Attached files

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EX-31.3 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex31-3.htm
EX-32.2 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex32-2.htm
EX-23.1 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex23-1.htm
EX-32.3 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex32-3.htm
EX-23.3 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex23-3.htm
EX-32.1 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex32-1.htm
EX-31.2 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex31-2.htm
EX-31.1 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex31-1.htm
EX-23.2 - Breitburn Energy Partners LPv177740_ex23-2.htm
 


UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K/A
Amendment No. 2

R
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2008
or
 
¨
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from ___ to ___
 
Commission File Number 001-33055
 
BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
74-3169953
(State or other jurisdiction of
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
Identification Number)
   
515 South Flower Street, Suite 4800
 
Los Angeles, California
90071
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (213) 225-5900

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
     
Common Units Representing Limited Partner Interests
 
Nasdaq Global Select Market
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.     Yes ¨     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.     Yes ¨     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ     No ¨
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.      þ   
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (check one):
 
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨
Smaller reporting company ¨
   
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check-mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ¨     No þ
 
As of February 27, 2009, there were 52,770,011 Common Units outstanding.  The aggregate market value of the Common Units held by non-affiliates of the registrant (98.69 percent) was approximately $1,124,000,000 for the Common Units on June 30, 2008 based on $21.63 per unit, the last reported sales price of the Common Units on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on such date. The calculation of the aggregate market value of the Common Units held by non-affiliates of the registrant is based on an assumption that Quicksilver Resources Inc., which owns 21,347,972 Common Units, representing 40.56 percent of the outstanding Common Units, is a non-affiliate of the registrant.  

 
Documents Incorporated By Reference:
Portions of our definitive Proxy Statement for our 2009 Annual Meeting of Unitholders are hereby incorporated by reference into Part III hereof.
 



 
 

 
 
EXPLANATORY NOTE
 
BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. is filing this Amendment No. 2 on Form 10-K/A (this “Amendment”) to amend its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 2, 2009 (the “Original 10-K”).
 
This Amendment is being filed to amend the Original 10-K solely (i) to correct the certifications by our Principal Executive Officers and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 due to the omission of the phrase “and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f))” in the introductory portion of paragraph 4 of the certifications and the phrase “(the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report)” in paragraph 4(d) of the certifications, (ii) to remove the inappropriate inclusion of the phrase “the audit committee of the board of directors of the registrant’s general partner” and replace it with the phrase “the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing equivalent functions)” in paragraph 5 of the certifications, and (iii) to replace the phrase “Annual Report” with the word “report” in paragraphs 1, 2, 3 and 4(a) of the certifications.  This amendment includes new certifications by our Principal Executive Officers and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Sections 302 and 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, filed as Exhibits 31.1, 31.2, 31.3, 32.1, 32.2 and 32.3 hereto.  Each certification was true and correct as of the date of the filing of the Original 10-K.
 
Pursuant to interpretation 246.13 in the Regulation S-K section of the SEC’s “Compliance & Disclosure Interpretations,” we are also filing full Item 9A disclosures and our consolidated financial statements as part of this Amendment (collectively “Other Information”).  Such Other Information was complete and correct as of the date of the filing of the Original 10-K.

Except as described above, we have not modified or updated other disclosures contained in the Original 10-K, including without limitation the Other Information.  Accordingly, this Amendment, with the exception of the foregoing, does not reflect events occurring after the date of filing of the Original 10-K, or modify or update those disclosures affected by subsequent events.  Consequently, all other information not affected by the corrections described above is unchanged and reflects the disclosures and other information made at the date of the filing of the Original 10-K and should be read in conjunction with our filings with the SEC subsequent to the filing of the Original 10-K, including amendments to those filings, if any.
 
 
1

 

Item 9A.  Controls and Procedures.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports that we file or submit under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our principal executive officers and principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.  See “Management’s Report to Unitholders on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” and “Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” on page F-2 and F-3, respectively, of the consolidated financial statements.

Our general partner’s Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officer, after evaluating the effectiveness of our “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act), as of December 31, 2008, concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2008 that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
 
2

 

 PART IV

Item 15.  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
 
(a)
(1) 
Financial Statements
 
See “Index to the Consolidated Financial Statements” set forth on Page F-1.

 
(2) 
Financial Statement Schedules
 
All schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is presented in the financial statements or notes thereto.
 
(3)
Exhibits

NUMBER
 
DOCUMENT
3.1
 
Certificate of Limited Partnership of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to Amendment No. 1 to Form S-1 filed on July 13, 2006).
     
3.2
 
First Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 10, 2006 and filed on October 16, 2006).
     
3.3
 
Amendment No. 1 to the First Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
3.4
 
Second Amendment and Restated Limited Liability Company Agreement of BreitBurn GP, LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
4.1
 
Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of November 1, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and Quicksilver Resources Inc. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007 and filed on November 6, 2007).
     
4.2
 
Unit Purchase Rights Agreement, dated as of December 22, 2008, between BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 22, 2008 and filed on December 23, 2008).
     
10.1
 
Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership of BreitBurn Energy Partners I, L.P. dated May 5, 2003 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 25, 2007 and filed May 29, 2007).
     
10.2
 
Contribution, Conveyance and Assumption Agreement, dated as of October 10, 2006, by and among Pro GP Corp., Pro LP Corp., BreitBurn Energy Corporation, BreitBurn Energy Company L.P., BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC, BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P., BreitBurn Operating GP, LLC and BreitBurn Operating L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 10, 2006 and filed on October 16, 2006).
     
10.3
 
Administrative Services Agreement, dated as of October 10, 2006, by and among BreitBurn GP, LLC, BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P., BreitBurn Operating L.P. and BreitBurn Management Company, LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 10, 2006 and filed on October16, 2006).

 
3

 

NUMBER
 
DOCUMENT
10.4†
 
BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan effective as of October 10, 2006 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to Amendment No. 3 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on September 19, 2006).
     
10.5†
 
BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. Unit Appreciation Plan for Officers and Key Individuals (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to Amendment No. 3 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on September 19, 2006).
     
10.6†
 
BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. Unit Appreciation Plan for Employees and Consultants (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to Amendment No. 3 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on September 19, 2006).
     
10.7†
 
Amendment No. 1 to the BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. Unit Appreciation Plan for Officers and Key Individuals (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to Amendment No. 5 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on October 2, 2006).
     
10.8†
 
Amendment to the BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.15 to Amendment No. 5 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on October 2, 2006).
     
10.9†
 
BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. Long Term-Incentive Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.8 to Amendment No. 3 to Form S-1 for BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. filed on September 19, 2006).
     
10.10†
 
Form of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan Restricted Phantom Units Award Agreement (for Directors) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.16 to the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006 and filed on April 2, 2007).
     
10.11†
 
Form of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan Performance Unit-Based Award Agreement (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.17 to the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006 and filed on April 2, 2007).
     
10.12
 
Amended and Restated Asset Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 16, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Operating L.P. and Calumet Florida, LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 24, 2007 and filed on May 31, 2007).
     
10.13
 
Unit Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 16, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and each of the Purchasers set forth therein (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 24, 2007 and filed on May 31, 2007).
     
10.14
 
Unit Purchase Agreement, dated as of May 25, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and each of the Purchasers set forth therein (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 25, 2007 and filed on May 29, 2007).
     
10.15
 
ORRI Distribution Agreement Limited Partner Interest Purchase and Sale Agreement, dated as of May 24, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Operating L.P. and TIFD X-III LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 25, 2007 and filed May 29, 2007).
     
10.16
 
Contribution Agreement, dated as of September 11, 2007, between Quicksilver Resources Inc. and BreitBurn Operating L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007 and filed November 6, 2007).
     
10.17
 
Amendment to Contribution Agreement, dated effective as of November 1, 2007, between Quicksilver Resources Inc. and BreitBurn Operating L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007 and filed November 6, 2007).
     
10.18
 
Amended and Restated Unit Purchase Agreement, dated as of October 26, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and each of the Purchasers set forth therein (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007 and filed November 6, 2007).
 
4

 
NUMBER
 
DOCUMENT
10.19
 
Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated November 1, 2007, by and among BreitBurn Operating L.P., as borrower, BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P., as parent guarantor, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2007 and filed November 6, 2007).
     
10.20†
 
Employment Agreement dated December 26, 2007 among BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC, Pro GP Corp. and Mark L. Pease (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 26, 2007 and filed December 27, 2007).
     
10.21†
 
First Amendment to the BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan dated December 26, 2007 (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 5, 2007 and filed December 28, 2007).
     
10.22†
 
Form of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan Restricted Phantom Unit Agreement (Executive Form) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 5, 2008 and filed March 11, 2008).
     
10.23†
 
Form of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan Restricted Phantom Unit Agreement (Non-Executive Form) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 5, 2008 and filed March 11, 2008).
     
10.24†
 
Second Amended and Restated Employment Agreement dated December 31, 2007 among BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC, Pro GP Corp. and Halbert Washburn.
     
10.25†
 
Second Amended and Restated Employment Agreement dated December 31, 2007 among BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC, Pro GP Corp. and Randall Breitenbach.
     
10.26†
 
Employment Agreement date January 29, 2008 among BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC, Pro GP Corp. and Gregory C. Brown.
     
10.27†
 
Form of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan Restricted Phantom Units Directors’ Award Agreement.
     
10.28
 
Purchase Agreement dated June 17, 2008 by and among Pro LP Corporation, Pro GP Corporation and BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
10.29
 
Purchase Agreement dated June 17, 2008 by and among Pro LP Corporation, Pro GP Corporation and BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
10.30
 
Contribution Agreement dated June 17, 2008 by and among BreitBurn Management Company LLC, BreitBurn Energy Corporation and BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
10.31
 
First Amendment to Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, Limited Waiver and Consent and First Amendment to Security Agreement by and among BreitBurn Operating LP, BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P., as Parent Guarantor, its subsidiaries as guarantors, the Lenders and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent for the Lenders (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
 
 
5

 

NUMBER
 
DOCUMENT
10.32
 
Amendment No. 1 to the Operations and Proceeds Agreement, relating to the Dominguez Field and dated October 10, 2006 entered into on June 17, 2008 by and between BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. and BreitBurn Operating L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
10.33
 
Amendment No. 1 to the Surface Operating Agreement dated October 10, 2006 entered into on June 17, 2008 by and between BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. and its predecessor BreitBurn Energy Corporation and BreitBurn Operating L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 17, 2008 and filed on June 23, 2008).
     
10.34†
 
Employment Agreement Form for grant of Convertible Phantom units pursuant and subject to the terms and conditions of the Convertible Phantom Unit Agreement and the Partnership's 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q dated June 30, 2008 and filed on August 11, 2008).
     
10.35†
 
Non-Employment Agreement Form for grant of Convertible Phantom units pursuant and subject to the terms and conditions of the Convertible Phantom Unit Agreement and the Partnership's 2006 Long-Term Incentive Plan (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q dated June 30, 2008 and filed on August 11, 2008).
     
10.36†
 
Amended and Restated Employment Agreement dated August 15, 2008 entered into by and between BreitBurn Management Company, LLC, BreitBurn GP, LLC and James Jackson (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 15, 2008 and filed on August 18, 2008).
     
10.37
 
Second Amended and Restated Administrative Services Agreement dated August 26, 2008 entered into by and between BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. and BreitBurn Management Company, LLC (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 26, 2008 and filed on September 02, 2008).
     
10.38
 
Omnibus Agreement, dated August 26, 2008, by and among BreitBurn Energy Holdings LLC, BEC (GP) LLC, BreitBurn Energy Company L.P, BreitBurn GP, LLC, BreitBurn management Company, LLC and BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 26, 2008 and filed on September 02, 2008).
     
