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EX-31.01 - EXHIBIT - MANAGED FUTURES PREMIER GRAHAM L.P.mscgex3101.htm
EX-31.02 - EXHIBIT - MANAGED FUTURES PREMIER GRAHAM L.P.mscgex3102.htm
EX-32.01 - EXHIBIT - MANAGED FUTURES PREMIER GRAHAM L.P.mscgex3201.htm
EX-32.02 - EXHIBIT - MANAGED FUTURES PREMIER GRAHAM L.P.mscgex3202.htm
EX-13.01 - MANAGED FUTURES PREMIER GRAHAM L.P.dtype1charann09.txt


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K

x           ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009 or

o           TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from __________________to__________________

Commission File Number: 0-25603

 
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY CHARTER GRAHAM L.P.
 
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 

 
Delaware
 
13-4018068
 
     State or other jurisdiction of
      incorporation or organization
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
       
Demeter Management LLC
   
522 Fifth Avenue, 13th Floor
   
New York, NY
 
10036
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code
 
(212) 296-1999
     
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
   
     
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange
   
On which registered
     
None
 
None
     
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Units of Limited Partnership Interest
(Title of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Registration S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the proceeding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files)    Yes o  No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.404 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  [   ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer x
Smaller reporting company o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes 0  No T

State the aggregate market value of the Units of Limited Partnership Interest held by non-affiliates of the registrant.  The aggregate market value shall be computed by reference to the price at which Units were sold as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter: $402,119,264 at June 30, 2009.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
(See Page 1)
 
 
 

 

MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY CHARTER GRAHAM L.P.
(formerly, Morgan Stanley Charter Graham L.P.)
INDEX TO ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
December 31, 2009


DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
……………………………………………………………
1

Part I.
   
     
Item 1.
Business
2-5
     
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
5-6
     
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
6
     
Item 2.
Properties
7
     
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
7
     
Item 4.
(Removed and Reserved)
7
     
     
Part II.
   
     
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters  and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
8
     
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
9
     
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
10-31
     
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
31-43
     
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
43-44
     
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
44
     
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
44-47
     
Item 9A(T).
Controls and Procedures
47-48
     
Item 9B.
Other Information
48
     
     
Part III.
   
     
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
49-55
     
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
56
     
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
56
     
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
56
     
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
57-58
     
Part IV.
   
     
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
59



 
 

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE


Portions of the following documents are incorporated by reference as follows:



     Documents Incorporated                                                                                                                               Part of Form 10-K
 
 
Partnership’s Prospectus dated May 1, 2008                                                                                                               I

Partnership’s Supplement to the Prospectus dated September 17,
                 2008                                                                                                                                                                                       I

Annual Report to Morgan Stanley
Smith Barney Charter Series Limited Partners                                                                                                          
for the year ended December 31, 2009                                                                                                               II, III, and IV































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PART I

Item 1.  BUSINESS

(a)  General Development of Business.  Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter Graham L.P. (formerly, Morgan Stanley Charter Graham L.P.) (the “Partnership”) is a Delaware limited partnership organized in 1998 to engage primarily in the speculative trading of futures contracts, options on futures and forward contracts, and forward contracts on physical commodities and other commodity interests, including, but not limited to, foreign currencies, financial instruments, metals, energy, and agricultural products.  The Partnership commenced trading operations on March 1, 1999.  The Partnership is one of the Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter series of funds, comprised of the Partnership, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter WNT L.P. (“Charter WNT”), Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter Aspect L.P. (“Charter Aspect”), and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter Campbell L.P. (“Charter Campbell”).  Effective May 1, 2006, Charter Campbell no longer accepts subscriptions and exchanges of units of limited partnership interest (“Unit(s)”) from any other Charter series funds for Units of Charter Campbell (collectively, the “Charter Series”).  Additionally, after the Charter Series’ November 30, 2008 monthly close, Demeter Management LLC (“Demeter”), the general partner of the Partnership, no longer offers for purchase or exchange Units in the Partnership, Charter Aspect, and Charter WNT.

The commodity brokers are Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated (“MS&Co.”) and Morgan Stanley & Co. International plc (“MSIP”).  MS&Co. also acts as the counterparty on all trading of foreign currency forward contracts.  MSIP serves as the commodity broker for trades on the London Metal Exchange.  MS&Co. and MSIP are wholly-owned subsidiaries of Morgan Stanley.  Graham Capital Management, L.P. (the “Trading Advisor”) is the trading advisor to the Partnership.

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On April 30, 2009, Demeter Management Corporation was converted from a Delaware corporation to a Delaware limited liability company and changed its name to Demeter Management LLC.  Demeter is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Holdings LLC, which is majority-owned indirectly by Morgan Stanley and minority-owned indirectly by Citigroup Inc. (“Citigroup”).

Demeter does not believe that the change in its ownership had a material impact on the Partnership’s limited partners.  At all times Demeter served as the general partner of the Partnership and it continues to do so.  The change in ownership occurred pursuant to the transaction in which Morgan Stanley and Citigroup agreed to combine the Global Wealth Management Group of Morgan Stanley and the Smith Barney division of Citigroup Global Markets Inc. into a new joint venture.  The transaction closed on June 1, 2009.

Prior to June 1, 2009, Demeter was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Morgan Stanley.

Effective September 29, 2009, Demeter changed the name of Morgan Stanley Charter Graham L.P. to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter Graham L.P.  The name change does not have any impact on the operation of the Partnership or its limited partners.

The Partnership began the year at a net asset value per Unit of $29.13 and returned (0.8)% to $28.89 per Unit on December 31, 2009.  For a more detailed description of the Partnership's business, see subparagraph (c).

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(b)  Financial Information about Segments.  For financial information reporting purposes, the Partnership is deemed to engage in one industry segment, the speculative trading of futures, forwards and options on such contracts.  The relevant financial information is presented in Items 6 and 8.

(c)  Narrative Description of Business.  The Partnership is in the business of speculative trading of futures, forwards, and options pursuant to trading instructions provided by the Trading Advisor.  For a detailed description of the different facets of the Partnership's business, see those portions of the Partnership's prospectus, dated May 1, 2008 (the “Prospectus”), and the Partnership’s supplement to the Prospectus dated September 17, 2008 (the “Supplement”), incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, set forth below.
Facets of Business
 
   
1. Summary
1. “Summary” (Pages 1-11 of the Prospectus).
   
2. Futures, Options and Forwards Markets
2. “The Futures, Options and Forwards Markets” (Pages 126-130 of the Prospectus).
   
3. Partnership’s Trading Arrangements and Policies
3. “Use of Proceeds” (Pages 27-29 of the Prospectus), “The Trading Advisors” (Pages 69-95 of the Prospectus and Pages S-1 – S-2 of
 
the Supplement).
   
4. Management of the Partnership
    4. “The Trading Advisors – Management Agreements” – (Page 69 of the Prospectus).  “The General Partner” (Pages 65-68 of the Prospectus and Page S-1 of the Supplement). “The Commodity Brokers” (Pages 99-100 of the Prospectus) and “The Limited Partnership Agreements” (Pages 106-109 of the Prospectus).
   
5. Taxation of the Partnership’s Limited Partners
5. “Material Federal Income Tax Considerations” and “State and Local Income Tax Aspects” (Pages 116-124 of the Prospectus).



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(d)  Financial Information about Geographic Areas.  The Partnership has not engaged in any operations in non-U.S. countries; however, the Partnership (through the commodity brokers) enters into forward contract transactions where non-U.S. banks are the contracting party and trades futures, forwards and options on non-U.S. exchanges.

(e)  Available Information.  The Partnership files an annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to these reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).  You may read and copy any document filed by the Partnership at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for information on the Public Reference Room. The Partnership does not maintain an internet website, however, the Partnership’s SEC filings are available to the public from the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at “http://www.sec.gov”.  The Partnership’s CIK number is 0001066656.

Item 1A.  RISK FACTORS
The following risk factors contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the safe harbor from civil liability provided for such statements by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (set forth in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).  All quantitative disclosures in “Quantifying the Partnership’s Trading Value at Risk” in Item 7A. “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” are deemed to be forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor, except for statements of historical fact.  The qualitative disclosures, except for (A) those disclosures that are statements of historical fact and

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(B) The descriptions of how the Partnership manages its primary market risk exposure, in the “Qualitative Disclosure Regarding Primary Trading Risk Exposures” in Item 7A. “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” are deemed to be forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor.

Current limited partners of the Partnership are advised that effective December 1, 2008, Demeter no longer accepts any subscriptions for investments in the Partnership or any exchanges from Charter Aspect and Charter WNT for Units of the Partnership.  Current limited partners of the Partnership will continue to be able to redeem Units of the Partnership.

The Partnership is in the business of speculative trading of futures, forwards and options.  For a detailed description of the risks that may affect the business of the Partnership or the limited partnership interests offered by the Partnership, see the discussion of the risk factors as set forth in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Item 7A. “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk”.
 
 
Item 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
Not applicable.




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Item 2.  PROPERTIES
The Partnership’s executive and administrative offices are located within the offices of MS&Co.  The MS&Co. offices utilized by the Partnership are located at 522 Fifth Avenue, 13th Floor, New York, NY 10036.

Item 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
None.

Item 4.  (REMOVED AND RESERVED)














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PART II

Item 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES


(a)  Market Information.  There is no established public trading market for Units of the Partnership.

(b)  Holders.  The number of holders of Units at December 31, 2009, was approximately 9,815.

