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EX-31 - EXHIBIT 31 A - CERTIFICATION OF CEO - HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES INCex31aara013110.htm
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EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32B - CERTIFICATION OF CFO - HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES INCex32bjls013110.htm
EX-32 - EXHIBIT 32A - CERTIFICATION OF CEO - HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES INCex32aara013110.htm

UNITED STATES

 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

[ X ] Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the

 

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

 

For quarterly period ended JANUARY 31, 2010

 

 

OR

 

[

]

Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the

 

Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

Commission file number 1-8551

 

Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

     Delaware

    22-1851059

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

     Incorporation or Organization)

   Identification No.)

 

110 West Front Street, P.O. Box 500, Red Bank, NJ 07701

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

(Zip Code)

 

732-747-7800

(Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [ X ]

No [

]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [ ] No [ ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [ ] No [ X ]

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date. 62,949,046 shares of Class A Common Stock and 14,565,395 shares of Class B Common Stock were outstanding as of March 3, 2010.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated Filer [

] Accelerated Filer [ X ]

Non-Accelerated Filer [

]

(Do not check if smaller reporting company)

Smaller Reporting Company [

]

 

 


HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC.

 

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

INDEX

PAGE NUMBER

 

 

PART I. Financial Information

 

Item l. Financial Statements:

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of January 31,

 

2010 (unaudited) and October 31, 2009

3

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations (unaudited) for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009

5

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statement of

 

Equity (unaudited) for the three months ended January 31, 2010

6

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited) for

 

the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009

7

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial

 

Statements (unaudited)

9

 

 

Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis

 

of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

28

 

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures

 

About Market Risk

55

 

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

55

 

 

PART II. Other Information

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

56

 

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and

 

Use of Proceeds

56

 

 

Item 6. Exhibits

57

 

 

Signatures

58

 

 


 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In Thousands Except Share Amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 31,

2010

 

October 31,

2009

ASSETS

(unaudited)

 

(1)

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding:

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$328,312

 

$419,955

 

 

 

 

Restricted cash

138,694

 

152,674

 

 

 

 

Inventories:

 

 

 

Sold and unsold homes and lots under development

611,636

 

631,302

 

 

 

 

Land and land options held for future

 

 

 

development or sale

390,836

 

372,143

 

 

 

 

Consolidated inventory not owned:

 

 

 

Specific performance options

24,117

 

30,534

Variable interest entities

38,506

 

45,436

Other options

24,860

 

30,498

 

 

 

 

Total consolidated inventory not owned

87,483

 

106,468

 

 

 

 

Total inventories

1,089,955

 

1,109,913

 

 

 

 

Investments in and advances to unconsolidated

 

 

 

joint ventures

39,392

 

41,260

 

 

 

 

Receivables, deposits, and notes

55,044

 

44,418

 

 

 

 

Property, plant, and equipment – net

71,090

 

73,918

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

94,212

 

98,159

 

 

 

 

Total homebuilding

1,816,699

 

1,940,297

 

 

 

 

Financial services:

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

4,752

 

6,737

Restricted cash

1,867

 

4,654

Mortgage loans held for sale or investment

45,528

 

69,546

Other assets

2,361

 

3,343

 

 

 

 

Total financial services

54,508

 

84,280

 

 

 

 

Income taxes receivable - including net deferred

 

 

 

tax benefits

228,980

 

-

 

 

 

 

Total assets

$2,100,187

 

$2,024,577

 

 

 

 

 

(1) Derived from the audited balance sheet as of October 31, 2009.

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

 


 

 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In Thousands Except Share Amounts)

 

 

January 31,

2010

 

October 31,

2009

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

(unaudited)

 

(1)

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding:

 

 

 

Nonrecourse land mortgages

$3,658 

 

$- 

Accounts payable and other liabilities

289,927 

 

325,722 

Customers’ deposits

14,856 

 

18,811 

Nonrecourse mortgages secured by operating

 

 

 

properties

21,300 

 

21,507 

Liabilities from inventory not owned

78,222 

 

96,908 

 

 

 

 

Total homebuilding

407,963 

 

462,948 

 

 

 

 

Financial services:

 

 

 

Accounts payable and other liabilities

9,608 

 

14,507 

Mortgage warehouse line of credit

33,264 

 

55,857 

 

 

 

 

Total financial services

42,872 

 

70,364 

 

 

 

 

Notes payable:

 

 

 

Senior secured notes

783,497 

 

783,148 

Senior notes

812,384 

 

822,312 

Senior subordinated notes

131,330 

 

146,241 

Accrued interest

32,835 

 

26,078 

 

 

 

 

Total notes payable

1,760,046 

 

1,777,779 

 

 

 

 

Income tax payable

-

 

62,354 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

2,210,881 

 

2,373,445 

 

 

 

 

Equity:

 

 

 

Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. stockholders’ equity deficit:

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $.01 par value - authorized 100,000

 

 

 

shares; issued 5,600 shares at January 31,

 

 

 

2010 and at October 31, 2009 with a

 

 

 

liquidation preference of $140,000

135,299 

 

135,299 

Common stock, Class A, $.01 par value – authorized

 

 

 

200,000,000 shares; issued 74,626,006 shares at

 

 

 

January 31, 2010 and 74,376,946 shares at

 

 

 

October 31, 2009 (including 11,694,720

 

 

 

shares at January 31, 2010 and 11,694,720 shares at

 

 

 

October 31, 2009 held in Treasury)

746 

 

744 

Common stock, Class B, $.01 par value (convertible

 

 

 

to Class A at time of sale) – authorized

 

 

 

30,000,000 shares; issued 15,257,143 shares at

 

 

 

January 31, 2010 and 15,265,067 shares at

 

 

 

October 31, 2009 (including 691,748 shares at

 

 

 

January 31, 2010 and 691,748 shares at October 31, 2009 held in

 

 

 

Treasury) 

153 

 

153 

Paid in capital - common stock

457,453 

 

455,470 

Accumulated deficit

(589,818)

 

(826,007)

Treasury stock - at cost

(115,257)

 

(115,257)

 

 

 

 

Total Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. stockholders’ equity deficit

(111,424)

 

(349,598)

 

 

 

 

Non-controlling interest in consolidated joint ventures

730 

 

730 

 

 

 

 

Total equity deficit

(110,694)

 

(348,868)

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and equity

$2,100,187 

 

$2,024,577 

 

 

 

 

 

(1) Derived from the audited balance sheet as of October 31, 2009.