14.1
 
BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and BreitBurn GP, LLC Code of Ethics for Chief Executive Officers and Senior Officers (as amended and restated on February 28, 2007) (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 14.1 to the Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 28, 2007 and filed on March 5, 2007).
     
21.1
 
List of subsidiaries of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P (incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 21.1 to the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 and filed on March 2, 2009).
     
23.1*
 
Consent of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
     
23.2*
 
Consent of Netherland, Sewell & Associates, Inc.
     
23.3*
 
Consent of Schlumberger Data and Consulting Services
     
31.1*
 
Certification of Registrant’s Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
31.2*
 
Certification of Registrant’s Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
31.3*
 
Certification of Registrant’s Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 
6

 

NUMBER
 
DOCUMENT
32.1**
 
Certification of Registrant’s Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as created by Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.2**
 
Certification of Registrant’s Co-Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as created by Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
     
32.3**
 
Certification of Registrant’s Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as created by Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

* Filed herewith.
** Furnished herewith.
† Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

 
7

 

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 
BREITBURN ENERGY PARTNERS L.P.
     
 
By:
BREITBURN GP, LLC,
   
its General Partner
     
Dated:  March 17, 2010
By:
/s/ Halbert S. Washburn
   
Halbert S. Washburn
   
Co-Chief Executive Officer
     
Dated:  March 17, 2010
By:
/s/ Randall H. Breitenbach
   
Randall H. Breitenbach
   
Co-Chief Executive Officer
 
 
8

 

BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and Subsidiaries
INDEX TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Management's Report to Unitholders on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
F-2
   
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations
F-5
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets
F-6
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
F-7
   
Consolidated Statements of Partners’ Equity
F-8
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
F-9
 
 
F-1

 

Management’s Report to Unitholders on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.  Internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the management of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P., designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A partnership's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the partnership; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the partnership are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the partnership; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the partnership's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Internal control over financial reporting, no matter how well designed, has inherent limitations. Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation to the effectiveness of future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Management assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008 using the criteria established in “Internal Control – Integrated Framework” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on this assessment, management has concluded that, as of December 31, 2008, we maintained effective internal control over financial reporting.

The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008 has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears on page F-3.

/s/ Halbert S. Washburn
 
/s/ Randall H. Breitenbach
Halbert S. Washburn
 
Randall H. Breitenbach
Co-Chief Executive Officer of BreitBurn GP, LLC
 
Co-Chief Executive Officer of BreitBurn GP, LLC
     
/s/ James G. Jackson
   
James G. Jackson
   
Chief Financial Officer of BreitBurn GP, LLC
   
 
 
F-2

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors of BreitBurn GP, LLC and Unitholders of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P.

In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the related consolidated statements of operations, partners’ equity and cash flows present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and its subsidiaries (“successor”) (“the Partnership”) at December 31, 2008 and 2007, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years ended  December 31, 2008 and 2007 and the period from October 10, 2006 to December 31, 2006 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  Also in our opinion, the Partnership maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2008, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).  The Partnership's management is responsible for these financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management's Report to Unitholders on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.  Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements and on the Partnership's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits (which were integrated audits in 2008 and 2007).  We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.  Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk.  Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances.  We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
 
As discussed in Note 14 to the financial statements, the Partnership changed the manner in which it accounts for recurring fair value measurements of financial instruments in 2008.
 
A partnership’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  A partnership’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the partnership; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the partnership are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the partnership; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the partnership’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.  Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Los Angeles, California
March 2, 2009
 
 
F-3

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors of BreitBurn GP, LLC and Unitholders of BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P.

In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated statements of operations, partners’ equity and cash flows present fairly, in all material respects, the results of operations and cash flows of BreitBurn Energy Company L.P. and its subsidiaries (“predecessor”) (the “Partnership”) for the period from January 1, 2006 to October 9, 2006 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  These financial statements are the responsibility of the Partnership’s management.  Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit.  We conducted our audit of these statements in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.  An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
As discussed in note 15 to the consolidated financial statements, the Partnership changed the manner in which it accounts for stock based compensation as of January 1, 2006.
 
/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
 
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Los Angeles, California
April 2, 2007
 
 
F-4

 

BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Operations

   
Successor
   
Predecessor
 
   
Year Ended
   
October 10 to
   
January 1 to
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
October 9,
 
Thousands of dollars, except per unit amounts
 
2008
   
2007
   
2006 (1)
   
2006
 
                         
Revenues and other income items:
                       
Oil, natural gas and natural gas liquid sales
  $ 467,381     $ 184,372     $ 18,452     $ 110,329  
Gains (losses) on commodity derivative instruments, net (note 14)
    332,102       (110,418 )     882       2,291  
Other revenue, net (note 10)
    2,920       1,037       170       923  
Total revenues and other income items
    802,403       74,991       19,504       113,543  
Operating costs and expenses:
                               
Operating costs
    149,681       70,329       7,159       34,893  
Depletion, depreciation and amortization (note 5)
    179,933       29,422       2,506       10,903  
General and administrative expenses
    43,435       30,588       7,938       18,849  
Total operating costs and expenses
    373,049       130,339       17,603       64,645  
                                 
Operating income (loss)
    429,354       (55,348 )     1,901       48,898  
                                 
Interest and other financing costs, net
    29,147       6,258       72       2,651  
Loss on interest rate swaps (note 14)
    20,035       -       -       -  
Other (income) expenses, net
    (191 )     (111 )     (2 )     (275 )
                                 
Income (loss) before taxes and minority interest
    380,363       (61,495 )     1,831       46,522  
                                 
Income tax expense (benefit) (note 6)
    1,939       (1,229 )     (40 )     90  
Minority interest (note 20)
    188       91       -       (1,039 )
                                 
Net income (loss) before change in accounting principle
    378,236       (60,357 )     1,871       47,471  
                                 
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle (note 15)
    -       -       -       577  
                                 
Net income (loss)
    378,236       (60,357 )     1,871     $ 48,048  
                                 
General Partner's interest in net income (loss)
    (2,019 )     (672 )     37          
                                 
Limited Partners' interest in net income (loss)
  $ 380,255     $ (59,685 )   $ 1,834          
                                 
Basic net income (loss) per unit (note 2)
  $ 6.42     $ (1.83 )   $ 0.08     $ 0.27  
Diluted net income (loss) per unit (note 2)
  $ 6.28     $ (1.83 )   $ 0.08     $ 0.27  

(1)  Reflects activity since closing of initial public offering on October 10, 2006.  There was no activity from inception on March 23, 2006 to October 10, 2006.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-5

 

BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Balance Sheets

   
December 31,
   
December 31,
 
Thousands of dollars, except unit amounts
 
2008
   
2007
 
ASSETS
           
Current assets:
           
Cash
  $ 2,546     $ 5,929  
Accounts receivable, net (note 2)
    47,221       44,202  
Derivative instruments (note 14)
    76,224       948  
Related party receivables (note 7)
    5,084       35,568  
Inventory (note 8)
    1,250       5,704  
Prepaid expenses
    5,300       2,083  
Intangibles (note 9)
    2,771       3,169  
Other current assets
    170       160  
Total current assets
    140,566       97,763  
Equity investments (note 10)
    9,452       15,645  
Property, plant and equipment
               
Oil and gas properties (note 4)
    2,057,531       1,910,941  
Non-oil and gas assets (note 4)
    7,806       568  
      2,065,337       1,911,509  
Accumulated depletion and depreciation (note 5)
    (224,996 )     (47,022 )
Net property, plant and equipment
    1,840,341       1,864,487  
Other long-term assets
               
Intangibles (note 9)
    495       3,228  
Derivative instruments (note 14)
    219,003       -  
Other long-term assets
    6,977       5,433  
                 
Total assets
  $ 2,216,834     $ 1,986,556  
LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS' EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 28,302     $ 13,910  
Book overdraft
    9,871       1,920  
Derivative instruments (note 14)
    10,192       35,172  
Related party payables (note 7)
    -       10,137  
Revenue distributions payable
    16,162       21,266  
Derivative settlements payable
    50       2,775  
Salaries and wages payable
    6,249       28  
Accrued liabilities
    9,164       5,476  
Total current liabilities
    79,990       90,684  
Long-term debt (note 11)
    736,000       370,400  
Long-term related party payables (note 7)
    -       1,532  
Deferred income taxes (note 6)
    4,282       3,074  
Asset retirement obligation (note 12)
    30,086       27,819  
Derivative instruments (note 14)
    10,058       65,695  
Other long-term liabilities
    2,987       2,000  
Total  liabilities
    863,403       561,204  
Minority interest (note 20)
    539       544  
Partners' equity (note 13)
               
Limited partners' interest (a)
    1,352,892       1,423,418  
General partner interest
    -       1,390  
Total liabilities and partners' equity
  $ 2,216,834     $ 1,986,556  
                 
(a) Limited partner units outstanding
    52,635,634       67,020,641  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-6

 


Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

   
Successor
   
Predecessor
 
   
Year Ended
   
October 10 to
   
January 1 to
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
October 9,
 
Thousands of dollars
 
2008
   
2007
   
2006(1)
   
2006
 
                         
Cash flows from operating activities
                       
Net income (loss)
  $ 378,236     $ (60,357 )   $ 1,871     $ 48,048  
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to cash flow from operating activities:
                               
Depletion, depreciation and amortization
    179,933       29,422       2,506       10,903  
Unit-based compensation expense
    6,907       12,999       4,490       7,979  
Unrealized (gain) loss on derivative instruments
    (370,734 )     103,862       1,299       (5,983 )
Distributions greater (less) than income from equity affiliates
    1,198       (28 )     32       48  
Deferred income tax
    1,207       (1,229 )     (40 )     90  
Minority interest
    188       91       -       (1,039 )
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
    -       -       -       (577 )
Amortization of intangibles
    3,131       2,174       -       -  
Other
    2,643       2,182       51       950  
Changes in net assets and liablities:
                               
Accounts receivable and other assets
    258       (24,713 )     (5,873 )     (5,569 )
Inventory
    4,454       4,829       -       -  
Net change in related party receivables and payables
    32,688       (39,202 )     (9,017 )     (3,694 )
Accounts payable and other liabilities
    (13,413 )     30,072       3,425       (3,576 )
Net cash provided (used) by operating activities
    226,696       60,102       (1,256 )     47,580  
Cash flows from investing activities(2)
                               
Capital expenditures
    (131,082 )     (23,549 )     (1,248 )     (36,941 )
Property acquisitions
    (9,957 )     (996,561 )     -       (79 )
Proceeds from sale of assets, net
    -       -       -       1,752  
Net cash used by investing activities
    (141,039 )     (1,020,110 )     (1,248 )     (35,268 )
Cash flows from financing activities
                               
Issuance of common units, net of discount
    -       663,338       118,715       -  
Purchase of common units
    (336,216 )     -       -       -  
Redemptions of common units from predecessors
    -       -       (15,485 )     -  
Distributions to predecessor members concurrent with initial
                               
public offering
    -       581       (63,230 )     -  
Distributions(3)
    (121,349 )     (60,497 )     -       (36,357 )
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt
    803,002       574,700       5,500       86,700  
Repayments of long-term debt
    (437,402 )     (205,800 )     (40,500 )     (67,200 )
Book overdraft
    7,951       (116 )     2,036       3,610  
Initial public offering costs
    -       -       (4,055 )     (2,845 )
Long-term debt issuance costs
    (5,026 )     (6,362 )     (400 )     -  
Cash contributed by minority interest
    -       -       -       2,399  
Net cash provided (used) by financing activities
    (89,040 )     965,844       2,581       (13,693 )
Increase (decrease) in cash
    (3,383 )     5,836       77       (1,381 )
Cash beginning of period
    5,929       93       16       2,740  
Cash end of period
  $ 2,546     $ 5,929     $ 93     $ 1,359  