(c)  Distributions. No distributions have been made by the Partnership since it commenced trading operations on March 1, 1999. Demeter has sole discretion to decide what distributions, if any, shall be made to investors in the Partnership.  Demeter currently does not intend to make any distributions of the Partnership’s profits.

(d)  Underwriter.  The managing underwriter for the Partnership was MS&Co.

(e)  Use of Proceeds.  All Units remaining unsold after the November 30, 2008 closing were deregistered with the SEC effective January 22, 2009.







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Item 6.  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA (in dollars)







 
 
    For the Years Ended December 31,
 

 
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
           
Total Trading Results
         
including interest income
 34,054,406
190,864,940
             84,308,915
          53,330,934
                (42,632,520)
           
Net Income (Loss)
 (5,250,245)
140,466,274
               50,906,801
           19,292,183
               (78,211,095)
           
Net Income (Loss) Per
         
Unit (Limited & General
         
Partners)
  (0.24)
    7.11
2.56
   0.86
(3.56)
           
Total Assets 
   409,978,898
   564,613,437
447,241,975
434,681,492
439,560,867
           
Total Limited Partners’
         
Capital
   395,815,421
    519,261,648
435,434,673
415,478,418
416,811,790
           
Net Asset Value Per Unit
    28.89
   29.13
22.02
 19.46
 18.60

























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Item 7.
  MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION  AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Liquidity.  The Partnership deposits its assets with MS&Co. and MSIP as commodity brokers in separate futures, forward and options trading accounts established for the Trading Advisor.  Such assets are used as margin to engage in trading and may be used as margin solely for the Partnership’s trading.  The assets are held in either non-interest bearing bank accounts or in securities and instruments permitted by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission for investment of customer segregated or secured funds.  Since the Partnership’s sole purpose is to trade in futures, forwards and options, it is expected that the Partnership will continue to own such liquid assets for margin purposes.

The Partnership’s investment in futures, forwards and options may, from time to time, be illiquid.  Most U.S. futures exchanges limit fluctuations in prices during a single day by regulations referred to as “daily price fluctuations limits” or “daily limits”.  Trades may not be executed at prices beyond the daily limit.  If the price for a particular futures or options contract has increased or decreased by an amount equal to the daily limit, positions in that futures or options contract can neither be taken nor liquidated unless traders are willing to effect trades at or within the limit.  Futures prices have occasionally moved the daily limit for several consecutive days with little or no trading.  These market conditions could prevent the Partnership from promptly liquidating its futures or options contracts and result in restrictions on redemptions.



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There is no limitation on daily price moves in trading forward contracts on foreign currencies.  The markets for some world currencies have low trading volume and are illiquid, which may prevent the Partnership from trading in potentially profitable markets or prevent the Partnership from promptly liquidating unfavorable positions in such markets, subjecting it to substantial losses.  Either of these market conditions could result in restrictions on redemptions.  For the periods covered by this report, illiquidity has not materially affected the Partnership’s assets.

There are no known material trends, demands, commitments, events, or uncertainties at the present time that are reasonably likely to result in the Partnership’s liquidity increasing or decreasing in any material way.

Capital Resources.  The Partnership does not have, nor does it expect to have, any capital assets.  Redemptions of Units in the future will affect the amount of funds available for investments in futures, forwards and options in subsequent periods.  It is not possible to estimate the amount, and therefore the impact, of future outflows of Units.  Effective December 1, 2008, Demeter no longer accepts any subscriptions for Units of the Partnership or any exchanges from Charter Aspect and Charter WNT for Units of the Partnership.

There are no known material trends, favorable or unfavorable, that would affect, nor any expected material changes to, the Partnership’s capital resource arrangements at the present time.



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Results of Operations
General.  The Partnership’s results depend on the Trading Advisor and the ability of the Trading Advisor’s trading programs to take advantage of price movements in the futures, forwards and options markets.  The following presents a summary of the Partnership’s operations for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2009 and a general discussion of its trading activities during each period.  It is important to note, however, that the Trading Advisor trades in various markets at different times and that prior activity in a particular market does not mean that such market will be actively traded by the Trading Advisor or will be profitable in the future.  Consequently, the results of operations of the Partnership are difficult to discuss other than in the context of the Trading Advisor’s trading activities on behalf of the Partnership during the period in question.  Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

The Partnership’s results of operations set forth in the financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), which require the use of certain accounting policies that affect the amounts reported in these financial statements, including the following:  the contracts the Partnership trades are accounted for on a trade-date basis and marked to market on a daily basis. The difference between their original contract value and market value is recorded on the Statements of Operations as “Net change in unrealized trading profit (loss)” for open (unrealized) contracts, and recorded as “Realized trading profit (loss)” when open positions are closed out.  The sum of these amounts constitutes the Partnership’s trading results.  The market value of a futures contract is the settlement price on the exchange on which that futures contract is traded on a particular day.  The value of a foreign currency forward contract is based on the spot rate as of the close of business.  Interest income, as well as

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management fees, incentive fees, and brokerage fees of the Partnership are recorded on an accrual basis.

Demeter believes that, based on the nature of the operations of the Partnership, no assumptions relating to the application of critical accounting policies other than those presently used could reasonably affect reported amounts.

The Partnership recorded total trading results including interest income totaling $34,054,406 and expenses totaling $39,304,651, resulting in a net loss of $5,250,245 for the year ended December 31, 2009.  The Partnership’s net asset value per Unit decreased from $29.13 at December 31, 2008, to $28.89 at December 31, 2009.  Total redemptions for the year were $119,379,227, and the Partnership’s ending capital was $399,908,477 at December 31, 2009, a decrease of $124,629,472 from ending capital at December 31, 2008, of $524,537,949.

The most significant trading losses of approximately 6.0% were incurred within the global interest rate sector, primarily during January, April, June, July, August, October, and December.  During January, losses were recorded from long positions in European fixed-income futures as prices decreased following news that debt sales might increase as governments around the world boosted spending in an effort to ease the deepening economic slump.  European fixed-income futures prices then moved lower during April and June amid rising investor confidence, which reduced demand for the relative “safety” of government debt, thus resulting in further losses from long positions.  Meanwhile, losses were experienced from short positions in Japanese fixed-income futures as prices increased during the second half of June after the Bank
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of Japan indicated that it remained cautious about the Japanese economy.  During July, newly established short positions in U.S. and European fixed-income futures resulted in losses as prices moved higher on investor sentiment that the slow pace of the global economic recovery and signs of moderate inflation might lead central banks in these regions to maintain low interest rates in the near term.  Additional losses were recorded during August from newly established long positions in European fixed-income futures as prices reversed lower at the beginning of the month amid a rise in the European equity markets, thus reducing demand for the relative “safety” of government bonds.  Lastly, losses were incurred during October and December from long positions in U.S. and European fixed-income futures as prices decreased on concerns that an unprecedented supply of government debt might outweigh demand.  Within the energy markets, losses of approximately 2.5% were experienced primarily during May from short positions in heating oil and gas oil as prices increased amid better-than-expected economic data in the U.S. and China, the world’s largest consumers of energy.  Additional losses were recorded during July and September from both long and short futures positions in crude oil and its related products as prices moved without consistent direction amid conflicting data regarding supply and demand.  Smaller losses were incurred during December from long futures positions in crude oil and its related products as prices dropped on speculation of waning energy demand after the U.S. government reported a rise in inventories.  A significant portion of the Partnership’s losses for the year was offset by gains of approximately 11.1% achieved within the global stock index sector during January, February, May, July, August, September, November, and December.  During January and February, short positions in U.S., European, and Pacific Rim equity index futures resulted in gains as prices dropped on concerns that financial firms might need to raise additional capital and a continued slowdown in global economic growth may further erode

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corporate earnings.  Additional gains were experienced during May, July, August, and September from long positions in U.S., European, and Pacific Rim equity index futures as prices rose due to positive economic data and increased merger and acquisition activity in the technology sector.  Further gains were achieved during November and December as global equity prices were pressured higher by a pledge from the Group of 20 leaders to maintain stimulus measures, as well as signs that the global economy might be recovering.  Within the currency sector, gains of approximately 2.9% were recorded primarily during January, May, July, August, September, and November.  During January, gains were experienced from short positions in the Australian dollar and New Zealand dollar versus the U.S. dollar as the value of the U.S. dollar moved higher against these currencies after a government report showed the U.S. trade deficit narrowed by the largest amount in 12 years.  Newly established long positions in the Australian dollar, New Zealand dollar, and Canadian dollar versus the U.S. dollar resulted in additional gains, primarily during May, July, August, September, and November as the value of the U.S. dollar declined relative to these currencies after improving global economic data reduced demand for the U.S. dollar as a “safe haven” currency.  The value of the U.S. dollar was also pressured lower by speculation that the U.S. Federal Reserve might keep borrowing rates low after the U.S. central bank indicated that it remained committed to its quantitative easing program.  In the metals markets, gains of approximately 2.6% were recorded primarily during May, July, August, September, and November from long futures positions in copper, aluminum, lead, and zinc as prices increased after positive economic data boosted speculation that demand for base metals may rise.  Additional gains were achieved during November from long positions in gold and silver futures as prices increased due to a drop in the value of the U.S. dollar.  Smaller gains of approximately 0.4% were experienced within the agricultural sector, primarily during February,

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May, July, August, September, and December from long positions in sugar futures as prices rose amid expectations of a drop in global production.  As such, prices climbed to a 28-year high on deepening concerns that unfavorable weather in producing countries and rising import demand might worsen the global supply shortfall.

