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EX-21 - FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP /PA/v176698_ex21.htm
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EX-23.1 - FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP /PA/v176698_ex23-1.htm
EX-31.1 - FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP /PA/v176698_ex31-1.htm
EX-32.2 - FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP /PA/v176698_ex32-2.htm
EX-32.1 - FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP /PA/v176698_ex32-1.htm

  

  

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



 

FORM 10-K



 

 
x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009

 
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from  to .

Commission file number 0-12126



 

FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 
PENNSYLVANIA   25-1440803
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 
20 South Main Street, Chambersburg, PA   17201-0819
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(717) 264-6116

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)



 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: NONE

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share

(Title of class)



 

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter periods that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).Yes o No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.

     
Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer x   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company o

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act)Yes o No x

The aggregate market value of the 3,476,074 shares of the Registrant’s common stock held by nonaffiliates of the Registrant as of June 30, 2009 based on the price of such shares was $59,093,258.

There were 3,864,176 outstanding shares of the Registrant’s common stock as of February 26, 2010.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the definitive annual proxy statement to be filed, pursuant to Reg. 14A within 120 days after December 31, 2009, are incorporated into Part III.

 

 


 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FRANKLIN FINANCIAL SERVICES CORPORATION
  
FORM 10-K
  
INDEX

 
  Page
Part I
 

Item 1.

Business

    1  

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

    6  

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

    8  

Item 2.

Properties

    9  

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

    9  

Item 4.

Reserved

    9  
Part II
 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

    10  

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

    13  

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

    14  

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

    44  

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

    44  

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

    90  

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

    90  

Item 9B.

Other Information

    92  
Part III
 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officer and Corporate Governance

    93  

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

    93  

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

    93  

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transaction, and Director Independence

    94  

Item 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

    94  
Part IV
 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

    95  
Signatures     96  
Index of Exhibits     97  

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Part I

Item 1. Business

General

Franklin Financial Services Corporation (the “Corporation”) was organized as a Pennsylvania business corporation on June 1, 1983 and is a registered bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHCA”). On January 16, 1984, pursuant to a plan of reorganization approved by the shareholders of Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of Chambersburg (“F&M Trust” or “the Bank”) and the appropriate regulatory agencies, the Corporation acquired all the shares of F&M Trust and issued its own shares to former F&M Trust shareholders on a share-for-share basis.

The Corporation’s common stock is not actively traded in the over-the-counter market. The Corporation’s stock is listed under the symbol “FRAF” on the Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”), an automated quotation service. The Corporation’s Internet address is www.franklinfin.com. Electronic copies of the Corporation’s 2009 Annual Report on Form 10-K are available free of charge by visiting the “Investor Information” section of www.franklinfin.com. Electronic copies of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K are also available at this Internet address. These reports are posted as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

The Corporation conducts substantially all of its business through its direct banking subsidiary, F&M Trust (the Bank), which is wholly owned. Other direct subsidiaries of the Corporation include Franklin Financial Properties Corp. and Franklin Future Fund Inc. F&M Trust, established in 1906, is a full-service, Pennsylvania-chartered commercial bank and trust company, which is not a member of the Federal Reserve System. F&M Trust operates twenty-five community banking offices in Franklin, Cumberland, Fulton and Huntingdon Counties, Pennsylvania, and engages in general commercial, retail banking and trust services normally associated with community banks and its deposits are insured (up to applicable limits) by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”). F&M Trust offers a wide variety of banking services to businesses, individuals, and governmental entities. These services include, but are not necessarily limited to, accepting and maintaining checking, savings, and time deposit accounts, providing investment and trust services, making loans and providing safe deposit facilities. Franklin Financial Properties Corp. is a “qualified real estate subsidiary” established to hold real estate assets used by F&M Trust in its banking operations. Franklin Future Fund Inc. is a non-bank investment company that makes venture capital investments within the Corporation’s primary market area.

The Corporation’s banking subsidiary is not dependent upon a single customer or a few customers for a material part of its business. Thus, the loss of any customer or identifiable group of customers would not materially affect the business of the Corporation or the Bank in an adverse manner. Also, none of the Corporation’s business is seasonal. The Bank’s lending activities consist primarily of commercial real estate, construction and land development, agricultural, commercial and industrial loans, installment and revolving loans to consumers and residential mortgage loans. Secured and unsecured commercial and industrial loans, including accounts receivable and inventory financing, and commercial equipment financing, are made to small and medium-sized businesses, individuals, governmental entities, and non-profit organizations. F&M Trust also participates in Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Act student loan programs, Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency programs and is a Small Business Administration approved lender.

Installment loans involve both direct loans to consumers and the purchase of consumer obligations from dealers who have sold or financed the purchase of automobiles to their customers. The Bank’s mortgage loans include long-term loans to individuals and to businesses secured by mortgages on the borrower’s real property. Construction loans are made to finance the purchase of land and the construction of residential and commercial buildings thereon, and are secured by mortgages on real estate. In certain situations, the Bank acquires properties through foreclosure on delinquent mortgage loans. The Bank holds these properties at their fair value at the date of foreclosure until such time as they are sold.

F&M Trust’s Investment and Trust Services Department offers all of the personal and corporate trust services normally associated with trust departments of area banks including: estate planning and administration, corporate and personal trust fund management, pension, profit sharing and other employee

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benefit funds management, and custodial services. F&M Trust’s Personal Investment Center sells mutual funds, annuities and selected insurance products.

Acquisitions

On November 29, 2008, Franklin Financial Services Corporation completed its acquisition of Community Financial, Inc. (Community). Community was the holding company of Community Trust Company, a Pennsylvania trust company headquartered in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. In connection with the Community merger, Community Trust Company merged with and into Farmers and Merchants Trust Company. The acquisition increased the Bank’s trust assets under management by approximately $62 million. The acquisition provided the Bank quick entry into an attractive market for asset management services and presents the opportunity for the expansion of retail and commercial banking services via an established office.

On July 1, 2006, Franklin Financial Services Corporation completed its acquisition of Fulton Bancshares Corporation (Fulton). In connection with the transaction, The Fulton County National Bank and Trust Company, a subsidiary of Fulton Bancshares was merged with and into Farmers and Merchants Trust Company of Chambersburg, a subsidiary of Franklin Financial Services Corporation. The acquisition added approximately $123 million in assets and 6 community-banking offices in Franklin, Fulton and Huntingdon counties to Franklin Financial Services Corporation. Management believes that the acquisition gave it access to a contiguous market, via an established network, that could be expanded with the product offerings of the Corporation.

Competition

The Corporation and its banking subsidiary operate in a competitive environment that has intensified in the past few years as it has been compelled to share its market with institutions that are not subject to the regulatory restrictions on domestic banks and bank holding companies. Profit margins in the traditional banking business of lending and gathering deposits have declined as deregulation has allowed nonbanking institutions to offer alternative services to many of F&M Trust’s customers.

The principal market of F&M Trust is in south central Pennsylvania, primarily the counties of Franklin, Cumberland, Fulton and Huntingdon. The majority of the Bank’s loan and deposit customers are in Franklin County. There are many commercial bank competitors in this region, in addition to credit unions, savings and loan associations, mortgage banks, brokerage firms and other competitors. The Bank utilizes various strategies including customer service and convenience as part of a relationship management culture, a wide variety of products and services, and the pricing of loans and deposits to compete. F&M Trust is the largest financial institution headquartered in Franklin County and had total assets of approximately $979.4 million on December 31, 2009.

Staff

As of December 31, 2009, the Corporation and its banking subsidiary had 254 full-time equivalent employees. The officers of the Corporation are employees of the Bank. Most employees participate in pension, incentive compensation plans, 401(k) plan and employee stock purchase plans and are provided with group life and health insurance. Management considers employee relations to be excellent.

Supervision and Regulation

Various requirements and restrictions under the laws of the United States and under Pennsylvania law affect the Corporation and its subsidiaries.

General

The Corporation is registered as a bank holding company and is subject to supervision and regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System under the Bank Holding Act of 1956, as amended. The Corporation has also made an effective election to be treated as a “financial holding company.” Financial holding companies are bank holding companies that meet certain minimum capital and other standards and are therefore entitled to engage in financially related activities on an expedited basis; see further discussion below. As a financial holding company, the Corporation’s activities and those of its Bank subsidiary are limited to the business of banking and activities closely related or incidental to banking. Bank holding companies are

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required to file periodic reports with and are subject to examination by the Federal Reserve Board. The Federal Reserve Board has issued regulations under the Bank Holding Company Act that require a bank holding company to serve as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary banks. As a result, the Federal Reserve Board, pursuant to such regulations, may require the Corporation to stand ready to use its resources to provide adequate capital funds to its Bank subsidiary during periods of financial stress or adversity.

The Bank Holding Company Act prohibits the Corporation from acquiring direct or indirect control of more than 5% of the outstanding shares of any class of voting stock, or substantially all of the assets of any bank, or from merging or consolidating with another bank holding company, without prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board. Additionally, the Bank Holding Company Act prohibits the Corporation from engaging in or from acquiring ownership or control of more than 5% of the outstanding shares of any class of voting stock of any company engaged in a non-banking business, unless such business is determined by the Federal Reserve Board to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident thereto. Federal law and Pennsylvania law also require persons or entities desiring to acquire certain levels of share ownership (generally, 10% or more, or 5% or more for another bank holding company) of the Corporation to first obtain prior approval from the Federal Reserve and the Pennsylvania Department of Banking.

As a Pennsylvania bank holding company for purposes of the Pennsylvania Banking Code, the Corporation is also subject to regulation and examination by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking.

The Bank is a state chartered bank that is not a member of the Federal Reserve System, and its deposits are insured (up to applicable limits) by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”). Accordingly, the Bank’s primary federal regulator is the FDIC, and the Bank is subject to extensive regulation and examination by the FDIC and the Pennsylvania Department of Banking. The Bank is also subject to requirements and restrictions under federal and state law, including requirements to maintain reserves against deposits, restrictions on the types and amounts of loans that may be granted and the interest that may be charged thereon, and limitations on the types of investments that may be made and the types of services that may be offered. The Bank is subject to extensive regulation and reporting requirements in a variety of areas, including helping to prevent money laundering, to preserve financial privacy, and to properly report late payments, defaults, and denials of loan applications. The Community Reinvestment Act requires the Bank to help meet the credit needs of the entire community where the Bank operates, including low and moderate income neighborhoods. The Bank’s rating under the Community Reinvestment Act, assigned by the FDIC pursuant to an examination of the Bank, is important in determining whether the bank may receive approval for, or utilize certain streamlined procedures in, applications to engage in new activities. The Bank’s present CRA rating is “satisfactory.” Various consumer laws and regulations also affect the operations of the Bank. In addition to the impact of regulation, commercial banks are affected significantly by the actions of the Federal Reserve Board as it attempts to control the money supply and credit availability in order to influence the economy.

Capital Adequacy Guidelines

Bank holding companies are required to comply with the Federal Reserve Board’s risk-based capital guidelines. The required minimum ratio of total capital to risk-weighted assets (including certain off-balance sheet activities, such as standby letters of credit) is 8%. At least half of the total capital is required to be “Tier 1 capital,” consisting principally of common shareholders’ equity less certain intangible assets. The remainder (“Tier 2 capital”) may consist of certain preferred stock, a limited amount of subordinated debt, certain hybrid capital instruments and other debt securities, and a limited amount of the general loan loss allowance and deferred tax accounts. The risk-based capital guidelines are required to take adequate account of interest rate risk, concentration of credit risk, and risks of nontraditional activities.

In addition to the risk-based capital guidelines, the Federal Reserve Board requires a bank holding company to maintain a leverage ratio of a minimum level of Tier 1 capital (as determined under the risk-based capital guidelines) equal to 3% of average total consolidated assets for those bank holding companies which have the highest regulatory examination ratings and are not contemplating or experiencing significant growth or expansion. All other bank holding companies are required to maintain a ratio of at least 1% to 2% above the stated minimum. The Bank is subject to almost identical capital requirements adopted by the FDIC. In

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addition to FDIC capital requirements, the Pennsylvania Department of Banking also requires state chartered banks to maintain a 6% leverage capital level and 10% risk based capital, defined substantially the same as the federal regulations.

Prompt Corrective Action Rules

The federal banking agencies have regulations defining the levels at which an insured institution would be considered “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized” and “critically undercapitalized.” The applicable federal bank regulator for a depository institution could, under certain circumstances, reclassify a “well-capitalized” institution as “adequately capitalized” or require an “adequately capitalized” or “undercapitalized” institution to comply with supervisory actions as if it were in the next lower category. Such a reclassification could be made if the regulatory agency determines that the institution is in an unsafe or unsound condition (which could include unsatisfactory examination ratings). At December 31, 2009, the Corporation and the Bank each satisfied the criteria to be classified as “well capitalized” within the meaning of applicable regulations.

Regulatory Restrictions on Dividends

Dividend payments by the Bank to the Corporation are subject to the Pennsylvania Banking Code, the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, and the regulations of the FDIC. Under the Banking Code, no dividends may be paid except from “accumulated net earnings” (generally, retained earnings). The Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC have formal and informal policies which provide that insured banks and bank holding companies should generally pay dividends only out of current operating earnings, with some exceptions. The Prompt Corrective Action Rules, described above, further limit the ability of banks to pay dividends, because banks that are not classified as well capitalized or adequately capitalized may not pay dividends.