(1)  Reflects activity since closing of initial public offering.  There was no activity from inception March 23, 2006 to October 10th, 2006.
(2) Non-cash investing activity in 2007 was $700 million, reflecting the issuance of 21.348 million Common Units for the Quicksilver acquisition.
(3) Includes distributions on equivalent units of $2.3 million

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-7

 

BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Partners' Equity

   
For the period from October 10, 2006 to
 
   
December 31, 2008
 
Thousands of dollars
 
Limited
Partners
   
General
Partner
   
Total
 
Balance, October 10, 2006
  $ -     $ -     $ -  
Contributions (a)
    136,035       2,776       138,811  
Initial public offering investment (b)
    99,175       -       99,175  
Distributions to predecessor members concurrent with
                       
initial public offering (c)
    (62,649 )     -       (62,649 )
Net income
    1,834       37       1,871  
Balance, December 31, 2006
  $ 174,395     $ 2,813     $ 177,208  
Issuance of units (d)
    700,000       -       700,000  
Private offering investment (e)
    663,338       -       663,338  
Distributions
    (59,746 )     (751 )     (60,497 )
Unit-based compensation
    5,133       -       5,133  
Net loss
    (59,685 )     (672 )     (60,357 )
Other
    (17 )     -       (17 )
Balance, December 31, 2007
  $ 1,423,418     $ 1,390     $ 1,424,808  
Redemtion of common units from predecessors (f)
    (336,216 )     -       (336,216 )
Distributions
    (118,580 )     (427 )     (119,007 )
Distributions paid on unissued units under incentive plans
    (2,335 )     (7 )     (2,342 )
Unit-based compensation
    7,383       -       7,383  
Net income (loss) (g)
    380,255       (2,019 )     378,236  
Contribution of general partner interest to the partnership
    (1,063 )     1,063       -  
Other
    30       -       30  
Balance, December 31, 2008
  $ 1,352,892     $ -     $ 1,352,892  

(a)  Represents book value contributions from predecessor.
(b)  Net of underwriting discount and initial public offering costs.
(c)  Includes receivable due from sponsors of $581.
(d) Reflects the issuance of 21.348 million Common Units for the Quicksilver acquisition.
(e) Reflects the issuance of 23.697 million Common Units in three private placements.
(f) Reflects the purchase of 14.405 million Common Units from subsidiaries of Provident.
(g) General partner interests were purchased as of June 17, 2008.

   
Predecessor
 
   
For the period from January 1, 2006 to October 9, 2006
 
Thousands of dollars
 
Pro LP
Corp
   
Pro GP
Corp
   
Breitburn
S Corp
   
Total
 
Balance, January 1, 2006
  $ 230,352     $ 960     $ 8,713     $ 240,025  
Distributions paid or accrued
    (34,628 )     (146 )     (1,619 )     (36,393 )
Net income
    45,718       192       2,138       48,048  
Balance, October 9, 2006
  $ 241,442     $ 1,006     $ 9,232     $ 251,680  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 
F-8

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Note 1.  Organization and Operations

BreitBurn Energy Partners L.P.

The Partnership is a Delaware limited partnership formed on March 23, 2006.  In October 2006, we completed an initial public offering of 6,000,000 Common Units and completed the sale of an additional 900,000 Common Units to cover over-allotments in the initial public offering at $18.50 per unit, or $17.205 per unit, after deducting the underwriting discount. On May 24, 2007, we sold 4,062,500 Common Units in a private placement at $32.00 per unit, resulting in proceeds of approximately $130 million.  The net proceeds of this private placement were used to acquire certain interests in oil leases and related assets located in Florida from Calumet Florida L.L.C. and to reduce indebtedness under our credit facility. On May 25, 2007, we sold 2,967,744 Common Units in a private placement at $31.00 per unit, resulting in proceeds of approximately $92 million.  The net proceeds of this private placement were used to acquire a 99 percent limited partner interest in BreitBurn Energy Partners I, L.P. (“BEPI”) from TIFD X-III LLC which owned interests in the Sawtelle and East Coyote oil fields located in California, and to terminate existing hedges related to future production from BEPI.  On November 1, 2007, we sold 16,666,667 Common Units in a private placement at $27.00 per unit, resulting in proceeds of approximately $450 million.  The net proceeds from this private placement were used to fund a portion of the cash consideration for our acquisition from Quicksilver of properties located in Michigan, Indiana and Kentucky (the “Quicksilver Acquisition”).  Also on November 1, 2007, we issued 21,347,972 Common Units to Quicksilver as partial consideration for the Quicksilver Acquisition as a private placement.

Our general partner is BreitBurn GP, a Delaware limited liability company, also formed on March 23, 2006.  The board of directors of our General Partner has sole responsibility for conducting our business and managing our operations. We conduct our operations through a wholly owned subsidiary, BOLP and BOLP’s general partner BOGP.  We own all of the ownership interests in BOLP and BOGP.

Our wholly owned subsidiary BreitBurn Management manages our assets and performs other administrative services for us such as accounting, corporate development, finance, land administration, legal and engineering.  See Note 7 for information regarding our relationship with BreitBurn Management.

On June 17, 2008, we purchased 14,404,962 Common Units from subsidiaries of Provident at $23.26 per unit, for a purchase price of approximately $335 million (the “Common Unit Purchase”). These units have been cancelled and are no longer outstanding.  This purchase was accounted for as a repurchase of issued Common Units and a cancellation of those Common Units. It increased debt by $336.2 million and decreased equity by $336.2 million, including $1.2 million in capitalized transaction costs.

On June 17, 2008, we also purchased Provident’s 95.55 percent limited liability company interest in BreitBurn Management, which owned the General Partner, for a purchase price of approximately $10 million (the “BreitBurn Management Purchase”).  See Note 4 for the purchase price allocation for this transaction.  Also on June 17, 2008, we entered into a contribution agreement (the “Contribution Agreement”) with the General Partner, BreitBurn Management and BreitBurn Corporation, which is wholly owned by the Co-Chief Executive Officers of the General Partner, Halbert S. Washburn and Randall H. Breitenbach, pursuant to which BreitBurn Corporation contributed its 4.45 percent limited liability company interest in BreitBurn Management to us in exchange for 19,955 Common Units, the economic value of which was equivalent to the value of their combined 4.45 percent interest in BreitBurn Management, and BreitBurn Management contributed its 100 percent limited liability company interest in the General Partner to us. On the same date, we entered into Amendment No. 1 to the First Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership of the Partnership, pursuant to which the economic portion of the General Partner’s 0.66473 percent general partner interest in us was eliminated and our limited partners holding Common Units were given a right to nominate and vote in the election of directors to the Board of Directors of the General Partner.  As a result of these transactions (collectively, the “Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions”), the General Partner and BreitBurn Management became our wholly owned subsidiaries.
 
 
F-9

 

On June 17, 2008, in connection with the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions, we and our wholly owned subsidiaries entered into the First Amendment to Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, Limited Waiver and Consent and First Amendment to Security Agreement (“Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement”), with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent. Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement increased the borrowing base available under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement dated November 1, 2007 from $750 million to $900 million.  We used borrowings under Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement to finance the Common Unit Purchase and the BreitBurn Management Purchase.

On June 17, 2008, in connection with the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions, the Omnibus Agreement, dated October 10, 2006, among us, the General Partner, Provident, Pro GP and BEC was terminated in all respects.

As of December 31, 2008, the public unitholders, the institutional investors in our private placements and Quicksilver owned 98.69 percent of the Common Units. BreitBurn Corporation owned 690,751 Common Units, representing a 1.31 percent limited partner interest. We own 100 percent of the General Partner, BreitBurn Management and BOLP.

On August 26, 2008, members of our senior management, in their individual capacities, together with Metalmark Capital Partners (“Metalmark”), Greenhill Capital Partners (“Greenhill”) and a third-party institutional investor, completed the acquisition of BEC, our Predecessor.  This transaction included the acquisition of a 96.02 percent indirect interest in BEC, previously owned by Provident, and the remaining indirect interests in BEC, previously owned by Randall H. Breitenbach, Halbert S. Washburn and other members of the our senior management.  BEC was a separate U.S. subsidiary of Provident and was our Predecessor.

In connection with the acquisition of Provident’s ownership in BEC by members of senior management, Metalmark, Greenhill and a third party institutional investor, BreitBurn Management has entered into a five-year Administrative Services Agreement to manage BEC's properties. In addition, we have entered into an Omnibus Agreement with BEC detailing rights with respect to business opportunities and providing us with a right of first offer with respect to the sale of assets by BEC.

2.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Principles of consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include our accounts and the accounts of our wholly owned subsidiaries and our predecessor.  Investments in affiliated companies with a 20 percent or greater ownership interest, and in which we do not have control, are accounted for on the equity basis.  Investments in affiliated companies with less than a 20 percent ownership interest, and in which we do not have control, are accounted for on the cost basis.  Investments in which we own greater than 50 percent interest are consolidated.  Investments in which we own less than a 50 percent interest but are deemed to have control or where we have a variable interest in an entity where we will absorb a majority of the entity’s expected losses or receive a majority of the entity’s expected residual returns or both, however, are consolidated.  The effects of all intercompany transactions have been eliminated.

Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.  The financial statements are based on a number of significant estimates including oil and gas reserve quantities, which are the basis for the calculation of depletion, depreciation, amortization, asset retirement obligations and impairment of oil and gas properties.

We account for business combinations using the purchase method, in accordance with SFAS No. 141 Accounting for Business Combinations.  We use estimates to record the assets and liabilities acquired.  All purchase price allocations are finalized within one year from the acquisition date.
 
 
F-10

 

Basis of Presentation

Our financial statements are prepared in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Certain items included in the prior year financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the 2008 presentation.

Business segment information

SFAS No. 131, Disclosures about Segments of an Enterprise and Related Information, establishes standards for reporting information about operating segments.  Segment reporting is not applicable because our oil and gas operating areas have similar economic characteristics and meet the criteria for aggregation as defined in SFAS No. 131.  We acquire, exploit, develop and explore for and produce oil and natural gas in the United States.  Corporate management administers all properties as a whole rather than as discrete operating segments.  Operational data is tracked by area; however, financial performance is measured as a single enterprise and not on an area-by-area basis.  Allocation of capital resources is employed on a project-by-project basis across our entire asset base to maximize profitability without regard to individual areas.

Revenue recognition

Revenues associated with sales of our crude oil and natural gas are recognized when title passes from us to our customer.  Revenues from properties in which we have an interest with other partners are recognized on the basis of our working interest (‘‘entitlement’’ method of accounting).  We generally market most of our natural gas production from our operated properties and pay our partners for their working interest shares of natural gas production sold.  As a result, we have no material natural gas producer imbalance positions.

Cash and cash equivalents

We consider all investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents.  At December 31, 2008 and 2007 we had no such investments.

Accounts Receivable

Our accounts receivable are primarily from purchasers of crude oil and natural gas and counterparties to our financial instruments.  Crude oil receivables are generally collected within 30 days after the end of the month.  Natural gas receivables are generally collected within 60 days after the end of the month.  We review all outstanding accounts receivable balances and record a reserve for amounts that we expect will not be fully recovered.  Actual balances are not applied against the reserve until substantially all collection efforts have been exhausted.  During 2008 we terminated our crude oil derivative instruments with Lehman Brothers due to their bankruptcy, and at December 31, 2008, we had an allowance of $4.6 million related to these contracts.  As of December 31, 2007, we did not carry an allowance for doubtful accounts receivable.

