets in the future.
 
     During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company evaluated the impairment analysis and updated for the change in market capitalization as from August 1, 2009 to January 31, 2010. While no impairment charges resulted from the analyses performed during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010, impairment charges may occur in the future due to changes in projected revenue growth rates, projected operating margins or estimated discount rates, among other factors. Historical or projected revenues or cash flows may not be indicative of actual future results. Due to uncertain market conditions, it is possible that future impairment reviews may indicate additional impairments of goodwill and/or other intangible assets, which could result in charges that could be material to our results of operations and financial position.
 
     Long –Lived Assets. SeaChange also evaluates property and equipment, investments, intangible assets and other long-lived assets on a regular basis for the existence of facts or circumstances, both internal and external that may suggest an asset is not recoverable. If such circumstances exist, SeaChange evaluates the carrying value of long-lived assets to determine if impairment exists based upon estimated undiscounted future cash flows over the remaining useful life of the assets and compares that value to the carrying value of the assets. SeaChange’s cash flow estimates contain management’s best estimates, using appropriate and customary assumptions and projections at the time.
 
     Intangible assets consist of customer contracts, completed technology, in-process research and development, non-competition agreements, patents and trademarks and are respectively assigned to the operating segments. The intangible assets are amortized to cost of sales and operating expenses, as appropriate, on a straight-line or accelerated basis in order to reflect the period that the assets will be consumed. In-process research and development assets as of the acquisition date were recorded as indefinite-lived intangible assets and will be subject to impairment testing at least annually. The useful life of the intangible asset recognized will be reconsidered if and when an in-process research and development project is completed or abandoned.
 
     SeaChange develops software for resale in markets that are subject to rapid technological change, new product development and changing customer needs. The time period during which software development costs can be capitalized from the point of reaching technological feasibility until the time of general product release is very short, and consequently, the amounts that could be capitalized are not material to the Company’s financial position or results of operations. Software development costs relating to sales of software requiring significant modification or customization are charged to costs of product revenues.
 
     Amortization expense of capitalized software is recorded over the period of economic consumption or the life of the agreement, whichever results in the higher expense, starting with the first shipment of the product to a customer. Amortization expense of capitalized software was $5,000 and $100,000 for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
     Accounting for Income Taxes. As part of the process of preparing our financial statements, we are required to estimate our provision for income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. This process involves estimating our actual current tax exposure, including assessing the risks associated with tax audits, together with assessing temporary differences resulting from the different treatment of items for tax and accounting purposes. These differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our balance sheet.
 
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     Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective income tax bases, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. We evaluate the weight of all available evidence to determine whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred income tax assets will not be realized. We will record a valuation allowance if the likelihood of realization of the deferred tax assets in the future is reduced based on an evaluation of objective verifiable evidence. Significant management judgment is required in determining our income tax provision, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our deferred tax assets. We have established a valuation allowance against our United States deferred tax assets due to indications that they may not be fully realized. The amount of the deferred tax asset considered realizable is subject to change based on future events, including generating sufficient pre-tax income in future periods. In the event that actual results differ from these estimates, our provision for income taxes could be materially impacted. SeaChange does not provide for U.S. federal and state income taxes on the undistributed earnings of its non-U.S. subsidiaries that are considered indefinitely reinvested in the operations outside the U.S.
 
     Authoritative guidance as it relates to income tax liabilities states that the minimum threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements is “more likely than not” (i.e., a likelihood of occurrence greater than fifty percent). The recognition threshold is met when an entity concludes that a tax position, based solely on its technical merits, is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by the relevant taxing authority. Those tax positions failing to qualify for initial recognition are recognized in the first interim period in which they meet the more likely than not standard, or are resolved through negotiation or litigation with the taxing authority, or upon expiration of the statute of limitations. Derecognition of a tax position that was previously recognized occurs when an entity subsequently determines that a tax position no longer meets the more likely than not threshold of being sustained.
 
     We file annual income tax returns in multiple taxing jurisdictions around the world. A number of years may elapse before an uncertain tax position is audited and finally resolved. While it is often difficult to predict the final outcome or the timing of resolution of any particular uncertain tax position, we believe that our reserves for income taxes reflect the most likely outcome. We adjust these reserves as well as the related interest and penalties, in light of changing facts and circumstances. If our estimate of tax liabilities proves to be less than the ultimate assessment, a further charge to expense would result. If payment of these amounts ultimately proves to be unnecessary, the reversal of the liabilities would result in tax benefits being recognized in the period when we determine the liabilities are no longer necessary. The changes in estimate could have a material impact on our financial position and operating results. In addition, settlement of any particular position could have a material and adverse effect on our cash flows and financial position.
 
     Share-based Compensation. We account for all employee and non-employee director stock-based compensation awards using the authoritative guidance regarding share based payments. We have continued to use the Black-Scholes pricing model as the most appropriate method for determining the estimated fair value of all applicable awards. Determining the appropriate fair value model and calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards requires the input of highly subjective assumptions, including the expected life of the share-based payment awards and stock price volatility. Management estimated the volatility based on the historical volatility of our stock. The assumptions used in calculating the fair value of share-based payment awards represent management’s best estimates, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management’s judgment. As a result, if circumstances change and we use different assumptions, our share-based compensation expense could be materially different in the future. In addition, we are required to estimate the expected forfeiture rate and only recognize expense for those shares expected to vest. If our actual forfeiture rate is materially different from our estimate, the share-based compensation expense could be significantly different from what we have recorded in the current period. The estimated fair value of SeaChange’s stock-based options and performance-based restricted stock units, less expected forfeitures, is amortized over the awards’ vesting period on a graded vesting basis, whereas the restricted stock units and Employee Stock Purchase Plan stock units are amortized on a straight line basis.
 
     Restructuring. During the first quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company completed a restructuring and will record restructuring charges primarily related to employee severance. Restructuring charges represent our best estimate of the associated liability at the date the charges are recognized. Adjustments for changes in assumptions are recorded as a component of operating expenses in the period they become known. Differences between actual and expected charges and changes in assumptions could have a material effect on our restructuring accrual as well as our consolidated results of operations.
 
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     Foreign Currency Translation. For subsidiaries where the U.S. dollar is designated as the functional currency of the entity, we translate that entity’s monetary assets and liabilities denominated in local currencies into U.S. dollars (the functional and reporting currency) at current exchange rates, as of each balance sheet date. Non-monetary assets (e.g., inventories, property, plant, and equipment and intangible assets) and related income statement accounts (e.g., cost of sales, depreciation, amortization of intangible assets) are translated at historical exchange rates between the functional currency (the U.S. dollar) and the local currency. Revenue and other expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the fiscal period. Translation adjustments and transaction gains and losses on foreign currency transactions, and any unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.
 
     For subsidiaries where the local currency is designated as the functional currency, we translate the subsidiaries’ assets and liabilities into U.S. dollars (the reporting currency) at current exchange rates as of each balance sheet date. Revenue and expense items are translated using average exchange rates during the period. Cumulative translation adjustments are presented as a separate component of stockholders’ equity. Exchange gains and losses on foreign currency transactions and unrealized gains and losses on short-term inter-company transactions are included in other income or expense, net.
 
     The aggregate foreign exchange transaction losses included as other expense, net on the Consolidated Statement of Operations were $572,000, $951,000 and $43,000 for the years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
     Non GAAP Measures As part of our ongoing review of financial information related to our business, we regularly use non-GAAP measures, in particular adjusted non-GAAP earnings per share, as we believe they provide a meaningful insight into our business and trends. We also believe that these adjusted non-GAAP measures provide readers of our financial statements with useful information and insight with respect to the results of our business. However, the presentation of adjusted non-GAAP information is not intended to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for results prepared in accordance with GAAP. Below are tables for 2010, 2009 and 2008 which detail and reconcile GAAP and adjusted non-GAAP earnings per share:
 
Twelve months Ended Twelve months Ended Twelve months Ended
January 31, 2010 January 31, 2009 January 31, 2008
   GAAP    Adjustment    Non-GAAP    GAAP    Adjustment    Non-GAAP    GAAP    Adjustment    Non-GAAP
Revenues $   201,665 $ 1,807 $     203,472 $   201,836 $ - $     201,836 $   179,893 $ - $      179,893
 
Operating expenses: 101,051 101,051 93,102 - 93,102 88,964 - 88,964
       Stock-based compensation - 3,105 3,105 - 3,954 3,954 - 3,978 3,978
       Amortization of intangible assets - eventIS - 978 978 - - - - - -
       Amortization of intangible assets - other - 2,487 2,487 - 2,025 2,025 - 4,205 4,205
       Acquisition related costs - 1,413 1,413 - - - - - -
       Restructuring 6,000 6,000
101,051 7,983 109,034 93,102 5,979 87,123 88,964 14,183 103,147
 
Income from operations 2,202 9,790 11,992 10,194 5,979 16,173 (8,000 ) 14,183 6,183
 
       Income tax impact expense (benefit) 371 3,106 3,477 575 2,073 2,648 2,156 4,895 7,051
 
Net income $ 1,323 $ 6,684 $ 8,007 $ 9,974 $ 3,906 $ 13,880 $ 2,902 $ 9,288 $ 12,190
       Diluted income per share $ 0.04 $ 0.21 $ 0.25 $ 0.32 $ 0.12 $ 0.44 $ 0.10 $ 0.31 $ 0.41
       Diluted weighted average common shares
       outstanding 31,433 31,433 31,433 31,192 31,192 31,192 30,000 30,000 30,000

     In managing and reviewing our business performance, we exclude a number of items required by GAAP. Management believes that excluding these items mentioned below is useful in understanding trends and managing our operations. We believe it is useful for investors to understand the effects of these items on our total operating expenses.
 