FDIC Insurance Assessment

The Bank is a member of the Deposit Insurance Fund (the “DIF”), which is administered by the FDIC. Deposit accounts at the Bank are insured by the FDIC, generally up to a maximum of $100 thousand for each separately insured depositor and up to a maximum of $250 thousand for self-directed retirement accounts. However, the FDIC increased the deposit insurance available on all deposit accounts to $250 thousand until December 31, 2013. In addition, certain transaction accounts maintained with financial institutions participating in the FDIC’s Transaction Account Guarantee Program are fully insured regardless of the dollar amount until June 30, 2010. The Bank has opted to participate in the FDIC’s Transaction Account Guarantee Program. See “Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program” below.

The FDIC imposes an assessment against all depository institutions for deposit insurance. This assessment is based on the risk category of the institution. On February 27, 2009, the FDIC published a final rule raising the current deposit insurance assessment rates uniformly for all institutions by seven basis points to a range from 12 to 45 basis points of total deposits starting in the first quarter of 2009. As of December 31, 2009, the Bank’s assessment rate was approximately 14 basis points.

On May 22, 2009, the FDIC adopted a final rule imposing a 5 basis point special assessment on each insured depository institution’s assets minus Tier 1 capital as of June 30, 2009, but not to exceed 10 basis points times the institution’s assessment base for the second quarter 2009. The special assessment was accrued for as of June 30, 2009 and collected on September 30, 2009 and the Bank paid an assessment of $450 thousand.

On September 29, 2009, the FDIC adopted an Amended Restoration Plan to allow the DIF to return to its statutorily mandated minimum reserve ratio of 1.15% within 8 years. At the same time, the FDIC adopted higher risk-based assessment rates effective beginning January 1, 2011. It also imposed a prepaid assessment on insured institutions payable December 30, 2009 that required insured institutions to prepay their estimated quarterly risk-based assessment for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for all of 2010, 2011 and 2012. The Bank paid an assessment of approximately $4.0 million on December 30, 2009 and it was recorded as a prepaid asset.

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Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the FDIC upon a finding that an institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC. We do not currently know of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of our deposit insurance.

In addition to the FDIC assessments, the Financing Corporation (“FICO”) is authorized to impose and collect, with the approval of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, assessments for anticipated payments, issuance costs and custodial fees on bonds issued by the FICO in the 1980s to recapitalize the former Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation. The bonds issued by the FICO are due to mature from 2017 to 2019. At December 31, 2009, the Bank’s annualized FICO assessment was approximately 1 basis point of total deposits.

Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program.

On October 14, 2008, the FDIC announced a new program — the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program. This program has two components — The Debt Guarantee Program and the Transaction Account Guarantee Program. The Debt Guarantee Program guarantees newly issued senior unsecured debt of a participating organization, up to certain limits established for each institution, issued between October 14, 2008 and June 30, 2009. The FDIC will pay the unpaid principal and interest on an FDIC-guaranteed debt instrument upon the uncured failure of the participating entity to make a timely payment of principal or interest in accordance with the terms of the instrument. The guarantee will remain in effect until June 30, 2012. In return for the FDIC’s guarantee, participating institutions will pay the FDIC a fee based on the amount and maturity of the debt. The Bank and the Corporation have opted not to participate in the Debt Guarantee Program.

The Transaction Account Guarantee Program provides full federal deposit insurance coverage for certain transaction deposit accounts, regardless of dollar amount, until June 30, 2010. An annualized 10 basis point assessment on balances in noninterest-bearing transaction accounts that exceed the existing deposit insurance limit of $250 thousand will be assessed on a quarterly basis to insured depository institutions that have not opted out of this component of the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program. The Bank has opted to participate in the Transaction Account Guarantee Program.

U.S. Treasury’s Troubled Asset Relief Program Capital Purchase Program.

On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”) was enacted that provides the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury with broad authority to implement certain actions to help restore stability and liquidity to U.S. markets. One of the provisions resulting from the legislation is the Troubled Asset Relief Program Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”), which provides direct equity investment in perpetual preferred stock by the U.S. Treasury Department in qualified financial institutions. The program is voluntary and requires an institution to comply with a number of restrictions and provisions, including limits on executive compensation, stock redemptions and declaration of dividends. The CPP provides for a minimum investment of one percent of total risk-weighted assets and a maximum investment equal to the lesser of three percent of total risk-weighted assets or $25 billion. Participation in the program is not automatic and is subject to approval by the U.S. Treasury Department. The Corporation opted not to participate in the CPP because it believes its strong capital position, asset quality and earnings allow us to effectively execute on our strategic objectives, and continue to originate and invest in loans to creditworthy borrowers in our marketplace. Our management team concluded that CPP participation would not be beneficial to our customers, shareholders or communities as it would restrict dividend increases and share repurchases as well as dilute ownership, earnings per share, and return on equity.

New Legislation

Congress is often considering new financial industry legislation, and the federal banking agencies routinely propose new regulations. The Corporation cannot predict how any new legislation, or new rules adopted by the federal banking agencies, may affect its business in the future.

Selected Statistical Information

Certain statistical information is included in this report as part of Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

The following is a summary of the primary risks associated with the Corporation’s business, financial condition and results of operations, and common stock. The list of risks identified below is not intended to be exhaustive and does not include risks that are faced by businesses generally. In addition to the risks identified below, there may be other risks and uncertainties, including those not presently known to us or those we currently consider immaterial that could adversely affect the Corporation and its business.

Risk Factors Relating to the Corporation

A focus on commercial loans may increase the risk of substantial credit losses.

The Bank offers a variety of loan products, including residential mortgage, consumer, construction and commercial loans. At December 31, 2009, approximately 75% of its loans were commercial purpose loans. These are loans made for commercial purposes that are primarily secured by commercial real estate, residential real estate or other business assets. As the Bank grows, it is expected that this percentage will grow as the Bank continues to focus its efforts on commercial lending. Commercial lending is more risky than residential mortgage and consumer lending because loan balances are greater and the borrower’s ability to repay is contingent on the successful operation of a business. Risk of loan defaults is unavoidable in the banking industry, and Management tries to limit exposure to this risk by carefully monitoring the amount of loans in specific industries and by exercising prudent lending practices. However, this risk cannot be eliminated and substantial credit losses could result in reduced earnings or losses.

The allowance for loan losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb potential losses in our loan portfolio.

The Bank maintains an allowance for loan losses that Management believes is appropriate to provide for any potential losses in the loan portfolio. The amount of the allowance is determined through a periodic review and consideration of several factors, including an ongoing review of the quality, size and diversity of our loan portfolio; evaluation of nonperforming loans; historical loan loss experience; and the amount and quality of collateral, including guarantees, securing the loan.

Although Management believes the loan loss allowance is adequate to absorb probable losses in the loan portfolio, such losses cannot be predicted and the allowance may not be adequate. Excess loan losses could have a material adverse effect on the Bank’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Bank’s lending limit is smaller than many of our competitors, which affects the size of the loans it can offer customers.

The Bank’s lending limit is approximately $11.2 million. Accordingly, the size of the loans that can be offered to potential customers is less than the size of loans that many of our competitors with larger lending limits can offer. This limit affects the Bank’s ability to seek relationships with larger businesses in its market area. Loan amounts in excess of the lending limits can be accommodated through the sale of participations in such loans to other banks. However, there can be no assurance that the Bank will be successful in attracting or maintaining customers seeking larger loans or that it will be able to engage in participation of such loans or on terms favorable to the Bank.

The Corporation depends on the services of its Management team and the unexpected loss of any member of the Management team could disrupt and adversely affect its operations.

The Bank is a relationship-driven organization. The Bank’s growth and development to date have depended in large part on the efforts of its senior officers, who have primary contact with its customers. These senior officers are extremely important in maintaining personalized relationships with the Bank’s customer base and increasing its market presence. The unexpected loss of services of one or more of these key employees could have a material adverse effect on the Bank’s operations and possibly result in reduced revenues. The Management team has considerable experience in the banking industry and is extremely valuable to the Bank and would be difficult to replace. The loss of the services of these officers could have a material adverse effect upon the Bank’s future prospects.

There is strong competition in the Bank’s primary market areas.

The Bank encounters strong competition from other financial institutions in its primary market area, which consists of Franklin, Cumberland, Fulton and Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. In addition,

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established financial institutions not already operating in the Bank’s primary market area may open branches there at future dates or can compete in the market via the internet. In the conduct of certain aspects of banking business, the Bank also competes with savings institutions, credit unions, mortgage banking companies, consumer finance companies, insurance companies and other institutions, some of which are not subject to the same degree of regulation or restrictions as are imposed upon the Bank. Many of these competitors have substantially greater resources and lending limits and can offer services that the Bank does not provide. In addition, many of these competitors have numerous branch offices located throughout their extended market areas that provide them with a competitive advantage. No assurance can be given that such competition will not have an adverse effect on the Bank’s financial condition and results of operations.

The Corporation may be affected by local, regional and national economic conditions over which it has no control.

The results of operations for financial institutions, including the Corporation, may be materially and adversely affected by changes in prevailing economic conditions, including declines in real estate markets, unemployment, recession, international developments, rapid changes in interest rates and the monetary and fiscal policies of the federal government. Substantially all of the Bank’s loans are to businesses and individuals in its primary market area and any decline in the economy of this area could have an adverse impact on the Bank. Accordingly, the Bank could be more vulnerable to economic downturns in our market area than its larger competitors, who are more geographically diverse. Changes in governmental economic and monetary policies, the Internal Revenue Code and banking and credit regulations may affect the demand for loans and the Bank’s ability to attract deposits. The interest rate payable on deposits and chargeable on loans is further subject to governmental regulations and fiscal policy, as well as national, state and local economic growth, employment rates and population trends.

Changes in interest rates could have an adverse impact upon our results of operations.

The Bank’s profitability is in part a function of the spread between interest rates earned on investments, loans and other interest-earning assets and the interest rates paid on deposits and other interest-bearing liabilities. Recently, interest rate spreads have generally narrowed due to changing market conditions and competitive pricing pressure. Interest rates are highly sensitive to many factors that are beyond the Bank’s control, including general economic conditions and policies of various governmental and regulatory agencies and, in particular, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Changes in monetary policy, including changes in interest rates, will influence not only the interest received on loans and investment securities and the amount of interest we pay on deposits and borrowings, but will also affect the Bank’s ability to originate loans and obtain deposits and the value of our investment portfolio. If the rate of interest paid on deposits and other borrowings increases more than the rate of interest earned on loans and other investments, the Bank’s net interest income, and therefore earnings, could be adversely affected. Earnings could also be adversely affected if the rates on loans and other investments fall more quickly than those on deposits and other borrowings. While Management takes measures to guard against interest rate risk, there can be no assurance that such measures will be effective in minimizing the exposure to interest rate risk.

The Corporation may be affected by events that have an adverse impact on its liquidity.

The Corporation must maintain sufficient liquidity in order to respond quickly to the changing level of funds required for loan and deposit activity, operational costs and other corporate purposes. The Bank obtains funding through deposits, short-term borrowings from corporate customers, brokered certificates of deposit, and borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh. If the Corporation experienced a significant deterioration in its financial performance or if other external economic events occur beyond the control of the Corporation, its access to funding from any or all of its sources could be disrupted. The Bank maintains secured borrowing facilities at both the Pittsburgh FHLB and the Federal Reserve Discount Window that it believes are sufficient to meet all of its liquidity demands.

Our controls and procedures may fail or could be circumvented.

Management has implemented a series of internal controls, disclosure controls and procedures, and corporate governance policies and procedures in order to ensure accurate financial control and reporting. However, any system of controls, no matter how well designed and operated, can only provide reasonable, not

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absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. Any failure or circumvention of our controls and/or procedures could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operation and financial condition.

The Corporation is subject to extensive governmental regulation.

The Corporation is subject to intensive regulation by federal and state bank regulatory agencies. There can be no assurance that this supervision and regulation will not have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s results of operations. The primary purpose of this regulation is the protection of the federal deposit insurance funds administered by the FDIC, as well as the Bank’s depositors, as opposed to the Corporation’s shareholders. Further, the financial services industry has received significant legislative attention in recent years, resulting in increased regulation in certain areas and deregulation in other areas. As a result, banks now face strong competition from other financial service providers in areas that were previously, almost the exclusive domain of banks.

In order to remain competitive, the Bank may be required to spend a significant amount of money on technology.

The banking industry continues to undergo rapid technological changes with frequent introduction of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to providing better services to customers, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and reduces costs. The Bank’s future success depends in part upon its ability to address the needs of its customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience, as well as to create additional operating efficiencies. Many of our competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. Such technology may permit competitors to perform certain functions at a lower cost than the Bank. The Bank may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services or be successful in marketing these to our customers.

Risk Factors Relating to the Common Stock

The FDIC does not insure investments in the Corporation’s common stock.

Investments in the Corporation’s common stock are not deposit accounts and are not insured by the FDIC or any other governmental agency. Investments in the Corporation’s common stock are not guaranteed, may lose value, and are subject to a variety of investment risks, including loss of principal.

There is a limited trading market for the Corporation’s common stock.