Inventory

Oil inventories are carried at the lower of cost to produce or market price.  We match production expenses with crude oil sales.  Production expenses associated with unsold crude oil inventory are recorded as inventory.

Investments in Equity Affiliates

Income from equity affiliates is included as a component of operating income, as the operations of these affiliates are associated with the processing and transportation of our natural gas production.

Property, plant and equipment

Oil and gas properties

We follow the successful efforts method of accounting.  Lease acquisition and development costs (tangible and intangible) incurred, including internal acquisition costs, relating to proved oil and gas properties are capitalized.  Delay and surface rentals are charged to expense as incurred.  Dry hole costs incurred on exploratory wells are expensed.  Dry hole costs associated with developing proved fields are capitalized.  Geological and geophysical costs related to exploratory operations are expensed as incurred.

 
F-11

 
 
Upon sale or retirement of proved properties, the cost thereof and the accumulated depletion, depreciation and amortization (“DD&A”) are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss is recognized in the statement of operations.  Maintenance and repairs are charged to operating expenses.  DD&A of proved oil and gas properties, including the estimated cost of future abandonment and restoration of well sites and associated facilities, are computed on a property-by-property basis and recognized using the units-of-production method net of any anticipated proceeds from equipment salvage and sale of surface rights.  Other gathering and processing facilities are recorded at cost and are depreciated using straight line, generally over 20 years.

Non-oil and gas assets

Buildings and non-oil and gas assets are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives, which range from 3 to 30 years.

Oil and natural gas reserve quantities

Reserves and their relation to estimated future net cash flows impact our depletion and impairment calculations.  As a result, adjustments to depletion are made concurrently with changes to reserve estimates.  We disclose reserve estimates, and the projected cash flows derived from these reserve estimates, in accordance with SEC guidelines.  The independent engineering firms adhere to the SEC definitions when preparing their reserve reports.

Asset retirement obligations

We have significant obligations to plug and abandon oil and natural gas wells and related equipment at the end of oil and natural gas production operations.  The computation of our asset retirement obligations (“ARO”) is prepared in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (‘‘SFAS’’) No. 143, Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations.  This accounting standard applies to the fair value of a liability for an asset retirement obligation that is recorded when there is a legal obligation associated with the retirement of a tangible long-lived asset and the liability can be reasonably estimated.  Over time, changes in the present value of the liability are accreted and expensed.  The capitalized asset costs are depreciated over the useful lives of the corresponding asset.  Recognized liability amounts are based upon future retirement cost estimates and incorporate many assumptions such as: (1) expected economic recoveries of crude oil and natural gas, (2) time to abandonment, (3) future inflation rates and (4) the risk free rate of interest adjusted for our credit costs.  Future revisions to ARO estimates will impact the present value of existing ARO liabilities and corresponding adjustments will be made to the capitalized asset retirement costs balance.

Impairment of assets

Long-lived assets with recorded values that are not expected to be recovered through future cash flows are written-down to estimated fair value in accordance with SFAS No. 144 “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets,” as amended.  Under SFAS 144, a long-lived asset is tested for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that its carrying value may not be recoverable.  The carrying value of a long-lived asset is not recoverable if it exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset.  If the carrying value exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows, an impairment loss equal to the amount by which the carrying value exceeds the fair value of the asset is recognized.  Fair value is generally determined from estimated discounted future net cash flows.  For purposes of performing an impairment test, the undiscounted cash flows are forecast using five-year NYMEX forward strip prices at the end of the period and escalated thereafter at 2.5 percent.  For impairment charges, the associated property’s expected future net cash flows are discounted using a rate of approximately ten percent. Reserves are calculated based upon reports from third-party engineers adjusted for acquisitions or other changes occurring during the year as determined to be appropriate in the good faith judgment of management.  Because of the low commodity prices that existed at year end 2008, and the uncertainty surrounding future commodity prices and costs, we performed impairment tests on our long-lived assets at December 31, 2008.

We assess our long-lived assets for impairment generally on a field-by-field basis where applicable.  In 2008, we recorded $51.9 million in impairments and $34.5 million in price related depletion and depreciation adjustments.  See Note 5 – Impairments and Price Related Depletion and Depreciation Adjustments.  We did not record an impairment charge in 2007 and we recorded an impairment charge of $0.3 million in the fourth quarter of 2006 for one of our Wyoming properties.  The charge was included in DD&A on the consolidated statement of operations.

 
F-12

 
 
Debt issuance costs

The costs incurred to obtain financing have been capitalized.  Debt issuance costs are amortized using the straight-line method over the term of the related debt.  Use of the straight-line method does not differ materially from the “effective interest” method of amortization.

Equity-based compensation

BreitBurn Management and the Predecessor had various forms of equity-based compensation outstanding under employee compensation plans that are described more fully in Note 15.  Prior to January 1, 2006, the Predecessor applied the recognition and measurement principles of Accounting Principles Board (‘‘APB’’) Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees, and related interpretations in accounting for those plans.  The Predecessor used the method prescribed under Financial Accounting Standards Board (‘‘FASB’’) Interpretation No. 28, Accounting for Stock Appreciation Rights and Other Variable Stock Option or Award Plans—and interpretation of APB Opinions No. 15 and 25, to calculate the expenses associated with its awards.

Effective January 1, 2006, the Predecessor adopted the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004) (SFAS No. 123(R)), Share Based Payments, using the modified-prospective transition method.  Under this transition method, equity-based compensation expense for the periods after January 1, 2006 includes compensation expense for all equity-based compensation awards granted prior to, but not yet vested as of January 1, 2006, based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation and for options granted subsequent to January 1, 2006 in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 123(R).  Unit based compensation awards granted prior to but not yet vested as of January 1, 2006 that are classified as liabilities were charged to compensation expense based on the fair value provisions of SFAS No. 123(R).  We and the Predecessor recognized these compensation costs on a graded-vesting method.  Under the graded-vesting method a company recognizes compensation cost over the requisite service period for each separately vesting tranche of the award as though the award was, in substance, multiple awards.

Awards classified as equity are valued on the grant date and are recognized as compensation expense over the vesting period.

Fair market value of financial instruments

The carrying amount of our cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and accrued expenses, approximate their respective fair value due to the relatively short term of the related instruments.  The carrying amount of long-term debt approximates fair value; however, changes in the credit markets at year-end may impact our ability to enter into future credit facilities at similar terms.

Accounting for business combinations

We and our Predecessor have accounted for all business combinations using the purchase method, in accordance with SFAS No. 141, Accounting for Business Combinations.  Under the purchase method of accounting, a business combination is accounted for at a purchase price based upon the fair value of the consideration given, whether in the form of cash, assets, equity or the assumption of liabilities.  The assets and liabilities acquired are measured at their fair values, and the purchase price is allocated to the assets and liabilities based upon these fair values.  The excess of the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed over the cost of an acquired entity, if any, is allocated as a pro rata reduction of the amounts that otherwise would have been assigned to certain acquired assets.  We and our Predecessor have not recognized any goodwill from any business combinations.

 
F-13

 

Concentration of credit risk
 
We maintain our cash accounts primarily with a single bank and invest cash in money market accounts, which we believe to have minimal risk.  As operator of jointly owned oil and gas properties, we sell oil and gas production to U.S. oil and gas purchasers and pay vendors on behalf of joint owners for oil and gas services.  We periodically monitor our major purchasers’ credit ratings.

Derivatives

SFAS No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, as amended, establishes accounting and reporting standards for derivative instruments, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other contracts, and hedging activities.  It requires the recognition of all derivative instruments as assets or liabilities in our balance sheet and measurement of those instruments at fair value.  The accounting treatment of changes in fair value is dependent upon whether or not a derivative instrument is designated as a hedge and if so, the type of hedge.  For derivatives designated as cash flow hedges, changes in fair value are recognized in other comprehensive income, to the extent the hedge is effective, until the hedged item is recognized in earnings.  Hedge effectiveness is measured based on the relative changes in fair value between the derivative contract and the hedged item over time.  Any change in fair value resulting from ineffectiveness, as defined by SFAS No.133, is recognized immediately in earnings.  Gains and losses on derivative instruments not designated as hedges are currently included in earnings.  The resulting cash flows are reported as cash from operating activities.  We currently do not designate any of our derivatives as hedges for accounting purposes.

Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements.”  SFAS No. 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.  Fair value measurement under SFAS No. 157 is based upon a hypothetical transaction to sell an asset or transfer a liability at the measurement date, considered from the perspective of a market participant that holds the asset or owes the liability.  The objective of fair value measurement as defined in SFAS No. 157 is to determine the price that would be received in selling the asset or transferring the liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date.  If there is an active market for the asset or liability, the fair value measurement shall represent the price in that market whether the price is directly observable or otherwise obtained using a valuation technique.

Income taxes

Our subsidiaries are mostly partnerships or limited liability companies treated as partnerships for federal tax purposes with essentially all taxable income or loss being passed through to the members.  As such, no federal income tax for these entities has been provided.

We have three wholly owned subsidiaries, which are subject to corporate income taxes.  We account for the taxes associated with one entity in accordance with SFAS No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.”  Deferred income taxes are recorded under the asset and liability method.  Where material, deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed for differences between the financial statement and income tax bases of assets and liabilities that will result in taxable or deductible amounts in the future.  Such deferred income tax asset and liability computations are based on enacted tax laws and rates applicable to periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income.  Income tax expense is the tax payable or refundable for the period plus or minus the change during the period in deferred income tax assets and liabilities.

Effective January 1, 2007, we implemented FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes — An Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 (“FIN 48”), which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in a company’s financial statements.  A company can only recognize the tax position in the financial statements if the position is more-likely-than-not to be upheld on audit based only on the technical merits of the tax position.  This accounting standard also provides guidance on thresholds, measurement, derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition that is intended to provide better financial-statement comparability among different companies.

We performed evaluations as of January 1, 2007, December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2008 and concluded that there were no uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in its financial statements.  The adoption of this standard did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 
F-14

 

Net Income or loss per unit

Weighted average units outstanding for computing basic and diluted net income or loss per unit were:

   
Successor
   
Predecessor
 
   
Year Ended
   
October 10 to
   
January 1 to
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
October 9,
 
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2006
 
Weighted average number of Common Units used to calculate basic and diluted net income or loss per unit:
                       
Basic
    59,238,588       32,577,429       21,975,758       179,795,294  
Dilutive (a)
    1,322,107       -       43,150       -  
Diluted
    60,560,695       32,577,429       22,018,908       179,795,294  

(a) 2007 does not include 310,513 potential anti-dilutive units issuable under the compensation plans.

We had 6,700,000 Common Units authorized for issuance under our long-term incentive compensation plans and there were approximately 1,422,171 partnership-based units outstanding that are eligible for receiving Common Units upon vesting at December 31, 2008.

Environmental expenditures

We review, on an annual basis, our estimates of the cleanup costs of various sites.  When it is probable that obligations have been incurred and where a reasonable estimate of the cost of compliance or remediation can be determined, the applicable amount is accrued.  For other potential liabilities, the timing of accruals coincides with the related ongoing site assessments.  We do not discount any of these liabilities.  At December 31, 2008 and 2007, we had a $2.0 million environmental liability related to a closure of a drilling pit in Michigan, which we assumed in the Quicksilver Acquisition.

3.  Accounting Pronouncements

SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements.  In September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 157, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.  The Statement does not require any new fair value measurements but would apply to assets and liabilities that are required to be recorded at fair value under other accounting standards.  SFAS No. 157 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after November 12, 2007.  In February 2008, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) 157-2, “Effective Date of FASB Statement No. 157,” which defers the effective date of SFAS No. 157 for nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities, except for items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in an entity’s financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually), to fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008, and interim periods within those fiscal years.  Earlier adoption is permitted, provided the company has not yet issued financial statements, including for interim periods, for that fiscal year.  Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted SFAS No. 157, as amended by FSP 157-2. Adoption of SFAS No. 157 did not have a material impact on our results from operations or financial position.