The Partnership recorded total trading results including interest income totaling $190,864,940 and expenses totaling $50,398,666, resulting in net income of $140,466,274 for the year ended December 31, 2008.  The Partnership’s net asset value per Unit increased from $22.02 at December 31, 2007, to $29.13 at December 31, 2008.  Total redemptions and subscriptions for the year were $164,418,815, and $108,216,510, respectively, and the Partnership’s ending capital was $524,537,949 at December 31, 2008, an increase of $84,263,969 from ending capital at December 31, 2007, of $440,273,980.

The most significant trading gains of approximately 11.4% were experienced within the energy markets, primarily during the first half of the year, from long futures positions in crude oil and its related products as prices moved consistently higher due to speculation that OPEC would cut production, ongoing geopolitical concerns in the Middle East, growing Asian fuel consumption, and strong demand for physical commodities as an inflation hedge.  Additional gains were recorded primarily during the fourth quarter from newly established short futures positions in crude oil and its related products as prices sharply decreased on concerns that a substantial global economic slowdown would erode energy demand.  Elsewhere, long positions in natural gas futures also resulted in gains during the first and second quarters as prices rose on expectations of a rise in demand due to colder

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weather in the U.S. Northeast, news of a drop in U.S. inventories, and forecasts for an active hurricane season in the Atlantic.  Further gains were recorded during October and December from newly established short positions in natural gas futures as prices dropped amid rising U.S. inventories and slowing global energy demand.  Within the global stock index sector, gains of approximately 11.3% were experienced primarily during January, February, March, and June from short positions in U.S., European, and Pacific Rim equity index futures as prices decreased during the first half of the year on concerns that a persistent U.S. housing slump, mounting losses linked to U.S. sub-prime mortgage investments, rising commodity prices, and a weakening job market would restrain consumer spending, erode corporate earnings, and curb global economic growth.  Additional gains were recorded during September and October as prices dropped sharply amid unprecedented U.S. financial market turmoil and growing concerns that efforts by central banks and governments around the world to support the financial system would not prevent a global recession.  Within the global interest rate sector, gains of approximately 7.4% were experienced primarily during January, February, September, October, November, and December from long positions in U.S. and European fixed-income futures as prices moved higher in a worldwide “flight-to-quality” following the aforementioned drop in the global equity markets throughout most of the year, as well as worries regarding the fundamental health of the global economy and financial system.  Additionally, prices of U.S. fixed-income futures moved higher as the U.S. Federal Reserve cut interest rates to an unprecedented target range of 0% to 0.25%, while European interest rate futures prices increased after the European Central Bank lowered borrowing costs in an attempt to stimulate economic growth.  Within the currency sector, gains of approximately 3.6% were recorded primarily during March, April, May, and July from long positions

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in the Australian dollar, euro, and Chilean peso versus the U.S. dollar as the value of the U.S. dollar moved lower against these currencies during the first six months of the year amid speculation that signs of a slowing U.S. economy would spur the U.S. Federal Reserve to lower interest rates at a faster pace than other central banks around the world.  Short positions in the Korean won versus the U.S. dollar resulted in additional gains, primarily during March, as the value of the Korean won decreased relative to the U.S. dollar amid news of a widening current account deficit out of Korea.  Further gains were experienced during October and November from newly established short positions in the Australian dollar and euro versus the U.S. dollar as the value of the U.S. dollar moved higher against most of its rivals in tandem with rising U.S. dollar-denominated Treasury bonds amid the aforementioned “flight-to-quality”.  Within the agricultural markets, gains of approximately 3.3% were recorded primarily during January, February, and June from long positions in corn futures as prices increased during the first half of the year following news that global production might drop, rising energy prices might boost demand for alternative biofuels made from ethanol, and severe floods in the U.S. Midwest had damaged crops.  Meanwhile, short futures positions in cotton resulted in gains as prices dropped to a one-year low in September after the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported exports remained below average due to a decline in demand.  Additional gains were experienced during October and November from short futures positions in wheat, corn, and cotton as prices decreased amid rising inventories and growing concerns that slowing global economic growth would erode demand for food, biofuels, and raw materials.  Similarly, smaller gains of approximately 1.8% were recorded within the metals markets, primarily during the fourth quarter, from short futures


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 positions in copper, zinc, aluminum, lead, and nickel as prices declined amid worries that a global economic recession would erode demand for base metals.

The Partnership recorded total trading results including interest income totaling $84,308,915 and expenses totaling $33,402,114, resulting in net income of $50,906,801 for the year ended December 31, 2007.  The Partnership’s net asset value per Unit increased from $19.46 at December 31, 2006, to $22.02 at December 31, 2007. Total redemptions and subscriptions for the year were $85,485,512 and $54,876,900, respectively, and the Partnership’s ending capital was $440,273,980 at December 31, 2007, an increase of $20,298,189 from ending capital at December 31, 2006, of $419,975,791.

The most significant trading gains of approximately 8.2% were recorded in the global interest rate sector, primarily during January, April, May, and June from short positions in European and U.S. interest rate futures as prices trended lower amid solid economic data, rising equity prices, and surging home prices in the United Kingdom and the United States, which reduced demand for the “safe haven” of fixed-income investments.  Further gains were recorded during November from newly established long positions in European and U.S. fixed-income futures as prices increased following a sharp decline in global equity markets and forecasts of deeper losses related to sub-prime investments, which fueled speculation that the U.S. Federal Reserve and Bank of England might need to reduce borrowing costs in response to widespread fears of an economic decline.  Within the currency sector, gains of approximately 7.0% were experienced primarily during April, May, and June from short positions in the U.S. dollar versus most of its major rivals, notably the Turkish lira, Brazilian real, euro, and

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Canadian dollar, as the value of the U.S. dollar declined relative to these currencies amid news that foreign central banks had diversified their currency holdings to non-U.S. dollar-denominated assets and fears that an economic slowdown in the United States might lead the U.S. Federal Reserve to lower interest rates.  Meanwhile, the value of the Canadian dollar, also known as a “commodity currency”, moved higher in the wake of consistently rising commodity prices.  During September and October, the value of the U.S. dollar continued to decline against the aforementioned currencies leading up to and after the U.S. Federal Reserve’s decision to reduce its benchmark interest rate to 4.5%, as well as on indications for further rate reductions in the near term.  Within the energy markets, gains of approximately 1.2% were experienced primarily during June, July, September, October, and December from long futures positions in crude oil and its related products as prices trended higher due to persistent concerns that instability in Iraq and tension regarding Iran’s nuclear program might negatively affect global supply.  In addition, energy prices increased due to continued weakness in the value of the U.S. dollar as U.S. dollar-denominated assets became more attractive to investors.  Additional gains of approximately 0.6% were recorded within the global stock index sector, primarily during January, April, and May from long positions in German and Hong Kong equity index futures as prices increased on continued optimism about the future of the global economy, as well as strong corporate earnings and increased merger and acquisition activity.  In addition, Hong Kong equity index futures prices increased in September amid strength in the technology sector.  Smaller gains of approximately 0.3% were recorded in the agricultural markets, primarily during February, August, and September from long futures positions in the soybean complex as prices increased amid news of


- 20 -

 
 

 

 persistent demand and concerns that hot, dry weather in U.S. growing regions might have damaged crops.  Further gains were experienced during December as prices continued to move higher amid speculation that the rising cost of oil might boost demand for alternative biofuels made from crops.  Elsewhere, long positions in the wheat futures resulted in gains as prices increased during September due to persistently strong international demand and fears of a shortage in supply.  A portion of the Partnership’s gains for the year was offset by a loss of approximately 0.9% within the metals sector, primarily during January, February, and May from long positions in copper, aluminum, and zinc futures as prices declined following news that the Chinese government might raise export taxes for base metals, while rising production and inventories might create a global surplus.  Additional losses were experienced during November from both short and long futures positions in copper as prices moved without consistent direction due to conflicting data regarding supply and demand.

For an analysis of unrealized gains and (losses) by contract type and a further description of 2009 trading results, refer to the Partnership’s Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009, which is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 13.01 of this Form 10-K.

The Partnership’s gains and losses are allocated among its partners for income tax purposes.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Contractual Obligations.
The Partnership does not have any off-balance sheet arrangements, nor does it have contractual obligations or commercial commitments to make future payments that would affect its liquidity or capital resources.

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Market Risk.
The Partnership is a party to financial instruments with elements of off-balance sheet market and credit risk.  The Partnership trades futures contracts, options on futures contracts and forward contracts on physical commodities and other commodity interests, including, but not limited to, foreign currencies, financial instruments, metals, energy, and agricultural products. In entering into these contracts, the Partnership is subject to the market risk that such contracts may be significantly influenced by market conditions, such as interest rate volatility, resulting in such contracts’ being less valuable. If the markets should move against all of the positions held by the Partnership at the same time, and the Trading Advisor was unable to offset positions of the Partnership, the Partnership could lose all of its assets and the limited partners would realize a loss equal to 100% of their capital account.

In addition to the Trading Advisor’s internal controls, the Trading Advisor must comply with the Partnership’s trading policies that include standards for liquidity and leverage that must be maintained.  The Trading Advisor and Demeter monitor the Partnership's trading activities to ensure compliance with the trading policies and Demeter can require the Trading Advisor to modify positions of the Partnership if Demeter believes they violate the Partnership's trading policies.