There is currently only a limited public market for the Corporation’s common stock. It is listed on the Over the Counter Bulletin Board (OTC-BB) under the symbol “FRAF.” Because it is thinly traded, you may not be able to resell your shares of common stock for a price that is equal to the price that you paid for your shares. The Corporation has no plans to apply to have its common stock listed for trading on any stock exchange or the NASDAQ market.

The Bank’s ability to pay dividends to the Corporation is subject to regulatory limitations that may affect the Corporation’s ability to pay dividends to its shareholders.

As a holding company, the Corporation is a separate legal entity from the Bank and does not have significant operations of its own. It currently depends upon the Bank’s cash and liquidity to pay dividends to its shareholders. The Corporation cannot assure you that in the future the Bank will have the capacity to pay dividends to the Corporation. Various statutes and regulations limit the availability of dividends from the Bank. It is possible; depending upon the Bank’s financial condition and other factors, that the Bank’s regulators could assert that payment of dividends by the Bank to the Corporation is an unsafe or unsound practice. In the event that the Bank is unable to pay dividends to the Corporation, the Corporation may not be able to pay dividends to its shareholders.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None

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Item 2. Properties

The Corporation’s headquarters is located in the main office of F&M Trust at 20 South Main Street, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. This location also houses a community banking office as well as operational support services for the Bank. The Corporation owns or leases thirty-four properties in Franklin, Cumberland, Fulton and Huntingdon Counties, Pennsylvania as described below:

   
Property   Owned   Leased
Community Banking Offices     19       6  
Remote ATM Sites           5  
Other Properties     3       1  

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

The nature of our business generates a certain amount of litigation involving matters arising in the ordinary course of business. However, in management’s opinion, there are no proceedings pending to which the Corporation is a party or to which our property is subject, which, if determined adversely to the Corporation, would be material in relation to our shareholders’ equity or financial condition. In addition, no material proceedings are pending nor are known to be threatened or contemplated against us by governmental authorities or other parties.

Item 4. Reserved

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Part II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market and Dividend Information

The Corporation’s common stock is not actively traded in the over-the-counter market. The Corporation’s common stock is listed under the symbol “FRAF” on the OTC Electronic Bulletin Board, an automated quotation service. Current price information is available from account executives at most brokerage firms as well as the registered market makers of Franklin Financial Services Corporation common stock as listed below under Shareholders’ Information.

The range of high and low bid prices is shown in the following table for the years 2009 and 2008, as well as cash dividends declared for those periods. The bids reflect interdealer quotations, do not include retail mark-ups, markdowns or commissions, and may not necessarily represent actual transactions. The closing price of Franklin Financial Services Corporation common stock recorded from an actual transaction on December 31, 2009 was $16.33. The Corporation had 2,123 shareholders of record as of December 31, 2009.

Market and Dividend Information
Bid Price Range Per Share

           
  2009   2008
(Dollars per share)   High   Low   Dividends
Declared
  High   Low   Dividends
Declared
First quarter   $ 19.00     $ 14.00     $ 0.27     $ 24.80     $ 23.10     $ 0.26  
Second quarter     17.50       14.50       0.27       24.15       23.00       0.27  
Third quarter     17.00       15.75       0.27       23.00       20.30       0.27  
Fourth quarter     20.50       15.46       0.27       21.51       16.50       0.27  
                 $ 1.08                 $ 1.07  

For limitations on the Corporation’s ability to pay dividends, see “Supervision and Regulation —  Regulatory Restrictions on Dividends” in Item 1 above.

The information related to equity compensation plans is incorporated by reference to the materials set forth under the heading “Executive Compensation — Compensation Tables and Additional Compensation Disclosure” in the Corporation’s Proxy Statement for the 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

Common Stock Repurchases:

The following table represents the repurchase of issuer equity securities during the fourth quarter of 2009:

       
Period   Number of
Shares Purchased
  Weighted
Average Price
Paid per Share
  Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Program
  Number of Shares
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
Program
October 2009                       97,000  
November 2009                       97,000  
December 2009     1,179       15.46       1,179       95,821  
Total     1,179     $ 15.46       1,179        

On July 9, 2009, the Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 100,000 shares of the Corporation’s $1.00 par value common stock over a twelve-month period ending on July 9, 2010. The common shares of the Corporation will be purchased in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. The Corporation uses the repurchased common stock (Treasury stock) for general corporate purposes including stock dividends and splits, employee benefit and executive compensation plans, and the dividend reinvestment plan. A plan approved July 10, 2008 that authorized the repurchase of up 100,000 shares expired in 2009 with 21,972 shares repurchased during the plan year.

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Performance Graph

The following graph compares the cumulative total return to shareholders of Franklin Financial with the NASDAQ — Total U.S. Index (a broad market index prepared by the Center for Research in Security Prices at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business) and with the Northeast OTCBB and Pink Banks Index (an industry-specific index prepared by SNL Financial LLC) for the five year period ended December 31, 2009, in each case assuming an initial investment of $100 on December 31, 2004 and the reinvestment of all dividends. The shareholder returns shown in the graph are not necessarily indicative of future performance.

Franklin Financial Services Corporation

[GRAPHIC MISSING]

           
  Year Ending
Index   12/31/04   12/31/05   12/31/06   12/31/07   12/31/08   12/31/09
Franklin Financial Services Corporation     100.00       96.14       107.98       102.62       78.68       75.02  
NASDAQ Composite     100.00       101.37       111.03       121.92       72.49       104.31  
SNL Northeast OTC-BB & Pink Banks     100.00       99.70       103.03       100.33       81.72       76.78  

In accordance with the rules of the SEC, this section captioned “Performance Graph” shall not be incorporated by reference into any of our future filings made under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or the Securities Act of 1933. The Performance Graph and its accompanying table are not deemed to be soliciting material or to be filed under the Exchange Act or the Securities Act.

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Shareholders’ Information

Dividend Reinvestment Plan:

Franklin Financial Services Corporation offers a dividend reinvestment program whereby shareholders with stock registered in their own names may reinvest their dividends in additional shares of the Corporation. Information concerning this optional program is available by contacting the Corporate Secretary at 20 South Main Street, P.O. Box 6010, Chambersburg, PA 17201-6010, telephone 717-264-6116.

Dividend Direct Deposit Program:

Franklin Financial Services Corporation offers a dividend direct deposit program whereby shareholders with registered stock in their own names may choose to have their dividends deposited directly into the bank account of their choice on the dividend payment date. Information concerning this optional program is available by contacting the Corporate Secretary at 20 South Main Street, P.O. Box 6010, Chambersburg, PA 17201-6010, telephone 717-264-6116.

Annual Meeting:

The Annual Shareholders’ Meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 27, 2010, at the Orchard Restaurant & Banquet Facility, 1580 Orchard Drive, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. The Business Meeting will begin at 10:30 a.m. followed by a luncheon.

Website:

www.franklinfin.com

Stock Information:

The following brokers are registered as market makers of Franklin Financial Services Corporation’s common stock:

   
RBC Wealth Management   2101 Oregon Pike, Lancaster, PA 17601   800/604-1471
Boenning & Scattergood, Inc.   4 Tower Bridge, 200 Bar Harbor Drive, Suite 300,
West Conshohocken, PA 19428
  800/883-1212
Stifel Nicolaus   20 Ash Street, Suite 400, Conshohocken, PA 19428   800/223-6807
Morgan Keegan & Co, Inc.   3050 Peachtree Road, NW, Suite 704, Atlanta, GA 30305   866/353-7522

Registrar and Transfer Agent:

The registrar and transfer agent for Franklin Financial Services Corporation is Fulton Financial Advisors, N.A., P.O. Box 4887, Lancaster, PA 17604.

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

         
  Summary of Selected Financial Data for the year ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands, except per share)   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005
Summary of operations
                                            
Interest income   $ 43,757     $ 46,156     $ 49,487     $ 40,902     $ 29,711  
Interest expense     14,674       16,037       23,796       19,956       12,173  
Net interest income     29,083       30,119       25,691       20,946       17,538  
Provision for loan losses     3,438       1,193       990       240       426  
Net interest income after provision for loan losses     25,645       28,926       24,701       20,706       17,112  
Noninterest income     8,880       6,538       10,107       8,257       6,995  
Noninterest expense     25,929       23,189       22,793       19,296       17,058  
Income before income taxes     8,596       12,275       12,015       9,667       7,049  
Income tax     2,011       3,680       2,759       2,097       937  
Net income   $ 6,585     $ 8,595     $ 9,256     $ 7,570     $ 6,112  
Per common share
                                            
Basic earnings per share   $ 1.71     $ 2.24     $ 2.41     $ 2.11     $ 1.82  
Diluted earnings per share     1.71       2.24       2.40       2.10       1.81  
Cash dividends paid     1.08       1.07       1.03       0.99       0.95  
Market value     16.33       18.25       24.95       27.30       25.25  
Balance sheet data (end of year)
                                            
Total assets   $ 979,373     $ 902,460     $ 820,371     $ 799,333     $ 621,357  
Loans, net     730,626       668,860       564,256       521,684       391,788  
Deposits     738,365       627,341       606,277       595,295       456,799  
Long-term debt     94,688       106,141       59,714       38,449       48,546  
Shareholders' equity     78,766       73,059       77,642       71,614       55,670  
Performance measurements
                                            
Return on average assets     0.69%       1.01 %      1.14 %      1.07 %      1.03 % 
Return on average equity     8.69%       10.99 %      12.62 %      11.92 %      11.13 % 
Return on average tangible assets(1)     0.74%       1.05 %      1.18 %      1.09 %      1.03 % 
Return on average tangible equity(1)     10.79%       13.19 %      15.41 %      13.42 %      11.13 % 
Dividend payout ratio     62.95%       47.66 %      42.77 %      47.03 %      52.31 % 
Average equity to average asset ratio     7.98%       9.18 %      8.98 %      8.96 %      9.28 % 
Efficiency ratio(2)     65.35%       61.25 %      61.28 %      63.06 %      66.39 % 
Net interest margin     3.44%       4.03 %      3.67 %      3.45 %      3.45 % 
Trust assets under management (market value)   $ 460,233     $ 497,215     $ 507,920     $ 538,152     $ 411,165  

(1) See Item 7 for definition of non-GAAP measurements.
(2) Efficiency ratio: Noninterest expense / (Tax equivalent net interest income plus noninterest income less security gains)

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Application of Critical Accounting Policies:

Disclosure of the Corporation’s significant accounting policies is included in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements. These policies are particularly sensitive requiring significant judgments, estimates and assumptions to be made by Management. Senior management has discussed the development of such estimates, and related Management Discussion and Analysis disclosure, with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors. The following accounting policies are the ones identified by management to be critical to the results of operations:

Allowance for Loan Losses — The allowance for loan losses is the estimated amount considered adequate to cover credit losses inherent in the outstanding loan portfolio at the balance sheet date. The allowance is established through the provision for loan losses, charged against income. In determining the allowance for loan losses, Management makes significant estimates and, accordingly, has identified this policy as probably the most critical for the Corporation.

Management performs a monthly evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses. Consideration is given to a variety of factors in establishing this estimate including, but not limited to, current economic conditions, diversification of the loan portfolio, delinquency statistics, results of internal loan reviews, borrowers’ actual or perceived financial and managerial strengths, the adequacy of the underlying collateral (if collateral dependent) and other relevant factors. This evaluation is inherently subjective, as it requires material estimates that may be susceptible to significant change, including the amounts and timing of future cash flows expected to be received on impaired loans.

The analysis has two components, specific and general allocations. Expected cash flow or collateral values discounted for market conditions and selling costs are used to establish specific allocations. The Bank’s historical loan loss experience and other qualitative factors derived from economic and market conditions are used to establish general allocations for the remainder of the portfolio. The allowance for loan losses was $8.9 million at December 31, 2009.

Management monitors the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses on an ongoing basis and reports its adequacy assessment monthly to the Board of Directors, and quarterly to the Audit Committee.

Mortgage Servicing Rights — In the past, the Bank originated fixed rate mortgages that it subsequently sold to the secondary market. However, the Bank retained the rights to service these loans for its customers. As required by Accounting Standard Codification (ASC) Topic 860, “Transferred Financial Assets”, upon the sale of mortgage loans, the Bank capitalizes the value allocated to the servicing rights in other assets and makes a corresponding entry to other income from mortgage banking activities. The capitalized servicing rights are amortized against noninterest income in proportion to, and over the periods of, the estimated net servicing income of the underlying financial assets.

Capitalized servicing rights are carried at the lower of cost or market and are evaluated for impairment based upon the fair value of the rights as compared to amortized cost. The rights are deemed to be impaired when the fair value of the rights is less than the amortized cost. If impaired, the Bank records a charge against noninterest income from mortgage banking activities through a mortgage servicing rights valuation allowance. The amount charged to the valuation allowance can be reversed in future periods if the rights are determined to no longer be impaired. However, the amount of impairment reversed may not exceed the balance of the valuation allowance.

The fair value of the servicing rights is determined through a discounted cash flow analysis and calculated using a computer-pricing model. The pricing model is based on the objective characteristics of the mortgage servicing portfolio (e.g, loan balance and interest rate) and commonly used industry assumptions (e.g., prepayment speeds, discount rates). The assumptions take into account those that many active purchasers of servicing rights employ in their evaluations of portfolios for sale in the secondary market. The unique characteristics of the secondary servicing market often dictate adjustments to the assumptions over short periods of time. Subjective factors are also considered in the derivation of market values, including levels of supply and demand for servicing, interest rate trends, and perception of risk not incorporated into prepayment assumptions.