     Deferred software revenue: Business combination accounting rules require us to account for the fair value of customer contracts assumed in connection with our acquisitions. In connection with the acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. on September 1, 2009, the book value of our deferred software revenue was reduced by approximately $5.3 million in the adjustment to fair value. Because these customer contracts may take up to 18 months to complete, our GAAP revenues subsequent to this acquisition do not reflect the full amount of software revenues on assumed customer contracts that would have otherwise been recorded by eventIS Group B.V. We believe this adjustment is useful to investors as a measure of the ongoing performance of our business because we have historically experienced high renewal rates on similar customer contracts, although we cannot be certain that customers will renew these contracts.
 
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     Stock-based compensation expenses: We have excluded the effect of stock-based compensation and stock-based payroll expenses from our non-GAAP operating expenses and net income measures. Although stock-based compensation is a key incentive offered to our employees, we continue to evaluate our business performance excluding stock-based compensation expenses. Stock-based compensation expenses will recur in future periods.
 
     Amortization of intangible assets: We have excluded the effect of amortization of intangible assets from our non-GAAP operating expenses and net income measures. Amortization of intangibles is inconsistent in amount and frequency and is significantly affected by the timing and size of our acquisitions.
 
     Acquisition related and other expenses: We incurred significant expenses in connection with our acquisitions of eventIS Group B.V. and VividLogic, Inc. and also incurred certain other operating expenses, which we generally would not have otherwise incurred in the periods presented as a part of our continuing operations. Acquisition related and other expenses consist of transaction costs, costs for transitional employees, other acquired employee related costs, and integration related professional services.
 
     Restructuring: We incurred charges due to the restructuring of our business including severance charges and impairment charges related to capitalized software licenses, which we generally would not have otherwise incurred in the periods presented as part of our continuing operations.
 
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Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2010 Compared to the Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2009
 
     The following table sets forth summarized consolidated financial information for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009.
 
Year Ended
January 31,
     2010      2009
(in thousands )
Revenues:
       Products $      101,941 $      117,372
       Services 99,724 84,464
              Total revenues 201,665 201,836
Costs and expenses:
       Cost of product revenues 38,961 46,533
       Cost of service revenues 59,451 52,007
       Research and development 50,664 43,042
       Selling and marketing 25,842 27,506
       General and administrative 21,719 20,979
       Amortization of intangibles 2,826 1,575
Income from operations 2,202 10,194
       Other income, net 145 1,125
Income before income taxes and equity income in earnings of affiliates 2,347 11,319
Income tax expense 371 575
Equity loss in earnings of affiliates, net of tax (653 ) (770 )
Net income $ 1,323 $ 9,974
 

Revenues
 
     The following table summarizes information about the Company’s reportable segments for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009.
 
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Fiscal Year Ended
January 31,
     2010      2009      %
(in thousands, except for percentage data)
Software revenues:
       Product $ 66,968 $ 78,397 -15 %
       Services 64,346 53,840 20 %
Total Software revenues $      131,314 $      132,237 -1 %
 
Servers and Storage revenues:
       Products $ 34,974 $ 38,975 -10 %
       Services 15,583 14,665 6 %
Total Servers and Storage revenues $ 50,557 $ 53,640 -6 %
 
Media Services Revenue:
       Services $ 19,794 $ 15,959 24 %
 
Total consolidated revenue:
       Product $ 101,942 $ 117,372 -13 %
       Services 99,723   84,464 18 %
Total consolidated revenues $ 201,665 $ 201,836 0 %
 

Product Revenue. Product revenue decreased 13% to $101.9 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 from $117.4 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. Product revenues from the Software segment accounted for 66% and 67% of the total product revenues in the years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The Servers and Storage segment accounted for 34% and 33% of total product revenues in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The decrease in product revenues between years is primarily due to lower Advertising Insertion and Broadcast product revenues which was attributable to weaker advertising revenues for our customers resulting in reduced capital spending for these products.
 
Service Revenue. Service revenues increased 18% to $99.7 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 from $84.5 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. Service revenue for the Software segment accounted for 65% and 64% of the total services revenue in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Servers and Storage services revenue accounted for 16% and 17% of total services revenue in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, while Media Services revenue accounted for 19% of total services revenue for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009. The increase in Services revenues was primarily in our Software segment and was due to increased VOD support maintenance and professional services and the inclusion of five months of eventIS for fiscal 2010, and is also due to higher contract revenues in our Media Services segment.
 
     For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, two customers each accounted for more than 10%, and collectively accounted for 39% and 43%, respectively, of our total revenues. Revenues from these customers were primarily in the Software and Servers and Storage segment. We believe that a significant amount of our revenues will continue to be derived from a limited number of customers.
 
     International products and services revenues accounted for approximately 35% or $71.6 million and 36% or $72.7 million of total revenues in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. We expect that international products and services revenues will remain a significant portion of our business in the future. A majority of our international sales are made in United States dollars (USD), and for the fiscal years 2010 and 2009, approximately 67% and 78%, of international revenues were transacted in USD.
 
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     Software Revenue. Revenues from our software segment decreased 1% to $131.3 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 from $132.2 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. The year over year decline in software product revenues was primarily due to significantly lower software licensing revenue from our Advertising Insertion products and our Broadcast software products due to the unfavorable advertising environment for our customers for those products as noted above. In addition, there were also two large nonrecurring orders during our fiscal 2009 for our VODlink and VOD hospitality software products. These decreases were partially offset by higher software licensing revenues of Axiom and higher VOD subscription revenue primarily from two large U.S. customers. In addition we had higher shipments of our VOD AdPulse software products primarily to Virgin Media.
 
     The 20% increase in service revenue for the Software segment was primarily due to higher VOD product maintenance revenues from a growing installed base of products, higher VOD software installation revenues and the inclusion of five months of eventIS for fiscal 2010.
 
     Servers and Storage Revenue. Revenues from the Server and Storage segment decreased 6% to $50.6 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 from $53.6 for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. The decrease in servers and storage product revenues of 10% compared to the previous year was due primarily to lower order driven Broadcast server revenue partially offset by higher increased shipments of VOD servers primarily to two large U.S. service providers, a large customer in Latin America and several customers in China. The 6% year over year increase in services revenue in the Servers and Storage segment is due to increased installation revenue for VOD server products year over year.
 
     Media Services Revenue. Revenues from Media Services increased 24% to $19.8 million in the year ended January 31, 2010 compared to the year ended January 31, 2009. The increase in revenue was due primarily to a full year’s impact of revenue from customers in Greece and Turkey for which we began to recognize revenue late in fiscal year 2009 and the recent contract wins during fiscal year with customers in France, Dubai and Cyprus.
 
     Product Gross Profit. Costs of product revenues consist primarily of the cost of purchased material components and subassemblies, labor and overhead relating to the final assembly and testing of complete systems and related expenses, and labor and overhead costs related to software development contracts. The gross profit percentage for products increased from 60% in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 to 62% in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010. The year over year increase in product gross profit percentages between years was due mainly to higher margin VOD software products accounting for a greater portion of total product revenues combined with lower Broadcast server products revenues, which typically carry lower margins.
 
     Services Gross Profit. Cost of services revenues consist primarily of labor, materials and overhead relating to the installation, training, product maintenance and technical support, software development, project management and costs associated with providing media services. The service gross profit percentage increased 2% year over year due primarily to the inclusion of eventIS for five months of fiscal 2010.
 
     Software Gross Profit. Software segment gross margin was 61% and 58% in the years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The increase in product gross profit percentages between years is due mainly to a more favorable product mix of higher margin VOD software products and higher Software services maintenance revenue year over year with comparable headcount-related costs.
 
     Servers and Storage Gross Profit. Servers and Storage segment gross margin of 40% in the year ended January 31, 2010 was six points lower than in the year ended January 31, 2009 due to increased shipments of lower margin VOD servers due to lower product pricing for a large U.S. customer and lower service margins as a result of higher VOD server headcount-related costs to service the larger installed base of products.
 
     Media Services Gross Profit. Media Services segment gross margin of 17% in the year ended January 31, 2010 was two points higher than in the year ended January 31, 2009 due principally to absorbing all content processing in-house that was previously provided by a third party. This occurred during our second and third quarters of fiscal 2010 and we expect to receive the full year’s benefits in fiscal 2011.
 
     Research and Development. Research and development expenses consist primarily of the compensation of development personnel, depreciation of development and test equipment and an allocation of related facilities expenses. Research and development expenses were 25% and 21% of total revenues for fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, and increased $7.6 million year over year. The increase year over year is primarily due to increased headcount costs related to the VOD and TV Navigator product lines, increased facilities-related expenses and five months of eventIS for fiscal 2010. We expect that total research and development expenses will increase in the fiscal year 2011 primarily due to a full year’s impact of the recent acquisitions of eventIS and VividLogic
 
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     Selling and Marketing. Selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of compensation expenses, including sales commissions, travel expenses and certain promotional expenses. Selling and marketing expenses decreased 6% from $27.5 million or 14% of total revenues in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 to $25.8 million, or 13% of total revenues, in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010. This decrease in total expenses is primarily due to lower compensation and benefits of $1.3 million, $800,000 of lower external commission and $300,000 in travel offset by the inclusion of five months of eventIS in fiscal 2010. We expect that in total selling and marketing expenses will increase in fiscal year 2011 as we will have a full year’s impact of the recent acquisition of eventIS.
 