SFAS No. 159 “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities — including an amendment of FAS 115” (“SFAS No. 159”).  In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159 which allows entities to choose, at specified election dates, to measure eligible financial assets and liabilities at fair value in situations in which they are not otherwise required to be measured at fair value.  If a company elects the fair value option for an eligible item, changes in that item’s fair value in subsequent reporting periods must be recognized in current earnings.  The provisions of SFAS No. 159 became effective for us on January 1, 2008.  We have elected not to adopt the fair value option allowed by SFAS No. 159, and, therefore, it had no impact on our financial position, results from operations or cash flows.

 
F-15

 

SFAS No. 141(revised 2007) “Business Combinations” (“SFAS No. 141R”).  In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141R which replaces SFAS No. 141.  SFAS No. 141R establishes principles and requirements for how an acquirer recognizes and measures in its financial statements the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, any non-controlling interest in the acquiree and the goodwill acquired.  SFAS No. 141R was issued in an effort to continue the movement toward the greater use of fair values in financial reporting and increased transparency through expanded disclosures. It changes how business acquisitions are accounted for and will impact financial statements at the acquisition date and in subsequent periods. Certain of these changes will introduce more volatility into earnings. The acquirer must now record all assets and liabilities of the acquired business at fair value, and related transaction and restructuring costs will be expensed rather than the previous method of being capitalized as part of the acquisition. SFAS No. 141R also impacts the goodwill impairment test associated with acquisitions, including those that close before the effective date of SFAS No. 141R. The definitions of a “business” and a “business combination” have been expanded, resulting in more transactions qualifying as business combinations. SFAS No. 141R is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning on or after December 31, 2008 and earlier adoption is prohibited. We may experience a financial statement impact depending on the nature and extent of any new business combinations entered into after the effective date of SFAS No. 141R.

SFAS No. 160 Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements — an amendment of ARB No. 51(“SFAS No. 160”).  In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 160 which requires that accounting and reporting for minority interests be recharacterized as noncontrolling interests and classified as a component of equity.  SFAS No. 160 also establishes reporting requirements that provide sufficient disclosures that clearly identify and distinguish between the interests of the parent and the interests of the noncontrolling owners.  SFAS No. 160 applies to all entities that prepare consolidated financial statements, except not-for-profit organizations, but will affect only those entities that have an outstanding noncontrolling interest in one or more subsidiaries or that deconsolidate a subsidiary.  This statement is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008.  The adoption of SFAS No. 160 is not expected to have a material impact on our results from operations or financial position.

SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities – an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS No. 161”).  In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161 which requires enhanced disclosures about how and why an entity uses derivative instruments, how derivative instruments and related hedge items are accounted for under Statement 133 and its related interpretations, and how derivative instruments and related hedged items affect an entity’s financial position, financial performance, and cash flows. SFAS No. 161 has the same scope as Statement 133, and, accordingly, applies to all entities.  SFAS No. 161 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after November 15, 2008. This statement will require the additional disclosures detailed above.

FSP 142-3, “Determination of the Useful Life of Intangible Assets” (“FSP 142-3”). In April 2008, the FASB issued FSP 142-3, which amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under SFAS No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets.” The intent of this FSP is to improve consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under SFAS No. 142 and the period of expected cash flows used to measure the fair value of the asset under SFAS No. 141 (revised 2007), “Business Combination” and other U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.  FSP 142-3 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008.  We do not expect the adoption of FSP 142-3 to have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

SFAS No. 162, “The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles” (“SFAS No. 162”).  In May 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 162 which identifies the sources of accounting principles and the framework for selecting the principles to be used in the preparation of financial statements of nongovernmental entities that are presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United States (the GAAP hierarchy). SFAS No. 162 became effective November 13, 2008.  The adoption of SFAS No. 162 did not have an impact on our results from operations or financial position.

FSP EITF 03-6-1, “Determining Whether Instruments Granted in Share-Based Payment Transactions Are Participating Securities” (“FSP EITF 03-6-1”). In June 2008, the FASB issued FSP EITF 03-6-1. Under this FSP, unvested share-based payment awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents, whether they are paid or unpaid, are considered participating securities and should be included in the computation of earnings per share pursuant to the two-class method. FSP EITF 03-6-1 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those years. In addition, all prior period earnings per share data presented should be adjusted retrospectively and early application is not permitted.  We are currently evaluating the impact adoption of FSP EITF 03-6-1 may have on our earnings per share disclosures.

 
F-16

 

On December 31, 2008, the SEC issued Release No. 33-8995 for guidelines on new reserves estimate calculations and related disclosures. The new reserve estimate disclosures apply to all annual reports for fiscal years ending on or after December 31, 2009 and thereafter, and to all registration statements filed after that date.  It does not permit companies to voluntarily comply at an earlier date.  The revised proved reserve definition incorporates a new definition of “reasonable certainty” using the PRMS (Petroleum Resource Management System) standard of “high degree of confidence” for deterministic method estimates, or a 90 percent recovery probability for probabilistic methods used in estimating proved reserves. The guideline also permits a company to establish undeveloped reserves as proved with appropriate degrees of reasonable certainty established absent actual production tests and without artificially limiting such reserves to spacing units adjacent to a producing well. For reserve reporting purposes, it also replaces the end-of-the-year oil and gas reserve pricing with an unweighted average first-day-of-the-month pricing for the past 12 fiscal months. This would impact depletion calculations. Costs associated with reserves will continue to be measured on the last day of the fiscal year. A revised tabular presentation of reserves by development category, final product type, and oil and gas activity disclosure by geographic regions and significant fields and a general disclosure of the internal controls a company uses to assure objectivity in reserves estimation will be required.  The adoption of SEC release No. 33-8995 is expected to have a material impact, which cannot be quantified at this point, on the calculation of our crude oil and natural gas reserves.

4.  Acquisitions

On January 23, 2007, we completed the purchase of certain oil and gas properties, known as the “Lazy JL Field” in the Permian Basin of Texas, including related property and equipment.  The purchase price for the Lazy JL Field acquisition was approximately $29.0 million in cash, and was financed through borrowings under our revolving credit facility.  The transaction was accounted for using the purchase method in accordance with SFAS No. 141 and was effective January 1, 2007.  The purchase price was allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as follows:

Thousands of dollars
          
Oil and gas properties
  $ 29,233  
Current assets
    2  
Asset retirement obligation
    (206 )
    $ 29,029  
 
In March 2007, we completed the purchase of certain oil and gas properties in California for approximately $1.0 million in cash.

In April 2007, we completed the purchase of additional interests in a certain oil and gas property in Wyoming for approximately $0.9 million in cash.

 
F-17

 

On May 24, 2007, BOLP entered into an Amended and Restated Asset Purchase Agreement with Calumet Florida, L.L.C. (“Calumet”), to acquire certain interests in oil leases and related assets located along the Sunniland Trend in South Florida through the acquisition of a limited liability company that owned all of the purchased assets (the “Calumet Acquisition” or “Calumet Properties”).  The Calumet Properties are comprised of five separate oil fields, one 23-mile pipeline serving one field, one storage terminal and rights in a shipping terminal.  The transaction closed on May 24, 2007.  The purchase price was $100.0 million with an effective date of January 1, 2007.  After adjustments for costs and revenues for the period between the effective date and the closing, including interest paid to the seller and after taking into account approximately 218,000 barrels of crude oil held in storage as of the closing date, and including acquisition related costs, our purchase price was approximately $109.9 million.  The acquisition was financed through our sale of Common Units through a private placement (see Note 13 for additional information on the private placement).  The acquiring subsidiary is a partnership and thus no deferred taxes were recognized for this transaction.  The purchase price of $109.9 million, including approximately $0.4 million in acquisition costs was allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as follows:

Thousands of dollars
         
Inventories
  $ 10,533  
Intangible assets
    3,377  
Oil and gas properties
    100,584  
Asset retirement obligation
    (3,843 )
Other current liabilities
    (729 )
    $ 109,922  
 
The purchase price allocation is based on discounted cash flows, quoted market prices and estimates made by management, the most significant assumptions related to the estimated fair values assigned to oil and gas properties with proved reserves.  To estimate the fair values of these properties, estimates of oil and gas reserves were prepared by management.  We applied estimated future prices to the estimated reserve quantities acquired, and estimated future operating and development costs, to arrive at estimates of future net revenues.  For estimated proved reserves, the future net revenues were discounted using a rate of approximately 10 percent.  There were no estimated quantities of hydrocarbons other than proved reserves allocated in the purchase price of the Calumet Acquisition.  The purchase price included the fair value attributable to the oil inventories held in storage at the closing date.  We assumed certain crude oil sales contracts for the remainder of 2007 and for 2008 through 2010.  An intangible asset was established to value the portion of the crude oil contracts that were above market at closing in the purchase price allocation.  Realized gains or losses from these contracts are recognized as part of oil sales and the intangible asset is being amortized over the life of the contracts.
 
On May 25, 2007, BOLP entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement with TIFD X-III LLC (“TIFD”), pursuant to which it acquired TIFD’s 99 percent limited partner interest in BreitBurn Energy Partners I, L.P. (“BEPI”) for a total purchase price of approximately $82 million (the “BEPI Acquisition”).  BEPI owns properties in the East Coyote and Sawtelle Fields in the Los Angeles Basin in California.  The general partner of BEPI is an affiliate of our general partner in which we have no ownership interest.  As part of the transaction, BEPI distributed to an affiliate of TIFD a 1.5 percent overriding royalty interest in the oil and gas produced by BEPI from the two fields.  The burden of the 1.5 percent override will be borne solely through our interest in BEPI.  In connection with the acquisition, we also paid approximately $10.4 million to terminate existing hedge contracts related to future production from BEPI.

 
F-18

 

The BEPI Acquisition, including the termination of existing hedge contracts, was financed through our sale of Common Units in a private placement (see Note 13 for additional information on the private placement).  The acquiring subsidiary is a partnership and thus no deferred taxes were recognized for this transaction.  We allocated the purchase price of $92.5 million including approximately $0.1 million in acquisition costs to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed as follows:

Thousands of dollars
         
Current assets
  $ 2,813  
Oil and gas properties
    92,980  
Current liabilities
    (2,281 )
Asset retirement obligation
    (582 )
Other
    (398 )
    $ 92,532  

The purchase price allocation is based on discounted cash flows, quoted market prices and estimates made by management, the most significant assumptions related to the estimated fair values assigned to oil and gas properties with proved reserves.  To estimate the fair values of these properties, estimates of oil and gas reserves were prepared by management.  We applied estimated future prices to the estimated reserve quantities acquired, and estimated future operating and development costs, to arrive at estimates of future net revenues.  For estimated proved reserves, the future net revenues were discounted using a rate of approximately ten percent.  There were no quantities of hydrocarbons other than proved reserves identified with the BEPI Acquisition.

On November 1, 2007, we completed the acquisition of certain assets (the “QRI Assets”) and equity interests (the “Equity Interests”) in certain entities from Quicksilver Resources Inc. (“Quicksilver” or “QRI”) in exchange for $750 million in cash and 21,347,972 Common Units (the “Quicksilver Acquisition”).  The issuance of Common Units to QRI was made in reliance upon an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933 pursuant to Section 4(2) thereof.  Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Contribution Agreement entered into by BOLP and QRI, dated as of September 11, 2007 (the “Contribution Agreement”), BOLP completed the Quicksilver Acquisition.  BOLP acquired all of QRI’s natural gas, oil and midstream assets in Michigan, Indiana and Kentucky.  The midstream assets in Michigan, Indiana and Kentucky consist of gathering, transportation, compression and processing assets that transport and process our production and third party gas.