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Financial Derivatives — As part of its interest rate risk management strategy, the Bank has entered into interest rate swap agreements. A swap agreement is a contract between two parties to exchange cash flows based upon an underlying notional amount. Under the swap agreements, the Bank pays a fixed rate and receives a variable rate from an unrelated financial institution serving as counter-party to the agreements. The swaps are designated as cash flow hedges and are designed to minimize the variability in cash flows of the Bank’s variable rate liabilities attributable to changes in interest rates. The swaps in effect convert a portion of a variable rate liability to a fixed rate liability.

The interest rate swaps are recorded on the balance sheet at fair value as an asset or liability. To the extent the swaps are effective in accomplishing their objectives; changes in the fair value are recorded in other comprehensive income. To the extent the swaps are not effective; changes in fair value are recorded in interest expense. Cash flow hedges are determined to be highly effective when the Bank achieves offsetting changes in the cash flows of the risk being hedged. The Bank measures the effectiveness of the hedges on a quarterly basis and it has determined the hedges are highly effective. Fair value is heavily dependent upon the market’s expectations for interest rates over the remaining term of the swaps.

Temporary Investment Impairment — Investment securities are written down to their net realizable value when there is impairment in value that is considered to be “other-than-temporary.” The determination of whether or not “other-than-temporary” impairment exists is a matter of judgment. Management reviews investment securities regularly for possible impairment that is “other-than-temporary” by analyzing the facts and circumstances of each investment and the expectations for that investment’s performance. “Other-than-temporary” impairment in the value of an investment may be indicated by the length of time and the extent to which market value has been less than cost; the financial condition and near term prospects of the issuer; and whether the Corporation has the intent to sell or is likely to be forced to sell the investment prior to any anticipated recovery in market value.

Stock-based Compensation — The Corporation has two stock compensation plans in place consisting of an Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP) and an Incentive Stock Option Plan (ISOP).

The Corporation accounts for stock compensation plans in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification Topic 718, “Stock Compensation.” ASC Topic 718 requires compensation costs related to share-based payment transactions to be recognized in the financial statements (with limited exceptions). The amount of compensation cost is measured on the grant-date fair value of the equity or liability instruments issued. Compensation cost is recognized over the period that an employee provides services in exchange for the award.

The Corporation calculates the compensation cost of the options by using the Black-Scholes method to determine the fair value of the options granted. In calculating the fair value of the options, the Corporation makes assumptions regarding the risk-free rate of return, the expected volatility of the Corporation’s common stock, dividend yield and the expected life of the option. These assumptions are made independently for the ESPP and the ISOP and if changed, would change the compensation cost of the options and net income.

Note 1 of the accompanying financial statements provides additional information about stock option expense.

GAAP versus Non-GAAP Presentations — The Corporation supplements its traditional GAAP measurements with Non-GAAP measurements. The Non-GAAP measurements include Return on Average Tangible Assets and Return on Average Tangible Equity. As a result of merger transactions, intangible assets (primarily goodwill, core deposit intangibles and customer list) were created. The Non-GAAP disclosures are intended to eliminate the effects of the intangible assets and allow for better comparisons to periods when such assets did not exist. The following table shows the adjustments made between the GAAP and NON-GAAP measurements:

 
GAAP Measurement   Calculation
Return on Average Assets   Net Income / Average Assets
Return on Average Equity   Net Income / Average Equity

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Non-GAAP Measurement   Calculation
Return on Average Tangible Assets   Net Income plus Intangible Amortization / Average Assets less Average Intangible Assets
Return on Average Tangible Equity   Net Income plus Intangible Amortization / Average Equity less Average Intangible Assets

Results of Operations:

Management’s Overview

The following discussion and analysis is intended to assist the reader in reviewing the financial information presented and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and other financial data presented elsewhere herein.

As 2008 ended, it was clear that the economy was in a recession and 2009 began with the passage of the largest ever government spending and economic stimulus plan in an effort to jump start the economy. Despite this effort, the economy continued into recession, unemployment and foreclosure rates increased and the Federal Reserve maintained short-term rates at historic lows. The economic conditions provided a difficult operating environment for many banks during 2009 as net interest margins continued to fall and loan losses increased. As the recession continued, bank failures increased from 25 in 2008 to 140 in 2009. As of February 26, 2010, 22 banks have already been closed this year.

Franklin Financial Services Corporation was not immune to the economic pressures of 2009, but in a year marked by bank failures and reported losses, the Corporation fared much better than many of its peers. In 2009, Franklin Financial Services Corporation earned $6.6 million representing a decrease of 23.4% from the 2008 earning of $8.6 million. Diluted earnings per share fell from $2.24 in 2008 to $1.71 in 2009. The Bank continued to grow its balance sheet with both loans and deposits showing nice increases over the prior year. Total assets at December 31, 2009 were $979.4 million compared to $902.5 million at the end of 2008. The balance sheet growth was not sufficient to overcome the low rate environment and net interest income fell by 3.4%. The provision for loan loss expense was $3.4 million in 2009, more than double in 2008, as charge-offs and delinquencies increased. Noninterest income improved during the year as the Bank benefited from a mortgage-refinancing boom spurred by low rates and the absence of a large equity investment write-down recorded at the end of 2008. Noninterest expense increased during the year driven primarily by higher FDIC premium expense, legal expenses and pension expense. Other key performance measurements are presented above in Item 6, Selected Financial Data.

A more detailed discussion of the areas that had the greatest affect on reported results follows.

Net Interest Income

The most important source of the Corporation’s earnings is net interest income, which is defined as the difference between income on interest-earning assets and the expense of interest-bearing liabilities supporting those assets. Principal categories of interest-earning assets are loans and securities, while deposits, securities sold under agreements to repurchase (Repos), short-term borrowings and long-term debt are the principal categories of interest-bearing liabilities. For the purpose of this discussion, balance sheet items refer to the average balance for the year and net interest income is adjusted to a fully taxable-equivalent basis. This tax-equivalent adjustment facilitates performance comparisons between taxable and tax-free assets by increasing the tax-free income by an amount equivalent to the Federal income taxes that would have been paid if this income were taxable at the Corporation’s 34% Federal statutory rate.

2009 versus 2008

Tax equivalent net interest income fell by approximately 4% in 2009 to $30.3 million. As short-term rates remained near historic lows during the year, the Bank experienced a larger decrease in tax-equivalent interest income than the decrease in interest expense. Therefore, the net interest margin fell to 3.44% in 2009 after two straight years of increases. As assets repriced during the year, tax-equivalent interest income dropped from $47.5 million in 2008 to $45.0 million in 2009. While earning asset growth increased interest income, the low rate environment more than offset this increase resulting in a reduction of net interest income year over year. Interest expense was lower in 2009 than in 2008, as deposit rates were reduced through the year. However, the rate reductions on deposits were not enough to offset the reduction in interest income.

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Interest earning assets grew by approximately 13% during 2009, but produced $2.5 million less interest income than in 2008. The yield on earning assets decreased by nearly 1% year over year, as assets continued to reprice to lower rates throughout the year.

Short-term interest earning assets were substantially higher than in 2008. However, despite a balance nearly fourteen times higher than the prior year, interest income from this asset actually declined by $13 thousand.

The investment portfolio decreased by approximately $8 million as the majority of investment purchases made in 2009 were to replace collateral for secured borrowings. The composition of the portfolio did not change significantly from the prior year. The yield on the investment portfolio fell to 4.5% in 2009, a decrease of approximately 80 basis points when compared to the 2008 yield. Investment income declined by $1.7 million in 2009 and was due primarily to lower yields on investment assets.

The loan portfolio showed an increase of approximately $90 million in 2009, but was also affected by lower rates as the loan yield declined nearly 1%. The growth in loans was not enough to offset the effect of lower rates and loan interest fell by 2% to $38.1 million during the year. Loan growth was driven by an increase of $108 million in commercial loans in 2009. Despite the poor economy, the Bank was able to continue to originate loans in its markets and supplemented this growth with purchased participations primarily within south central Pennsylvania. The Bank was able to capture new business because some larger bank competitors had reduced their lending activity during the year. Approximately 54% of the commercial loan portfolio is loans with variable rates that reprice with market rates.

The average balances of residential mortgage and consumer loan balances both decreased year over year and yielded lower rates than in 2008. As a result of these changes, both of these products generated $1.6 million less interest income than in 2008. The Bank’s mortgage portfolio continued to decline because the Bank sells most of its mortgage loan production and it expects this trend to continue. In addition, the low rate environment of 2009 created a mortgage refinance boom that resulted in some of the Bank’s portfolio mortgages being refinanced. Consumer lending activity was slow in 2009, with balances decreasing by $7.5 million from the 2008 average. The recession, higher unemployment and lower consumer confidence about jobs and the economy all caused consumer spending and borrowing to fall in 2009. Lower real estate values evaporated homeowners’ equity in 2009 and home equity lending declined year over year after several years of strong growth.

Interest earning assets averaged $880.9 million in 2009 compared to $782.2 million in the prior year and the yield on fell from 6.08% in 2008 to 5.10% in 2009. Consequently, tax-equivalent interest income fell from $47.5 million in 2008 to $45.0 million in 2009. The growth in average interest earning assets produced $4.3 million in additional interest income, but this was more than offset by lower yields that reduced interest income by $6.9 million.

While lower rates negatively affected interest income, the same rate environment enabled the Bank to reduce its interest expenses by $1.4 million despite an increase in interest bearing liabilities of approximately $100 million. Interest expense in 2009 was $14.7 million compared to $16.0 million in 2008. Interest expense on deposits decreased $706 thousand while the interest expense on other interest bearing liabilities decreased by $657 thousand. The average balance of interest bearing deposits was $607.8 million in 2009, and increase of 18% compared to the prior year. However, the cost of these funds was 44 basis points less than in 2008. The Money Management product posted a modest increase of approximately 3% on average balances and the average rate fell from 2.01% in 2008 to 1.61% in 2009. While short-term rates remained low during 2009, they were fairly stable. Therefore, the Bank was not able to reduce interest expense on the Money Management product as much in 2009 as it did in 2008. Time deposits increased by approximately $72 million year over year and the cost fell from 3.61% to 2.68%. Despite the lower rate, the increase in balances offset any interest savings from lower rates and interest expense on time deposits was $298 thousand higher in 2009. Time deposit growth was split between in-market growth and brokered time deposits.

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase (Repos) averaged $67.0 million in 2009, down from the 2008 average of $75.2 million. During the recession, corporate cash managers did not have as much excess liquidity as in past years and this contributed to the decline in balances. The cost of these funds fell

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significantly in 2009 to a rate of .25% compared to 1.88% in 2008. Long-term debt (FHLB advances) increased by $25.3 million on average in 2009 and the cost fell to 4.03%. The increase in the average balance for 2009 is due the volume of advances taken in 2008, with the majority occurring in the fourth quarter of 2008. The Bank took only $379 thousand of FHLB advances in 2009.

Total average interest bearing liabilities were $780.6 million in 2009, 14.7% higher than the 2008 average. Interest expense declined by 8.5% and the rate on these funds fell from 2.36% in 2008 to 1.88% in 2009. The higher average balance of interest bearing liabilities increased interest expense by $3.2 million, but lower rates more than offset that by decreasing $4.5 million, resulting in a net decline in interest expense.

See Tables 1, 2 and 3 for more information on net interest income, average balances, rates, and a rate-volume analysis of net interest income.

2008 versus 2007

In 2008, the Corporation’s tax equivalent net interest income increased by approximately 15%, growing from $27.4 million in 2007 to $31.5 million in 2008. Interest rates dropped dramatically during the year as the liquidity and credit problems in the financial markets grew worse. Rates moved down throughout the year with the Federal Reserve cutting the Fed funds rate 7 times. These actions drove the Fed funds rate from 4.25% at year-end 2007 to .25% at year-end 2008. Likewise, the Prime rate fell 4% during the year to 3.25% at the end of 2008. Treasury yields experienced extreme volatility during the year and short-term yields actually hit 0% for a short time. These market conditions are just two years removed from 2006 when the Fed ended a twenty-four month period of rate increases.

Tax-equivalent interest income on earning assets was $47.5 million, a decrease of $3.6 million or approximately 7% from 2007. The previously mentioned market rate decreases during the year had the effect of reducing the interest rates of new and re-pricing assets. As a result, $6.7 million of the reduction in interest income was a result of rate changes. However, an increase in average earning assets of $36.2 million produced an increase in interest income of $3.1 million that partially offset the effects of lower pricing. The Bank’s investment portfolio decreased by approximately $22 million on average as maturities and pay-downs were not reinvested. The lower balance, coupled with a yield reduction of approximately .25% produced lower interest income in the portfolio compared to the previous year. Tax-equivalent interest income generated by the loan portfolio totaled $39 million in 2008, down from $40.6 million in 2007. Total average loans during the year were $620.4 million, an increase of approximately $64 million from the prior year average and produced an increase of $4.4 million in interest income. However, this increase was completely offset by falling rates with the yield on the loan portfolio falling more than 1% and in total, interest income decreased by $1.7 million year over year.