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

 


 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In Thousands Except Per Share Data)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

January 31,

 

2010

 

2009

Revenues:

 

 

 

Homebuilding:

 

 

 

Sale of homes

$309,353 

 

$359,052 

Land sales and other revenues

2,686 

 

6,413 

 

 

 

 

Total homebuilding

312,039 

 

365,465 

Financial services

7,606 

 

8,319 

 

 

 

 

Total revenues

319,645 

 

373,784 

 

 

 

 

Expenses:

 

 

 

Homebuilding:

 

 

 

Cost of sales, excluding interest

259,816 

 

340,675 

Cost of sales interest

19,848 

 

23,129 

Inventory impairment loss and land option
       write-offs

4,966 

 

110,181 

 

 

 

 

Total cost of sales

284,630 

 

473,985 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative

43,072 

 

71,044 

 

 

 

 

Total homebuilding expenses

327,702 

 

545,029 

 

 

 

 

Financial services

5,395 

 

6,748 

 

 

 

 

Corporate general and administrative

16,213 

 

30,910 

 

 

 

 

Other interest

25,607 

 

24,230 

 

 

 

 

Other operations

1,897 

 

1,624 

 

 

 

 

Total expenses

376,814 

 

608,541 

 

 

 

 

Gain on extinguishment of debt

2,574 

 

79,520 

 

 

 

 

Loss from unconsolidated joint

 

 

 

ventures

(373)

 

(22,589)

 

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

(54,968)

 

(177,826)

 

 

 

 

State and federal income tax
   (benefit) provision:

 

 

 

State

171 

 

555 

Federal

(291,328)

 

29 

 

 

 

 

Total taxes

(291,157)

 

584 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

$236,189 

 

$(178,410)

 

 

 

 

Per share data:

 

 

 

Basic:

 

 

 

Income (loss) per common share

$3.01

 

$(2.29)

Weighted average number of common

 

 

 

shares outstanding

78,553

 

78,043 

 

 

 

 

Assuming dilution:

 

 

 

Income (loss) per common share

$2.97

 

$(2.29)

Weighted average number of common

 

 

 

shares outstanding

79,536

 

78,043

 

 

 

 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

 


HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF EQUITY

(In Thousands Except Share Amounts)

(unaudited)

 

 

A Common Stock

 

B Common Stock

 

Preferred Stock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Issued and Outstanding

 

Amount

 

Shares Issued and Outstanding

 

Amount

 

Shares Issued and Outstanding

 

Amount

 

Paid-In

Capital

 

Accumulated Deficit

 

Treasury Stock

 

Non-Controlling Interest

 

Total Equity Deficit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, November 1, 2009

62,682,226

 

$744

 

14,573,319

 

$153

 

5,600

 

$135,299

 

$455,470

 

$(826,007)

 

$(115,257)

 

$730

 

$(348,868)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock options amortization
  and issuances, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,189

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,189

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Restricted stock 
  amortization, issuances and 
  forfeitures, net of tax

241,136

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

794

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

796

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conversion of Class B to
  Class A Common Stock

7,924

 

 

 

(7,924)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

236,189

 

 

 

 

 

236,189

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, January 31, 2010

62,931,286

 

$746

 

14,565,395

 

$153

 

5,600

 

$135,299

 

$457,453

 

$(589,818)

 

$(115,257)

 

$730

 

$(110,694)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

 

 


 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In Thousands)

(unaudited)

 

Three Months Ended

 

January 31,

 

2010

 

2009

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

$236,189 

 

$(178,410)

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash

 

 

 

(used in) provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

Depreciation

3,386 

 

5,298 

Compensation from stock options and awards

2,364 

 

4,512 

Stock option cancellations

-

 

12,269 

Amortization of bond discounts and deferred financing costs

1,227 

 

333 

(Gain) loss on sale and retirement of property

 

 

 

and assets

(119)

 

156 

Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures

373 

 

22,589 

Distributions of earnings from unconsolidated joint ventures

1,697 

 

1,149 

Gain on extinguishment of debt

(2,574)

 

(79,520)

Inventory impairment and land option write-offs

4,966 

 

110,181 

Decrease in assets:

 

 

 

Mortgage notes receivable

22,976 

 

7,069 

Restricted cash, receivables, prepaids, deposits and

 

 

 

other assets

10,881 

 

28,195 

Inventories

26,076 

 

103,854 

State and Federal income tax assets

-

 

126,826 

(Decrease) increase in liabilities:

 

 

 

State and Federal income tax

(291,334)

 

18,954 

Customers’ deposits

(3,955)

 

(4,764)

Accounts payable, interest and other accrued liabilities

(63,523)

 

(148,479)

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities

(51,370)

 

30,212 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

Net proceeds from sale of property and assets

150 

 

195 

Purchase of property, equipment and other fixed
    assets and acquisitions

(371)

 

(654)

Investments in and advances to unconsolidated

 

 

 

joint ventures

(989)

 

(3,650)

Distributions of capital from unconsolidated joint ventures

816 

 

1,522 

Net cash used in investing activities

(394)

 

(2,587)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

Proceeds from mortgages and notes

3,450 

 

-

Net payments related to mortgage

 

 

 

warehouse line of credit

(22,593)

 

(9,345)

Deferred financing costs from note issuances

(448)

 

(2,248)

Principal payments and debt repurchases

(22,273)

 

(14,895)

Net cash used in financing activities

(41,864)

 

(26,488)

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

(93,628)

 

1,137 

Cash and cash equivalents balance, beginning

 

 

 

of period

426,692 

 

848,056 

Cash and cash equivalents balance, end of period

$333,064

 

$849,193 

 

 


HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In Thousands - Unaudited)

(Continued)

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

January 31,

 

2010

 

2009

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow:

 

 

 

Cash paid (received) during the period for:

 

 

 

Interest, net of capitalized interest

$38,875 

 

$81,875 

Income taxes

$177 

 

$(145,196)

 

Supplemental disclosure of noncash financing activities:

 

In the first quarter of fiscal 2009, the Company issued $29.3 million of 18.0% Senior Secured Notes due 2017 in exchange for $71.4 million of unsecured senior notes.

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

 


HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - UNAUDITED

 

 Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. (“the Company”, “the Parent”, “we”, “us” or “our”) has reportable segments consisting of six Homebuilding segments (Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southeast, Southwest and West) and the Financial Services segment (see Note 15).