     General and Administrative. General and administrative expenses consist primarily of the compensation of executive, finance, human resource and administrative personnel, legal and accounting services and an allocation of related facilities expenses. In the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010, general and administrative expenses of $21.7 million, or 11% of total revenues, increased 4% from $21.0 million, or 10% of total revenues, in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. General and administrative expenses increased primarily due to acquisition-related costs of $1.4 million and professional fees of $400,000 offset by lower compensation expense and benefits of $400,000 and bad debt expense of $700,000.
 
     Amortization of Intangibles. Amortization expense consists of the amortization of acquired intangible assets which are operating expenses and not considered costs of revenues. Amortization of intangible assets increased from $1.6 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 to $2.8 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 which included a full years impact of amortization expense for our Mobix intangible assets which were acquired in November 2008, and five months of amortization expense of eventIS intangible assets which were acquired on September 1, 2009. Amortization is also based on the future economic value of the related intangible assets which is generally higher in the earlier years of the assets’ lives. We expect amortization expense to increase as we include in fiscal 2011 the full year’s impact of the recent eventIS and VividLogic acquisitions.
 
     An additional $638,000 and $350,000 of amortization expense related to acquired technology was charged to cost of sales for the years ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.
 
     Other income (expense). The table below provides detail regarding our other income (expense):
 
Fiscal Year ended
January 31,
        2010         2009
(in thousands)
Interest income $      763   $      2,107  
Interest expense (156 ) (57 )
Foreign exchange (loss)   (572 )   (951 )
Gain on sale of fixed assets 22 -
Gain on sale of marketable securities   88     26  
$ 145 $ 1,125
 
     Interest Income. Interest income, net was $600,000 in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 and $2.1 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. The decrease in interest income is primarily due to the lower cash balance in fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009 due to our recent acquisitions of eventIS and Mobix, the purchase of our London facility and lower prevailing interest rates earned on our marketable securities.
 
     Foreign exchange (loss). The decrease in foreign exchange losses was a result of the change in rates between the USD and foreign currencies during fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009. In light of the high proportion of our international businesses, we expect the risk of any adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates could have an impact on our results within the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
 
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     Equity Loss in Earnings of Affiliates. Equity loss in earnings of affiliates was $653,000 in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 compared with $770,000 in equity loss in earnings of affiliates for fiscal year-ended January 31, 2009. The equity loss in earnings of affiliates consists of our 50% ownership share of On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, our German joint venture, under the equity method of accounting.
 
     Income Tax Provision. Our effective tax rate and income tax provision for fiscal 2010 was 16% and $371,000 compared to an effective tax rate of 5% and $600,000 for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. The difference between the underlying effective tax rate for the year ended January 31, 2010 and the federal statutory rate of 35% is primarily due to income tax expense on foreign source pre-tax income generated at our international subsidiaries which carry lower tax rates. In addition, the Company tax rate decreased in the U.S. based on the benefit of releasing a portion of the valuation for the utilization of foreign tax credits and Federal research and development credits.
 
     At January 31, 2010 and 2009, we provided a valuation allowance for the full amount of U.S. net deferred tax assets due to the uncertainty of realization of those assets. We will continue to assess the need for the valuation allowance at each balance sheet date based on all available evidence. If we determine that we can realize some portion or all of the net deferred tax assets, the valuation allowance would be reversed and a corresponding increase in net income would be recognized during the period.
 
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Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2009 Compared to the Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2008
 
     The following table sets forth summarized consolidated financial information for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008.
 
Year Ended
January 31,
        2009         2008
(in thousands)
Revenues:
       Products
$      117,372 $      105,769
       Services
84,464 74,124
              Total revenues 201,836 179,893
Costs and expenses:
       Cost of product revenues
46,533 52,464
       Cost of service revenues
52,007 46,465
       Research and development
43,042 42,699
       Selling and marketing
27,506 23,073
       General and administrative
20,979 20,240
       Amortization of intangibles
1,575 2,952
Income (loss) from operations 10,194 (8,000 )
       Other income, net
1,125 1,884
       Gain on sale of investment in affiliate
- 10,031
Income before income taxes and equity income in earnings of affiliates 11,319 3,915
Income tax expense 575 2,156
Equity (loss) income in earnings of affiliates, net of tax (770 ) 1,143
Net income $ 9,974 $ 2,902
 
Revenues
 
     The following table summarizes information about the Company’s reportable segments for each of the two fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008. Segment data for fiscal 2008 is presented on a basis consistent with the fiscal 2009 data and the changed reporting data segment structure.
 
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January 31,
        2009         2008         %
(in thousands, except for percentage data)
Software revenues:
      Products
$      78,397 $      69,762 12 %
      Services
53,840 43,507 24 %
Total Software revenues $ 132,237 $ 113,269 17 %
  
Servers and Storage revenues:
      Products
$ 38,975 $ 36,007 8 %
      Services
14,665 12,990 13 %
Total Servers and Storage revenues $ 53,640 $ 48,997 9 %
  
Media Services Revenue:
      Services
$ 15,959 $ 17,627 -9 %
  
Total consolidated revenue:
      Products
$ 117,372 $ 105,769 11 %
      Services
84,464 74,124 14 %
Total consolidated revenues $ 201,836 $ 179,893 12 %
 
     Product Revenue. Product revenue increased 11% to $117.4 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 from $105.8 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. Product revenues from the Software segment accounted for 67% and 66% of the total product revenues in the years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The Servers and Storage segment accounted for 33% and 34% of total product revenues in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
     Service Revenue. Service revenues increased 14% to $84.5 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 from $74.1 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. Services revenue for the Software segment accounted for 64% and 59% of the total services revenue in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Servers and Storage services revenue accounted for 17% and 18% of total services revenue in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, while Media Services revenue accounted for 19% and 23% of total services revenue for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
     For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009, two customers each accounted for more than 10% and collectively accounted for 43% of our total revenues and these same two customers each accounted for more than 10% and collectively accounted for 45% of our total revenues for the year ended January 31, 2008. Revenues from these customers were primarily in the Software and Servers and Storage segment.
 
     International products and services revenues accounted for approximately 36% or $72.7 million and 38% or $ 68.4 million of total revenues in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. A majority of our international sales are made in United States dollars (USD), and for the fiscal years 2009 and 2008, approximately 78% and 74%, of international revenues were transacted in USD.
 
     Media Services has designated the Great Britain Pound (GBP) as its functional currency. For the fiscal years 2009 and 2008, approximately 76% and 85%, respectively of the Media Services revenues were sales in GBP and 24% and 11%, respectively were made in Euros. During the third and fourth quarter of fiscal 2009, Media Services’ financial results were translated to USD for reporting purposes, and the depreciation of the GBP compared to the USD has impacted the amount of revenue recorded by our Media Services during fiscal 2009.
 
     Software Revenue. Revenues from our software segment increased 17% to $132.2 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 from $113.3 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. The year over year growth was primarily due to increased software licensing revenue from shipments of Advertising Insertion, Axiom, VODlink, Media Client and our VOD hospitality software products which were partially offset by $7.9 million of lower software subscription revenues from Comcast. The 24% increase in service revenue for the Software segment was primarily due to higher Advertising and VOD product maintenance revenues from a growing installed base of products and installation revenue from the completion of several large projects during fiscal 2009.
 
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     Servers and Storage Revenue. Revenues from the Server and Storage segment increased 9% to $53.6 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 from $49.0 for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. The increase in product revenues of 8% compared to the previous year was due primarily to higher VOD server revenue from increased shipments of our new flash servers during our fourth quarter of fiscal 2009. The 13% year over year increase in services revenue in the Servers and Storage segment is due to increased installation revenue from VOD and broadcast servers products year over year.
 
     Media Services Revenue. Revenues from Media Services decreased 9% to $16.0 million in the year ended January 31, 2009 compared to the year ended January 31, 2008. The decrease in revenue was due primarily to the impact of the weakening of GBP compared to the USD during fiscal 2009 compared to the previous year. Valued at a constant USD/GBP exchange rate, ODG increased revenue year over year by 5% with two additional customers in Europe.
 
     Product Gross Profit. Costs of product revenues consist primarily of the cost of purchased material components and subassemblies, labor and overhead relating to the final assembly and testing of complete systems and related expenses, and labor and overhead costs related to software development contracts. The gross profit percentage for products increased from 50% in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008 to 60% in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. The increase in product gross profit percentages between years were primarily due to higher sales volume-related margin from our Advertising Insertion, Axiom, VODlink and our VOD hospitality software products. In addition, the Company recorded a charge of $4.1 million in connection with asset impairments taken during fiscal 2008 which significantly lowered our fiscal 2008 product gross margin.
 
     Services Gross Profit. Cost of services revenues consist primarily of labor, materials and overhead relating to the installation, training, product maintenance and technical support, software development, project management and costs associated with providing media services. Costs of services revenues increased from $46.5 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008 to $52.0 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 while our service gross profit percentage was relatively flat year over year. The increase in the cost of service of $5.5 million was due to increased headcount-related costs to service our increased installed base of systems.
 
     Software Gross Profit. Software segment gross margin was 58% and 51% in the years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The increase in product gross profit percentages between years is due mainly to a favorable product mix of higher margin Advertising Insertion and VOD software product revenue in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 compared to the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008, as well as the asset impairments taken in fiscal year 2008.
 
     Servers and Storage Gross Profit. Servers and Storage segment gross margin of 46% in the years ended January 31, 2009 was six points higher than in the year ended January 31, 2008 because of increased shipment of higher margin VOD flash servers and lower manufacturing costs due to headcount and other cost reductions taken in fiscal year 2008.
 
     Media Services Gross Profit. Media Services segment gross margin of 15% in the year ended January 31, 2009 was two points lower than in the year ended January 31, 2008 due principally to higher year over year higher headcount related expenses to support additional revenue.
 