The commercial loan portfolio continued to grow during 2008 and the average balance of the portfolio increased by more than $70 million during the year. The commercial loan portfolio is comprised of approximately 50% fixed rate and 50% variable rate loans. As market rates fell during the year, new loans were booked at lower rates and existing loans repriced downward. The yield on the commercial loan portfolio fell by 1.45% during the year and the decrease in interest income produced by falling rates more than offset the increase produced by the higher volume.

Interest income on consumer loans increased slightly during the year despite a declining yield. Interest income from growth in the consumer loan portfolio, primarily home equity loans, more than offset the effect of a lower yield. The yield on consumer loans was 6.69% in 2008, down from 7.08% during the prior year. Mortgage interest income and balances continue to decline as the Bank sells nearly all of its new mortgage production and its existing portfolio of mortgages continues to pay down. Mortgage yields were also lower in 2008, 6.43%, compared to 6.68% in 2007.

The total effect of rate changes on earning assets was a drop in interest income of $6.7 million in 2008 while volume growth increased interest income by $3.1 million. The yield on earning assets for 2008 dropped to 6.08% from 6.86% in 2007.

For 2008, total interest expense was $16.0 million. This represents a decrease in interest expense of $7.8 million (32.6%) from 2007 interest expense of $23.8 million. Interest expense on deposits decreased $6.9 million when compared to the prior year. Ninety-two percent of the reduction in deposit interest expense

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is attributable to lower interest rates in 2008. Within the deposit category, the largest drop in interest expense was a $5.3 million reduction of interest expense on the Bank’s Money Management product. This product is tied to short-term market interest rates and as these rates fell during 2008, the interest expense on this product fell. In fact, the rate decrease accounted for $4.3 million of the total decrease in Money Management interest expense. After realizing an increase of 39% on average balances from 2006 to 2007, the Money Management product average balance fell by approximately 12% from 2007 to 2008 and this balance change accounted for the remaining drop in interest expense on this product. The decline in the average balance was in part caused by run-off due to low rates in 2008. All other deposit categories also reported a decline in interest expense that was primarily caused by lower interest rates. Interest expense on time deposits dropped $1.1 million from 2007 to 2008 despite recording an increase in the average balance of $10.8 million year over year. In total, average interest bearing deposits decreased $13.7 million compared to the previous year and the average rate paid fell from 3.39% to 2.14%.

Interest expense on Securities sold under agreement to repurchase (Repos) was $1.4 million in 2008, $2.5 million less than in 2007. While the average balance decreased $5.8 million during the year, declining rates accounted for 89% of the reduction in interest expense as compared to 2007. The average rate paid on Repos was 1.88% in 2008 compared to 4.83% in 2007. The average balance of long-term debt (FHLB advances) increased $42.7 million during the year as the Bank took new advances to fund asset growth that outpaced deposit growth. While the average balance of long-term debt increased approximately 120% during 2008, the average rate paid dropped from 5.16% in 2007 to 4.34% in 2008 because of the low rates on new advances. As a result of these changes, interest expense on long-term debt increased $1.6 million during 2008. The total cost of interest bearing liabilities was 2.36% for 2008, compared to 3.67% in 2007.

See Tables 1, 2 and 3 for more information on net interest income, average balances, rates, and a rate-volume analysis of net interest income. Net interest income, defined as interest income less interest expense, and the percentage change from the prior year is shown in the following table:

Table 1. Net Interest Income

           
(Dollars in thousands)   2009   % Change   2008   % Change   2007   % Change
Interest income   $ 43,757       -5.20%     $ 46,156       -6.73 %    $ 49,487       20.99 % 
Interest expense     14,674       -8.50%       16,037       -32.61 %      23,796       19.24 % 
Net interest income     29,083       -3.44%       30,119       17.24 %      25,691       22.65 % 
Tax equivalent adjustment     1,194             1,369             1,683        
Tax equivalent net interest income   $ 30,277       -3.85%     $ 31,488       15.03 %    $ 27,374       21.61 % 

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The following table identifies increases and decreases in tax equivalent net interest income to either changes in average volume or to changes in average rates for interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. Numerous and simultaneous balance and rate changes occur during the year. The amount of change that is not due solely to volume or rate is allocated proportionally to both.

Table 2. Rate-Volume Analysis of Net Interest Income

           
  2009 Compared to 2008
Increase (Decrease) due to:
  2008 Compared to 2007
Increase (Decrease) due to:
(Dollars in thousands)   Volume   Rate   Net   Volume   Rate   Net
Interest earned on:
                                                     
Interest-bearing obligations in other banks and Federal funds sold   $ 58     $ (71)     $ (13)     $ (231 )    $ (107 )    $ (338 ) 
Investment securities
                                                     
Taxable     (152)       (1,123)       (1,275)       (968 )      (484 )      (1,452 ) 
Nontaxable     (286)       (124)       (410)       (145 )      (60 )      (205 ) 
Loans:
                                                     
Commercial     5,866       (5,149)       717       4,806       (5,341 )      (535 ) 
Residential mortgage     (663)       (102)       (765)       (1,144 )      (249 )      (1,393 ) 
Consumer     (489)       (339)       (828)       766       (488 )      278  
Loans     4,714       (5,590)       (876)       4,428       (6,078 )      (1,650 ) 
Total net change in interest income     4,334       (6,908)       (2,574)       3,084       (6,729 )      (3,645 ) 
Interest expense on:
                                                     
Interest-bearing checking     36       (131)       (95)       30       (187 )      (157 ) 
Money market deposit accounts     140       (856)       (716)       (996 )      (4,268 )      (5,264 ) 
Savings accounts     (3)       (190)       (193)       (39 )      (334 )      (373 ) 
Time deposits     2,192       (1,894)       298       465       (1,560 )      (1,095 ) 
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase     (139)       (1,105)       (1,244)       (264 )      (2,243 )      (2,507 ) 
Short-term borrowings     (106)       (80)       (186)       204       (125 )      79  
Long-term debt     1,031       (258)       773       1,895       (337 )      1,558  
Total net change in interest expense     3,151       (4,514)       (1,363)       1,295       (9,054 )      (7,759 ) 
Increase (decrease) in net interest income   $ 1,183     $ (2,394)     $ (1,211)     $ 1,789     $ 2,325     $ 4,114  

Nonaccruing loans are included in the loan balances. All nontaxable interest income has been adjusted to a tax-equivalent basis, using a tax rate of 34%.

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The following table presents average balances, tax-equivalent interest income and expense, and yields earned or rates paid on the assets or liabilities.

Table 3. Analysis of Net Interest Income

                 
                 
  2009   2008   2007
(Dollars in thousands)   Average
balance
  Income
or expense
  Average
yield/rate
  Average
balance
  Income
or expense
  Average
yield/rate
  Average
balance
  Income
or expense
  Average
yield/rate
Interest-earning assets:
                                                                                
Interest-bearing obligations of other banks and federal funds sold   $ 18,032     $ 30       0.17%     $ 1,316     $ 43       3.27 %    $ 7,266     $ 381       5.24 % 
Investment securities
                                                                                
Taxable     111,009       4,173       3.76%       114,290       5,448       4.77 %      134,079       6,900       5.15 % 
Nontaxable     41,755       2,651       6.35%       46,193       3,061       6.63 %      48,362       3,266       6.75 % 
Loans:
                                                                                
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     511,807       25,441       4.97%       404,076       24,724       6.12 %      333,514       25,259       7.57 % 
Residential mortgage     73,214       4,616       6.30%       83,708       5,381       6.43 %      101,375       6,774       6.68 % 
Consumer, including home equity     125,091       8,040       6.43%       132,571       8,868       6.69 %      121,361       8,590       7.08 % 
Loans     710,112       38,097       5.36%       620,355       38,973       6.28 %      556,250       40,623       7.30 % 
Total interest-earning assets     880,908       44,951       5.10%       782,154       47,525       6.08 %      745,957       51,170       6.86 % 
Other assets     67,889                   69,242                   68,665              
Total assets   $ 948,797                 $ 851,396                 $ 814,622              
Interest-bearing liabilities:
                                                                                
Deposits:
                                                                                
Interest-bearing checking   $ 96,958       150       0.15%     $ 83,128       245       0.29 %    $ 76,923       402       0.52 % 
Money Market deposit accounts     216,201       3,479       1.61%       209,028       4,195       2.01 %      236,533       9,459       4.00 % 
Savings     48,308       97       0.20%       48,860       290       0.59 %      52,091       663       1.27 % 
Time     246,360       6,594       2.68%       174,191       6,296       3.61 %      163,364       7,391       4.52 % 
Total interest-bearing deposits     607,827       10,320       1.70%       515,207       11,026       2.14 %      528,911       17,915       3.39 % 
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase     67,032       168       0.25%       75,238       1,412       1.88 %      81,077       3,919       4.83 % 
Short-term borrowings     2,142       14       0.66%       11,628       200       1.72 %      2,386       121       5.08 % 
Long-term debt     103,636       4,172       4.03%       78,381       3,399       4.34 %      35,654       1,841       5.16 % 
Total interest-bearing liabilities     780,637       14,674       1.88%       680,454       16,037       2.36 %      648,028       23,796       3.67 % 
Noninterest-bearing deposits     79,149                         84,189                         84,029                    
Other liabilities     13,263                         8,553                         9,385                    
Shareholders' equity     75,748                   78,200                   73,180              
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity   $ 948,797                 $ 851,396                 $ 814,622              
Tax equivalent net interest income/
Net interest margin
          30,277       3.44%             31,488       4.03 %            27,374       3.67 % 
Tax equivalent adjustment           (1,194)                   (1,369 )                  (1,683 )       
Net interest income         $ 29,083                 $ 30,119                 $ 25,691        

All amounts have been adjusted to a tax-equivalent basis using a tax rate of 34%. Investments include the average unrealized gains or losses. Dividend income is reported as taxable income, but is adjusted for the dividend received deduction. Loan balances include nonaccruing loans, loans held for sale, and are gross of the allowance for loan losses. Loan categories are based on an internal classification/purpose and do not necessarily reflect a specific type of collateral, if any.

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Provision for Loan Losses

During 2009, the Corporation saw an increase in nonperforming assets and net loans charged-off as the economy was stressed by the effects of the recession. These factors, loan growth of more than $60 million and Management’s analysis of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses (ALL) resulted in an increase to the provision for loan loss expense during the year. In 2009, the provision expense was $3.4 million compared to $1.2 million in 2008. Net loan charge-offs were $1.9 million in 2009 and when offset against the provision expense, resulted in a net increase to the allowance for loan losses of $1.6 million. The ALL as a percentage of total loans was 1.21% at year-end compared to 1.09% at the end of 2008. Management performs a monthly analysis of the loan portfolio considering current economic conditions and other relevant factors to determine the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses and the provision for loan losses. For more information, refer to the Loan Quality discussion and Tables 10, 11 and 12.

Noninterest Income

2009 versus 2008

Noninterest income grew by 36% in 2009 to $8.9 million from $6.5 million in 2008. The increase is attributable to loan fees related to high volume of mortgage refinancing activity and lower asset valuation write-downs in 2009 than in 2008. Fee income from the Bank’s Investment and Trust Services department remained virtually unchanged year over year. However, the composition of the fees was different in 2009 as recurring fee income increased and non-recurring fee income decreased. Recurring fee income is produced by the market value of assets under management. These assets declined approximately $37 million year over year due to lower market values, despite adding assets from the Community acquisition near the end of 2008. Nonrecurring fee income was down in 2009 and is primarily generated by estate administration and settlement fees.

Loan service charges were $1.2 million in 2009 representing an increase of approximately 28% over the 2008 total of $897 thousand. The low mortgage rates of 2009 helped spur an increase in mortgage refinancing and resulted in higher fee income. The Bank closed approximately $38 million of mortgage loans as a third party originator and collected fee income for this service. In December 2009, the company that the Bank originates mortgages for announced that it was being acquired by another bank. As a result, the Bank is in the process of looking for a new mortgage partner and it is uncertain whether the same products and fee structure will be available. All other loan service charge categories remained constant from year to year.

Mortgage banking activities consist primarily of servicing mortgage loans originated and sold by the Bank. Mortgage banking activities recorded $145 thousand in fee income in 2009 compared to a loss of $335 thousand in 2008. The Bank recognized $82 thousand less income from the sale of mortgages in 2009 than it did the prior year as a result of lower sales volume. Nearly all of the Bank’s mortgage originations were as a third party originator for a fee, as previously discussed. As a result, these loans are not recorded on the Bank’s balance sheet and; therefore, the opportunity to record a gain on sale does not exist. The Bank continues to service approximately $101.2 million of previously originated mortgage loans for a fee. This servicing fee declined by approximately $150 thousand during the year; however, the Bank recorded a net increase of $712 thousand in the valuation of its mortgage servicing rights (MSR) over the prior to year. MSR represent the Bank’s rights to receive future fee income from servicing mortgages that it originated and sold in the secondary market. MSR are measured and carried at the lower of cost or market value and the value fell significantly in 2008, but recovered in 2009. As a result, a portion of previously recorded MSR impairment could be reversed in 2009. While the Bank does not expect to originate and sell mortgages with servicing retained in the future, it will retain the existing servicing portfolio until those loans are paid-off. See Note 9 of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information on mortgage servicing rights.