 

 The accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements include our accounts and those of all wholly-owned subsidiaries after elimination of all intercompany balances and transactions. Certain immaterial prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

 

 1. The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. In the opinion of management, all adjustments for interim periods presented have been made, which include normal recurring accruals and deferrals necessary for a fair presentation of our consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates, and these differences could have a significant impact on the financial statements. Results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results which might be expected for a full year. The balance sheet at October 31, 2009 has been derived from the audited Consolidated Financial Statements at that date but does not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements.

 

 Effective July 1, 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) established the Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) as the primary source of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”) recognized by the FASB to be applied by nongovernmental entities. Although the establishment of the ASC did not change US GAAP, it did change the way we refer to US GAAP throughout this document to reflect the updated referencing convention.

 

 2. For the three months ended January 31, 2010, the Company’s total stock-based compensation expense was $2.4 million. Included in this total stock-based compensation expense was the vesting of stock options of $1.3 million for the three months ended January 31, 2010.

 

 

3. Interest costs incurred, expensed and capitalized were:

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

January 31,

 

(In thousands)

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

Interest capitalized at

 

 

 

 

beginning of period

$164,340 

 

$170,107 

 

Plus interest incurred(1)

40,141 

 

53,510 

 

Less cost of sales interest

 

 

 

 

expensed

(19,848)

 

(23,129)

 

Less other interest expensed(2)(3)

(25,607)

 

(24,230)

 

Interest capitalized at

 

 

 

 

end of period(4)

$159,026 

 

$176,258 

 

 

(1) Data does not include interest incurred by our mortgage and finance subsidiaries.

(2) Our assets that qualify for interest capitalization (inventory under development) no longer exceed our

 

debt, and therefore, the portion of interest not covered by qualifying assets must be directly expensed.

(3) Interest on completed homes and land in planning, which does not qualify for capitalization, must be

 

expensed directly.

(4) We have incurred significant inventory impairments in recent years, which are determined based on

 


 

total inventory including capitalized interest. However, the capitalized interest amounts shown above

 

are gross amounts before allocating any portion of the impairments to capitalized interest.

 

4. Accumulated depreciation at January 31, 2010 and October 31, 2009 amounted to $69.0 million and $67.4 million, respectively, for our homebuilding property, plant and equipment.

 

5. We record impairment losses on inventories related to communities under development and held for future development when events and circumstances indicate that they may be impaired and the undiscounted cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than their related carrying amounts. If the expected undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying amount, then the community is written down to its fair value. We estimated the fair value of each impaired community by determining the present value of the estimated future cash flows at a discount rate commensurate with the risk of the respective community. For the three months ended January 31, 2010, our discount rates used for the impairments recorded ranged from 17.5% to 18.5%. Should the estimates or expectations used in determining cash flows or fair value decrease or differ from current estimates in the future, we may be required to recognize additional impairments. We recorded inventory impairments, which are presented in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as “Inventory impairment and land option write-offs” and deducted from Inventory of $3.3 million and $95.7 million for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

The following table represents inventory impairments by homebuilding segment for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009:

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Three Months Ended

(Dollars in millions)

January 31, 2010

 

January 31, 2009

 

Number of

Communities

Dollar

Amount of

Impairment

Pre-

Impairment

Value(1)

 

Number of

Communities

Dollar

Amount of

Impairment

Pre-

Impairment

Value(1)

Northeast

1

$2.6

$4.7

 

11

$53.6

$151.1

Mid-Atlantic

1

0.3

0.6

 

13

12.9

41.0

Midwest

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

Southeast

5

0.4

1.0

 

15

7.9

32.4

Southwest

-

-

-

 

5

3.0

10.8

West

-

-

-

 

3

18.3

43.8

Total

7

$3.3

$6.3

 

47

$95.7

$279.1

 

(1) Represents carrying value, net of prior period impairments, if any, at the time of recording

 

the applicable period’s impairments.

 

"Homebuilding-Inventory impairment loss and land option write-offs" on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations also includes write-offs of options, and approval, engineering and capitalized interest costs that we record when we redesign communities and/or abandon certain engineering costs and we do not intend to exercise options in various locations because the communities' proforma profitability is not projected to produce adequate returns on investment commensurate with the risk. The total write-offs were $1.7 million and $14.5 million for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 


            The following table represents write-offs of such costs and the number of lots walked away from by homebuilding segment for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009:

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

(Dollars in millions)

January 31,

 

 

2010

 

2009

 

 

Number of Walk-Away Lots

 

Dollar Amount of Write-Offs

 

Number of Walk-Away Lots

 

Dollar Amount of Write-Offs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northeast

259

 

$1.6 

 

503

 

$4.3

 

Mid-Atlantic

11

 

-

 

1,450

 

6.2

 

Midwest

-

 

(0.1)

 

-

 

-

 

Southeast

-

 

0.1 

 

153

 

0.3

 

Southwest

-

 

0.1 

 

284

 

3.4

 

West

-

 

-

 

-

 

0.3

 

Total

270

 

$1.7 

 

2,390

 

$14.5

 

 

As a result of the continued decline in the homebuilding market, we have decided to mothball (or stop development on) certain communities in some of our segments where we have determined the current performance does not justify further investment at this time. When we decide to mothball a community, the inventory is reclassified from “Sold and unsold homes and lots under development” to “Land and land options held for future development or sale”. During the first quarter of fiscal 2010, we mothballed four communities, sold seven previously mothballed communities and re-activated four previously mothballed communities, which resulted in a net change in the book value of our mothballed communities of $7.3 million, net of an impairment reserve balance of $12.3 million. As of January 31, 2010, the net book value associated with our 70 total mothballed communities was $287.8 million, net of an impairment reserve balance of $560.6 million.

 

6. We establish a warranty accrual for repair costs under $5,000 per occurrence to homes, community amenities and land development infrastructure. We accrue for warranty costs as part of cost of sales at the time each home is closed and title and possession have been transferred to the homebuyer. In addition, we accrue for warranty costs over $5,000 per occurrence as part of our general liability insurance deductible, which is expensed as selling, general and administrative costs. For homes delivered in fiscal 2010 and 2009, our deductible under our general liability insurance is $20 million per occurrence with an aggregate $20 million for liability claims and an aggregate $21.5 million for construction defect claims. Additions and charges in the warranty reserve and general liability accrual for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009 were as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

January 31,

 

(In thousands)

 

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance, beginning of period

 

$127,869 

 

$125,738 

 

Additions

 

9,902 

 

11,513 

 

Charges incurred

 

(7,227)

 

(11,275)

 

Balance, end of period

 

$130,544 

 

$125,976 

 

 

Warranty accruals are based upon historical experience. We engage a third-party actuary that uses our historical warranty data to estimate our unpaid claims, claim adjustment expenses and incurred but not reported claims reserves for the risks that we are assuming under the general liability and workers compensation programs. The estimates include provisions for inflation, claims handling and legal fees.