The purchase price allocations are based on reserve reports, quoted market prices and estimates by management.  To estimate the fair values of acquired oil and gas reserves, we utilized the reserve engineers’ estimates of oil and natural gas proved reserves to arrive at estimates of future cash flows net of operating and development costs.  The estimated future net cash flows were discounted using a rate of approximately ten percent.  Included in the purchase price allocation is a $5.2 million intangible asset related to retention bonuses.  In connection with the acquisition, we entered into an agreement with QRI which provides for QRI to fund retention bonuses payable for 139 retained employees from QRI in the event these employees remain continuously employed by us from November 1, 2007 through November 1, 2009 or in the event of termination without cause, disability or death.

Our final purchase price allocation including approximately $9.1 million of acquisition costs is presented below:

Thousands of dollars
         
Current assets
  $ 1,148  
Investment
    10,481  
Intangible asset
    5,193  
Oil and gas properties - proved
    1,132,955  
Oil and gas properties - unproved
    209,873  
Pipelines and processing facilities
    112,726  
Long-term liabilities
    (4,678 )
Asset retirement obligation
    (8,248 )
    $ 1,459,450  

 
F-19

 

In December 2007, we acquired an additional interest in an oil and gas field located in Michigan for approximately $3.4 million.


The following unaudited pro forma financial information presents a summary of our consolidated results of operations for 2007 and 2006, assuming the Calumet, BEPI and Quicksilver Acquisitions had been completed as of the beginning of each year, including adjustments to reflect the allocation of the purchase price to the acquired net assets.  The pro forma financial information assumes that the initial public offering that occurred in 2006 occurred January 1, 2006.  As such, the 2006 results are presented on a comparable basis to the Successor and are not presented as pro forma for the Predecessor.  The pro forma financial information also assumes our 2007 private placements of Common Units (see Note 13) were completed as of the beginning of the year, since the private placements were contingent on two of the acquisitions.  The revenues and expenses of these three acquisitions are included in the 2007 consolidated results of the Partnership effective May 24, May 25 and November 1, 2007.  The pro forma financial information is not necessarily indicative of the results of operations if the acquisitions had been effective as of these dates.

   
Pro Forma Year Ended
December 31,
 
Thousands of dollars, except per unit amounts
 
2007 (1)
   
2006 (1)
 
Revenues
  $ 233,761     $ 315,302  
Net income (loss)
    (43,966 )     66,720  
Net income (loss) per unit
               
Basic
  $ (0.65 )   $ 0.99  
Diluted
    (0.65 )     0.99  
 
(1) Results include losses on derivative instruments of  $101.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2007 and $0.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2006.

On June 17, 2008, we purchased Provident’s 95.55 percent limited liability company interest in BreitBurn Management for a purchase price of approximately $10.0 million.  This transaction resulted in BreitBurn Management becoming our wholly owned subsidiary and was accounted for as a business combination.  The following table presents the purchase price allocation of the BreitBurn Management Purchase:

Thousands of dollars
         
Related party receivables - current, net
  $ 10,662  
Other current assets
    21  
Oil and gas properties
    8,451  
Non-oil and gas assets
    4,343  
Related party receivables - non-current
    6,704  
Current liabilities
    (13,510 )
Long-term liabilities
    (6,704 )
    $ 9,967  

Certain of the current and long-term related party receivables are with the Partnership, so they are now eliminated in consolidation.

5.  Impairments and Price Related Depletion and Depreciation Adjustments

Because of the low commodity prices at year end 2008, and the uncertainty surrounding future commodity prices as well as future costs, we performed impairment tests on our long-lived assets at December 31, 2008.  For the year ended December 31, 2008, we recorded approximately $51.9 million for total impairments and $34.5 million for price related adjustments to depletion and depreciation expense.

 
F-20

 
 
We assess our developed and undeveloped oil and gas properties and other long-lived assets for possible impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable. Such indicators include changes in business plans, changes in commodity prices and, for crude oil and natural gas properties, significant downward revisions of estimated proved-reserve quantities. If the carrying value of an asset exceeds the future undiscounted cash flows expected from the asset, an impairment charge is recorded for the excess of carrying value of the asset over its estimated fair value.

Determination as to whether and how much an asset is impaired involves management estimates on highly uncertain matters such as future commodity prices, the effects of inflation and technology improvements on operating expenses, production profiles, and the outlook for market supply and demand conditions for crude oil and natural gas. The impairment reviews and calculations are based on assumptions that are consistent with our business plans. See “Impairment of Assets” in Note 2.  The low commodity price environment that existed at December 31, 2008 influenced our future commodity price projections.  As a result, the expected discounted cash flows for many of our fields (i.e., fair values) were negatively impacted resulting in a charge to depletion and depreciation expense of approximately $51.9 million for field impairments for the year ended December 31, 2008.

An estimate as to the sensitivity to earnings for these periods if other assumptions had been used in impairment reviews and calculations is not practicable, given the number of assumptions involved in the estimates. That is, favorable changes to some assumptions might have avoided the need to impair any assets in these periods, whereas unfavorable changes might have caused an additional unknown number of other assets to become impaired.

Lower commodity prices also negatively impacted our oil and gas reserves in the fourth quarter of 2008 resulting in significant price related adjustments to our depletion and depreciation expense in the fourth quarter of 2008 as compared to the fourth quarter of 2007. These price related reserve reductions in 2008 resulted in additional depletion and depreciation charges of approximately $34.5 million for the fourth quarter and for the year ended December 31, 2008.

6.  Income Taxes

We, our predecessor and all of our subsidiaries, with the exception of Phoenix Production Company, Alamitos Company and BreitBurn Management, are partnerships or limited liability companies treated as partnerships for federal and state income tax purposes.  Essentially all of our taxable income or loss, which may differ considerably from the net income or loss reported for financial reporting purposes, is passed through to the federal income tax returns of our partners.  As such, we have not recorded any federal income tax expense for those pass-through entities.  State income tax expenses are recorded for certain operations that are subject to state taxation in various states, primarily Michigan, California and Texas.  The total state taxes paid were $0.5 million in 2008 and less than $0.1 million in 2007.

Our wholly-owned subsidiary, Phoenix Production Company, is a tax-paying corporation.  We record an income tax provision in accordance with SFAS No. 109 “Accounting for Income Taxes.”  In 2008 and 2007, Phoenix Production Company recorded $0.1 million and less than $0.1 million, respectively, for alternative minimum taxes.  Phoenix Production Company also recorded a deferred federal income tax expense of $1.2 million in 2008 and a deferred federal income tax benefit of $1.3 million in 2007.  The following is a reconciliation for Phoenix Production Company of federal income taxes at the statutory rates to federal income tax expense or benefit as reported in the consolidated statements of operations.

   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31,
 
Thousands of dollars
 
2008
   
2007
 
Income (loss) before taxes and minority interest
  $ 380,363     $ (61,495 )
Partnership income not subject to tax
    376,459       (56,997 )
Income (loss) subject to tax
    3,904       (4,498 )
Federal income tax rate
    34 %     34 %
Income tax at statutory rate
    1,327       (1,529 )
Other
    -       300  
Income tax expense (benefit)
  $ 1,327     $ (1,229 )

 
F-21

 

At December 31, 2008 and 2007, a net deferred federal income tax liability of $4.3 million and $3.1 million, respectively, was included in our consolidated balance sheet for Phoenix Production Company.  As shown in the table below, the net deferred federal income tax liability primarily consisted of the tax effect of book and tax basis differences of certain assets and liabilities and the deferred federal income tax asset for net operating loss carry forwards.  Management expects to utilize $2.3 million of estimated unused operating loss carry forwards to offset future taxable income.  As such, no valuation allowance has been recorded against the deferred federal income tax asset.

   
December 31,
 
Thousands of dollars
 
2008
   
2007
 
Deferred tax assets:
           
Net operating loss carryforwards
  $ 767     $ 726  
Asset retirement obligation
    337       428  
Unrealized hedge loss
    -       1,104  
Other
    103       74  
Deferred tax liabilities:
               
Depreciation, depletion and intangible drilling costs
    (3,404 )     (5,356 )
Other
    (2,085 )     (50 )
Net deferred tax liability
  $ (4,282 )   $ (3,074 )

In 2008, our other wholly-owned tax-paying corporation, Alamitos Company, incurred a current federal tax expense of $0.1 million.  No deferred federal or state income tax is recognized for this company as the temporary differences between the tax basis and the reported financial amounts of its assets and liabilities are immaterial.  BreitBurn Management became our wholly-owned subsidiary and a taxable entity on June 17, 2008.  However, no federal or state income tax expense is expected due to the nature of its business as expenses incurred are essentially offset by amounts recovered for services provided to the operating companies.

Cash paid for federal and state income taxes was $0.6 million in 2008, $0.1 million in 2007 and an immaterial amount in 2006.

New Accounting Pronouncement

Effective January 1, 2007, we implemented FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes — An Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 (“FIN 48”), which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in a company’s financial statements.  A company can only recognize the tax position in the financial statements if the position is more-likely-than-not to be upheld on audit based only on the technical merits of the tax position.  This accounting standard also provides guidance on thresholds, measurement, derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition that is intended to provide better financial-statement comparability among different companies.

We performed evaluations as of January 1, 2007, December 31, 2007 and December 31, 2008 and concluded that there were no uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in its financial statements.  The adoption of this standard did not have an impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

7.  Related Party Transactions

BreitBurn Management operates our assets and performs other administrative services for us such as accounting, corporate development, finance, land administration, legal and engineering.  All of our employees, including our executives, are employees of BreitBurn Management.  Prior to June 17, 2008, BreitBurn Management provided services to us and to BEC, and allocated its expenses between the two entities.  On June 17, 2008, in connection with the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions, BreitBurn Management became our wholly owned subsidiary and entered into an Amended and Restated Administrative Services Agreement with BEC, pursuant to which BreitBurn Management agreed to continue to provide administrative services to BEC, in exchange for a monthly fee of $775,000 for indirect expenses. In addition to the monthly fee, BreitBurn Management agreed to continue to charge BEC for direct expenses including incentive plan costs and direct payroll and administrative costs.  Beginning on June 17, 2008, all of the costs charged to BOLP are consolidated with our results.

 
F-22

 

During 2007, we incurred approximately $30.2 million in direct and indirect general and administrative expenses from BreitBurn Management, including accruals related to incentive compensation.  We reimbursed BreitBurn Management $23.8 million under the Administrative Services Agreement during 2007.  At December 31, 2007, we had a net short-term payable to BreitBurn Management of $9.2 million and a long-term payable of $1.5 million with both primarily relating to incentive compensation.

On August 26, 2008, members of our senior management, in their individual capacities, together with Metalmark, Greenhill and a third-party institutional investor, completed the acquisition of BEC, our Predecessor.  This transaction included the acquisition of a 96.02 percent indirect interest in BEC previously owned by Provident and the remaining indirect interests in BEC previously owned by Randall H. Breitenbach, Halbert S. Washburn and other members of our senior management.  BEC was an indirectly owned subsidiary of Provident.

In connection with the acquisition of Provident’s ownership in BEC by members of senior management, Metalmark, Greenhill and a third party institutional investor, BreitBurn Management entered into a five year Administrative Services Agreement to manage BEC's properties. The monthly fee charged to BEC remained $775,000 for indirect expenses through December 31, 2008.  We expect this fee to be renegotiated annually during the term of the agreement and expect a monthly fee of less than $775,000 in 2009.  In addition, we have entered into an Omnibus Agreement with BEC detailing rights with respect to business opportunities and providing us with a right of first offer with respect to the sale of assets by BEC.