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Deposit fees were flat from year to year at $2.6 million in both 2009 and 2008. The composition of the 2009 fees was different than in 2008 as the Bank recorded more fees from commercial account analysis customers and commercial overdrafts and fewer fees from retail overdraft fees. Commercial account analysis fees increased primarily due to lower earning credits and consequently, higher account charges. In 2010, new regulations with regard to consumer overdraft activity will go in effect and will essentially require all consumers to opt-in to an overdraft protection program. If a substantial number of consumers who are currently covered by the Bank’s overdraft protection service do not opt-in, fee income from this service could be reduced. The Bank is currently taking steps to implement this change and educate its customers about the benefits of an overdraft protection program. At this time, the Bank does not expect to experience a significant reduction in the number of customers participating in such programs.

Other fees and service charges increased approximately 7% from 2008 driven by an increase in fee income from business debit cards and a change to a vendor contract that allows the Bank to retain more fee income from the sale of customer check orders. On December 31, 2008, the Bank discontinued the equity method of accounting for an investment it held and no income was recorded for this line item in 2009. This asset was reclassified as an investment available for sale at December 31, 2008. Likewise, the event that triggered the change in accounting for this asset produced a one time valuation write down of $1.2 million in 2008.

Other fee income increased in 2009 as the result of a net gain on the proceeds of a life insurance policy and refunds relating to sales and real estate taxes obtained by audits and appeals to the taxing authorities.

The Corporation recorded write-downs of $422 thousand on four equity securities that it considered to be other than temporarily impaired. All of the equity securities were bank stocks. In 2008, $888 thousand of impairment charges on eleven equity securities was recorded. Net securities losses were $522 thousand in 2009 compared to net gains of $164 thousand in 2008. The largest item included in the net loss was a loss of $452 thousand on two CIT bonds.

The following table presents a comparison of noninterest income for the past two years:

Table 4. Noninterest Income

       
  For the Twelve
Months Ended
December 31
  Change
     2009   2008   Amount   %
Noninterest Income
                                   
Investment and trust services fees     3,519       3,500     $ 19       0.5  
Loan service charges     1,151       897       254       28.3  
Mortgage banking activities     145       (335 )      480       143.3  
Deposit service charges and fees     2,575       2,569       6       0.2  
Other service charges and fees     1,292       1,210       82       6.8  
Increase in cash surrender value of life insurance     643       660       (17 )      (2.6 ) 
Equity method investment           (143 )      143       100.0  
Exchange of equity method investment           (1,205 )      1,205       100.0  
Other     499       109       390       357.8  
Impairment writedown on securities     (422)       (888 )      466       52.5  
Securities gains (losses), net     (522)       164       (686 )      (418.3 ) 
Total noninterest income     8,880       6,538     $ 2,342       35.8  

2008 versus 2007

The Corporation’s total noninterest income fell during 2008, primarily the result of falling asset valuations that resulted in write-downs on mortgage servicing rights, other than temporary impairment charges on investment securities and its investment in American Home Bank, N.A. Fee income from the Bank’s Investment and Trust Services department fell by $629 thousand to $3.5 million in 2008 compared to $4.1 million in 2007. This decrease was due primarily to two estate settlements that occurred in 2007 that produced $617 thousand of nonrecurring fee income that year. These estates represented the largest settlements ever handled by the department and contributed to the year over year decrease in fee income. After accounting for

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these settlements, fee income from Investment and Trust Services was virtually flat year over year despite continued growth in accounts. As the value of assets under management fell during the year due to market conditions, fee revenue fell as well.

Loan service charges increased by approximately 9% from $822 thousand in 2007 to $897 thousand in 2008. A nonrecurring commercial loan prepayment fee of $170 thousand was recorded in 2007. This is an unusually large fee and has somewhat tempered the true growth in 2008 commercial fees and service charges. Mortgage fees and service charges increased $61 thousand in 2008 as a result of a new mortgage program that began in the 4th quarter of 2007. As part of this program, the Bank serves as a third party originator of mortgage loans and can provide a wider range of mortgage products. In return, the Bank collects a fee for this service and is not responsible for funding or servicing the loans. Consumer loan fees and service charges increased approximately 13% during 2008 fueled primarily by an increase in the Bank’s consumer debt protection product that provides debt protection in the event of death, disability or involuntary unemployment.

Mortgage banking activities produced a loss of $335 thousand in 2008 compared to income of $422 thousand in 2007, a negative swing of $758 thousand. Two factors contributed to this large swing. First, gains recognized on the sale of mortgage loans decreased by $159 thousand in 2008 as the Bank originated fewer loans for sale in the secondary market. Fewer loans were originated for sale due to a slow down in purchase and refinance activity and the implementation of the Bank’s new mortgage origination program that eliminates its sales activities. Secondly, the Bank’s mortgage servicing rights portfolio recorded net impairment charges (i.e., expense) of $500 thousand in 2008, while impairment charges of $98 thousand were reversed (i.e., income) in 2007. Mortgage servicing rights (MSR) represent the Bank’s rights to receive future fee income from servicing mortgages that it originated and sold in the secondary market. MSR are measured and carried at the lower of cost or market value and the value fell in 2008 as rates fell and prepayment assumptions were accelerated. While the Bank does not expect to originate and sell mortgages with servicing retained in the future, it will retain the existing servicing portfolio until those loans are paid-off. See Note 9 of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information on mortgage servicing rights.

Deposit fees were $2.6 million in 2008 compared to $2.4 million in 2007. Account analysis fees increased $129 thousand year over year as lower market interest rates produced lower earnings credits for commercial account analysis customers and therefore, higher account charges. Retail overdraft fees also increased by $64 thousand (12%) in 2008. Income from the Bank’s retail and commercial overdraft protection programs remained unchanged at $1.1 million, year over year.

Other service charges and fees decreased slightly to $1.2 million in 2008 from $1.3 million in 2007. Debit card fees increased by approximately 9% ($59 thousand) during the year, but this increase was more than offset by a nonrecurring fee of $86 thousand in 2007 that was not recorded in 2008. The Bank also recorded a decrease in fee income it earns from a third party provider of check services as the vendor reduced its payment schedule in 2008.

The Bank previously had an investment in American Home Bank, N.A. (AHB) common stock that represented an ownership of approximately 21% of the voting stock of AHB. This investment was accounted for utilizing the equity method of accounting. Under the equity method of accounting, the Corporation recorded a loss of $143 thousand in 2008 and income of $49 thousand in 2007. On December 31, 2008 First Chester County Corporation (FCEC) acquired the common stock of AHB. The acquisition was structured so that shareholders of AHB would receive a combination of cash ($11 per share) and FCEC common stock (0.7 shares of FCEC for each share of AHB) subject to allocation provisions defined in the merger agreement. At the time of the merger announcement, FCEC common stock price was $15.25 per share. After the merger, the Corporation’s ownership of FCEC was less than 5% and it would no longer account for this investment using the equity method. On the merger date, the Corporation discontinued the equity method of accounting on the AHB investment and recorded the FCEC transaction with 58,000 shares exchanged at $11.00 per share cash ($638 thousand) and the remaining AHB shares (299,000) exchanged for 209,000 FCEC common shares at the December 31, 2008 fair value of $10.00 per common share. As a result of this transaction, the Corporation recorded a loss of $1.2 million. For 2008, the Corporation recorded a total loss of $1.3 million from its investment in AHB, comprised of $1.2 million loss from the asset exchange and a $143 thousand loss

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recognized by the equity method of accounting. At December 31, 2008, the Corporation recorded its investment in FCEC common stock on the balance sheet as Investment securities available for sale.

The Corporation also recorded write-downs of $888 thousand on eleven equity securities that it considered to be other than temporarily impaired. All of the equity securities were national or regional bank stocks. In 2007, impairment charges totaled $104 thousand. Net securities gains were $164 thousand in 2008 compared to $284 thousand in 2007. The net gains in 2008 were comprised of a combination of gains and losses on both debt and equity securities.

Noninterest Expense

2009 versus 2008

Noninterest expense increased by 11.8% in 2009 to a $25.9 million compared to $23.2 million in 2008. Nearly 50% of the increase is related to FDIC insurance expense that increased by $1.3 million in 2009. This increase is due to higher assessment rates on insured deposits and a $450 thousand special assessment. The FDIC imposed the higher rates and the special assessment in an effort to replenish the Deposit Insurance Fund that has been severely reduced by the high rate of bank failures. The Bank expects the higher assessment rates to remain in effect for the foreseeable future. These substantial rate increases come just one year after the Bank utilized the final premium credits that it was previously granted by the FDIC.

Salary and employee benefits totaled $12.7 million compared to $12.1 million the prior year. Recognizing that 2009 would be a difficult year for the economy, the Bank elected to defer salary increases for 6 months in 2009 and this held the increase in salary expense to $357 thousand. In addition, the Bank suspended any payouts from its incentive compensation plan and saved $472 thousand. Partially offsetting these savings were a 19% increase in health insurance premiums and a $587 thousand increase in pension expense. The increase in pension expense is due to market valuations of pension obligations, despite action Management took to control pension costs including closing the plan to new participants. The Bank expects that the 2010 pension expense will be similar to the 2009 expense. See Note 15 of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information on benefit plans.

Advertising costs were down nearly 26% or $460 thousand in 2009, approximately the same amount advertising costs increased in 2008. Two special marketing activities contributed to the increase in 2008. Since these were one-time events, they did not occur again in 2009 and advertising costs were lower.

Legal and professional fees consist of fees paid to outside legal counsel and audit fees. In general, the Corporation did a good job of controlling these costs in 2009, however, legal fees related to the defense of a lawsuit involving activities engaged in by Community, prior to its acquisition by the Corporation, were responsible for nearly all the of the increase year over year. In January 2010, a judge issued an interim ruling that appears to be favorable towards the Corporation’s position and there is a possibility that a significant amount of these legal fees could be recovered. However, this matter could be appealed and it is unknown when this issue will be finalized or whether legal fees can be recovered.

Data processing costs increased $108 thousand in 2009. The Bank is reviewing proposals for a new core processing system that it has tentatively scheduled to implement in late 2010. This new system should provide greater operating efficiency and should help reduce the rate of fee increases in future years. Pennsylvania bank shares tax was lower in 2008 than 2009 due to the resolution of an outstanding tax issue relating to its 2006 acquisition of Fulton Bancshares Corporation. The 2009 shares tax expense more accurately reflects expected future shares tax expense.

Other noninterest expense was $3.5 million in 2009, an increase of approximately 6% over 2008. Nearly all line items in this category remained fairly constant year and the increase was due primarily to two events. First, the Bank paid an $87 thousand prepayment penalty to the FHLB to pay-off high rate borrowings, thereby providing a benefit to the Bank in future periods. Second, the Bank closed an office located in a mall during the second quarter of 2009 and recorded a loss of $117 for the write-off of leasehold improvements.

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The following table presents a comparison of noninterest expense for the past two years:

Table 5. Noninterest Expense

       
  For the Twelve
Months Ended
December 31
  Change
     2009   2008   Amount   %
Noninterest Expense
                                   
Salaries and benefits   $ 12,713     $ 12,086     $ 627       5.2  
Net occupancy expense     1,898       1,792       106       5.9  
Furniture and equipment expense     850       843       7       0.8  
Advertising     1,327       1,787       (460 )      (25.7 ) 
Legal and professional fees     1,697       1,146       551       48.1  
Data processing     1,538       1,430       108       7.6  
Pennsylvania bank shares tax     573       367       206       56.1  
Intangible amortization     468       370       98       26.5  
FDIC insurance     1,397       105       1,292       1,230.5  
Other     3,468       3,263       205       6.3  
Total noninterest expense   $ 25,929     $ 23,189     $ 2,740       11.8  

2008 versus 2007

The Corporation did a good job of controlling noninterest expense in 2008. For the year, noninterest expense was $23.2 million, only 1.7% higher than $22.8 million recorded in 2007. Salary and benefit costs are the largest noninterest expense of the Corporation and totaled $12.1 million in 2008. This is an increase of $596 thousand (5.2%) over 2007. Salary expense increased $851 thousand year over year, primarily from normal salary adjustments. The expense for the Bank’s matching portion of its 401(k) plan increased $106 thousand due in part to higher salary deferrals and an increase to the Bank’s matching percentage. The increase in the Bank’s matching percentage was implemented as a partial offset to changes in the Bank’s pension plan that were discussed in last years report and are repeated below in the section comparing 2007 and 2006. In addition, salary increases resulted in higher payroll tax expense. Due to lower net income in 2008, the expense of the Bank’s incentive compensation plans was $322 thousand less in 2008 compared to 2007. In addition, changes to the pension plan that were effective in 2008 resulted in a savings of $229 thousand versus the 2007 pension expense. However, due to a significant drop in interest rates used to calculate pension obligations at December 31, 2008, pension expense for 2009 is expected to be approximately $500 thousand higher than in 2008. Management believes that if the 2008 pension changes had not been implemented, the increase in the 2009 pension expense would have been significantly higher than what is currently expected. See Note 15 of the accompanying consolidated financial statements for additional information on benefit plans.

A decrease in building maintenance expense was primarily responsible for a $102 thousand decrease in net occupancy and furniture year over year. Depreciation expense remained fairly constant year over year.