     Research and Development. Research and development expenses consist primarily of the compensation of development personnel, depreciation of development and test equipment and an allocation of related facilities expenses. Research and development expenses were 21% and 24% of total revenues for fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and increased $300,000 year over year. The increase is primarily due to higher software-related headcount and related expenses of $900,000 offset by lower contract labor of $500,000.
 
     Selling and Marketing. Selling and marketing expenses consist primarily of compensation expenses, including sales commissions, travel expenses and certain promotional expenses. Selling and marketing expenses increased 19% from $23.1 million or 13% of total revenues in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008 to $27.5 million, or 14% of total revenues, in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009. This increase in total expenses is primarily due to $1.9 million in increased salaries and benefits attributable to the hiring of additional sales and marketing employees, increased commissions of approximately $1.7 million due to higher revenues and distributor commissions of $900,000 offset by lower trade show expenses.
 
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     General and Administrative. General and administrative expenses consist primarily of the compensation of executive, finance, human resource and administrative personnel, legal and accounting services and an allocation of related facilities expenses. In the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009, general and administrative expenses of $21.0 million, or 10% of total revenues, increased 4% from $20.2 million, or 11% of total revenues, in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. General and administrative expenses increased approximately $800,000 due to higher general and administrative expenses at ODG of $600,000 primarily due to higher headcount, higher bad debt expense of $400,000, offset by lower accounting fees.
 
     Amortization of Intangibles. Amortization expense consists of the amortization of acquired intangible assets which are operating expenses and not considered costs of revenues. Amortization of intangible assets decreased from $3.0 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008 to $1.6 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 due primarily to the sale of the Company’s equity investment in FilmFlex and the related intangible assets in fiscal 2008.
 
     An additional $350,000 and $490,000 of amortization expense related to acquired technology was charged to cost of sales for the years ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
     The table below provides detail regarding our other expense (income) :
 
Fiscal Year ended
January 31,
        2009         2008
(in thousands)
Interest income $      2,107 $      1,981
Interest expense (57 ) (54 )
Foreign exchange (loss) (951 ) -
Gain on sale of marketable securities 26 -
$ 1,125 $ 1,927
 
     Interest Income, net. Interest income, net was $2.1 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 and $1.9 million in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. The increase in interest income is primarily due to the increase in average cash balance in fiscal 2009 compared to fiscal 2008.
 
     Foreign exchange (loss). The increase in foreign exchange losses was a result of the increased strength of the USD against the foreign currencies held by our subsidiaries in the second half of fiscal 2009 compared to fiscal 2008.
 
     Gain on Sale of Investment in Affiliate. The gain of $10 million was the result the sale of our equity investment in FilmFlex during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008.
 
     Equity Loss in Earnings of Affiliates. Equity loss in earnings of affiliates was $800,000 in the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 compared with $1.1 million in income for fiscal year-ended January 31, 2008. The equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates consists of our proportionate ownership share of the net income (loss) under the equity method of accounting. For fiscal year 2009, the losses consisted of our 50% ownership share in our German joint venture, On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG. For fiscal 2008 (until December 2007, when we sold FilmFlex), the equity income in earnings of affiliates consisted of our proportionate ownership share of the earnings of FilmFlex and the losses of On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG.
 
     Income Tax Provision. Our effective tax rate and income tax provision for fiscal 2009 was 5% and $600,000 respectively compared to an effective tax rate of 55% and $2.2 million respectively for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2008. The decrease in the effective tax rate was due to the reduction of our valuation allowance from the utilization in fiscal 2009 of a $1.4 million foreign tax credit attributable to the taxable gain from the sale of our equity investment in FilmFlex during fiscal 2008. In addition, the fiscal 2009 tax rate was also reduced for the entitlement and claim of the benefit for a refundable research and development credit of $300,000 as a result of the tax stimulus package passed by the U.S. Congress in 2008. For the fiscal year 2008, the income tax provision was primarily attributable to the taxable gains recorded for ODG’s transfer of assets to and the reimbursement of previously paid costs from On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG and taxable gain on the sale of our equity investment in FilmFlex.
 
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     At January 31, 2009 and 2008, we provided a valuation allowance for the full amount of net deferred tax assets due to the uncertainty of realization of those assets. We will continue to assess the need for the valuation allowance at each balance sheet date based on all available evidence. If we determine that we can realize some portion or all of the net deferred tax assets, the valuation allowance would be reversed and a corresponding increase in net income would be recognized during the period.
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
     Historically, we have financed our operations and capital expenditures primarily with the proceeds from sales of our common stock and cash flows generated from operations. During fiscal 2010, cash and marketable securities decreased by $35.8 million from $84.3 million at January 31, 2009 to $48.5 million at January 31, 2010, largely due to cash used for the acquisition of eventIS, and open market repurchases of our common stock, offset by cash provided by operations. Working capital decreased $28.6 million to $60.9 million at January 31, 2010 from $89.5 million at January 31, 2009. We believe that existing funds combined with available borrowings under our revolving line of credit and cash provided by future operating activities are adequate to satisfy our working capital, potential acquisitions, capital expenditure requirements and other contractual obligations for the foreseeable future, including at least the next 24 months.
 
     Our operating activities provided net cash of $8.6 million. Cash provided by operating activities was the result of the net income of $1.3 million and non-cash charges of $14.8 million which were primarily from depreciation and amortization, stock-based based compensation, charges for inventory valuation and accounts receivable allowance. These amounts were offset by increases to inventory, accounts receivable, and prepaid expenses, and lower accounts payable and accrued expenses. The increase in accounts receivable was primarily related to the timing of product shipped in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010 compared to the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009. The decrease in accrued expenses was the result of lower performance-based compensation accruals.
 
     Our investing activities used $33.0 million of cash primarily due to cash payments aggregating $35.0 million, net of cash acquired, for our September 1, 2009 acquisition of eventIS, an earnout payment to the former shareholders of Mobix, additional cash invested in unconsolidated entities, and $8.4 million of capital expenditures. These amounts were offset by $10.7 million of net sales and maturities of marketable securities during the fiscal year.
 
     Our financing activities used $800,000 primarily due to the purchase of $2.8 million of the Company’s stock under the share repurchase program which was partially offset by proceeds from the issuance of common stock for the exercise of employee stock options and the employee stock purchase plan of $1.8 million.
 
Debt Instruments and Related Covenants
 
     The Company maintains a revolving line of credit with RBS Citizens (a subsidiary of the Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc) for $15.0 million which expires on October 31, 2010. Loans made under this revolving line of credit bear interest at a rate per annum equal to the bank’s prime rate. Borrowings under this line of credit are collateralized by substantially all of our assets. The loan agreement requires SeaChange to comply with certain financial covenants. On August 31, 2009, these financial covenants were amended to reflect the acquisition of eventIS. As of January 31, 2010, we were in compliance with the financial covenants and there were no amounts outstanding under the revolving line of credit.
 
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
The Company does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of Regulation S-K.
 
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Contractual Obligations
 
     The following table reflects our current and contingent contractual obligations to make potential future payments as of January 31, 2010 (in thousands):
 
Less than one One to three Three to five
        Total         year         years         years
(in thousands)
Purchase obligations $      6,649 $      6,429 $      - $      -
Non-cancelable lease obligations 5,563 2,763 2,739 61
Contingent consideration 9,514 2,940 6,574 -
Foreign exchange contract 1,664 1,664 - -
Total $ 23,390 $ 13,796 $ 9,313 $ 61
 
     The purchase obligations include open, non-cancelable purchase commitments from our suppliers.
 
     The Company has excluded from the table above uncertain tax liabilities as defined by authoritative guidance due to the uncertainty of the amount and period of payment. As of January 31, 2010, the Company has gross unrecognized tax benefits of $7.6 million.
 
     On February 27, 2007, ODG, a wholly-owned subsidiary of SeaChange, entered into an agreement with Tele-Munchen Fernseh GmbH & Co. Produktionsgesellschaft (TMG) to create a joint venture named On Demand Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG. The related Shareholder’s Agreement requires ODG and TMG to provide cash contributions up to $4.2 million upon the request of the joint venture’s management and approval by the shareholders of the joint venture. To date the Company has contributed $1.2 million as required per the shareholders agreement.
 
     Under the share purchase agreement with the former shareholder of eventIS, on each of the first, second and third anniversaries of the closing date, the Company is obligated to make additional fixed payments of deferred purchase price, each such payment to be in an aggregate amount of $2.8 million with $1.7 million payable in cash and $1.1 million payable by the issuance of restricted shares of SeaChange common stock, which will vest in equal installments over three years starting on the first anniversary of the date of issuance. At the option of the former shareholder of eventIS, up to forty percent of this payment in Restricted Stock may be payable in cash. Under the earnout provisions of the share purchase agreement if certain performance goals are met over each of the three periods ending January 31, 2013, the Company will be obligated to make additional cash payments to the former shareholder of eventIS.
 
     At the closing of the VividLogic acquisition, the Company made a cash payment to the former shareholders of VividLogic of $12.0 million In addition, the VividLogic shareholders are entitled to $8.5 million in cash from available working capital of which $3.5 was paid at the closing. Of the remaining $5.0 million of estimated working capital adjustment to be paid in cash, $1.5 million will be paid on each of May 1, 2010 and August 1, 2010 and $2 million will be paid on the February 1, 2011. On each of the first, second and third anniversaries of the closing date, the Company is also obligated to make additional fixed payments of deferred purchase price of $1.0 million in cash. In addition, the Company may also be obligated to make earnout payments if certain performance goals are met over each of the three periods ending February 1, 2011, February 1, 2012 and February 1, 2013.
 