At December 31, 2008, we had current receivables of $4.4 million due from BEC related to the Administrative Services Agreement, outstanding liabilities for employee related costs and oil and gas sales made by BEC on our behalf from certain properties. At December 31, 2007, we had current receivables of $1.0 million due from BEC related to oil and gas sales made by BEC on our behalf from certain properties.  In 2008 and 2007, total oil and gas sales made on our behalf for these properties were approximately $2.1 million and $1.7 million, respectively.

Mr. Greg L. Armstrong is the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Plains All American GP LLC (“PAA”). Mr. Armstrong was a director of our General Partner until March 26, 2008 when his resignation became effective.  We sell all of the crude oil produced from our Florida properties to Plains Marketing, L.P., a wholly owned subsidiary of PAA.  In 2008, prior to Mr. Armstrong’s resignation on March 26, 2008, we sold $19.3 million of our crude oil to Plains Marketing, L.P.  At December 31, 2007, the receivable from Plains Marketing, L.P. was $10.5 million, which was collected in the first quarter of 2008.

Through a transition services agreement through March 2008, Quicksilver provided services to us for accounting, land administration, and marketing and charged us $0.9 million for the first three months of 2008 and $0.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2007.  These charges were included in general and administrative expenses on the consolidated statements of operations. At December 31, 2007, the net receivable from Quicksilver was approximately $22.7 million which reflected cash collections made on our behalf net of advances.  In 2008, we collected these outstanding receivables from Quicksilver.  Quicksilver also buys natural gas from us in Michigan.  For the year ended December 31, 2008, total net gas sales to Quicksilver were approximately $8.0 million and the related receivable was $0.6 million as of December 31, 2008.

At December 31, 2008, we had a receivable of $0.1 million for management fees due from equity affiliates and operational expenses incurred on behalf of equity affiliates.  At December 31, 2007, we had a receivable of $1.4 million, which primarily included a $1.3 million receivable for a cash advance made to an equity affiliate that was repaid in 2008.

On June 17, 2008, in connection with the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions, the Omnibus Agreement, dated October 10, 2006, among us, the General Partner, Provident, Pro GP and BEC was terminated in all respects and Provident is no longer considered a related party.  At December 31, 2007, we had a payable to Provident of $0.9 million relating primarily to the management agreement and insurance costs that were provided by Provident on our behalf.

 
F-23

 

8.  Inventory

Our crude oil inventory from our Florida operations at December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007 was $1.3 million and $5.5 million respectively.  At December 31, 2007, we had an additional $0.2 million in non-crude oil inventory. Inventories purchased through the Calumet Acquisition (see Note 4) were $10.5 million, which were sold and charged to the consolidated statement of operations as inventory cost during the year ended December 31, 2007. For the year ended December 31, 2008, we sold 762 MBbls of crude oil and produced 707 MBbls from our Florida operations.  Crude oil inventory additions are at cost and represent our production costs.  We match production expenses with crude oil sales.  Production expenses associated with unsold crude oil inventory are recorded to inventory.  Crude oil sales are a function of the number and size of crude oil shipments in each quarter and thus crude oil sales do not always coincide with volumes produced in a given quarter.

We carry inventory at the lower of cost or market.  When using lower of cost or market to value inventory, market should not exceed the net realizable value or the estimated selling price less costs of completion and disposal.  During the fourth quarter of 2008, commodity prices decreased substantially.  As a result, we assessed our crude oil inventory for possible write-down, and recorded $1.2 million to write-down the Florida crude oil inventory to our net realizable value at December 31, 2008.

For our properties in Florida, there are a limited number of alternative methods of transportation for our production.  Substantially all of our oil production is transported by pipelines, trucks and barges owned by third parties.  The inability or unwillingness of these parties to provide transportation services for a reasonable fee could result in our having to find transportation alternatives, increased transportation costs, or involuntary curtailment of our oil production in Florida, which could have a negative impact on our future consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

9.  Intangibles

In May 2007, we acquired certain interests in oil leases and related assets through the acquisition of a limited liability company from Calumet Florida, L.L.C. As part of this acquisition, we assumed certain crude oil sales contracts for the remainder of 2007 and for 2008 through 2010.  A $3.4 million intangible asset was established to value the portion of the crude oil contracts that were above market at closing in the purchase price allocation.  Realized gains or losses from these contracts are recognized as part of oil sales and the intangible asset will be amortized over the life of the contracts.  As of December 31, 2008, our intangible asset related to the crude oil sales contracts was $1.6 million.

In November 2007, we acquired oil and gas properties and facilities from Quicksilver. Included in the Quicksilver purchase price was a $5.2 million intangible asset related to retention bonuses. In connection with the acquisition, we entered into an agreement with Quicksilver which provides for Quicksilver to fund retention bonuses payable to 139 former Quicksilver employees in the event these employees remain continuously employed by BreitBurn Management from November 1, 2007 through November 1, 2009 or in the event of termination without cause, disability or death. The amortization expense of $2.1 million for 2008 and $1.4 million for 2007 are included in the total operating expenses line on the consolidated statement of operations.  As of December 31, 2008, our intangible asset related to Quicksilver retention bonuses was $1.7 million.

10.  Equity Investments

We had equity investments at December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007 of $9.5 million and $15.6 million, respectively.  These investments are reported in the “Equity investments” line caption on the consolidated balance sheet and primarily represent investments in natural gas processing facilities.  For the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, we recorded $0.8 million and $0.3 million, respectively, in earnings from equity investments.  Earnings from equity investments are reported in the “Other Revenue” line caption on the consolidated statement of operations.
At December 31, 2008, our equity investments consisted primarily of a 24.5 percent limited partner interest and a 25.5 percent general partner interest in Wilderness Energy Services LP, with a combined carrying value of $8.2 million.  The remaining $1.3 million consists of smaller interests in several other investments.  At December 31, 2007, our equity investment totaled $15.6 million. The decrease in 2008 is primarily due to the final purchase price allocations related to our Quicksilver asset purchase.

11.  Long-Term Debt

On November 1, 2007, in connection with the Quicksilver Acquisition, BOLP, as borrower, and we and our wholly owned subsidiaries, as guarantors, entered into a four year, $1.5 billion amended and restated revolving credit facility with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC and a syndicate of banks (the “Amended and Restated Credit Agreement”).

 
F-24

 

The initial borrowing base of the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement was $700 million and was increased to $750 million on April 10, 2008.  Under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, borrowings were allowed to be used (i) to pay a portion of the purchase price for the Quicksilver Acquisition, (ii) for standby letters of credit, (iii) for working capital purposes, (iv) for general company purposes and (v) for certain permitted acquisitions and payments enumerated by the credit facility.  Borrowings under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement are secured by first-priority liens on and security interests in substantially all of the Partnership’s and certain of its subsidiaries’ assets, representing not less than 80 percent of the total value of their oil and gas properties.   

The Amended and Restated Credit Agreement contains (i) financial covenants, including leverage, current assets and interest coverage ratios, and (ii) customary covenants, including restrictions on the Partnership’s ability to: incur additional indebtedness; make certain investments, loans or advances; make distributions to unitholders or repurchase units if aggregated letters of credit and outstanding loan amounts exceed 90 percent of its borrowing base; make dispositions; or enter into a merger or sale of its property or assets, including the sale or transfer of interests in its subsidiaries.

The events that constitute an Event of Default (as defined in the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement) include: payment defaults; misrepresentations; breaches of covenants; cross-default and cross-acceleration to certain other indebtedness; adverse judgments against the Partnership in excess of a specified amount; changes in management or control; loss of permits; failure to perform under a material agreement; certain insolvency events; assertion of certain environmental claims; and occurrence of a material adverse effect.  At December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007, the Partnership was in compliance with the credit facility’s covenants.

On June 17, 2008, in connection with the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions, we and our wholly owned subsidiaries entered into Amendment No. 1 to the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent (the “Agent”). Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement increased the borrowing base available under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, from $750 million to $900 million. In addition, Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement enacted certain additional amendments, waivers and consents to the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement and the related Security Agreement, dated November 1, 2007, among BOLP, certain of its subsidiaries and the Agent, necessary to permit the Amendment No. 1 to the First Amended and Restated Limited Partnership Agreement and the transactions consummated in the Purchase, Contribution and Partnership Transactions.  Under Amendment No. 1 to the Credit Agreement, the interest margins applicable to borrowings, the letter of credit fee and the commitment fee under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement were increased by amounts ranging from 12.5 to 25 basis points.

As of December 31, 2008, approximately $736.0 million in indebtedness was outstanding under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement.  The credit facility will mature on November 1, 2011.  At December 31, 2008, the LIBOR interest rate, a weighted average interest rate of our four outstanding LIBOR loans, was 2.350 percent on the LIBOR portion of $736.0 million.

As of December 31, 2007, approximately $370.4 million in indebtedness was outstanding under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement.  At December 31, 2007, the interest rate was the Prime Rate of 7.625 percent on the Prime Debt portion of $3.4 million and the LIBOR rate of 6.595 percent on the LIBOR portion of $367.0 million.

The credit facility contains customary covenants, including restrictions on our ability to: incur additional indebtedness; make certain investments, loans or advances; make distributions to our unitholders (including the restriction in our ability to make distributions if aggregated letters of credit and outstanding loan amounts exceed 90 percent of our borrowing base); make dispositions or enter into sales and leasebacks; or enter into a merger or sale of our property or assets, including the sale or transfer of interests in our subsidiaries.

As of December 31, 2008 and 2007, we were in compliance with the credit facility’s covenants.  At December 31, 2008 and 2007, we had $0.3 million and $0.3 million, respectively, in letters of credit outstanding.

Previous to the amended and restated credit agreement, we had in place a $400 million revolving credit facility with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as lead arranger, administrative agent, and issuing lender, and a syndicate of banks.  We entered the $400 million credit facility on October 10, 2006, in connection with our initial public offering.  The credit facility’s initial borrowing base was $90 million and was increased to $100 million in December 2006.  At December 31, 2006, the interest rate was the Prime Rate of 8.5 percent on the Prime Debt portion of $1.5 million.

 
F-25

 

Our interest expense is detailed in the following table:

   
Successor
   
Predecessor
 
   
Year Ended
   
October 10 to
   
January 1 to
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
October 9,
 
Thousands of dollars
 
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2006
 
Credit facility
  $ 25,487     $ 5,373     $ 11     $ 2,510  
Commitment fees
    1,047       503       61       141  
Amortization of discount and deferred issuance costs
    2,613       382       -       -  
Total
  $ 29,147     $ 6,258     $ 72     $ 2,651  
Cash paid for interest on Credit facility (including realized losses on interest rate swaps)
  $ 29,767     $ 3,545     $ 72     $ 2,651  

12.  Asset Retirement Obligation

Our asset retirement obligation is based on our net ownership in wells and facilities and our estimate of the costs to abandon and remediate those wells and facilities as well as our estimate of the future timing of the costs to be incurred.  The total undiscounted amount of future cash flows required to settle our asset retirement obligations is estimated to be $256.8 million at December 31, 2008 and was $225.2 million at December 31, 2007.  The increase from prior year is attributable to increased cost estimates primarily for California fields.  Payments to settle asset retirement obligations occur over the operating lives of the assets, estimated to be from 7 to 50 years.  Estimated cash flows have been discounted at our credit adjusted risk free rate of 7 percent and adjusted for inflation using a rate of 2 percent.  Changes in the asset retirement obligation for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 are presented in the following table:

   
Year Ended December 31,
 
Thousands of dollars
 
2008
   
2007
 
Carrying amount, beginning of period
  $ 27,819     $ 10,253  
Liabilities settled in the current period
    (1,054 )     (367 )
Revisions (1)
    1,363       3,950  
Acquisitions
    -       12,955  
Accretion expense
    1,958       1,028  
                 
Carrying amount, end of period
  $ 30,086     $ 27,819  

(1) Increased cost estimates and revisions to reserve life.