Advertising costs increased $452 thousand during 2008 to $1.8 million. Two special marketing activities were responsible for the increase. The first was a new customer acquisition campaign that offered merchandise incentives to retail and business customers to open selected checking account products. The second activity involved the creation of a consumer financial education website: www.mymoneyclinic.com

Legal and professional fees increased approximately 13% year over year. Legal and regulatory requirements continue to increase in number every year and are a burden to community banks, both in terms of financial and employee resources. Bank Secrecy Act and Anti-Money Laundering regulations continue to stretch the Bank’s resources. The increase in legal and professional fees in 2008 is attributable to fees paid to outside legal counsel and audit fees, both internal and external.

In 2008, the Bank got a final resolution of an outstanding Pennsylvania Bank Shares tax issue relating to its 2006 acquisition of Fulton Bancshares Corporation. This allowed the Bank to recognize lower shares tax expense in 2008 than in 2007.

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Intangible amortization increased only $9 thousand year over year. This increase is due entirely to amortization of a customer list obtained in acquisition of Community. Only one month of customer list amortization was recorded in 2008. The remaining intangible amortization is related to a previously acquired core deposit intangible. See Note 8 of the accompanying financial statements for additional information on intangible assets.

Other noninterest expense decreased $462 thousand in 2008 when compared to 2007. Total noninterest expense for 2008 was $3.4 million. In 2007, the Bank incurred $540 thousand in prepayment penalties to the FHLB to pay-off high rate borrowings. The absence of this expense is primarily responsible for the decrease in other noninterest expense year over year. FDIC insurance was $105 thousand in 2008, up $34 thousand from 2007. The 2008 FDIC insurance premium reflects use of the remaining premium credits carried over from 2007 that were granted to the Bank as part of the 2007 FDIC Reform Act. Most categories of other noninterest expense remained fairly constant as compared to 2007.

Provision for Income Taxes

Federal income tax expense for 2009 was $2.0 million compared to $3.7 million in 2008 and $2.8 million in 2007. The Corporation’s effective tax rate for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007 was 23.4%, 30.0% and 23.0%, respectively. The lower income tax expense and effective rate in 2009 is due to a lower level of taxable income and a higher contribution of tax-exempt income to pretax income. In 2009, the benefit of having tax-exempt income was equivalent to 13.8% of taxable income compared to 11.5% in 2008. The 2009 tax expense includes a $188 thousand valuation account established against capital losses that were incurred in 2009. For a more comprehensive analysis of Federal income tax expense refer to Note 12 of the accompanying financial statements.

Financial Condition

One method of evaluating the Corporation’s condition is in terms of its sources and uses of funds. Assets represent uses of funds while liabilities represent sources of funds. At December 31, 2009, total assets reached $979.4 million, increasing 8.5% from total assets of $902.5 million at December 31, 2008. Table 3 presents average balances of the Corporation’s assets and liabilities over a three-year period. The following discussion on financial condition will reference the average balance sheet in Table 3 unless otherwise noted.

Investment Securities:

The investment portfolio serves as a mechanism to invest funds if funding sources out pace lending activity, provide liquidity for lending and operations, and provide collateral for deposits and borrowings. The Corporation invests in taxable and tax-free debt securities and equity securities as part of its investment strategy. The mix of taxable and tax-free debt securities are determined by the Bank’s Investment Committee and investing decisions are made as a component of balance sheet management. Debt securities include U.S. Government Agencies, U.S. Government Agency mortgage-backed securities, non-agency mortgage-backed securities, state and municipal government bonds and corporate debt. The equity portfolio consists of bank stocks only and is considered to be longer-term with a focus on capital appreciation. Tables 6 and 7 provide additional detail about the investment portfolio. All securities are classified as available for sale.

The portfolio averaged $152.8 million in 2009 down slightly from the 2008 average of $160.5 million. The ending balance of the portfolio was $149.8 million, $4.3 million less than at the end of 2008. At year-end, the portfolio held lower balances in U.S. Treasury and agency issues and corporate securities, but a slightly larger position in agency mortgage backed securities. The portfolio produced approximately $7 million less cash flow from maturing investments in 2009 compared to 2008, but the dollars reinvested in the portfolio remained fairly constant at approximately $43 million each year. Most purchases were made only to maintain collateral positions.

Mortgage-backed securities continue to be the subject of much discussion in the financial markets and the mortgages backing some of these notes have been blamed for contributing to the recession. Most of the negative attention is focused on sub-prime mortgages that were used as collateral for some mortgage-backed securities. The delinquency trend in sub-prime mortgages that started in 2007 and continued through 2009 only reinforced that much of the sub-prime production was exactly that, credit given to sub-prime customers

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without the long-term ability to repay the loan. The failure of these loans continues to result in significant write-downs of mortgage-backed assets.

The Bank’s investment in mortgage-backed securities is comprised primarily of U.S. Agency mortgage-backed products ($53.2 million) that do not include sub-prime mortgage collateral. When Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were placed in conservatorship in September 2008, these mortgage-backed securities that had always had an implicit U.S. Government guarantee now have explicit U.S. Government guarantee. The Bank also has $5.9 million of private label “Alt-A” mortgage-backed products, down from $7.6 million at year-end 2008. Alt-A loans are first-lien residential mortgages that generally conform to traditional “prime” credit guidelines; however, loan factors such as the loan-to-value ratio, loan documentation, occupancy status or property type cause these loans not to qualify for standard underwriting programs. The Alt-A product in the Bank’s portfolio is comprised of fixed-rate product that was originated between 2003 and 2006 and all were originally rated AAA. The bonds issued in 2006, during the height of the real estate market, appear to be experiencing the highest delinquency and loss rates. During 2009, all of the Bank’s Alt-A investments experienced rating declines and some experienced an increase in delinquencies and default rates, and a weakening of the underlying credit support. All of these bonds have some type of credit support tranche that will absorb any loss prior to losses at the senior tranche held by the Bank. At December 31, 2009, the bond ratings ranged from C to AAA and credit support levels ranged from 1.90% to 12.85%. The Bank monitors the performance of the Alt-A investments on a regular basis and reviews delinquencies, default rates, credit support levels and various cash flow stress test scenarios. Management will continue to monitor these securities and it is possible that a write down on some of these securities may occur in 2010 if current loss trends continue.

The performance of bond insurance companies seems to have stabilized in 2009 as compared to the financial troubles they experienced in 2008. However, the Corporation’s exposure to the bond insurers continued to come from the insurers credit guarantee on municipal bonds owned by the Bank. The Bank has exposure to 11 bond insurers in its municipal bond portfolio with the largest exposure to one carrier of $8 million. The Bank’s municipal bond portfolio is well diversified geographically and is comprised primarily of general obligation bonds. The Bank does not think its municipal bond portfolio represents any undue risk.

Within the corporate bond portfolio, the Bank holds approximately $6 million of trust-preferred securities. Trust preferred securities are typically issued by a subsidiary grantor trust of a bank holding company, which uses the proceeds of the equity issuance to purchase deeply subordinated debt issued by the bank holding company. Trust-preferred securities can reflect single entity issues or a group of entities (pooled trust preferred). Pooled trust preferred securities have been the subject of significant write-downs due in some cases from the default of one issuer in the pool that then impairs the entire pool. Because of the current financial conditions, most trust preferred securities have realized a significant decline in value, but market prices have improved since the end of 2008. All of the issues owned by the Bank are single issue variable rate notes from companies that received money (and in some cases paid back) from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), continue to pay dividends and have raised capital during 2009. The holdings and ratings of the trust-preferred securities include issues from: BankAmerica (Baa3), JP Morgan (A1), Wells Fargo (Baa1) and Huntington Bancshares (Baa3). At December 31, 2009, the Bank believes it will be able to collect all interest and principal due on these bonds.

At December 31, 2008, the Bank held two CIT bonds. During 2009, the financial condition of CIT continued to weaken and talks of a collapse of the company surfaced during the third quarter. Short-term restricting plans were developed that included a discounted tender offer for bonds maturing in 2009. The Bank accepted the tender offer and recorded a loss of $250 thousand on one bond and continued to hold a bond with a 2010 maturity. In December 2009, CIT filed for bankruptcy and then quickly emerged with another restructuring plan that included an exchange of existing debt for new debt and equity. As a result of this debt exchange, the Bank recorded a loss of $202 thousand and received five new bonds and 6,037 new common shares of CIT. At December 31, 2009 the bonds were trading at prices slightly below cost and the common shares had appreciated in value.

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The Corporation and the Bank each have a portfolio of equity securities that are concentrated in bank stocks. The stocks represent a mix of community, large regional and national bank stocks with a fair value of $4.0 million at December 31, 2009.

The Bank held $6.5 million of restricted stock at the end of 2009. The restricted stock is comprised of $30 thousand in Atlantic Central Bankers’ Bank and $6.5 million in Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh. The FHLB stock is carried at a cost of $100 per share. In 2008, FHLB announced a capital restoration plan that has resulted in it discontinuing paying dividends and repurchasing excess capital stock from its members. It is not known if or when FHLB will be able to restore its dividend or repurchase its stock. As of December 31, 2009, the Bank held $1.6 million in FHLB stock that is in excess to what it is normally required to hold. Due to concerns about the capital strength of the Pittsburgh FHLB, and the entire FHLB system, there has been industry discussion about impairment issues on FHLB stock. If FHLB stock were deemed to be impaired, the write-down for the Bank could be significant. FHLB stock is evaluated for impairment primarily based on an assessment of the ultimate recoverability of its cost. As a government sponsored entity, FHLB has the ability to raise funding through the U.S. Treasury that can be used to support it operations. There is not a public market for FHLB stock and the benefits of FHLB membership (e.g., liquidity and low cost funding) add value to the stock beyond purely financial measures. Management intends to remain a member of the FHLB and believes that it will be able to fully recover the cost basis of this investment.

The following table presents amortized costs of investment securities by type at December 31 for the past three years:

Table 6. Investment Securities at Amortized Cost

     
(Dollars in thousands)   2009   2008   2007
Equity Securities   $ 5,400     $ 5,783     $ 3,792  
U.S. Treasury securities and obligations of U.S. Government agencies     28,258       29,548       45,099  
Obligations of state and political subdivisions     42,611       45,518       50,254  
Corporate debt securities     9,603       12,868       15,296  
Mortgage-backed securities
                          
Agency     53,214       50,667       43,483  
Non Agency     5,947       7,551       5,839  
Asset backed securities     84       95       83  
     $ 145,117     $ 152,030     $ 163,846  

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The following table presents analysis of investment securities at December 31, 2009 by maturity, and the weighted average yield for each maturity presented. The yields presented in this table are calculated using tax-equivalent interest and fair value.

Table 7. Maturity Distribution of Investment Portfolio

                   
                   
  One year or less   After one year
through five years
  After five years
through ten years
  After ten years   Total
(Dollars in thousands)   Fair
Value
  Yield   Fair
Value
  Yield   Fair
Value
  Yield   Fair
Value
  Yield   Fair
Value
  Yield
Available for Sale
                                                                                         
U.S. Treasury securities & obligations of U.S. Government agencies   $ 1,999       0.12%     $ 7,437       1.72%     $ 9,157       5.07%     $ 10,122       0.85%     $ 28,715       2.37%  
Obligations of state & political subdivisions     923       7.23%       7,166       5.20%       23,287       6.71%       12,505       6.31%       43,881       6.36%  
Corporate debt securities     100       0.26%       3,058       2.87%       458       9.76%       3,644       1.64%       7,260       2.65%  
Mortgage-backed securities
                                                                                         
Agency                 1,333       4.24%       9,336       5.25%       44,074       4.02%       54,743       4.24%  
Non Agency                                         4,668       5.85%       4,668       5.85%  
Asset-backed securities                 31       0.47%                   15       7.41%       46       2.73%  
     $ 3,022       2.30%     $ 19,025       3.39%     $ 42,238       6.06%     $ 75,028       3.97%     $ 139,313       4.49%  

Loans:

The Bank continued to actively lend during 2009, despite the continued outcry that the recession has worsened because banks are not lending. Gross loans totaled $739.6 million at December 31, 2009, an increase of 9.4% over the prior year-end. For the year, loans outstanding averaged $710.1 million versus $620.4 million on average during 2008, an increase of 14.5%. However, the average loan yield fell from 6.28% in 2008 to 5.36% in 2009 as rates remained low and much of the portfolio repriced to lower rates. The Bank had no loans held for sale at year-end. See Tables 8 and 9 for additional information on the Bank’s loan portfolio.

Commercial lending activity continues to be the primary driver of loan growth. The growth in 2009 was fueled by both in-market loans and purchased loan participations primarily from within the south central Pennsylvania market. In addition, the Bank was able to provide credit to new customers who found their national or large regional bank reduced lending activity during the year. Commercial lending products offered by the Bank include fixed and variable rate loans, lines-of-credit and letter-of-credits. During 2009, the Bank originated more than $205 million in new money commercial loans. At year-end there were $84.6 million in outstanding loans for residential construction and land development, a slight increase over the prior year-end. The majority of these loans are for projects that are located in south central Pennsylvania and represent both in-market loans and purchased loan participations. Commercial, industrial and agricultural loans totaled $427.9 million at the end of 2009, approximately 18% higher than at the end of 2008. Some type of real estate or other collateral secures most of these loans. Included in this total is $37.4 million of loans to local municipal governments. The majority of the 2009 originations were variable rate loans, as low market rates appeared very attractive to commercial borrowers. While the low rates are attractive to borrowers, they are not as beneficial to the Bank, and the Bank took action to impose rate floors on most new and refinanced loans during the year. The Bank was also busy in 2009 with requests to refinance existing commercial loans as borrowers looked to reduce their interest rate. Such refinancing activity reduces future interest income, but the Bank believes it is important to retain the relationship rather than lose the loan from refinancing elsewhere. However, because the Bank has been effective in implementing prepayment language into its commercial loans, the Bank either collects a prepayment penalty or the presence of the penalty defers refinancing. Approximately 53% of commercial loans at year-end are variable rate loans, a slight increase from the 2008 ratio of 50%. The Bank continues to aggressively pursue commercial lending opportunities in its market and loan participations in south central Pennsylvania. It has recently renewed its partnership with two Small Business Development Centers at two local universities. The Small Business Development Centers provide guidance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs. With this partnership, the Bank will be at the

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forefront of forging banking relations with those clients using the development centers. The Bank was approved as a designated lender for Small Business Administration guaranteed loans.