     We are occasionally required to post letters of credit, issued by a financial institution, to secure certain sales contracts. Letters of credit generally authorize the financial institution to make a payment to the beneficiary upon the satisfaction of a certain event or the failure to satisfy an obligation. The letters of credit are generally posted for one-year terms and are usually automatically renewed upon maturity until such time as we have satisfied the commitment secured by the letter of credit. We are obligated to reimburse the issuer only if the beneficiary collects on the letter of credit. We believe that it is unlikely we will be required to fund a claim under our outstanding letters of credit. As of January 31, 2010, the full amount of the letters of credit of $707,000 was supported by our credit facility.
 
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Effects of Inflation
 
     Our management believes that financial results have not been significantly impacted by inflation and price changes.
 
Impact of Recently Adopted Accounting Guidance
 
     Business Combinations
 
     In December 2007, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued revised accounting guidance requiring the use of fair value, defined as “the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.” The new guidance also changes the method of applying the acquisition method in a number of significant aspects. Any change in the fair value of the acquisition-related consideration subsequent to the acquisition date, including changes from events after the acquisition date, such as changes in the estimate of the performance goals, will be recognized in earnings in the period the estimated fair value changes; acquisition costs will generally be expensed as incurred; noncontrolling interests will be valued at fair value at the acquisition date; in-process research and development will be recorded at fair value as an indefinite-lived intangible asset at the acquisition date; restructuring costs associated with a business combination will generally be expensed subsequent to the acquisition date; and changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and income tax uncertainties after the acquisition date generally will affect income tax expense. The new guidance amends Accounting for Income Taxes such that adjustments made to valuation allowances on deferred taxes and acquired tax contingencies associated with acquisitions that closed prior to the effective date of this guidance would also apply the provisions of this new guidance. The new guidance was effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and was adopted by the Company on February 1, 2009. See our Note 6 to Consolidated Financial Statements for disclosures relating to the acquisition of eventIS Group B.V. on September 1, 2009 and VividLogic, Inc on February 1, 2010.
 
     Measuring Liabilities at Fair Value
 
     In August 2009, the FASB issued an authoritative update to Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures. This update provides amendments to reduce potential ambiguity in financial reporting when measuring the fair value of liabilities. Among other provisions, this update provides clarification in circumstances in which a quoted price in an active market for the identical liability is not available, a reporting entity is required to measure fair value using one or more of the valuation techniques described in the authoritative update. The update will become effective upon issuance for subsequent interim and annual periods. The Company adopted this standard on October 31, 2009. The Company has determined that the update had no impact on its financial condition or results of operations.
 
     Interim Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments
 
     In April 2009, the FASB issued new accounting guidance requiring additional disclosures about the fair value of financial instruments in interim as well as in annual financial statements. The Company adopted this standard on July 31, 2009.
 
Determining Fair Value When the Volume and Level of Activity for the Asset or Liability Have Significantly Decreased and Identifying Transactions That Are Not Orderly
 
     In April 2009, the FASB issued new accounting guidance providing guidelines for making fair value measurements more consistent with the principles presented in the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures guidance. This new accounting guidance provides additional guidelines in determining whether a market is active or inactive, and whether a transaction is distressed, is applicable to all assets and liabilities (i.e. financial and nonfinancial). The Company adopted this standard on April 30, 2009.
 
Recent Accounting Guidance Not Yet Effective
 
Determining which Entity has a Controlling Financial Interest in a Variable Interest Equity
 
     In December 2009, the FASB amended authoritative guidance regarding the quantitative-based risks and rewards calculation for determining which reporting entity, if any, has a controlling financial interest in a variable interest entity with an approach focused on identifying which reporting entity has the power to direct the activities of a variable interest entity that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance and (1) the obligation to absorb losses of the entity or (2) the right to receive benefits from the entity. An approach that is expected to be primarily qualitative will be more effective for identifying which reporting entity has a controlling financial interest in a variable interest entity. The amendments in this update also require additional disclosures about a reporting entity’s involvement in variable interest entities, which will enhance the information provided to users of financial statements. The update will become effective for the first annual period starting after November 15, 2009. This guidance will be adopted by the Company on a prospective basis beginning February 1, 2010. The Company is currently assessing the impact this amendment may have on its results of operations and financial position.
 
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Revenue Recognition for Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables
 
     In September 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Boards (“FASB”) amended the guidance for revenue recognition in multiple-element arrangements. It has been amended to remove from the scope of industry specific revenue accounting guidance for software and software related transactions, tangible products containing software components and non-software components that function together to deliver the product’s essential functionality. The guidance now requires an entity to provide updated guidance on whether multiple deliverables exist, how the deliverables in an arrangement should be separated and the consideration allocated, and allocates revenue in an arrangement using estimated selling prices of deliverables for these products if a vendor does not have vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) or third-party evidence of selling price. The guidance also eliminates the use of the residual method and requires an entity to allocate revenue using the relative selling price method for these products. The accounting changes summarized are effective for fiscal years beginning on or after June 15, 2010, with early adoption permitted. Adoption may either be on a prospective basis or by retrospective application. The Company is currently assessing the impact of these amendments on its accounting and reporting systems and processes; however, at this time the Company is unable to quantify the impact of their adoption on its financial statements or determine the timing and method of its adoption. The Company believes the impact of the new guidance on future multi-element arrangements may result in earlier recognition of revenue in future periods.
 
ITEM 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
 
Foreign Currency Exchange Risk
 
We face exposure to financial market risks, including adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates and changes in interest rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve and could have a material adverse impact on our financial results. Our foreign currency exchange exposure is primarily associated with product sales arrangements or settlement of intercompany payables and receivables among subsidiaries and its parent company, and/or investment/equity contingency considerations denominated in the local currency where the functional currency of the foreign subsidiary is the U.S. dollar.
 
Substantially all of our international product sales are payable in United States Dollars (USD) or in the case of our Media Services operations in the United Kingdom and eventIS in the Netherlands, payable in local currencies, providing a natural hedge for receipts and local payments. In light of the high proportion of our international businesses, we expect the risk of any adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates could have an impact on our translated results within the Consolidated Statements of Operations. In addition, for the year ended January 31, 2010 the Company generated a foreign currency translation loss of $7.9 million which was recorded as accumulated other comprehensive gain increasing the Company’s equity section of the balance sheet over the prior year.
 
The Company has entered into a forward foreign currency exchange contract to manage exposure related to liabilities denominated in Euros. SeaChange does not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading purposes. At January 31, 2010, we had one forward contract to buy Euros totaling 1.2 million that settles on September 1, 2010. While SeaChange does not anticipate that near-term changes in exchange rates will have a material impact on its operating results, financial position and liquidity, a sudden and significant change in the value of foreign currencies could harm the Company’s operating results, financial position and liquidity.
 
The U.S. Dollar is the functional currency for a majority of our international subsidiaries. All foreign currency gains and losses are included in interest and other income, net, in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations. In fiscal year 2010, the Company recorded approximately $572,000 in losses due to international subsidiary translations and cash settlements of revenues and expenses.
 
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Interest Rate Risk
 
Exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the Company’s investment portfolio of marketable debt securities of various issuers, types and maturities and to SeaChange’s borrowings under its bank line of credit facility. The Company does not use derivative instruments in its investment portfolio, and its investment portfolio only includes highly liquid instruments. Our cash and marketable securities include cash equivalents, which we consider to be investments purchased with original maturities of nine months or less. There is risk that losses could be incurred if the Company were to sell any of its securities prior to stated maturity. Given the short maturities and investment grade quality of the portfolio holdings at January 31, 2010, a sharp rise in interest rates should not have a material adverse impact on the fair value of our investment portfolio. Additionally, our long term marketable investments, which are carried at the lower of cost or market, have fixed interest rates, and therefore are subject to changes in fair value. At January 31, 2010, we had $2.1 million in short-term marketable securities and $8.7 million in long-term marketable securities.
 
ITEM 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
     See the consolidated financial statements fields as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K as listed under Item 15 below.
 
ITEM 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
 
     None.
 
ITEM 9A. Controls and Procedures
 
(A) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
     We evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) Rule 13a-15(e), as of the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K. William C. Styslinger, III, our Chief Executive Officer, and Kevin M. Bisson, our Chief Financial Officer, participated in this evaluation. Based upon that evaluation, Messrs. Styslinger and Bisson concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by the report.
 
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(B) Report of Management on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
     Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
 
     Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors, and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
     Because of inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
     Our management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2010. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control—Integrated Framework. Based on our assessment, management concluded that, as of January 31, 2010, our internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.
 
     The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2010 has been audited by Grant Thornton LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which is included immediately below.
 
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of SeaChange International, Inc.
 
We have audited SeaChange International, Inc. (a Delaware Corporation) and subsidiaries internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). SeaChange International, Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
 
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
In our opinion, SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries’ maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by COSO.
 
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statement of operations, stockholders’ equity and comprehensive income (loss), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2010 and our report dated April 9, 2010 expressed an unqualified opinion.
 
/s/ Grant Thornton LLP
 
Boston, Massachusetts
April 9, 2010
 
(C) Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
     As a result of the evaluation completed by management, and in which Messrs. Styslinger and Bisson participated, we have concluded that there were no changes during the fiscal quarter ended January 31, 2010 in our internal control over financial reporting, which have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
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ITEM 9B. Other Information
 
     None.
 
PART III
 
ITEM 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
 
     Information concerning the directors of SeaChange is hereby incorporated by reference from the information contained under the heading “Election of Directors” in SeaChange’s definitive proxy statement related to SeaChange’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on or about July 15, 2010 which will be filed with the Commission within 120 days after the close of the fiscal year (the “Definitive Proxy Statement”).
 