 

Insurance claims paid by our insurance carriers were $5.3 million and $10.3 million for the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 


7. We are involved in litigation arising in the ordinary course of business, none of which is expected to have a material adverse effect on our financial position or results of operations, and we are subject to extensive and complex regulations that affect the development and home building, sales and customer financing processes, including zoning, density, building standards and mortgage financing. These regulations often provide broad discretion to the administering governmental authorities. This can delay or increase the cost of development or homebuilding.

We also are subject to a variety of local, state, federal and foreign laws and regulations concerning protection of health and the environment. The particular environmental laws that apply to any given community vary greatly according to the community site, the site’s environmental conditions and the present and former uses of the site. These environmental laws may result in delays, may cause us to incur substantial compliance, remediation and/or other costs, and can prohibit or severely restrict development and homebuilding activity.

In March 2005, we received two requests for information pursuant to Section 308 of the Clean Water Act from Region 3 of the Environmental Protection Agency (the “EPA”). These requests sought information concerning storm water discharge practices in connection with completed, ongoing and planned homebuilding projects by subsidiaries in the states and district that comprise EPA Region 3. We also received a notice of violations for one project in Pennsylvania and requests for sampling plan implementation in two projects in Pennsylvania. We have subsequently received notification from the EPA alleging violations of storm water discharge practices at other locations and requesting related information. We provided the EPA with information in response to its requests. The Department of Justice (“DOJ”) is also involved in the review of these practices and enforcement with respect to them. We are engaged in discussions with the DOJ and EPA regarding a resolution of these matters, which we anticipate will include a monetary fine and an agreement to implement certain operational and training measures nationwide to ensure ongoing compliance with storm water regulations. Although we do not currently anticipate that we will incur any material costs in excess of the amount we have reserved for this matter, we cannot predict whether our discussions with the DOJ and EPA will result in a resolution, or what any resolution of these matters ultimately will require of us.

 

We anticipate that increasingly stringent requirements will be imposed on developers and homebuilders in the future. Although we cannot predict the effect of these requirements, they could result in time-consuming and expensive compliance programs and in substantial expenditures, which could cause delays and increase our cost of operations. In addition, the continued effectiveness of permits already granted or approvals already obtained is dependent upon many factors, some of which are beyond our control, such as changes in policies, rules, and regulations and their interpretations and application.

 

 

The Company is also involved in the following litigation:

 

The Company, Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President, Ara K. Hovnanian, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, J. Larry Sorsby, and a former officer of a Company subsidiary have been named as defendants in a purported class action. The original complaint, which only named Mr. Sorsby as a defendant, was filed on September 14, 2007 in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, captioned Herbert Mankofsky v. J. Larry Sorsby. On January 31, 2008, the court appointed Herbert Mankofsky as Lead Plaintiff. On February 19, 2008, the action was transferred to the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. On March 10, 2008, Lead Plaintiff filed an amended complaint, captioned In re Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. Securities Litigation, alleging, among other things, that the defendants violated federal securities laws by making false and misleading statements regarding the Company’s business and future prospects in connection with the Company’s acquisition of First Home Builders of Florida. The Company and Messrs. Hovnanian and Sorsby filed a Motion to Dismiss the amended complaint on July 14, 2008. On September 11, 2008, Lead Plaintiff filed his opposition to the Motion to Dismiss. The Company and Messrs. Hovnanian and Sorsby filed their reply brief on October 28, 2008. In March 2009, by court-ordered stipulation, the defendants withdrew their Motion to Dismiss, and a second amended complaint was filed in June 2009. The Company’s insurance carrier has agreed to provide coverage for the case under the Company’s insurance policy, therefore, the maximum exposure to the Company is the deductible, which has already been incurred and expensed. The matter has been resolved, and the resolution was approved by the court on December 15, 2009, with no further payments from the Company.

 


A subsidiary of the Company has been named as a defendant in a purported class action suit filed on May 30, 2007 in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida, Randolph Sewell, et al., v. D’Allesandro & Woodyard, et al., alleging violations of the federal securities acts, among other allegations, in connection with the sale of some of the subsidiary’s homes in Fort Myers, Florida. Plaintiffs filed an amended complaint on October 19, 2007. Plaintiffs sought to represent a class of certain home purchasers in southwestern Florida and sought damages, rescission of certain purchase agreements, restitution of out-of-pocket expenses, and attorneys’ fees and costs. The Company’s subsidiary filed a Motion to Dismiss the amended complaint on December 14, 2007. Following oral argument on the Motion in September 2008, the court dismissed the amended complaint with leave for plaintiffs to amend. Plaintiffs filed a second amended complaint on October 31, 2008. The Company’s subsidiary filed a Motion to Dismiss this second amended complaint. The Court dismissed portions of the second amended complaint. The Company’s subsidiary has filed a Motion for Reconsideration of a position of the Court’s decision and is awaiting a decision. Plaintiffs seek to represent a class of certain home purchasers in southwestern Florida and seek damages, rescission of certain purchase agreements, restitution of out-of-pocket expenses, and attorneys’ fees and costs. While we have determined that a loss related to this case is not probable, it is not possible to estimate a loss or range of loss related to this matter at this time.

 

8. Cash and cash equivalents include cash deposited in checking accounts, overnight repurchase agreements, certificates of deposit, Treasury Bills and government money market funds with maturities of 90 days or less when purchased. Our cash balances are held at a few financial institutions and may, at times, exceed insurable amounts. We believe we help to mitigate this risk by depositing our cash in major financial institutions. At January 31, 2010, $183.0 million of the total cash and cash equivalents was in cash equivalents, the book value of which approximates fair value.