Residential mortgage lending was slow throughout the Bank’s market area in 2009, despite falling home prices and interest rates. Much of the Bank’s mortgage lending was related to refinancing activity for those consumers who still had sufficient equity in their home. As a result, the average outstanding balance of residential mortgages loans fell to $73.2 million in 2009 compared to $83.7 million in 2008 and the yield fell from 6.43% to 6.30% from 2008 to 2009. At year-end, residential mortgage loans totaled $63.3 million compared to $78.1 million one-year prior. The Bank expects residential mortgage balances to continue to decline because the Bank retains very few of the loans it originates. In 2009, the Bank originated $38 million of mortgage loans through a third party brokerage agreement. This agreement allows the Bank to offer a broader range of mortgage products and receive a fee for this activity. The Bank does not fund the loans nor will it service the loans. In December 2009, the company that the Bank originates mortgages for announced that it was being acquired by another bank. As a result, the Bank is in the process of looking for a new mortgage partner and it is uncertain whether the same products and fee structure will be available. In the first quarter of 2009, the Bank introduced an on-line mortgage service that will provide on-line mortgage applications, interest rates and a pre-qualification approval letter.

The recession, higher unemployment and lower consumer confidence about jobs and the economy all caused consumer spending and borrowing to fall in 2009. Lower real estate values evaporated homeowners’ equity in 2009 and home equity lending declined year over year after several years of strong growth. In 2009 the Bank originated $30.1 million of consumer related loans (including home equity products) compared to $57.3 million in 2008. Non-real estate related consumer loans fell from $25.5 million at December 31, 2008 to $23.2 million at the end of 2009. The yield fell from 6.69% to 6.43% over the same period. The majority of the Bank’s consumer loan portfolio is comprised of home equity related products. Consumer lending, other than home equity loans, continues to be a highly competitive market and the Bank is often at a disadvantage when compared to financing offered by captive lenders such as automobile dealers. For over 30 years, the Bank has been involved in indirect lending, primarily with automobile dealers. In the first quarter of 2010, the Bank announced that it would discontinue its indirect lending activity. The Bank had approximately $12.5 million of indirect loans outstanding at December 31, 2009 that it will continue to service until they payoff.

The following table presents an analysis of the Bank’s loan portfolio, by primary collateral, for each of the past five years:

Table 8. Loan Portfolio

         
  December 31
(Dollars in thousands)   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005
Residential real estate   $ 203,790     $ 215,885     $ 209,636     $ 191,667     $ 149,172  
Residential real estate construction     84,649       72,818       83,369       46,537       47,504  
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate     283,839       229,673       145,400       134,777       85,631  
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     144,035       132,368       107,263       128,747       89,452  
Consumer     23,250       25,473       25,949       26,806       25,431  
Total loans     739,563       676,217       571,617       528,534       397,190  
Less: Allowance for loan losses     (8,937)       (7,357 )      (7,361 )      (6,850 )      (5,402 ) 
Net loans   $ 730,626     $ 668,860     $ 564,256     $ 521,684     $ 391,788  

The Corporation had no foreign loans in any of the years presented.

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The following table presents the stated maturities (or earlier call dates) of selected loans as of December 31, 2009. Residential mortgage and consumer loans are excluded from the presentation.

Table 9. Maturities and Interest Rate Terms of Selected Loans

       
(Dollars in thousands)   Within
one year
  After
one year
but within
five years
  After
five years
  Total
Loans:
                                   
Residential real estate construction   $ 31,654     $ 32,487     $ 20,508     $ 84,649  
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     15,100       43,230       85,705       144,035  
     $ 46,754     $ 75,717     $ 106,213     $ 228,684  

Loans with predetermined interest rates and loans with variable interest rates at December 31, 2009 are shown below:

   
(Dollars in thousands)   After
one year
but within
five years
  After
five years
Loans with predetermined rates   $ 23,008     $ 40,613  
Loans with variable rates     52,709       65,600  
     $ 75,717     $ 106,213  

Loan Quality:

Management monitors loan asset quality (risk of loss from lending activities) by continually reviewing four measurements: (1) watch list loans, (2) delinquent loans (nonaccrual loans and loans past due 90 days or more), (3) foreclosed real estate (commonly referred to as other real estate owned or “OREO”), and (4) net-charge-offs. Management compares trends in these measurements with the Corporation’s internally established targets, as well as its national peer group’s average measurements.

Watch list loans are adversely criticized/classified loans where borrowers are experiencing weakening cash flow and may be paying loans with alternative sources of cash, for example, savings or the sale of unrelated assets. If this continues, the Corporation has an increasing likelihood that it will need to liquidate collateral for repayment. Management emphasizes early identification and monitoring of these loans in order for it to proactively minimize any risk of loss. Loans on the Watch list loans include delinquent and non-delinquent loans. Watch list loans increased approximately 123% as evidenced by the following discussion.

Delinquent loans are a result of borrowers’ cash flow and/or alternative sources of cash being insufficient to pay loans. The Corporation’s likelihood of collateral liquidation to repay the loans becomes more probable the further behind a borrower falls, particularly when loans reach 90 days or more past due. Management breaks down delinquent loans into two categories: (1) loans that are past due 30-89 days, and (2) nonperforming loans that are comprised of loans that are 90 days or more past due or loans for which Management has stopped accruing interest. Nonaccruing loans (primarily residential mortgage and commercial loans) generally represent Management’s determination that collateral liquidation is not likely to fully repay both interest and principal.

The quality of the Bank’s loan portfolio, as measured by nonperforming loans, declined during 2009 as the effects of the recession moved through the Bank’s market area. Total nonperforming loans at year-end were $18.3 million, more than four times higher than the 2008 total of $4.0 million.

Nonaccrual loans increased from $2.9 million at end of 2008 to $10.2 million at the end of 2009. There are four loans that account for the majority of the nonaccrual balance. These loans include two residential real estate developments ($4.0 million), one agricultural loan ($1.8 million) and one manufacturing loan ($3.9 million). All of the loans are secured by some type of real estate and have had specific reserves established for them. Management believes that its action to actively charge-off portions of these loans and to

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establish reserves has reduced the risk of loss. Loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing grew to $8.1 million at December 31, 2009 from $1.1 million at the end of 2008. The majority of the past due loans are concentrated in real estate loans and are comprised of a mix of residential first lien mortgages, commercial and farm real estate.

The Bank also had $642 thousand in foreclosed real estate (three properties) at the end of the year as compared to no foreclosed real estate at the end of 2008.

As a result of the increase in nonperforming loans during the year, the ratio of nonperforming loans to gross loans increased from .59% in 2008 to 2.47% at the end of 2009. Likewise, the ratio of nonperforming assets to total assets increased to 1.93%. The growth in nonperforming loans more than offset the increase to the allowance for loan losses (ALL) during the year and the ALL covered only 49.0% of nonperforming loans as compared to 183.9% at the end of 2008.

It is the Corporation’s policy to evaluate the probable collectability of principal and interest due under terms of loan contracts for all loans 90-days or more past due or restructured loans. Further, it is the Corporation’s policy to discontinue accruing interest on loans that are not adequately secured and in the process of collection. Upon determination of nonaccrual status, the Corporation subtracts any current year accrued and unpaid interest from its income, and any prior year accrued and unpaid interest from the allowance for loan losses. The Corporation has no foreign loans.

Charged-off loans usually result from: (1) a borrower being legally relieved of loan repayment responsibility through bankruptcy, (2) insufficient collateral sale proceeds to repay a loan; or (3) the borrower and/or guarantor does not own other marketable assets that, if sold, would generate sufficient sale proceeds to repay a loan.

The Corporation’s net charge-offs were $1.9 million in 2009, an increase of $661 thousand over 2008. The level of recoveries made on previously charged-off loans was nearly the same in 2008, but it recorded more charge-offs in indirect consumer loans and residential real estate loans. The increased charge-offs resulted in the net charge-off ratio increasing from .19% last year to .26% this year. Despite this increase, the Corporation’s net charge-offs as a percent of average loans compared favorably to the Corporation’s peer group’s ratio of 1.06 for 2009.

Due to an increase in charged-off loans and nonperforming loans, and continued loan growth during the year, the provision for loan losses was increased to $3.4 million in 2009 compared to $1.2 million the previous year. The increase in the provision expense resulted in a net increase of $1.6 million to the ALL during 2009. The ALL increased to $8.9 million during the year and this was equal to 1.21% of loans at year-end. This compares to an ALL of $7.4 million and a coverage ratio of 1.09% at December 31, 2008. Management monitors the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses on an ongoing basis and reports its adequacy assessment monthly to the Board of Directors. Management believes the allowance for loan losses is adequate.

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The following table presents an analysis of nonperforming assets, by primary collateral, for each of the past five years:

Table 10. Nonperforming Assets

         
  December 31
(Dollars in thousands)   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005
Nonaccrual loans
                                            
Residential real estate   $ 345     $ 333     $ 87     $ 234     $ 193  
Residential real estate construction     4,040       1,286       449       524        
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate     5,654             78       298        
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     124       1,252       3,635       123       13  
Consumer     30                          
Total nonaccrual loans   $ 10,193     $ 2,871     $ 4,249     $ 1,179     $ 206  
Loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing
                                            
Residential real estate   $ 3,554     $ 544     $ 407     $ 527     $ 218  
Residential real estate construction     1,426                          
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate     1,926       429       832       137       7  
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     960       33       205       389       264  
Consumer     195       123       64       95       94  
Total loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing   $ 8,061     $ 1,129     $ 1,508     $ 1,148     $ 583  
Total nonperforming loans     18,254       4,000       5,757       2,327       789  
Repossessed assets     18                          
Foreclosed assets     642             207              
Total nonperforming assets   $ 18,914     $ 4,000     $ 5,757     $ 2,327     $ 789  
Nonperforming loans to total gross loans     2.47%       0.59 %      1.01 %      0.44 %      0.20 % 
Nonperforming assets to total assets     1.93%       0.44 %      0.73 %      0.29 %      0.13 % 
Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans     48.96%       183.93 %      127.86 %      294.37 %      684.66 % 

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The following table presents an analysis of the allowance for loan losses, by primary collateral, for each of the past five years:

Table 11. Allowance for Loan Losses

         
  December 31
(Dollars in thousands)   2009   2008   2007   2006   2005
Balance at beginning of year   $ 7,357     $ 7,361     $ 6,850     $ 5,402     $ 4,886  
Addition of allowance from acquistion                       1,392        
Charge-offs:
                                            
Residential real estate     (283)       (405 )      (204 )      (179 )      (66 ) 
Residential real estate construction     (724)       (350 )                   
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate     (63)       (28 )                   
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     (567)       (335 )      (362 )            (82 ) 
Consumer     (492)       (315 )      (252 )      (205 )      (137 ) 
Total charge-offs     (2,129)       (1,433 )      (818 )      (384 )      (285 ) 
Recoveries:
                                            
Residential real estate     166       147       191       107       73  
Residential real estate construction                              
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate           28       37              
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     62       19       70       59       270  
Consumer     43       42       41       34       32  
Total recoveries     271       236       339       200       375  
Net (charge-offs) recoveries     (1,858)       (1,197 )      (479 )      (184 )      90  
Provision for loan losses     3,438       1,193       990       240       426  
Balance at end of year   $ 8,937     $ 7,357     $ 7,361     $ 6,850     $ 5,402  
Ratios:
                                            
Net loans charged-off (recovered) as a percentage of average loans     0.26%       0.19 %      0.09 %      0.04 %      -0.02 % 
Net loans charged-off (recovered) as a percentage of the provision for loan losses     54.04%       100.34 %      48.38 %      76.67 %      -21.13 % 
Allowance as a percentage of loans     1.21%       1.09 %      1.29 %      1.30 %      1.36 % 

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The following table shows the allocation of the allowance for loan losses by loan type and the percentage of each loan type in the loan portfolio:

Table 12. Allocation of the Allowance for Loan Losses

                   
                   
(Dollars in thousands)   2009(1)   2008   2007   2006   2005
Residential real estate   $ 3,915       44%     $ 1,324       18 %    $ 1,344       18 %    $ 1,498       22 %    $ 1,560       29 % 
Commercial, industrial and agricultural real estate     4,175       47%                                                  
Commercial, industrial and agricultural     752       8%       5,739       78 %      5,572       76 %      4,902       72 %      3425       63 % 
Consumer