Credit Risk.
In addition to market risk, in entering into futures, forward and options contracts, there is a credit risk to the Partnership that the counterparty on a contract will not be able to meet its obligations to the Partnership.  The ultimate counterparty or guarantor of the Partnership for futures, forward and options contracts, traded

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in the United States and most foreign exchanges on which the Partnership trades is the clearinghouse associated with such exchange.  In general, a clearinghouse is backed by the membership of the exchange and will act in the event of non-performance by one of its members or one of its member’s customers, which should significantly reduce this credit risk.  There is no assurance that a clearinghouse, exchange, or other exchange member will meet its obligations to the Partnership, and Demeter and the commodity brokers will not indemnify the Partnership against a default by such parties. Further, the law is unclear as to whether a commodity broker has any obligation to protect its customers from loss in the event of an exchange or clearinghouse defaulting on trades effected for the broker’s customers.  In cases where the Partnership trades off-exchange forward contracts with a counterparty, the sole recourse of the Partnership will be the forward contract’s counterparty.

Demeter deals with these credit risks of the Partnership in several ways.  First, Demeter monitors the Partnership’s credit exposure to each exchange on a daily basis.  The commodity brokers inform the Partnership, as with all of their customers, of the Partnership’s net margin requirements for all of its existing open positions, and Demeter has installed a system which permits it to monitor the Partnership’s potential net credit exposure, exchange by exchange, by adding the unrealized trading gains on each exchange, if any, to the Partnership’s margin liability thereon.

Second, the Partnership’s trading policies limit the amount of its net assets that can be committed at any given time to futures contracts and require a minimum amount of diversification in the Partnership’s trading, usually over several different products and exchanges.  Historically, the Partnership’s exposure to any one

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exchange has typically amounted to only a small percentage of its total net assets and on those relatively few
occasions where the Partnership’s credit exposure climbs above such level, Demeter deals with the situation on a case by case basis, carefully weighing whether the increased level of credit exposure remains appropriate.  Material changes to the trading policies may be made only with the prior written approval of the limited partners owning more than 50% of Units then outstanding.

Third, with respect to forward contract trading, the Partnership trades with only those counterparties which Demeter, together with MS&Co., has determined to be creditworthy.  The Partnership presently deals with MS&Co. as the sole counterparty on all trading of foreign currency forward contracts.

For additional information, see the “Financial Instruments” section under “Notes to Financial Statements” in the Partnership’s Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009, which is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 13.01 of this Form 10-K.

Inflation has not been a major factor in the Partnership’s operations.

Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures.
As defined by Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 820-10-55, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (formerly Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 157, Fair Value Measurements), fair value is the amount that would be recovered when an asset is sold or an amount paid to transfer a liability, in an ordinary transaction between market participants at the measurement date

- 24 -

 
 

 

(exit price).  Market price observability is impacted by a number of factors, including the types of investments, the characteristics specific to the investment, and the state of the market (including the existence and the transparency of transactions between market participants).  Investments with readily available actively quoted prices in an ordinary market will generally have a higher degree of market price observability and a lesser degree of judgment used in measuring fair value.

ASC 820-10-55 requires use of a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three levels: Level 1 – unadjusted quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities; Level 2 - inputs other than unadjusted quoted market prices that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly (including quoted prices for similar investments, interest rates, credit risk); and Level 3 - unobservable inputs for the asset or liability (including the Partnership’s own assumptions used in determining the fair value of investments).

In certain cases, the inputs used to measure fair value may fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy.  In such cases, an investment’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement.  The Partnership’s assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment, and considers factors specific to the investment.




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The following tables summarize the valuation of the Partnership’s investments according to the level of the above ASC 820-10-55 fair value hierarchy as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively:
 
Unadjusted
      Quoted Prices in
     Active Markets for
       Identical Assets
               (Level 1)
 
     Significant Other
   Observable
       Inputs
     (Level 2)
 
 Significant
  Unobservable
    Inputs
   (Level 3)
 
 
 
 
Total
December 31, 2009
$
$
$
$
Assets
       
Net unrealized gain on open contracts
4,878,451
1,043,055
n/a
5,921,506
         
December 31, 2008
       
Assets
       
Net unrealized gain (loss) on open contracts
 
2,306,468
 
(1,323,077)
 
n/a
 
983,391


Derivatives and Hedging
ASC 815-10-65, Derivatives and Hedging (formerly, SFAS No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activitiesan amendment of SFAS No. 133), which was issued in March 2008, is intended to improve financial reporting about derivative instruments and hedging activities by requiring enhanced disclosures to enable investors to better  understand how those instruments and activities are accounted for; how and why they are used; and their effects on a Partnership’s financial position, financial performance, and cash flows.  ASC 815-10-65 is effective as of January 1, 2009 for the Partnership.  The adoption of ASC 815-10-65 did not have a material impact on the Partnership’s financial statements, other than enhanced financial statements disclosures.

The Partnership’s objective is to profit from speculative trading in Futures Interests.  Therefore, the Trading Advisor for the Partnership will take speculative positions in Futures Interests where they feel the best profit opportunities exist for their trading strategy.  As such, the absolute quantity (the total of

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 the open long and open short positions) has been presented as a part of the volume disclosure, as position direction is not an indicative factor in such volume disclosures. In regards to foreign currency forward trades, each notional quantity amount has been converted to an equivalent contract based upon an industry convention.

The following table summarizes the valuation of the Partnership’s investments as required by the ASC 815-10-65 as of December 31, 2009 and reflects the contracts outstanding at such time.

The Effect of Trading Activities on the Statements of Financial Condition as of December 31, 2009:
Futures and Forward Contracts
Long Unrealized
Gain
Long Unrealized
Loss
 Short Unrealized
Gain
  Short Unrealized
Loss
Net
Unrealized Gain/(Loss)
Average number of contracts
outstanding
for the year
(absolute quantity)
 
$
$
$
$
$
 
             
Commodity
7,291,580
(1,397,853)
499,089
(253,409)
6,139,407
4,941
Equity
1,413,940
(626,978)
18,522
805,484
3,384
Foreign currency
1,718,378
(1,102,078)
1,070,003
(631,454)
1,054,849
41,153
Interest rate
      154,564
(2,323,801)
   227,907
             (97,248)
(2,038,578)
10,824
Total
  10,578,462
  (5,450,710)
 1,815,521
   (982,111)
  5,961,162
 
             
Unrealized currency loss
       
  (39,656)
 
Total net unrealized gain on open contracts
       
 
  5,921,506
 


The following table summarizes the net trading results of the Partnership for the year ended December 31, 2009 as required by the disclosures about Derivatives and Hedging Topic of ASC 815-10-65.







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The Effect of Trading Activities on the Statements of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2009 included in Total Trading Results:

Type of Instrument
$
   
Commodity
1,660,953
Equity
45,253,372
Foreign currency
13,138,360
Interest rate
(25,166,393)
Unrealized currency loss
  (1,214,454)
Total
   33,671,838

Line Items on the Statements of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2009:

Trading Results
$
   
Realized
28,733,723
Net change in unrealized
   4,938,115
   
Total Trading Results
   33,671,838

Other Pronouncements
(a)  Accounting Standards Codification and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
On July 1, 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 168, The FASB Accounting Standards Codification and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, also known as FASB ASC 105-10, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“ASC 105-10” or the “Codification”).  ASC 105-10 established the exclusive authoritative reference for U.S. GAAP for use in financial statements except for SEC rules and interpretive releases, which are also authoritative GAAP for SEC registrants.  The Codification supersedes all existing non-SEC accounting and reporting standards.  The Codification became the single source of authoritative accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009.

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(b)  Subsequent Events
The Partnership adopted ASC 855-10, Subsequent Events (formerly, SFAS No. 165, Subsequent Events), which was issued in May 2009, and Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2010-09, Subsequent Events (Topic 855) Amendments to Certain Recognition and Disclosures Requirements, which was issued in February 2010.  ASC 855-10 establishes general standards of accounting for and disclosure of events that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued.  ASC 855-10 is effective for the interim and annual periods ending after June 15, 2009 and ASU No. 2010-09 is effective immediately.  Management has performed its evaluation of subsequent events, and has determined that there were no subsequent events requiring adjustment or disclosures in the financial statements.

(c)  Fair Value Measurements
ASC 820-10-65, Fair Value Measurements (formerly, FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) SFAS No. 157-4, Determining Fair Value When the Volume and Level of Activity for the Asset or Liability Have Significantly Decreased and Identifying Transactions That Are Not Orderly), was issued in April 2009.  ASC 820-10-65 provides additional guidance for determining fair value and requires new disclosures regarding the categories of fair value instruments, as well as the inputs and valuation techniques utilized to determine fair value and any changes to the inputs and valuation techniques during the period.  ASC 820-10-65 is effective for the interim and annual periods ending after June 15, 2009.  The adoption of ASC 820-10-65 did not have a material impact on the Partnership’s financial statements.


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Recent Accounting Pronouncements
(a)  Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements
In January 2010, the FASB issued ASU No. 2010-06, Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements, which, among other things, amends ASC 820 to require entities to separately present purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements in their reconciliation of Level 3 fair value measurements (i.e., to present such items on a gross basis rather than on a net basis), and which clarifies existing disclosure requirements provided by ASC 820 regarding the level of disaggregation and the inputs and valuation techniques used to measure fair value for measurements that fall within either Level 2 or Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy.  ASU No. 2010-06 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements in the roll forward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements which are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010, and for interim periods within those fiscal years.  The Partnership is currently assessing the impact of adopting ASU No. 2010-06.