 

9. In connection with the issuance of our senior secured first lien notes in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009, we terminated our revolving credit facility and refinanced the borrowing capacity thereunder. Also in connection with the refinancing, we entered into certain stand alone cash collateralized letter of credit agreements and facilities under which there were a total of $117.1 million and $130.3 million of letters of credit outstanding as of January 31, 2010 and October 31, 2009, respectively. These agreements and facilities require us to maintain specified amounts of cash as collateral in segregated accounts to support the letters of credit issued thereunder, which will affect the amount of cash we have available for other uses. As of January 31, 2010 and October 31, 2009, the amount of cash collateral in these segregated accounts was $121.3 million and $135.2 million, respectively, which is reflected in “Restricted cash” on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Our secured Master Repurchase Agreement with a group of banks is a short-term borrowing facility that provides up to $60 million through March 5, 2010. Interest is payable monthly, at the Company’s option, at either LIBOR plus 2.00% or the prime rate, with a rate floor of 4.25% on both. The loan is secured by the mortgages held for sale and is repaid when we sell the underlying mortgage loans to permanent investors. As of January 31, 2010, the aggregate principal amount of all borrowings under the Master Repurchase Agreement was $33.3 million. The Master Repurchase Agreement requires our wholly owned mortgage banking subsidiary K. Hovnanian American Mortgage, LLC (“K. Hovnanian Mortgage”) to satisfy and maintain specified financial ratios and other financial condition tests. Because of the extremely short period of time mortgages are held by K. Hovnanian Mortgage before the mortgages are sold to investors (generally a period of a few weeks), the immateriality to us on a consolidated basis of the size of the facility, the levels required by these financial covenants, our ability based on our immediately available resources to contribute sufficient capital to cure any default, were such conditions to occur, and our right to cure any conditions of default based on the terms of the Master Repurchase Agreement, we do not consider any of these covenants to be substantive or material. As of January 31, 2010, we believe we were in compliance with the covenants of the Master Repurchase Agreement. We are currently in negotiations for a replacement facility but there can be no assurance that such an agreement will be finalized. As of March 5, 2010, there were no outstanding amounts under this facility. In the event we do not obtain a replacement facility, the Company expects, but is not obligated, to provide any necessary funding for the mortgage operations that would have been provided under the Master Repurchase Agreement from available cash. In the event the Company elected not to provide such funding, we would need to seek alternative arrangements to be able to underwrite mortgages for our homebuilding customers.

 

10. At January 31, 2010, we had $797.2 million ($783.5 million net of discount) of outstanding senior secured notes, comprised of $0.5 million 11 1/2% Senior Secured Notes due 2013, $785.0 million 10 5/8% Senior Secured Notes due 2016 and $11.7 million 18% Senior Secured Notes due 2017. At January 31, 2010 we also had $814.3 million of outstanding senior notes ($812.4 million net of discount), comprised of $35.5 million 8% Senior

 


Notes due 2012, $81.4 million 6 1/2% Senior Notes due 2014, $73.7 million 6 3/8% Senior Notes due 2014, $82.3 million 6 1/4% Senior Notes due 2015, $173.2 million 6 1/4% Senior Notes due 2016, $172.3 million 7 1/2% Senior Notes due 2016 and $195.9 million 8 5/8% Senior Notes due 2017. In addition, we had $131.3 million of outstanding senior subordinated notes, comprised of $67.0 million 8 7/8% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2012, and $64.3 million 7 3/4% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2013.

 

During the three months ended January 31, 2010, we paid $13.6 million due to the maturity of our 6% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2010. In addition, we repurchased in open market transactions $10.0 million principal amount of our 6 3/8% Senior Notes due 2014, $1.0 million principal amount of 8 7/8% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2012, and $0.3 million principal amount of 7 3/4% Senior Subordinated Notes due 2013. The aggregate purchase price for these repurchases was $8.7 million, plus accrued and unpaid interest. These repurchases resulted in a gain on extinguishment of debt of $2.6 million, net of the write-off of unamortized discounts and fees. The gains from the repurchases are included in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the three months ended January 31, 2010 as “Gain on extinguishment of debt”.

 

Since the end of our first quarter of fiscal 2010, we purchased approximately $76.4 million of principal amount of our unsecured senior notes and $11.2 million of principal amount of unsecured senior subordinated notes for approximately $70.8 million in cash, resulting in approximately $16.8 million gain, and a corresponding increase in stockholders equity deficit.

 

We and each of our subsidiaries are guarantors of the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes, except for K. Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. (“K. Hovnanian”), the issuer of the notes, certain of our financial services subsidiaries, joint ventures and subsidiaries holding interests in our joint ventures and our foreign subsidiary (see Note 20). The indentures governing the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes do not contain any financial maintenance covenants, but do contain restrictive covenants that limit, among other things, the Company’s ability and that of certain of its subsidiaries, including K. Hovnanian, the issuer of the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes, to incur additional indebtedness (other than certain permitted indebtedness, refinancing indebtedness and non-recourse indebtedness), pay dividends and make distributions on common and preferred stock, repurchase senior notes and senior subordinated notes (with respect to the senior secured first-lien notes indenture), make other restricted payments, make investments, sell certain assets, incur liens, consolidate, merge, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all assets and enter into certain transactions with affiliates. The indentures also contain events of default which would permit the holders of the senior secured, senior, and senior subordinated notes to declare those notes to be immediately due and payable if not cured within applicable grace periods, including the failure to make timely payments on the notes or other material indebtedness, the failure to comply with agreements and covenants and specified events of bankruptcy, and insolvency and, with respect to the indentures governing the senior secured notes, the failure of the documents granting security for the senior secured notes to be in full force and effect and the failure of the liens on any material portion of the collateral securing the senior secured notes to be valid and perfected. As of January 31, 2010, we believe we were in compliance with the covenants of the indentures governing our outstanding notes. Under the terms of the indentures, we have the right to make certain redemptions and, depending on market conditions and covenant restrictions, may do so from time to time. We may also continue to make debt purchases and/or exchanges from time to time through tender offers, open market purchases, private transactions, or otherwise depending on market conditions and covenant restrictions.

 

Because of covenant restrictions in our bond indentures, we are currently unable to pay dividends, which are not cumulative, on our 7.625% Series A Preferred Stock. If current market trends continue or worsen, we will continue to be restricted from paying dividends for the foreseeable future. Our inability to pay dividends is in accordance with covenant restrictions and will not result in a default under our bond indentures or otherwise affect compliance with any of the covenants contained in the bond indentures.