     Certain information concerning directors and executive officers of SeaChange is hereby incorporated by reference to the information contained under the headings “Information Concerning Executive Officers”, and “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance”, “Availability of Corporate Governance Documents” and “Audit Committee” in our Definitive Proxy Statement.
 
ITEM 11. Executive Compensation
 
     Information concerning executive compensation is hereby incorporated by reference to the information contained under the headings “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” and “Compensation of Directors” in the Definitive Proxy Statement.
 
ITEM 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
     Information concerning security ownership of certain beneficial owners and management is hereby incorporated by reference to the information contained under the headings “Securities Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management” and “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” in the Definitive Proxy Statement.
 
ITEM 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
 
     Information concerning certain relationships and related transactions is hereby incorporated by reference to the information contained under the heading “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” and “Determination of Director Independence” in the Definitive Proxy Statement.
 
ITEM 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
     Information concerning Principal accountant fees and services is hereby incorporated by reference to the information contained under the heading “Ratification of Appointment of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in the Definitive Proxy Statement.
 
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PART IV
 
ITEM 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
 
(a)(1) INDEX TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
     The following Consolidated Financial Statements of the Registrant are filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K:
 
Page
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm 62
Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 31, 2010 and 2009 63
Consolidated Statement of Operations for the years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 64
Consolidated Statement of Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the  
       years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 65
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 66
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 67

(a)(2) INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULE
 
     The following Financial Statement Schedule of the Registrant is filed as part of this report:
 
Page
Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts and Reserves 101

     Schedules not listed above have been omitted because the information requested to be set forth therein is not applicable or is shown in the accompanying consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.
 
(a)(3) INDEX TO EXHIBITS
 
     See attached Exhibit Index of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
(b) EXHIBITS
 
     The Company hereby files as part of this Form 10-K the Exhibits listed in Item 15 (a) (3) above. Exhibits which are incorporated herein by reference can be inspected and copied at the public reference facilities maintained by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”), 450 Fifth Street, Room 1024, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549. Copies of such material can also be obtained from the Public Reference Section of the Commission, 450 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549, at prescribed rates.
 
(c) FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES
 
     The Company hereby files as part of this Form 10-K the consolidated financial statements schedule listed in Item 15 (a) (2) above, which is attached hereto.
 
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SIGNATURES
 
     Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, SeaChange International, Inc. has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
Dated: April 9, 2010
 
SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
   
By:    /s/ WILLIAM C. STYSLINGER, III
William C. Styslinger, III
Chief Executive Officer,
Chairman of the Board and Director

POWER OF ATTORNEY AND SIGNATURES
 
     KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints William C. Styslinger, III and Kevin M. Bisson, jointly and severally, his attorney-in-fact, each with the power of substitution, for him in any and all capacities, to sign any amendments to this Report on Form 10-K and to file same, with exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, hereby ratifying and confirming all that each of said attorneys-in-fact, or his substitute or substitutes, may do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.
 
     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
 
Signature        Title(s)        Date
/s/     WILLIAM C. STYSLINGER, III Chief Executive Officer, Chairman April 9, 2010
William C. Styslinger, III of the Board and Director (Principal
Executive Officer)
 
/s/     KEVIN M. BISSON Chief Financial Officer, Senior Vice April 9, 2010
Kevin M. Bisson President, Finance and Administration,
Treasurer and Secretary (Principal Financial
and Accounting Officer)
 
/s/     MARY PALERMO COTTON Director April 9, 2010
Mary Palermo Cotton
 
/s/     THOMAS F. OLSON Director April 9, 2010
Thomas F. Olson
 
/s/     CARLO SALVATORI Director April 9, 2010
Carlo Salvatori
 
/s/     CARMINE VONA Director April 9, 2010
Carmine Vona
 
/s/     REIJANE HUAI Director April 9, 2010
ReiJane Huai

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EXHIBIT INDEX 
 
Exhibit No.       Description
         2.1              Share Purchase Agreement relating to the sale and purchase of the whole issued and to be issued share capital of Mobix Interactive Capital, dated as of November 14, 2008, by and among On Demand Group Limited and the other parties set forth on the signature pages thereto (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed on November 25, 2008 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
2.2 Agreement for the Entire Issued Share Capital of eventIS Group B.V. dated as of September 1, 2009 by and among Ventise Holding B.V., SeaChange B.V. and SeaChange International, Inc. (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on 10-Q previously filed on September 8, 2009 (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
2.3 Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of January 6, 2010, by and among SeaChange International, Inc., Vividlogic, Inc., Vulcan Acquisition, Inc. and Shiva Patibanda in the limited capacity of Stockholder Representative (filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed on January 8, 2010 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
3.1 Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Company (filed as Exhibit 3.3 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
3.2 Certificate of Amendment, filed May 25, 2000 with the Secretary of State in the State of Delaware, to the Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Company (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on 10-Q previously filed on December 15, 2000 with the Commission (Filed No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
3.3 Amended and Restated By-laws of the Company (filed as Exhibit 3.5 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
4.1 Specimen certificate representing the Common Stock (filed as Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
4.2 Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Company (filed as Exhibit 3.3 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
4.3 Certificate of Amendment, filed May 25, 2000 with the Secretary of State in the State of Delaware, to the Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Company (filed as Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s registration statement on Form S-3 previously filed on December 6, 2000 with the Commission (Filed No. 333-51386) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.1 Amended and Restated 2005 Equity Compensation and Incentive Plan (filed as Appendix A to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A previously filed May 25, 2007 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.2 Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement pursuant to the Company’s 2005 Equity Compensation and Incentive Plan (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 14, 2005 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
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Exhibit No.       Description
         10.3              Form of Incentive Stock Option Agreement pursuant to the Company’s 2005 Equity Compensation and Incentive Plan (filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K previously filed on April 17, 2006 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.4 Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement pursuant to the Company’s 2005 Equity Compensation and Incentive Plan (filed as Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K previously filed on April 17, 2006 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.5 Amended and Restated 1995 Stock Option Plan (filed as Annex B to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Form 14a previously filed on May 31, 2001 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.6 Form of Incentive Stock Option Agreement pursuant to SeaChange’s Amended and Restated 1995 Stock Option Plan (filed as Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 6, 2004 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.7 Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement pursuant to SeaChange’s Amended and Restated 1995 Stock Option Plan (filed as Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 6, 2004 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.8 1996 Non-Employee Director Stock Option Plan (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.9 Third Amended and Restated 1996 Employee Stock Purchase Plan of the Company (filed as Appendix A to the Company’s Definitive Proxy Statement filed on Schedule 14A previously filed on May 30, 2008 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.10 Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001, by and between Citizens Bank of Massachusetts and the Company (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q previously filed on December 13, 2001 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.11 Amendment No. 1, dated as of June 14, 2002, by and between the Company and Citizen’s Bank of Massachusetts, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001, by and between the Company and Citizen’s Bank of Massachusetts (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q previously filed on September 13, 2002 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.12 Amendment No. 2, dated as of April 21, 2003, between the Company and Citizen’s Bank of Massachusetts, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001 by and between the Company and Citizen’s Bank of Massachusetts (filed as Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K previously filed on May 1, 2003 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.13 Amendment No. 3, dated as of December 1, 2003, between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001 by and between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on December 15, 2003 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
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Exhibit No.       Description
         10.14              Amendment No. 8, dated as of April 14, 2006, between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001, by and between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts (filed as Exhibit 10.15 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K previously filed on April 17, 2006 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.15 Amendment No. 12, dated as of August 17, 2007, between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001, by and between the Company and Citizens Bank of Massachusetts (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q previously filed on April 17, 2006 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.16 Amendment No. 14, dated as of October 31, 2008, between the Company and RBS Citizens, to that certain Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of October 22, 2001, by and between the Company and RBS Citizens (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q previously filed December 8, 2008 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.17 License Agreement dated May 30, 1996 between Summit Software Systems, Inc. and the Company (filed as Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 previously filed on November 4, 1996 with the Commission (File No. 333-12233) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.18 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between the Company and Kevin Bisson (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.19 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between SeaChange and Steven M. Davi (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.20 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between the Company and Ira Goldfarb (filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.21 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between SeaChange and Yvette Kanouff (filed as Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.22 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between the Company and Bruce Mann (filed as Exhibit 10.6 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
10.23 Amended and Restated Change-in-Control Severance Agreement, dated as of December 21, 2009, by and between the Company and William C. Styslinger, III (filed as Exhibit 10.7 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed December 21, 2009 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
 
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Exhibit No.       Description
         10.24              Executive Services Agreement, dated as of September 23, 2005, by and between On Demand Management Limited and Anthony Kelly (filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed September 29, 2005 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
         
  10.25     Separation Agreement and General Release, dated as of March 10, 2010, by and between SeaChange International, Inc. and Ed Dunbar (filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K previously filed on March 12, 2010 with the Commission (File No. 000-21393) and incorporated herein by reference).
 
21.1* List of Subsidiaries of the Registrant.
 
23.1* Consent of Grant Thornton LLP.
 
24.1 Power of Attorney (included on signature page).
 
31.1* Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
31.2* Certification Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
32.1* Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
32.2* Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
____________________ 
 
*       Provided herewith.
 
61
 


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of SeaChange International, Inc.
 
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of SeaChange International, Inc. (a Delaware corporation) and subsidiaries (collectively the Company) as of January 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders' equity and comprehensive income (loss), and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2010. Our audits of the basic financial statements included the financial statement schedule listed in the index appearing under Item 15 (a) (2). These financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 31, 2010 and 2009, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended January 31, 2010, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.
 