(b) Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities

In June 2009, the FASB issued ASC 810-10, Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities (formerly, SFAS 167, Amendments to FASB Interpretation No. 46(R), Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities). ASC 810-10 contains new criteria for determining the primary beneficiary, and increases the frequency of required reassessments to determine whether a company is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity. ASC 810-10 also contains a new requirement that any term, transaction, or arrangement that does

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not have a substantive effect on an entity’s status as a variable interest entity, a company’s power over a variable interest entity, or a company’s obligation to absorb losses or its right to receive benefits of an entity must be disregarded in applying Interpretation 46(R)’s provisions. ASC 810-10 is applicable for annual periods beginning after November 15, 2009, and interim periods thereafter. Effective February 25, 2010, the FASB has decided to indefinitely defer the application of ASC 810-10 for certain entities. Management believes that the Partnership meets the criteria for the indefinite deferral of the application of ASC 810-10.

Item 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
Introduction

The Partnership is a commodity pool engaged primarily in the speculative trading of futures, forwards and options. The market-sensitive instruments held by the Partnership are acquired for speculative trading purposes only and, as a result, all or substantially all of the Partnership’s assets are at risk of trading loss.  Unlike an operating company, the risk of market-sensitive instruments is inherent to the primary business activity of the Partnership.

The futures, forwards and options on such contracts traded by the Partnership involve varying degrees of related market risk.  Market risk is often dependent upon changes in the level or volatility of interest rates, exchange rates, and prices of financial instruments and commodities, factors that result in frequent changes in the fair value of the Partnership’s open positions, and consequently in its earnings, whether realized or unrealized, and cash flow.  Gains and losses on open positions of exchange- traded futures,

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exchange-traded forward, and exchange-traded futures-styled options contracts are settled daily through variation margin.  Gains and losses on off-exchange-traded forward currency contracts are settled upon termination of the contract.  Gains and losses on off-exchange-traded forward currency options contracts are settled upon an agreed upon settlement date.  However, the Partnership is required to meet margin requirements equal to the net unrealized loss on open forward currency contracts in the Partnership accounts with the counterparty, which is accomplished by daily maintenance of the cash balance in a custody account held at MS&Co.

The Partnership’s total market risk may increase or decrease as it is influenced by a wide variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the diversification among the Partnership’s open positions, the volatility present within the markets, and the liquidity of the markets.

The face value of the market sector instruments held by the Partnership is typically many times the applicable margin requirements.  Margin requirements generally range between 2% and 15% of contract face value.  Additionally, the use of leverage causes the face value of the market sector instruments held by the Partnership typically to be many times the total capitalization of the Partnership.

The Partnership’s past performance is no guarantee of its future results.  Any attempt to numerically quantify the Partnership’s market risk is limited by the uncertainty of its speculative trading.  The Partnership’s speculative trading and use of leverage may cause future losses and volatility (i.e., “risk of ruin”) that far exceed the Partnership’s experience to date under the “Partnership’s Value at Risk in Different Market Sectors” section and significantly exceed the Value at Risk (“VaR”) tables disclosed.
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Limited partners will not be liable for losses exceeding the current net asset value of their investment.

Quantifying the Partnership’s Trading Value at Risk
The following quantitative disclosures regarding the Partnership’s market risk exposures contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor from civil liability provided for such statements by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (set forth in Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).  All quantitative disclosures in this section are deemed to be forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor, except for statements of historical fact.

The Partnership accounts for open positions on the basis of mark to market accounting principles.  Any loss in the market value of the Partnership’s open positions is directly reflected in the Partnership’s earnings and cash flow.

The Partnership’s risk exposure in the market sectors traded by the Trading Advisor is estimated below in terms of VaR. The Partnership estimates VaR using a model based upon historical simulation (with a confidence level of 99%) which involves constructing a distribution of hypothetical daily changes in the value of a trading portfolio.  The VaR model takes into account linear exposures to risks including equity and commodity prices, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, and correlation among these variables. The hypothetical changes in portfolio value are based on daily percentage changes observed in key market indices or other market factors (“market risk factors”) to which the portfolio is sensitive.

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The one-day 99% confidence level of the Partnership’s VaR corresponds to the negative change in portfolio value that, based on observed market risk factors, would have been exceeded once in 100 trading days, or one day in 100.  VaR typically does not represent the worst case outcome.  Demeter uses approximately four years of daily market data (1,000 observations) and re-values its portfolio (using delta-gamma approximations) for each of the historical market moves that occurred over this time period.  This generates a probability distribution of daily “simulated profit and loss” outcomes.  The VaR is the appropriate percentile of this distribution.  For example, the 99% one-day VaR would represent the 10th worst outcome from Demeter’s simulated profit and loss series.

The Partnership’s VaR computations are based on the risk representation of the underlying benchmark for each instrument or contract and do not distinguish between exchange and non-exchange dealer-based instruments.  They are also not based on exchange and/or dealer-based maintenance margin requirements.

VaR models, including the Partnership’s, are continually evolving as trading portfolios become more diverse and modeling techniques and systems capabilities improve.  Please note that the VaR model is used to numerically quantify market risk for historic reporting purposes only and is not utilized by either Demeter or the Trading Advisor in their daily risk management activities.  Please further note that VaR as described above may not be comparable to similarly-titled measures used by other entities.


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The Partnership’s Value at Risk in Different Market Sectors
The following table indicates the VaR associated with the Partnership’s open positions as a percentage of total net assets by primary market risk category at December 31, 2009 and 2008.  At December 31, 2009 and 2008, the Partnership’s total capitalization was approximately $400 million and $525 million, respectively.

Primary Market
December 31, 2009
December 31, 2008
Risk Category
Value at Risk
Value at Risk
     
Equity
(2.65)%
(0.05)%
     
Currency
(0.93)
(0.07)
     
Interest Rate
(0.61)
(0.32)
     
Commodity
   (1.71)
(0.19)
     
Aggregate Value at Risk
(4.44)%
(0.42)%

The VaR for a market category represents the one-day downside risk for the aggregate exposures associated with this market category.  The Aggregate Value at Risk listed above represents the VaR of the Partnership’s open positions across all the market categories, and is less than the sum of the VaRs for all such market categories due to the diversification benefit across asset classes.

Because the business of the Partnership is the speculative trading of futures, forwards and options, the composition of its trading portfolio can change significantly over any given time period, or even within a single trading day.  Such changes could positively or negatively materially impact market risk as measured by VaR.
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The tables below supplement the December 31, 2009 and 2008 VaR set forth above by presenting the Partnership’s high, low, and average VaR, as a percentage of total net assets for the four quarter-end reporting periods from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2009 and January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2008, respectively.

December 31, 2009
     
Primary Market Risk Category
High
Low
Average
Equity
(3.45)%
(0.64)%
(2.21)%
Currency
(1.37)
(0.51)
(0.96)
Interest Rate
  (1.78)
(0.32)
(0.85)
Commodity
   (1.71)
(0.28)
(0.98)
Aggregate Value at Risk
  (4.44)%
(0.95)%
(3.19)%

December 31, 2008
     
Primary Market Risk Category
High
Low
Average
Equity
(0.59)%
(0.05)%
(0.29)%
Currency
(0.98)
(0.07)
(0.59)
Interest Rate
  (0.35)
(0.22)
 (0.30)
Commodity
   (0.97)
(0.19)
 (0.54)
Aggregate Value at Risk
 (1.26)%
(0.42)%
 (0.91)%
 






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Limitations on Value at Risk as an Assessment of Market Risk

VaR models permit estimation of a portfolio’s aggregate market risk exposure, incorporating a range of varied market risks, reflect risk reduction due to portfolio diversification or hedging activities, and can cover a wide range of portfolio assets.  However, VaR risk measures should be viewed in light of the methodology’s limitations, which include, but may not be limited to the following:

·  
past changes in market risk factors will not always result in accurate predictions of the distributions and correlations of future market movements;
·  
changes in portfolio value caused by market movements may differ from those of the VaR model;
·  
VaR results reflect past market fluctuations applied to current trading positions while future risk depends on future positions;
·  
VaR using a one-day time horizon does not fully capture the market risk of positions that cannot be liquidated or hedged within one day; and
·  
the historical market risk factor data used for VaR estimation may provide only limited insight into losses that could be incurred under certain unusual market movements.

In addition, the VaR tables above, as well as the past performance of the Partnership, give no indication of the Partnership’s potential “risk of ruin”.

The VaR tables provided present the results of the Partnership’s VaR for each of the Partnership’s market risk exposures and on an aggregate basis at December 31, 2009 and 2008, and for the four quarter-end


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reporting periods during calendar years 2009 and 2008. VaR is not necessarily representative of the Partnership’s historic risk, nor should it be used to predict the Partnership’s future financial performance or its ability to manage or monitor risk.  There can be no assurance that the Partnership’s actual losses on a particular day will not exceed the VaR amounts indicated above or that such losses will not occur more than once in 100 trading days.

Non-Trading Risk
The Partnership has non-trading market risk on its foreign cash balances.  These balances and any market risk they may represent are immaterial.

The Partnership also maintains a substantial portion of its available assets in cash at MS&Co.; as of December 31, 2009, such amount is equal to approximately 93% of the Partnership‘s net asset value.  A decline in short-term interest rates would result in a decline in the Partnership’s cash management income. This cash flow risk is not considered to be material.