 

The 10 5/8% Senior Secured Notes due 2016 are secured by a first-priority lien, the 11 1/2% Senior Secured Notes due 2013 are secured by a second-priority lien and the 18% Senior Secured Notes due 2017 are secured by a third-priority lien, in each case, subject to permitted liens and other exceptions, on substantially all the assets owned by us, K. Hovnanian (the issuer of the senior secured notes) and the guarantors, in the case of the 11 1/2% Senior Secured Notes due 2013 and the 18% Senior Secured Notes due 2017, to the extent such assets secure obligations under the 10 5/8% Senior Secured Notes due 2016. At January 31, 2010, the aggregate book value of the real property collateral securing these notes was approximately $819.9 million, which does not include the

 


impact of inventory investments, home deliveries, or impairments thereafter and which may differ from the appraised value. In addition, cash collateral securing these notes was $328.0 million as of January 31, 2010, which includes $121.3 million of restricted cash also collateralizing certain letters of credit. Subsequent to such date, cash uses include general business operations and real estate and other investments.

 

11. Each share of Class A Common Stock entitles its holder to one vote per share and each share of Class B Common Stock entitles its holder to ten votes per share. The amount of any regular cash dividend payable on a share of Class A Common Stock will be an amount equal to 110% of the corresponding regular cash dividend payable on a share of Class B Common Stock. If a shareholder desires to sell shares of Class B Common Stock, such stock must be converted into shares of Class A Common Stock.

 

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income (the “numerator”) by the weighted-average number of common shares, adjusted for non-vested shares of restricted stock (the “denominator”) for the period. Computing diluted earnings per share is similar to computing basic earnings per share, except that the denominator is increased to include the dilutive effects of options and non-vested shares of restricted stock. Any options that have an exercise price greater than the average market price are considered to be anti-dilutive and are excluded from the diluted earnings per share calculation. For the three months ended January 31, 2010, diluted earnings per common share is computed using the weighted average number of shares outstanding adjusted for the 1.0 million incremental shares attributed to non-vested stock and outstanding options to purchase common stock. For the three months ended January 31, 2009, all stock options and non-vested restricted stock were excluded from the calculation as they were anti-dilutive during the period.

 

On July 3, 2001, our Board of Directors authorized a stock repurchase program to purchase up to 4 million shares of Class A Common Stock. As of January 31, 2010, 3.4 million shares of Class A Common Stock have been purchased under this program.

 

12. On July 12, 2005, we issued 5,600 shares of 7.625% Series A Preferred Stock, with a liquidation preference of $25,000. Dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock are not cumulative and are payable at an annual rate of 7.625%. The Series A Preferred Stock is not convertible into the Company’s common stock and is redeemable in whole or in part at our option at the liquidation preference of the shares beginning on the fifth anniversary of their issuance. The Series A Preferred Stock is traded as depositary shares, with each depositary share representing 1/1000th of a share of Series A Preferred Stock. The depositary shares are listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “HOVNP”. During the three months ended January 31, 2010 and 2009, we did not make any dividend payments on the Series A Preferred Stock as a result of covenant restrictions in the indentures governing our senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes discussed above. We anticipate we will be restricted from paying dividends for the foreseeable future.

 

13. On August 4, 2008, we announced that our Board of Directors adopted a shareholder rights plan (the “Rights Plan”) designed to preserve shareholder value and the value of certain income tax assets primarily associated with net operating loss carryforwards (“NOL”) and built-in losses under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. Our ability to use NOLs and built-in losses would be limited if there was an “ownership change” under Section 382. This would occur if shareholders owning (or deemed under Section 382 to own) 5% or more of our stock increase their collective ownership of the aggregate amount of our outstanding shares by more than 50 percentage points over a defined period of time. The Rights Plan was adopted to reduce the likelihood of an “ownership change” occurring as defined by Section 382. Under the Rights Plan, one right was distributed for each share of Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock outstanding as of the close of business on August 15, 2008. Effective August 15, 2008, if any person or group acquires 4.9% or more of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock without the approval of the Board of Directors, there would be a triggering event causing significant dilution in the voting power of such person or group. However, existing stockholders who owned, at the time of the Rights Plan’s adoption, 4.9% or more of the outstanding shares of Class A Common Stock will trigger a dilutive event only if they acquire additional shares. The approval of the Board of Directors’ decision to adopt the Rights Plan may be terminated by the Board at any time, prior to the Rights being triggered. The Rights Plan will continue in effect until August 15, 2018, unless it expires earlier in accordance with its terms. The approval of the Board of Directors’ decision to adopt the Rights Plan was submitted to a stockholder vote and approved at a Special Meeting of stockholders held on December 5, 2008. Also at the Special Meeting on December 5, 2008, our stockholders approved an amendment to our Certificate of Incorporation to restrict certain transfers of Class A Common Stock in

 


order to preserve the tax treatment of our net operating loss carryforwards and built-in losses under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. Subject to certain exceptions pertaining to pre-existing 5% stockholders and Class B stockholders, the transfer restrictions in the amended Certificate of Incorporation generally restrict any direct or indirect transfer (such as transfers of our stock that result from the transfer of interests in other entities that own our stock) if the effect would be to: (i) increase the direct or indirect ownership of our stock by any person (or public group) from less than 5% to 5% or more of our common stock; (ii) increase the percentage of our common stock owned directly or indirectly by a person (or public group) owning or deemed to own 5% or more of our common stock; or (iii) create a new public group. Transfers included under the transfer restrictions include sales to persons (or public groups) whose resulting percentage ownership (direct or indirect) of common stock would exceed the 5% thresholds discussed above, or to persons whose direct or indirect ownership of common stock would by attribution cause another person (or public group) to exceed such threshold.

 

14. Total income tax benefit was $291.2 million for the three months ended January 31, 2010 due primarily to the impact of a federal net operating loss carryback. On November 6, 2009, President Obama signed the Worker, Homeownership, and Business Assistance Act of 2009, under which the Company was able to carryback its 2009 net operating loss five years to previously profitable years that were not available to the Company for carryback prior to the new tax legislation. We recorded the impact of the carryback of $291.3 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2010. We received $274.1 million of the federal income tax refund in the second quarter of 2010 and expect to receive the remaining $17.2 million later this year.

 

Deferred federal and state income tax assets primarily represent the deferred tax benefits arising from temporary differences between book and tax income which will be recognized in future years as an offset against future taxable income. If the combination of future years income (or loss) and the reversal of the timing differences results in a loss, such losses can be carried back to prior years or carried forward to future years to recover the deferred tax assets. In accordance with ASC 740 “Income Taxes” (ASC 740), we evaluate our deferred tax assets quarterly to determine if valuation allowances are required. ASC 740 requires that companies assess whether valuation allowances should be established based on the consideration of all available evidence using a "more likely than not" standard. Because of the continued downturn in the homebuilding industry during 2007, 2008 and 2009, which has resulted in additional inventory and intangible impairments, we were in a three year cumulative loss position as of October 31, 2009. According to ASC 740, a three-year cumulative loss is significant negative evidence in considering whether deferred tax assets are realizable, and in this circumstance, the Company does not rely on projections of future taxable income to support the recovery of deferred tax assets. Our valuation allowance for current and deferred tax assets decreased $281.5 million during the three months ended January 31, 2010 primarily due to the impact of a federal net operating loss carryback. At January 31, 2010, our total valuation allowance amounted to $706.1 million.