13.  Partners’ Equity

At December 31, 2008, we had 52,635,634 Common Units outstanding.

On June 17, 2008, we purchased 14,404,962 Common Units from subsidiaries of Provident at $23.26 per unit, for a purchase price of approximately $335 million. These units have been cancelled and are no longer outstanding.  This transaction was accounted for as a repurchase of issued Common Units and a cancellation of those Common Units.  This transaction decreased equity by $336.2 million, including $1.2 million in capitalized transaction costs.  We also purchased Provident’s 95.55 percent limited liability company interest in BreitBurn Management, which owned the General Partner.  Also on June 17, 2008, we entered into a Contribution Agreement with the General Partner, BreitBurn Management and BreitBurn Corporation, pursuant to which BreitBurn Corporation contributed its 4.45 percent limited liability company interest in BreitBurn Management to us in exchange for 19,955 Common Units and BreitBurn Management contributed its 100 percent limited liability company interest in the General Partner to us.  On the same date, we entered into Amendment No. 1 to the First Amended and Restated Agreement of Limited Partnership of the Partnership, pursuant to which the economic portion of the General Partner’s 0.66473 percent general partner interest in us was eliminated.  As a result of these transactions, the General Partner and BreitBurn Management became our wholly owned subsidiaries.

 
F-26

 

On December 22, 2008, we entered into a Unit Purchase Rights Agreement, dated as of December 22, 2008 (the “Rights Agreement”), between us and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company LLC, as Rights Agent.  Under the Rights Agreement, each holder of Common Units at the close of business on December 31, 2008 automatically received a distribution of one unit purchase right (a “Right”), which entitles the registered holder to purchase from us one additional Common Unit at a price of $40.00 per Common Unit, subject to adjustment. We entered into the Rights agreement to increase the likelihood that our unitholders receive fair and equal treatment in the event of a takeover proposal.

The issuance of the Rights was not taxable to the holders of the Common Units, had no dilutive effect, will not affect our reported earnings per Common Unit, and will not change the method of trading the Common Units. The Rights will not trade separately from the Common Units unless the Rights become exercisable.  The Rights will become exercisable if a person or group acquires beneficial ownership of 20 percent or more of the outstanding Common Units or commences, or announces its intention to commence, a tender offer that could result in beneficial ownership of 20 percent or more of the outstanding Common Units. If the Rights become exercisable, each Right will entitle holders, other than the acquiring party, to purchase a number of Common Units having a market value of twice the then-current exercise price of the Right. Such provision will not apply to any person who, prior to the adoption of the Rights Agreement, beneficially owns 20 percent or more of the outstanding Common Units until such person acquires beneficial ownership of any additional Common Units.

The Rights Agreement has a term of three years and will expire on December 22, 2011, unless the term is extended, the Rights are earlier redeemed or we terminate the Rights Agreement.

Cash Distributions

The partnership agreement requires us to distribute all of our available cash quarterly.  Available cash is cash on hand, including cash from borrowings, at the end of a quarter after the payment of expenses and the establishment of reserves for future capital expenditures and operational needs.  We may fund a portion of capital expenditures with additional borrowings or issuances of additional units.  We may also borrow to make distributions to unitholders, for example, in circumstances where we believe that the distribution level is sustainable over the long term, but short-term factors have caused available cash from operations to be insufficient to pay the distribution at the current level.  The partnership agreement does not restrict our ability to borrow to pay distributions.  The cash distribution policy reflects a basic judgment that unitholders will be better served by us distributing our available cash, after expenses and reserves, rather than retaining it.

Distributions are not cumulative.  Consequently, if distributions on Common Units are not paid with respect to any fiscal quarter at the initial distribution rate, our unitholders will not be entitled to receive such payments in the future.

Distributions are paid within 45 days of the end of each fiscal quarter to holders of record on or about the first or second week of each such month.  If the distribution date does not fall on a business day, the distribution will be made on the business day immediately preceding the indicated distribution date.

We do not have a legal obligation to pay distributions at any rate except as provided in the partnership agreement.  Our distribution policy is consistent with the terms of our partnership agreement, which requires that we distribute all of our available cash quarterly.  Under the partnership agreement, available cash is defined to generally mean, for each fiscal quarter, cash generated from our business in excess of the amount of reserves the General Partner determines is necessary or appropriate to provide for the conduct of the business, to comply with applicable law, any of its debt instruments or other agreements or to provide for future distributions to its unitholders for any one or more of the upcoming four quarters.  The partnership agreement provides that any determination made by the General Partner in its capacity as general partner must be made in good faith and that any such determination will not be subject to any other standard imposed by the partnership agreement, the Delaware limited partnership statute or any other law, rule or regulation or at equity.

On February 14, 2008, we paid a cash distribution of approximately $30.5 million to our General Partner and common unitholders of record as of the close of business on February 11, 2008.  The distribution that was paid to unitholders was $0.4525 per Common Unit.

On May 15, 2008, we paid a cash distribution of approximately $33.7 million to our General Partner and common unitholders of record as of the close of business on May 9, 2008.  The distribution that was paid to unitholders was $0.50 per Common Unit.

 
F-27

 

On August 14, 2008, we paid a cash distribution of approximately $27.4 million to our common unitholders of record as of the close of business on August 11, 2008.  The distribution that was paid to unitholders was $0.52 per Common Unit.

On November 14, 2008, we paid a cash distribution of approximately $27.4 million to our common unitholders of record as of the close of business on November 10, 2008.  The distribution that was paid to unitholders was $0.52 per Common Unit.

During the year ended December 31, 2008, we made payments equivalent to the distributions made to unitholders of $2.3 million on Restricted Phantom Units and Convertible Phantom Units issued under our Long-Term Incentive Plans.

2007 Private Placements

On May 24, 2007, we sold 4,062,500 Common Units, at a negotiated purchase price of $32.00 per unit, to certain investors (the “Purchasers”).  We used $108 million from such sale to fund the cash consideration for the Calumet Acquisition and the remaining $22 million of the proceeds was used to repay indebtedness under our credit facility.  Most of the debt repaid was associated with our first quarter 2007 acquisition of the Lazy JL Field properties in West Texas.

On May 25, 2007, we sold an additional 2,967,744 Common Units to the same Purchasers at a negotiated purchase price of $31.00 per unit.  We used the proceeds of approximately $92 million to fund the BEPI Acquisition, including the termination of existing hedge contracts related to future production from BEPI.

On November 1, 2007, we sold 16,666,667 Common Units, at a negotiated purchase price of $27.00 per unit, to certain investors in a third private placement.  We used the proceeds from such sale to fund a portion of the cash consideration for the Quicksilver Acquisition. Also on November 1, 2007, we issued 21,347,972 Common Units to Quicksilver as partial consideration for the Quicksilver Acquisition as a private placement.

In connection with the private placements of Common Units to finance the Quicksilver Acquisition, we entered into registration rights agreements with the institutional investors in our private placements and Quicksilver to file shelf registration statements to register the resale of the Common Units sold or issued in the Private Placements and to use our commercially reasonable efforts to cause the registration statements to become effective with respect to the Common Units sold to the institutional investors not later than August 2, 2008 and, with respect to the Common Units issued to Quicksilver, within one year from November 1, 2007.  Quicksilver is prohibited from selling any of the Common Units issued to it prior to the first anniversary of November 1, 2007 or more than 50 percent of such Common Units prior to eighteen months after November 1, 2007.  In addition, the agreements give the institutional investors and Quicksilver piggyback registration rights under certain circumstances.  These registration rights are transferable to affiliates of the institutional investors and Quicksilver and, in certain circumstances, to third parties.

On July 31, 2008, the registration statement relating to the resale of the Common Units issued in the private placement to the institutional investors was declared effective.  On October 28, 2008, the registration statement relating to the resale of the Common Units issued in the private placement to Quicksilver was declared effective.

 
F-28

 

14.  Financial Instruments

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Our commodity price risk management program is intended to reduce our exposure to commodity prices and to assist with stabilizing cash flow and distributions.  Routinely, we utilize derivative financial instruments to reduce this volatility.  During 2008, there has been extreme volatility and disruption in the capital and credit markets which has reached unprecedented levels and may adversely affect the financial condition of our derivative counterparties.  Although each of our derivative counterparties carried an S&P credit rating of A or above at December 31, 2008, we could be exposed to losses if a counterparty fails to perform in accordance with the terms of the contract.  This risk is managed by diversifying the derivative portfolio among counterparties meeting certain financial criteria.

Commodity Activities

The derivative instruments we utilize are based on index prices that may and often do differ from the actual crude oil and natural gas prices realized in our operations.  These variations often result in a lack of adequate correlation to enable these derivative instruments to qualify for cash flow hedges under SFAS No. 133.  Accordingly, we do not attempt to account for our derivative instruments as cash flow hedges and instead recognize changes in the fair value immediately in earnings.  For the year ended December 31, 2008 we had realized losses of $55.9 million and unrealized gains of $388.0 million relating to our market based commodity contracts.  We had net financial instruments receivable relating to our commodity contracts of $292.3 million at December 31, 2008.

For the year ended December 31, 2007, we had realized losses of $6.6 million and unrealized losses of $103.9 million relating to our market based commodity contracts.  We had net financial instruments payable of $99.9 million at December 31, 2007. For the period October 10, 2006 to December 31, 2006, we had realized gains of $2.2 million and unrealized losses of $1.3 million relating to our market based commodity contracts.  We had net financial instruments receivable of $3.9 million at December 31, 2006.

For the period from January 1, 2006 to October 9, 2006, the predecessor had realized losses of $3.7 million and unrealized gains of $6.0 million relating to various market based contracts.

On September 19, 2008, due to Lehman Brothers’ bankruptcy, we terminated our crude oil derivative instruments with Lehman Brothers.  Our derivative contract with Lehman Brothers, commonly referred to as a “zero cost collar,” was for oil volumes of 1,000 Bbls/d for the full year 2011. This represented approximately 8 percent of our total 2011 oil and natural gas hedge portfolio. The floor price for the collar was $105.00 per Bbl and the ceiling price was $174.50 per Bbl.  This contract was replaced with contracts by substantially similar terms, with different counterparties, for oil volumes of 1,000 Bbls/d covering January 1, 2011 to January 31, 2011 and March 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.

 
F-29

 

We had the following contracts in place at December 31, 2008:

   
Year
   
Year
   
Year
   
Year
 
   
2009
   
2010
   
2011
   
2012
 
Gas Positions:
                       
Fixed Price Swaps:
                       
Hedged Volume (MMBtu/d)
    45,802       43,869       25,955       19,129  
Average Price ($/MMBtu)
  $ 8.14     $ 8.20     $ 9.21     $ 10.12  
Collars:
                               
Hedged Volume (MMBtu/d)
    1,740       3,405       16,016       19,129  
Average Floor Price ($/MMBtu)
  $ 9.00     $ 9.00     $ 9.00     $ 9.00  
Average Ceiling Price ($/MMBtu)
  $ 16.36     $ 12.79     $ 11.28     $ 11.89  
Total:
                               
Hedged Volume (MMMBtu/d)
    47,542       47,275       41,971       38,257