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), SeaChange International, Inc. and subsidiaries internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and our report dated April 9, 2010 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
 
/s/ Grant Thornton LLP
 
Boston, Massachusetts
April 9, 2010
 
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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
(in thousands, except share data)
 
January 31, January 31,
      2010       2009
Assets
Current assets:
       Cash and cash equivalents $ 37,647 $ 62,458
       Restricted cash 73 1,431
       Marketable securities 2,114 9,447
       Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $852 in 2010
              and $853 in 2009, respectively 50,337 41,513
       Unbilled receivables 3,941 4,595
       Inventories, net 17,830 17,251
       Prepaid expenses and other current assets 7,253 3,902
       Deferred tax asset 2,474 217
              Total current assets 121,669 140,814
Property and equipment, net 39,682 35,217
Marketable securities, long-term 8,688 12,415
Investments in affiliates 13,697 13,043
Intangible assets, net 26,264 4,621
Goodwill 55,876 27,422
Other assets 1,271 451
       Total assets $        267,147 $        233,983
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
Current liabilities:
       Accounts payable $ 10,371 $ 11,951
       Other accrued expenses 11,174 10,974
       Customer deposits 4,279 1,966
       Deferred revenues 34,158 26,237
       Deferred tax liabilities 800 137
              Total current liabilities 60,782 51,265
Deferred revenue, long-term 12,635 6,737
Other liabilities, long-term 6,574
Distribution and losses in excess of investment 1,469 1,745
Deferred tax liabilities and taxes payable, long-term 7,765 2,000
       Total liabilities 89,225 61,747
 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 10)
Stockholders Equity:
Convertible preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized,
       none issued or outstanding
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 32,563,063 and
       31,822,838 shares issued; 31,216,267 and 30,949,457 326 318
       respectively
Additional paid-in capital 211,504 206,411
Treasury stock, at cost 1,346,796 and 873,381 common shares , respectively (8,757 ) (5,989 )
Accumulated deficit (17,450 ) (18,773 )
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income (7,701 ) (9,731 )
              Total stockholders’ equity 177,922 172,236
       Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity $ 267,147 $ 233,983
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
Fiscal Year ended January 31,
2010       2009       2008
Revenues:
       Products $        101,941 $        117,372 $        105,769
       Services 99,724 84,464 74,124
              Total revenues 201,665 201,836 179,893
Cost of revenues:
       Products 38,961 46,533 52,464
       Services 59,451 52,007 46,465
              Total cost of revenues 98,412 98,540 98,929
       Gross profit 103,253 103,296 80,964
Operating expenses:
       Research and development 50,664 43,042 42,699
       Selling and marketing 25,842 27,506 23,073
       General and administrative 21,719 20,979   20,240
       Amortization of intangibles 2,826 1,575 2,952
              Total operating expenses 101,051 93,102 88,964  
       Income (loss) from operations 2,202 10,194 (8,000 )
Interest income 763   2,107 1,981
Interest expense (156 ) (57 ) (54 )
Other expense, net (462 ) (925 ) (43 )
Gain on sale of investment in affiliate - - 10,031
       Income before income taxes and equity loss in earnings      
              of affiliates   2,347 11,319 3,915
Income tax expense 371 575 2,156
Equity (loss) income in earnings of affiliates, net of tax (653 ) (770 ) 1,143
       Net income $ 1,323 $ 9,974 $ 2,902
Earnings per Share:
       Basic income per share $ 0.04 $ 0.32 $ 0.10
       Diluted income per share $ 0.04 $ 0.32 $ 0.10
Weighted average common shares outstanding:
       Basic 30,860 30,724 29,634
       Diluted 31,433 31,192 30,000

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
64
 


SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDER'S EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
Accumulated other
                              comprehensive   Treasury                
Common Stock income(loss) Stock
Number Additional Cumulative Unrealized Number Total
of Par paid-in Accumulated translation gain/loss on of Stockholders' Comprehensive
  shares   value   capital   Deficit   adjustment   investments   shares   Amount   Equity   income (loss)
Balance January 31, 2007 29,384,887 $ 293 $ 184,976   $ (31,649 ) $ 1,588 $ (13 ) (39,784 ) $ - $ 155,195
Issuance of common stock  
       pursuant to exercise of stock options 189,623 2 1,120 - - - 1,122
Issuance of common stock in connection
       with the employee stock purchase plan 245,535 3 1,554 - - - 1,557  
Issuance of common stock pursuant to
       vesting of restricted stock units 124,050 1 (1 ) - - - -
Stock-based compensation expense - - 3,978 - - - 3,978
Change in fair value on    
       marketable securities, net of tax -   - - -   449 - - 449   $ 449
       Translation adjustment -   -   - - 199 - -   199 199
       Net income - - -   2,902   - -   2,902   2,902
       Comprehensive income   $ 3,550
       Balance at January 31, 2008 29,944,095 299   191,627 (28,747 )   1,787   436 (39,784 ) -   165,402
Issuance of common stock          
       pursuant to exercise of stock options 223,006 4 1,176 - - - 1,180
Issuance of common stock in connection  
       with the employee stock purchase plan 236,707 3 1,560   -   - - 1,563
Issuance of common stock pursuant to      
       vesting of restricted stock units 287,642 1 - - - - 1
Issuance of common stock pursuant to    
       third earnout for ODG acquisition 1,131,388 11 8,094 - - - 8,105
Stock-based compensation expense - - 3,954 - - - 3,954
Purchase of treasury shares (833,597 ) (5,989 ) (5,989 )
Change in fair value on
       marketable securities, net of tax - - - - 23 - - 23 $ 23
Translation adjustment - - - - (11,977 ) - - (11,977 )       (11,977 )
Net income - - - 9,974 - - 9,974 9,974
Comprehensive loss $ (1,980 )
Balance at January 31, 2009 31,822,838 318 206,411 (18,773 ) (10,190 ) 459 (873,381 ) (5,989 ) 172,236
Issuance of common stock
       pursuant to exercise of stock options 47,805 1 483 - - - - 484
Issuance of common stock in connection
       with the employee stock purchase plan 282,889 3 1,510 - - - - - 1,513
Issuance of common stock pursuant to
       vesting of restricted stock units 409,531 4 (4 ) - - - - - -
Stock-based compensation expense - - 3,104 - - - - - 3,104
Purchase of treasury shares - - (473,415 ) (2,768 ) (2,768 )
Change in fair value on
       marketable securities, net of tax - - - - - (262 ) - - (262 ) $ (262 )
Translation adjustment - - - - 2,292 - - - 2,292 2,292
Net income - - - 1,323 - - - - 1,323 1,323
Comprehensive income $ 3,353
Balance at January 31, 2010 32,563,063 $ 326 $ 211,504 $ (17,450 ) $ (7,898 ) $ 197 (1,346,796 ) $ (8,757 ) $ 177,922  
    
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
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SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)
 
Year ended January 31,
2010       2009       2008
Cash flows from operating activities:
       Net income $ 1,323 $ 9,974 $ 2,902
       Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
              Depreciation 7,995 7,216 7,892
              Amortization of intangibles and capitalized software 3,461 2,025 4,205
              Impairment of capitalized software - - 4,056
              Inventory valuation charge 585 1,085 2,130
              Provision for doubtful accounts receivable 75 761 486
              Discounts earned and amortization of premiums on marketable securities 110 22 (14 )
              Equity loss (income) in earnings of affiliates 654 770 (1,143 )
              Gain on sale of investment in affiliate - - (10,031 )
              Stock-based compensation expense 3,105 3,954 3,978
              Deferred income taxes (1,210 ) (124 )   (1,021 )
              Excess tax benefit related to share based compensation expense (159 )   -     -
              Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
                     Accounts receivable (4,380 )   (15,524 ) 54
                     Unbilled receivables 654   2,772 (1,805 )
                     Inventories (3,926 ) (7,509 ) 2,981
                     Prepaid expenses and other assets (3,657 ) (1,508 ) 547
                     Accounts payable   (3,048 ) 2,672 (355 )
                     Accrued expenses (3,232 ) 331 4,568
                     Customer deposits 2,313 707 (757 )
                     Deferred revenues 7,901 13,946 (2,705 )
                     Other 35 92 104
                            Net cash provided by operating activities 8,599 21,662 16,072
Cash flows from investing activities:
       Purchases of property and equipment (8,355 ) (12,948 ) (5,768 )
       Proceeds from sale of property and equipment - - 468
       Purchases of marketable securities (43,402 ) (57,063 ) (32,109 )
       Proceeds from sale and maturity of marketable securities 54,091 59,740 32,150
       Acquisition of businesses and payment of contingent consideration, net of cash acquired (35,019 ) (3,204 ) (154 )
       Investments in affiliates (1,824 ) (43 ) -
       Capital distribution from investment in affiliate - - 880
       Proceeds from sale of investment in affiliate - - 18,187
       (Deposit) release of restricted cash 1,512 (1,500 ) -
                            Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities (32,997 ) (15,018 ) 13,654
Cash flows from financing activities:
       Purchase of treasury stock (2,768 ) (5,989 ) -
       Proceeds from issuance of common stock relating to the stock plans 1,838 2,743 2,679
       Excess tax benefit related to share based compensation expense 159 - -
                            Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities (771 ) (3,246 ) 2,679
Effect of exchange rates on cash 358 (4,299 ) (225 )
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents        (24,811 ) (901 ) 32,180
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period 62,458 63,359 31,179
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period $        37,647 $        62,458 $        63,359
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
       Income taxes paid $ 554 $ 1,267 $ 709
       Interest paid 41 38 43
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash activities:
       Transfer of items originally classified as inventories to equipment 2,841 3,488 1,589
       Issuance of equity for ODG contingent consideration - 8,105 -
       Conversion of accounts receivable to equity related to investment in affiliate - 332 -  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
66
 


SEACHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
     1. Nature of Business
 
     SeaChange International, Inc. (“SeaChange” or “the Company”), headquartered in Acton, Massachusetts, is a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of digital video systems and services including the aggregation, licensing, storage, management and distribution of video, television programming, and advertising content to cable system operators, telecommunications companies and broadcast television companies.
 