 

15. Our operating segments are components of our business for which discrete financial information is available and reviewed regularly by the chief operating decision-maker, our Chief Executive Officer, to evaluate performance and make operating decisions. We have 22 homebuilding operating segments, and therefore, it is impractical to provide segment disclosures for this many segments. As such, we have aggregated the homebuilding operating segments into six reportable segments.

 

Our homebuilding operating segments are aggregated into reportable segments based primarily upon geographic proximity, similar regulatory environments, land acquisition characteristics and similar methods used to construct and sell homes. The Company’s reportable segments consist of the following six homebuilding segments and a financial services segment:

 

 

Homebuilding:

 

(1) Northeast (New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania)

 

(2) Mid-Atlantic (Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington D.C.)

 

(3) Midwest (Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, Ohio)

 

(4) Southeast (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina)

 

(5) Southwest (Arizona, Texas)

 

(6) West (California)

 

 

Financial Services

 

 


Operations of the Company’s Homebuilding segments primarily include the sale and construction of single-family attached and detached homes, attached townhomes and condominiums, mid-rise and high-rise condominiums, urban infill and active adult homes in planned residential developments. In addition, from time to time, the homebuilding segments include land sales. Operations of the Company’s Financial Services segment include mortgage banking and title services provided to the homebuilding operations’ customers. We do not retain or service mortgages that we originate but rather sell the mortgages and related servicing rights to investors.

 

Corporate and unallocated primarily represents operations at our headquarters in Red Bank, New Jersey. This includes our executive offices, information services, human resources, corporate accounting, training, treasury, process redesign, internal audit, construction services, and administration of insurance, quality, and safety. It also includes interest income and interest expense resulting from interest incurred that cannot be capitalized in inventory in the Homebuilding segments, as well as, the gains or losses on extinguishment of debt from debt repurchases or exchanges.

Evaluation of segment performance is based primarily on operating earnings from continuing operations before provision for income taxes (“(Loss) income before income taxes”). (Loss) income before income taxes for the Homebuilding segments consist of revenues generated from the sales of homes and land, (loss) income from unconsolidated entities, management fees and other income, less the cost of homes and land sold, selling, general and administrative expenses and non-controlling interest expense. Income before income taxes for the Financial Services segment consist of revenues generated from mortgage financing, title insurance and closing services, less the cost of such services and certain selling, general and administrative expenses incurred by the Financial Services segment.

 

Operational results of each segment are not necessarily indicative of the results that would have occurred had the segment been an independent, stand-alone entity during the periods presented.

 


                Financial information relating to the Company’s operations was as follows:

 

 

Three Months Ended

January 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

Northeast

$69,461 

 

$87,046 

 

Mid-Atlantic

67,023 

 

69,505 

 

Midwest

23,432 

 

27,030 

 

Southeast

24,785 

 

35,124 

 

Southwest

82,548 

 

88,259 

 

West

44,479 

 

56,343 

 

Total homebuilding

311,728 

 

363,307 

 

Financial services

7,606 

 

8,319 

 

Corporate and unallocated

311 

 

2,158 

 

Total revenues

$319,645 

 

$373,784 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Loss) income before income taxes:

 

 

 

 

Northeast

$(10,221)

 

$(100,101)

 

Mid-Atlantic

599 

 

(27,516)

 

Midwest

(2,240)

 

(4,708)

 

Southeast

(2,188)

 

(16,061)

 

Southwest

3,891 

 

(9,022)

 

West

(5,873)

 

(40,643)

 

Homebuilding loss
        before income taxes

(16,032)

 

(198,051)

 

Financial services

2,211 

 

1,571 

 

Corporate and unallocated

(41,147)

 

18,654 

 

Loss before income taxes

$(54,968)

 

$(177,826)

 

 

 

 

January 31,

 

October 31,

(In thousands)

2010

 

2009

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

Northeast

$535,848 

 

$559,257 

Mid-Atlantic

190,481 

 

200,908 

Midwest

53,753 

 

54,560 

Southeast

64,920 

 

60,441 

Southwest

198,247 

 

191,495 

West

173,984 

 

163,710 

Total homebuilding

1,217,233 

 

1,230,371 

Financial services

54,508 

 

84,280 

Corporate and unallocated

828,446 

 

709,926 

Total assets

$2,100,187 

 

$2,024,577 

 

16. Per ASC 810 “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), a Variable Interest Entity (“VIE”) is created when (i) the equity investment at risk is not sufficient to permit the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support from other parties or (ii) equity holders either (a) lack direct or indirect ability to make decisions about the entity, (b) are not obligated to absorb expected losses of the entity or (c) do not have the right to receive expected residual returns of the entity if they occur. If an entity is deemed to be a VIE pursuant to ASC 810, an enterprise that absorbs a majority of the expected losses of the VIE is considered the primary beneficiary and must consolidate the VIE.

 


 

Based on the provisions of ASC 810, we have concluded that, whenever we option land or lots from an entity and pay a non-refundable deposit, a VIE is created under condition (ii)(b) and (c) of the previous paragraph. We have been deemed to have provided subordinated financial support, which refers to variable interests that will absorb some or all of an entity’s expected theoretical losses if they occur. For each VIE created with a significant nonrefundable option fee (we currently define significant as greater than $100,000 because we have determined that in the aggregate the VIEs related to deposits of this size or less are not material), we compute expected losses and residual returns based on the probability of future cash flows as outlined in ASC 810. If we are deemed to be the primary beneficiary of the VIE, we consolidate it on our balance sheet. The fair value of the VIEs inventory is reported as “Consolidated inventory not owned - variable interest entities”.

 

Typically, the determining factor in whether or not we are the primary beneficiary is the nonrefundable deposit amount as a percentage of the total purchase price, because it determines the amount of the first risk of loss we take on the contract. The higher this percentage deposit, the more likely we are to be the primary beneficiary. Other important criteria that impact the outcome of the analysis are the probability of getting the property through the approval process for residential homes, because this impacts the ultimate value of the property, as well as determining who is the party responsible (seller or buyer) for funding the approval process and development work that will take place prior to our decision to exercise the option.