Materiality, as used throughout this section, is based on an assessment of reasonably possible market movements and any associated potential losses, taking into account the leverage, optionality, and multiplier features of the Partnership’s market-sensitive instruments, in relation to the Partnership’s net assets.

Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Primary Trading Risk Exposures
The following qualitative disclosures regarding the Partnership’s market risk exposures – except for (A)

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those disclosures that are statements of historical fact and (B) the descriptions of how the Partnership manages its primary market risk exposures – constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act.  The Partnership’s primary market risk exposures, as well as the strategies used and to be used by Demeter and the Trading  Advisor for managing such exposures, are subject to numerous uncertainties, contingencies and risks, any one of which could cause the actual results of the Partnership’s risk controls to differ materially from the objectives of such strategies. Government interventions, defaults and expropriations, illiquid markets, the emergence of dominant fundamental factors, political upheavals, changes in historical price relationships, an influx of new market participants, increased regulation, and many other factors could result in material losses, as well as in material changes to the risk exposures and the risk management strategies of the Partnership. Investors must be prepared to lose all or substantially all of their investment in the Partnership.

The Trading Advisor, in general, tends to utilize trading system(s) to take positions when market opportunities develop, and Demeter anticipates that the Trading Advisor will continue to do so.

The following were the primary trading risk exposures of the Partnership at December 31, 2009, by market sector.  It may be anticipated, however, that these market exposures will vary materially over time.

Equity.  The largest market exposure of the Partnership at December 31, 2009, was to the global stock index sector, primarily to equity price risk in the G-7 countries.  The G-7 countries consist of France,


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the U.S., the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Italy, and Canada. The stock index futures traded by the Partnership are by law limited to futures on broadly-based indices.  At December 31, 2009, the Partnership’s primary market exposures were to the CAC 40 (France), FTSE 100 (United Kingdom), DAX (Germany), NASDAQ 100 (U.S.), IBEX 35 (Spain), Russell 2000 (U.S.), Euro Stox 50 (Europe), Canadian S&P 60 (Canada), SPI 200 (Australia), Hang Seng (Hong Kong), Nikkei 225 (Japan), Dow Jones (U.S.), S&P 500 (U.S.), AEX (The Netherlands), S&P Midcap (U.S.), and TOPIX (Japan) stock indices.  The Partnership is typically exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the U.S., European, and Pacific Rim stock indices. Static markets would not cause major market changes, but would make it difficult for the Partnership to avoid trendless price movements, resulting in numerous small losses.

Currency.  The third largest market exposure of the Partnership at December 31, 2009, was to the currency sector.  The Partnership’s currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations which disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs.  Interest rate changes, as well as political and general economic conditions influence these fluctuations.  The Partnership trades a number of currencies, including cross-rates - i.e., positions between two currencies other than the U.S. dollar.  At December 31, 2009, the Partnership’s major exposures were to the Australian dollar, Japanese yen, euro, British pound, Swedish krona, Canadian dollar, Swiss franc, Norwegian krone, and Polish zloty currency crosses, as well as to outright U.S. dollar positions.  Outright positions consist of the U.S. dollar vs. other currencies.  These other currencies include major and minor currencies.  Demeter does not anticipate that the risk associated with the Partnership’s currency trades will change significantly in the future.
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Interest Rate.  At December 31, 2009, the Partnership had market exposure to the global interest rate sector.  Exposure was primarily spread across the European, Japanese, U.S., Canadian, and Australian interest rate sectors.  Interest rate movements directly affect the price of the sovereign bond futures positions held by the Partnership and indirectly affect the value of its stock index and currency positions.  Interest rate movements in one country, as well as relative interest rate movements between countries, materially impact the Partnership’s profitability. The Partnership’s interest rate exposure is generally to interest rate fluctuations in the U.S. and the other G-7 countries.  However, the Partnership also takes futures positions in the government debt of smaller nations - e.g., Australia.  Demeter anticipates that the G-7 countries’ and Australian interest rates will remain the primary interest rate exposure of the Partnership for the foreseeable future.  The speculative futures positions held by the Partnership may range from short to long-term instruments.  Consequently, changes in short, medium, or long-term interest rates may have an effect on the Partnership.

Commodity.
Soft Commodities and Agriculturals.  The second largest market exposure of the Partnership at December 31, 2009, was to the markets that comprise these sectors.  Most of the exposure was to the cotton, soybeans, sugar, cocoa, wheat, soybean meal, coffee, corn, live cattle, and soybean oil markets.  Supply and demand inequalities, severe weather disruptions, and market expectations affect price movements in these markets.
 
 

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Energy.  At December 31, 2009, the Partnership had market exposure to the energy sector.  The Partnership’s energy exposure was shared primarily by futures contracts in crude oil and its related products, as well as in natural gas.  Price movements in these markets result from geopolitical developments, particularly in the Middle East, as well as weather patterns and other economic fundamentals.  Significant profits and losses, which have been experienced in the past, are expected to continue to be experienced in the future.  Natural gas has exhibited volatility in prices resulting from weather patterns and supply and demand factors and will likely continue in this choppy pattern.

Metals.  At December 31, 2009, the Partnership had market exposure to the metals sector.  The Partnership’s metals exposure was to fluctuations in the price of base metals, such as aluminum, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel, as well as precious metals, such as gold and silver.  Economic forces, supply and demand inequalities, geopolitical factors, and market expectations influence price movements in these markets.

 
Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Non-Trading Risk Exposure
The following was the only non-trading risk exposure of the Partnership at December 31, 2009:

Foreign Currency Balances. The Partnership’s major foreign currency balances at December 31, 2009, were in euros, British pounds, Japanese yen, Australian dollars, Canadian dollars,


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Swiss francs, and Hong Kong dollars.  The Partnership controls the non-trading risk of foreign currency balances by regularly converting them back into U.S. dollars upon liquidation of their respective positions.

Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Means of Managing Risk Exposure
The Partnership and the Trading Advisor, separately, attempt to manage the risk of the Partnership’s open positions in essentially the same manner in all market categories traded.  Demeter attempts to manage market exposure by diversifying the Partnership’s assets among different market sectors through the selection of a Commodity Trading Advisor and by daily monitoring its performance.  In addition, the Trading Advisor establishes diversification guidelines, often set in terms of the maximum margin to be committed to positions in any one market sector or market-sensitive instrument.

Demeter monitors and controls the risk of the Partnership’s non-trading instrument, cash.  Cash is the only Partnership investment directed by Demeter, rather than the Trading Advisor.


Item 8.  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

The Financial Statements are incorporated by reference to the Partnership's Annual Report, which is filed as Exhibit 13.01 hereto.




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Supplementary data specified by Item 302 of Regulation S-K:

Summary of Quarterly Results (Unaudited)


 
Total Trading Results
Net
Net Income/
Quarter Ended
including interest income
Income/(Loss)
(Loss) Per Unit
       
2009
     
March 31
$      (4,875,075)
$   (16,819,838)           
$  (1.00)
June 30
(9,204,328)
(17,889,607)          
(1.16)
September 30
45,743,954
37,584,015
2.56
December 31
          2,389,855
   (8,124,815)
  (0.64)
       
Total
 $    34,054,406
             $    (5,250,245)
   $ (0.24)
       
       
2008
     
March 31
$      54,841,750
$    45,755,139           
$   2.30
June 30
52,253,850
42,545,589             
2.18
September 30
  (21,666,831)
 (31,578,952)
 (1.64)
December 31
     105,436,171
   83,744,498
   4.27
       
Total
 $  190,864,940
 $   140,466,274
   $   7.11


Item 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

Item 9A.  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
As of the end of the period covered by this annual  report, the President and Chief Financial Officer of Demeter have evaluated the effectiveness of the Partnership’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act), and have judged such controls and procedures to be effective.
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Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Demeter is responsible for the management of the Partnership.

Management of Demeter (“Management”) is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting.  The internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

The Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

·  
Pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Partnership;

·  
Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP, and that the Partnership’s transactions are being made only in accordance with authorizations of Management and directors of Demeter; and

·  
Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection and correction of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Partnership’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.


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Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.  Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Management assessed the effectiveness of the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009.  In making this assessment, Management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control-Integrated Framework. Based on our assessment and those criteria, Management believes that the Partnership maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009.

Attestation Report of the Registered Public Accounting Firm
Deloitte & Touche LLP, the Partnership’s independent registered public accounting firm, has issued an attestation report on the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting.  This report, which expresses an unqualified opinion on the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting, appears under “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in the Partnership’s Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting
There have been no changes during the period covered by this annual report in the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act) that have

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materially affected or are reasonably likely to affect the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting.

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls
Any control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide reasonable (not absolute) assurance that its objectives will be met.  Furthermore, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected.

Item 9A(T).  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Under the supervision and with the participation of the management of Demeter, at the time this annual report was filed, Demeter’s President (Demeter’s principal executive officer) and Chief Financial Officer (Demeter’s principal financial officer) have evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Partnership’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(c) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of December 31, 2009.  The Partnership’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that information the Partnership is required to disclose in the reports that the Partnership files or submits under the Exchange Act are recorded, processed and summarized and reported within the time period specified in the applicable rules and forms.  Based on this evaluation, the President and Chief Financial Officer of Demeter have concluded that the disclosure controls and procedures of the Partnership were effective at December 31, 2009.