     2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
     Significant accounting policies followed in the preparation of the accompanying consolidated financial statements are as follows:
 
     Use of Estimates
 
     The preparation of these financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires the Company to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, management evaluates these estimates and judgments, including those related to revenue recognition, valuation of inventory and accounts receivable, valuation of investments and income taxes, stock-based compensation, goodwill, intangible assets and related amortization. The Company bases these estimates on historical and anticipated results and trends and on various other assumptions that the Company believes are reasonable under the circumstances, including assumptions as to future events. These estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. By their nature, estimates are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty. Actual results may differ from management’s estimates.
 
     Principles of Consolidation
 
     The Company consolidates the financial statements of its wholly-owned subsidiaries and all intercompany accounts are eliminated in consolidation. SeaChange also holds minority investments in the capital stock of certain private companies having product offerings or customer relationships that have strategic importance. The Company evaluates its equity and debt investments and other contractual relationships with affiliate companies in order to determine whether the guidelines regarding the consolidation of variable interest entities (“VIE”) should be applied in the financial statements. Consolidation guidelines address consolidation by business enterprises of variable interest entities that possess certain characteristics. A variable interest entity is defined as an entity in which equity investors do not have the characteristics of a controlling financial interest or do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support. The primary beneficiary is required to consolidate the financial position and results of the VIE. The Company has concluded that it is not the primary beneficiary for any variable interest entities during the fiscal year ended January 31, 2010.
 
     Equity Investments
 
     The Company’s investments in affiliates include investments accounted for under the cost method and the equity method of accounting. The investments that represent less than a 20% ownership interest of the common shares of the affiliate are carried at cost. Under the equity method of accounting, which generally applies to investments that represent 20% to 50% ownership of the common shares of the affiliate, SeaChange’s proportionate ownership share of the earnings or losses of the affiliate are included in equity income in earnings of affiliates in equity income (loss) in earnings of affiliates in the consolidated statement of operations.
 
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     The Company periodically reviews indicators of the fair value of its investments in affiliates in order to assess whether available facts or circumstances, both internally and externally, may suggest an other than temporary decline in the value of the investment. The carrying value of an investment in an affiliate may be affected by the affiliate’s ability to obtain adequate funding and execute its business plans, general market conditions, industry considerations specific to the affiliate’s business, and other factors. The inability of an affiliate to obtain future funding or successfully execute its business plan could adversely affect the Company’s equity earnings of the affiliate in the periods affected by those events. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the affiliates could result in equity losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the investments in affiliates that may not be reflected in an investment’s current carrying value, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. The Company records an impairment charge when it believes an investment has experienced a decline in value that is other-than-temporary.
 
     Revenue Recognition
 
     Revenues from sales of hardware, software and systems that do not require significant modification or customization of the underlying software are recognized when title and risk of loss has passed to the customer, there is evidence of an arrangement, fees are fixed or determinable and collection of the related receivable is considered probable. Customers are billed for installation, training, project management and at least one year of product maintenance and technical support at the time of the product sale. Revenue from these activities are deferred at the time of the product sale and recognized ratably over the period these services are performed. Revenue from ongoing product maintenance and technical support agreements are recognized ratably over the period of the related agreements. Revenue from software development contracts that include significant modification or customization, including software product enhancements, is recognized based on the percentage of completion contract accounting method using labor efforts expended in relation to estimates of total labor efforts to complete the contract. Accounting for contract amendments and customer change orders are included in contract accounting when executed. Revenue from shipping and handling costs and other out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed by customers are included in revenues and cost of revenues. SeaChange’s share of intercompany profits associated with sales and services provided to affiliated companies are eliminated in consolidation in proportion to our equity ownership.
 
     SeaChange’s transactions frequently involve the sales of hardware, software, systems and services in multiple element arrangements. Revenues under multiple element arrangements are recorded based on the residual method of accounting. Under this method, the total arrangement value is allocated first to undelivered elements, based on their fair values, with the remainder being allocated to the delivered elements. Where fair value of undelivered service elements has not been established, the total arrangement value is recognized over the period during which the services are performed. The amounts allocated to undelivered elements, which may include project management, training, installation, maintenance and technical support and certain hardware and software components, are based upon the price charged when these elements are sold separately and unaccompanied by the other elements. The amount allocated to installation, training and project management revenue is based upon standard hourly billing rates and the estimated time required to complete the service. These services are not essential to the functionality of systems as these services do not alter the equipment’s capabilities, are available from other vendors and the systems are standard products. For multiple element arrangements that include software development with significant modification or customization and systems sales where vendor-specific objective evidence of the fair value does not exist for the undelivered elements of the arrangement (other than maintenance and technical support), percentage of completion accounting is applied for revenue recognition purposes to the entire arrangement with the exception of maintenance and technical support.
 
     Service revenue from content processing provided to the Company’s customers is recognized when services are provided, based on contracted rates. Upfront fees received for services are recognized ratably over the period earned, whichever is the longer of the contract term or the estimated customer relationship.
 
     Any taxes assessed by a governmental authority related to revenue-producing transactions (e.g. sales or value-added taxes) are reported on a net basis and excluded from revenues.
 
     Concentration of Credit Risk and Major Customers
 
     Financial instruments which potentially expose SeaChange to concentrations of credit risk include cash equivalents, investments in treasury bills, certificates of deposits and commercial paper, trade accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities. The Company restricts its cash equivalents and investments in marketable securities to repurchase agreements with major banks and U.S. government and corporate securities which are subject to minimal credit and market risk.
 
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     For trade accounts receivable, SeaChange evaluates customers’ financial condition, requires advance payments from certain of its customers and maintains reserves for potential credit losses. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of customers’ financial condition but generally does not require collateral. For some international customers, SeaChange requires an irrevocable letter of credit to be issued by the customer before the purchase order is accepted. The Company monitors payments from customers and assesses any collection issues. The Company maintains allowances for specific doubtful accounts and other risk categories of accounts based on estimates of losses resulting from the inability of the Company’s customers to make required payments and records these allowances as a charge to general and administrative expenses. SeaChange bases its allowances for doubtful accounts on historical collections and write-off experience, current trends, credit assessments, and other analysis of specific customer situations. At January 31, 2010 and 2009, SeaChange had an allowance for doubtful accounts of $852,000 and $853,000, respectively, to provide for potential credit losses. At January 31, 2010, three separate customers accounted for 23%, 16%, and 11%, respectively, of SeaChange’s gross accounts receivable balance. At January 31, 2009, two separate customers accounted for 27% and 14%, respectively, of SeaChange’s gross accounts receivable balance.
 
     Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities
 
     SeaChange accounts for investments in accordance with authoritative guidance that defines investment classifications. The Company determines the appropriate classification of debt securities at the time of purchase and reevaluates such designation as of each balance sheet date. SeaChange’s investment portfolio consists of money market funds, corporate debt investments, asset-backed securities, government-sponsored enterprises, and state and municipal obligations. All highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased are considered to be cash equivalents. All cash equivalents are carried at cost, which approximates fair value. SeaChange’s marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale and are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, reported in stockholders’ equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income or loss. The amortization of premiums and accretions of discounts to maturity are computed under the effective interest method and are included in interest income. Interest on securities is recorded as earned and is also included in interest income. Any realized gains or losses would be shown in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations in other income or expense.
 
     The Company evaluates its investments on a regular basis to determine whether an other-than-temporary decline in fair value has occurred. This evaluation consists of a review of several factors, including, but not limited to: the length of time and extent that an investment has been in an unrealized loss position; the existence of an event that would impair the issuer's future earnings potential; and the Company’s intent and ability to hold an investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value. Declines in value below cost for investments where it is considered probable that all contractual terms of the investment will be satisfied, is due primarily to changes in interest rates, and where the company has the intent and ability to hold the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow a market recovery, and are not assumed to be other-than-temporary. Any other-than-temporary declines in fair value are recorded in earnings and a new cost basis for the investment is established.
 
     Inventory Valuation
 
     Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. Inventories consist primarily of components and subassemblies and finished products held for sale. The values of inventories are reviewed quarterly to determine that the carrying value is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. SeaChange records charges to reduce inventory to its net realizable value when impairment is identified through the quarterly review process. The obsolescence evaluation is based upon assumptions and estimates about future demand, or possible alternative uses and involves significant judgments. For the years ended January 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, the Company recorded inventory write-downs of $569,000, $1.0 million, and $2.1 million, respectively.
 
     Property and Equipment
 
     Property and equipment consists of land and buildings, office and computer equipment, leasehold improvements, demonstration equipment, deployed assets and spare components and assemblies used to service SeaChange’s installed base.
 
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     Demonstration equipment consists of systems manufactured by SeaChange for use in marketing and selling activities. Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated over their estimated useful lives. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the term of the respective leases using the straight-line method. Deployed assets consist of movie systems owned and manufactured by SeaChange that are installed in a hotel environment. Deployed assets are depreciated over the life of the related service agreements. Capitalized service and spare components are depreciated over the estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. Maintenance and repair costs are expensed as incurred. Upon retirement or sale, the cost of the assets disposed of, and the related accumulated depreciation, are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gain or loss is included in the determination of net income.
 
     Goodwill and Long-Lived Assets