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Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Demeter is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act).  Demeter has assessed the effectiveness of the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2009.  In making this assessment, Demeter used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, known as COSO, in Internal Control-Integrated Framework.  Demeter has concluded that, as of December 31, 2009, the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting is effective based on these criteria.  This report shall not be deemed to be filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that section.  This annual report does not include an attestation report of the Partnership’s independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting.  Management's report was not subject to attestation by the Partnership’s independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to temporary rules of the SEC that permit the Partnership to provide only management's report in this annual report.

Item 9B.  OTHER INFORMATION
None.





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Item 10.  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

There are no directors or executive officers of the Partnership.  The Partnership is managed by Demeter, its general partner.


Directors and Officers of the General Partner
The directors and executive officers of Demeter are as follows:

Effective May 1, 2006, Mr. Walter Davis, age 45, is a Director, Chairman of the Board of Directors, and President of Demeter.  Mr. Davis is a Managing Director at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and the Director of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney’s Managed Futures Department.  Prior to joining Morgan Stanley in 1999, Mr. Davis worked for Chase Manhattan Bank’s Alternative Investment Group.  Throughout his career, Mr. Davis has been involved with the development, management, and marketing of a diverse array of commodity pools, hedge funds, and other alternative investment funds.  Mr. Davis received an M.B.A. in Finance and International Business from the Columbia University Graduate School of Business in 1992 and a B.A. degree in Economics from the University of the South in 1987.

Effective December 5, 2002, Mr. Frank Zafran, age 54, is a Director of Demeter.  Mr. Zafran is a Managing Director at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and in June 2009, was named Director of Annuities.  Previously, Mr. Zafran was Director of the Wealth Solutions Division.  Mr. Zafran joined the firm in 1979 and has held various positions in Corporate Accounting and the Insurance

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Department, including Senior Operations Officer — Insurance Division, until his appointment in 2000 as Director of Retirement Plan Services, responsible for all aspects of 401(k) Plan Services, including marketing, sales, and operations.  Subsequently, he was named Chief Administrative Officer of Morgan Stanley’s Client Solution Division in 2002.  Mr. Zafran, in addition of being a Director of Demeter, is a Director of Morgan Stanley Insurance Services, Inc., Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Insurance Services LLC, The Insured Retirement Institute and Community Hospice of Bergen County Inc., and Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Insurance Services (Arizona) Inc.  Mr. Zafran received a B.S. degree in Accounting from Brooklyn College, New York.

Effective March 31, 2003, Mr. Douglas J. Ketterer, age 44, is a Director of Demeter.  Mr. Ketterer is a Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer, Wealth Management Group, within Morgan Stanley Smith Barney.  Mr. Ketterer joined Morgan Stanley in 1990 and has served in many roles in the corporate finance/investment banking, asset management, and wealth management divisions of the firm; most recently as a head of the Product Group with responsibility for a number of departments (including, among others, the Alternative Investments Group, Consulting Services Group, Annuities & Insurance Department, and Retirement & Equity Solutions Group), which offer products and services through Morgan Stanley’s Global Wealth Management Group.  Mr. Ketterer, in addition of being a Director of Demeter, is a Director of Morgan Stanley GWM Feeder Strategies LLC, Morgan Stanley HedgePremier GP LLC, and Morgan Stanley Offshore Investment Company Ltd.  Mr. Ketterer received his M.B.A. from New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business and his B.S. degree in Finance from the University at Albany’s School of Business.


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Effective May 1, 2005, Mr. Harry Handler, age 51, is a Director of Demeter. Mr. Handler serves as an Executive Director at Morgan Stanley in the Global Wealth Management Group.  Mr. Handler works in the Capital Markets Division as Equity Business Officer.  Additionally, Mr. Handler serves as Chairman of the Global Wealth Management Group’s Best Execution Committee and manages the Stock Lending business.  In his prior position, Mr. Handler was a Systems Director in Information Technology, in charge of Equity and Fixed Income Trading Systems along with the Special Products, such as Unit Trusts, Managed Futures, Futures and Annuities.  Prior to his transfer to the Information Technology Area, Mr. Handler managed the Foreign Currency and Precious Metals Trading Desk of Dean Witter, a predecessor company to Morgan Stanley.  He also held various positions in the Futures Division where he helped to build the Precious Metals Trading Operation of Dean Witter.  Before joining Dean Witter, Mr. Handler worked at Mocatta Metals as an Assistant to the Chairman. His roles at Mocatta Metals included stints on the Futures Order Entry Desk and the Commodities Exchange Trading Floor.  Additional work included building a computerized Futures Trading System and writing a history of the company.  Mr. Handler graduated on the Dean’s List from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a B.A. degree and a double major in History and Political Science.

Effective March 20, 2008, Mr. Jose Morales, age 33, is a Director of Demeter.  Mr. Morales has been a principal of Demeter since June 23, 2008.  Mr. Morales is an Executive Director at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and is the Associate Director of its New Products Committee.  Prior to his current role, Mr. Morales headed the Product Development Group for Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated’s Global Wealth Management business since August 2007.  Mr. Morales joined

- 51 -

 
 

 

Morgan Stanley in September 1998 as an analyst in the investment management division, and subsequently held positions in the Morgan Stanley Investment Management Global Product Development Group from May 2000 to December 2003, in the Global Wealth Management Product Development Group from December 2003 to June 2006, and in Global Wealth Management Alternative Investments Product Development & Management from June 2006 to August 2007.  Prior to his appointment as a director of Demeter, Mr. Morales served as a member of the managed Futures Investment Management Committee from March of 2005 until March of 2008.  Mr. Morales received an M.B.A. with a concentration in Finance from the NYU Stern School of Business in June 2007 and a B.S. in International Business Administration with a concentration in Economics from Fordham University in 1998.

Effective May 11, 2006, Mr. Michael McGrath, age 41, is a Director of Demeter.  Mr. McGrath is a Managing Director at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and currently serves as the Head of Alternative Investments for the Global Wealth Management Group of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney. He also serves on the Management Committee of the Global Wealth Management Group.   Prior to his current role, Mr. McGrath served as the Director of Product Management for the Consulting Services Group in Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated as well as the Chief Operating Officer for Private Wealth Management North America and Private Wealth Management Latin America (the Americas) and the Director of Product Development for Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated’s Global Wealth Management Group.  Mr. McGrath joined Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated in May 2004, after three years with Nuveen Investments, a publicly traded investment management company headquartered in Chicago, Illinois.  At Nuveen, Mr. McGrath served as a Managing

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Director and oversaw the development of alternative investment products catering to the ultra-high net worth investor.  Mr. McGrath, in addition to being a Director of Demeter is a Director of Morgan Stanley GWM Feeder Strategies LLC and Morgan Stanley HedgePremier GP LLC.  Mr. McGrath received his B.A. degree from Saint Peters College in 1990, and currently serves on the school’s Board of Regents. He received his M.B.A. in Finance from New York University in 1996.

Effective September 22, 2006, Mr. Jacques Chappuis, age 40, is a Director of Demeter.  Mr. Chappuis is a Managing Director of Morgan Stanley and Head of Alternative Investment Partners.  He joined Morgan Stanley in 2006 and has 16 years of relevant industry experience.  Prior to his current role, he was Head of Alternative Investments for Morgan Stanley’s Global Wealth Management Group responsible for all aspects of the alternative investments platform including Morgan Stanley’s industry-leading managed futures fund of fund business and customized hedge fund portfolio business.  Mr. Chappuis has experience managing Fund of Fund organizations.  Demeter previously reported to him, as did Graystone Consulting, as does Morgan Stanley Alternative Investment Partners currently.  Before joining Morgan Stanley, Jacques was Head of Alternative Investments for Citigroup’s Global Wealth Management Group and prior to that a Managing Director at Citigroup Alternative Investments.  In both roles, Jacques’ responsibilities spanned the spectrum of alternative investments including hedge funds, private equity, and real estate, among others.  Previously, Jacques was a consultant at the Boston Consulting Group where he focused on the financial services sector, and an investment banker at Bankers Trust Company.  Mr. Jacques Chappuis, in addition of being a Director of Demeter, is a Director of Morgan Stanley AIP Funding Inc. and Morgan Stanley HedgePremier GP LLC, Chairman of Morgan Stanley AIP

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(Cayman) GP Ltd., Morgan Stanley Alpha Institutional Cayman Fund SPC, Morgan Stanley Alternative Investments Inc., Morgan Stanley HedgePremier GP LLC, Morgan Stanley Institutional Cayman Fund SPC, and Morgan Stanley Opportunistic Cayman Fund SPC, Managing Director of Morgan Stanley AIP (Cayman) GP Ltd., Morgan Stanley AIP Funding Inc., Morgan Stanley Alternative Investments Inc., Morgan Stanley Institutional Cayman Fund SPC, Morgan Stanley Investment Management Inc., Morgan Stanley Opportunistic Cayman Fund SPC, Morgan Stanley SCRSIC Strategic Partnership Fund GP Inc., and Morgan Stanley Alpha Institutional Cayman Fund SPC, and President of Morgan Stanley Alpha Institutional Cayman Fund SPC, Morgan Stanley SCRSIC Strategic Partnership Fund GP Inc., and Morgan Stanley HedgePremier GP LLC.  Mr. Chappuis was a Director, Chairman, and President of Morgan Stanley GWM Feeder Strategies LLC from February 2007 to September 2009.  Mr. Chappuis received an M.B.A. with honors, from the Columbia University Graduate School of Business in 1998 and a B.A. degree in Finance from Tulane University in 1991.

Effective December 3, 2007, Mr. Christian Angstadt, age 48, serves as Chief Financial Officer of Demeter.  He is an Executive Director within Morgan Stanley’s Financial Control Group.  Mr. Angstadt also serves as Chief Financial Officer for Morgan Stanley Trust NA, and is responsible for the financial management of the regulated bank. Since joining Morgan Stanley in April 1990, Mr. Angstadt has held several positions within the firm’s Financial Control Group, mostly supporting the Asset Management segment (including Chief Financial Officer for Morgan Stanley Asset Management Operations and Morgan Stanley Trust FSB).  Mr. Angstadt received a B.A. degree in Accounting from Montclair University.
 
- 54 -

 
 

 

All of the foregoing directors have indefinite terms.
 
Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance
 
To the Partnership’s knowledge, all required Section 16(a) filings during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009, were timely and correctly made.

Code of Ethics
The Partnership has not adopted a code of ethics that applies to the Partnership’s principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, or persons performing similar functions.  The Partnership is operated by its general partner, Demeter.  The President, Chief Financial Officer, and each member of the Board of Directors of Demeter are employees of Morgan Stanley or Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and are subject to the code of ethics adopted by Morgan Stanley, the text of which can be viewed on Morgan Stanley’s website at http://www.morganstanley. com/individual/ourcommitment/codeofconduct.html.

The Audit Committee
The Partnership is operated by its general partner, Demeter, and has no audit committee.  However, Demeter has a Disclosure Committee that meets quarterly to review periodic filings made by the Partnership for which Demeter acts as the general partner. Demeter’s Disclosure Committee reports directly to the Board of Directors of Demeter.







 
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Item 11.  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The Partnership has no directors and executive officers.  As a limited partnership, the business of the Partnership is managed by Demeter, which is responsible for the administration of the business affairs of the Partnership but receives no compensation for such services.

 
Item 12.   SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND
MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

(a)  Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners – At December 31, 2009, there were no persons known to be beneficial owners of more than 5 percent of the Units.

(b)  Security Ownership of Management – At December 31, 2009, Demeter owned 141,663.501 Units of general partnership interest, representing a 1.02 percent interest in the Partnership.

(c)  Changes in Control – None.


Item 13.  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND
 DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE


Refer to Note 5 – “Related Party Transactions” of “Notes to Financial Statements”, in the accompanying Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009, which is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 13.01 of this Form 10-K.  In its capacity as the Partnership’s retail commodity broker, MS&Co. received commodity brokerage fees (paid and accrued by the Partnership) of $26,465,763 for the year ended December 31, 2009.


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Item 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
MS&Co. on behalf of the Partnership, pays all accounting fees.  The Partnership reimburses MS&Co. through the brokerage fees it pays, as discussed in the Notes to Financial Statements in the Annual Report to the Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009.

 (1)  Audit Fees.  The aggregate fees for professional services rendered by Deloitte & Touche LLP in connection with their audit of the Partnership’s Financial Statements and review of the Financial Statements included in the Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, audit of Management’s assessments of the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting, and in connection with statutory and regulatory filings were approximately $54,009 for the year ended December 31, 2009, and $50,896 for the year ended December 31, 2008.

(2)  Audit-Related Fees.  None.


(3)  Tax Fees. The Partnership did not pay Deloitte & Touche LLP any amounts in 2009 and 2008 for professional services in connection with tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning.  The Partnership engaged another unaffiliated professional firm to provide services in connection with tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning.


 
 
(4)  All Other Fees.  None.
Because the Partnership has no audit committee, the Board of Directors of Demeter, its general partner, functions as the audit committee with respect to the Partnership.  The Board of Directors of

- 57-

 
 

 

Demeter has not established pre-approval policies and procedures with respect to the engagement of audit or permitted non-audit services rendered to the Partnership.  Consequently, all audit and permitted non-audit services provided by Deloitte & Touche LLP that are borne by MS&Co. through the brokerage fees paid for by the Partnership are approved by Morgan Stanley’s Board Audit Committee and the Board of Directors of Demeter.




















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PART IV

Item 15.   EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

1. Listing of Financial Statements
The following financial statements and report of independent registered public accounting firm, all appearing in the accompanying Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009, are incorporated by reference to Exhibit 13.01 of this Form 10-K:
 
-
Report of Deloitte & Touche LLP, independent registered public accounting firm.

 
-
Statements of Financial Condition, including the Condensed Schedules of Investments, as of December 31, 2009 and 2008.

 
-
Statements of Operations, Changes in Partners' Capital, and Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008, and 2007.

-           Notes to Financial Statements.


With the exception of the aforementioned information and the information incorporated in Items 7, 8, and 13, the Annual Report to Limited Partners for the year ended December 31, 2009, is not deemed to be filed with this report.

2. Listing of Financial Statement Schedules
No Financial Statement schedules are required to be filed with this report.

3. Exhibits
For the exhibits incorporated by reference or filed herewith to this report, refer to Exhibit Index on Pages E-1 to E-3.
- 59 -

 
 

 

SIGNATURE

Pursuant to the requirements of the Sections 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY CHARTER GRAHAM L.P.
 
(Registrant)
     
 
By:
Demeter Management LLC
   
(General Partner)
     
March 29, 2010
By:
/s/Walter Davis
   
Walter Davis,
   
President

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

Demeter Management LLC

BY:
/s/
Walter Davis
 
March 29, 2010
   
Walter Davis, President
   
         
 
/s/
Frank Zafran
 
March 29, 2010
   
Frank Zafran, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Douglas J. Ketterer
 
March 29, 2010
   
Douglas J. Ketterer, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Harry Handler
 
March 29, 2010
   
Harry Handler, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Jose A. Morales
 
March 29, 2010
   
Jose A. Morales, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Michael P. McGrath
 
March 29, 2010
   
Michael P. McGrath, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Jacques Chappuis
 
March 29, 2010
   
Jacques Chappuis, Director
   
         
 
/s/
Christian Angstadt
 
March 29, 2010
   
Christian Angstadt, Chief Financial Officer
   

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 EXHIBIT INDEX
ITEM
 
3.01
Form of Amended and Restated Limited Partnership Agreement of the Partnership is incorporated by reference to Exhibit A of the Partnership’s Prospectus, dated May 1, 2008, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3) under the Securities Act of 1933 on May 6, 2008.
 
3.01(a)
Amendment No. 1 to the Amended and Restated Limited Partnership Agreement of the Partnership, dated May 31, 2009, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.01(a) of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 4, 2009.
 
3.02
Certificate of Limited Partnership, dated July 15, 1998, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.02 of the Partnership’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-60115) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 29, 1998.
 
3.03  
Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Limited Partnership, dated November 1, 2001 (changing its name from Dean Witter Graham L.P.), is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.01 of the Partnership's Form 10-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 
3.04
Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Limited Partnership, dated June 1, 2009 (changing the name and mailing address of the general partner of the Partnership), is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.04 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 4, 2009.
 
3.05
Certificate of Amendment of Certificate of Limited Partnership, date September 29, 2009, (changing its name from Morgan Stanley Charter Graham L.P. to Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Charter Graham L.P.), is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.05 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2009.
 
10.02
Management Agreement, dated as of November 6, 1998, among the Partnership, Demeter, and Graham Capital Management, L.P., is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.01 of the Partnership's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 17, 1999.
 
10.03
Form of Subscription and Exchange Agreement and Power of Attorney to be executed by each purchaser of Units is incorporated by reference to Exhibit B of the Partnership’s Prospectus, dated May 1, 2008, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, on May 6, 2008.
 

 

 
 
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10.04
Escrow Agreement, dated as of July 25, 2007, among The Bank of New York, Demeter, and Morgan Stanley & Co. Incorporated is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.04 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 31, 2007.
 
10.05
Amended and Restated Customer Agreement between the Partnership and Morgan Stanley DW, dated as of November 13, 2000, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.01 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 
10.05(a)
Amendment No. 1 to the Amended and Restated Customer Agreement between the Partnership and Morgan Stanley DW Inc. is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.05(a) of the Partnership’s Form 10-Q (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 10, 2005.
 
10.05(b)
Amendment No. 1 to the Customer Agreement between the Partnership and Morgan Stanley DW Inc., dated July 1, 2005, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.05(b) of the Partnership’s Form 10-Q (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 12, 2005.
 
10.06
Commodity Futures Customer Agreement between MS&Co. and the Partnership, and acknowledged and agreed to by Morgan Stanley DW, dated as of November 6, 2000, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.02 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 
10.07
Customer Agreement between the Partnership and MSIP, dated as of November 6, 2000, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.04 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 
10.08
Foreign Exchange and Options Master Agreement between MS&Co. and the Partnership, dated as of August 30, 1999, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.05 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 
10.09
Form of Subscription Agreement Update Form is incorporated by reference to Exhibit C of the Partnership’s Prospectus, dated May 1, 2008, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, on May 6, 2008.
 
10.10
Securities Account Control Agreement among the Partnership and MS&Co. dated as of May 1, 2000, is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.03 of the Partnership’s Form 8-K (File No. 0-25603) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 6, 2001.
 

 
 
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13.01
December 31, 2009, Annual Report to Limited Partners is filed herewith.
 
31.01
Certification of President of Demeter Management LLC, the general partner of the Partnership pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
31.02
Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Demeter Management LLC, the general partner of the Partnership pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
32.01
Certification of President of Demeter Management LLC, the general partner of the Partnership, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
32.02
Certification of Chief Financial Officer of Demeter Management LLC, the general partner of the Partnership, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
































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