 

Management believes the guidance for VIEs was not clearly thought out for application in the homebuilding industry for land and lot options, because we can have an option and put down a small deposit as a percentage of the purchase price and still have to consolidate the entity. Our exposure to loss as a result of our involvement with the VIE is only the deposit, not its total assets consolidated on our balance sheet. In certain cases, we will have to place inventory the VIE has optioned to other developers on our balance sheet. In addition, if the VIE has creditors, its debt will be placed on our balance sheet even though the creditors have no recourse against us. Based on these observations, we believe consolidating VIEs based on land and lot option deposits does not reflect the economic realities or risks of owning and developing land.

 

At January 31, 2010, all seven VIEs we were required to consolidate were the result of our options to purchase land or lots from the selling entities. We paid cash or issued letters of credit deposits to these VIEs totaling $6.0 million. Our option deposits represent our maximum exposure to loss. The fair value of the property owned by these VIEs was $38.5 million. Because we do not own an equity interest in any of the unaffiliated VIEs that we must consolidate pursuant to ASC 810, we generally have little or no control or influence over the operations of these entities or their owners. When our requests for financial information are denied by the land sellers, certain assumptions about the assets and liabilities of such entities are required. In most cases, we determine the fair value of the assets of the consolidated entities based on the remaining contractual purchase price of the land or lots we are purchasing. In these cases, it is assumed that the entities funded the acquisition of the property with debt and the only asset recorded is the land or lots we have the option to buy with a related offset for the assumed third party financing of the variable interest entity. At January 31, 2010, the balance reported in liabilities from inventory not owned related to these VIEs was $32.5 million. Creditors of these seven VIEs have no recourse against us.

 

We will continue to control land and lots using options. Including the deposits with the seven VIEs described above, at January 31, 2010, we had total cash and letters of credit deposits amounting to approximately $27.0 million to purchase land and lots with a total purchase price of $527.6 million. Not all our deposits are with VIEs. The maximum exposure to loss is limited to the deposits, although some deposits are refundable at our request or refundable if certain conditions are not met.

 

17. We enter into homebuilding and land development joint ventures from time to time as a means of accessing lot positions, expanding our market opportunities, establishing strategic alliances, managing our risk profile, leveraging our capital base and enhancing returns on capital. Our homebuilding joint ventures are generally entered into with third-party investors to develop land and construct homes that are sold directly to third party homebuyers. Our land development joint ventures include those entered into with developers and other homebuilders as well as financial investors to develop finished lots for sale to the joint venture’s members or other third parties. The tables set forth below summarize the combined financial information related to our unconsolidated homebuilding and land development joint ventures that are accounted for under the equity method.

 


 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

January 31, 2010

 

 

 

Homebuilding

 

Land Development

 

Total

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$15,912

 

$1,182

 

$17,094

Inventories

289,338

 

82,700

 

372,038

Other assets

14,960

 

701

 

15,661

Total assets

$320,210

 

$84,583

 

$404,793

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities and equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued
  liabilities

17,311

 

12,973

 

30,284

Notes payable

188,437

 

40,585

 

229,022

Total liabilities

205,748

 

53,558

 

259,306

Equity of:

 

 

 

 

 

Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc.

30,548

 

8,363

 

38,911

Others

83,914

 

22,662

 

106,576

Total equity

114,462

 

31,025

 

145,487

Total liabilities and equity

$320,210

 

$84,583

 

$404,793

Debt to capitalization ratio

62%

 

57%

 

61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

October 31, 2009

 

 

 

Homebuilding

 

Land Development

 

Total

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$22,502

 

$1,539

 

$24,041

Inventories

281,556

 

83,833

 

365,389

Other assets

25,889

 

87

 

25,976

Total assets

$329,947

 

$85,459

 

$415,406

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities and equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued
  liabilities

$19,236

 

$17,108

 

$36,344

Notes payable

193,567

 

40,051

 

233,618

Total liabilities

212,803

 

57,159

 

269,962

Equity of:

 

 

 

 

 

Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc.

32,183

 

9,068

 

41,251

Others

84,961

 

19,232

 

104,193

Total equity

117,144

 

28,300

 

145,444

Total liabilities and equity

$329,947

 

$85,459

 

$415,406

Debt to capitalization ratio

62%

 

59%

 

62%

 

As of January 31, 2010 and October 31, 2009, we had advances outstanding of approximately $11.9 million and $11.5 million, respectively, to these unconsolidated joint ventures, which were included in the “Accounts payable and accrued liabilities” balances in the table above. On our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets our “Investments in and advances to unconsolidated joint ventures” amounted to $39.4 million and $41.3 million at January 31, 2010 and October 31, 2009, respectively. In some cases, our net investment in these joint ventures is less than our proportionate share of the equity reflected in the table above because of the differences between asset impairments recorded against our joint venture investments and any impairments recorded in the applicable joint venture. During the first three months of fiscal 2010, we did not write down any joint venture investments based on our determination that none of the investments in our joint ventures have sustained an other than temporary impairment.

 


 

 

For the Three Months Ended January 31, 2010

(Dollars in thousands)

Homebuilding

 

Land Development

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

$21,711 

 

$6,271 

 

$27,982 

Cost of sales and expenses

(21,294)

 

(3,124)

 

$(24,418)

Joint venture net income (loss)

$417 

 

$3,147 

 

$3,564 

Our share of net income (loss)

$9 

 

$(441)

 

$(432)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended January 31, 2009

(Dollars in thousands)

Homebuilding

 

Land Development

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

$24,931 

 

$1,349 

 

$26,280 

Cost of sales and expenses

(41,802)

 

(2,335)

 

(44,137)

Joint venture net loss

$(16,871)

 

$(986)

 

$(17,857)

Our share of net loss

$(596)

 

$(94)

 

$(690)

 

 

Loss from unconsolidated joint ventures is reflected as a separate line in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and reflects our proportionate share of the loss of these unconsolidated homebuilding and land development joint ventures. The difference between our share of the loss from these unconsolidated joint ventures disclosed in the tables above for the first quarter of 2009 compared to the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations is due primarily to the write down of our investment in joint ventures where we determined that our investment had an other than temporary impairment. For the first quarter of 2010, the minor difference is primarily due to one joint venture that had net income for which we do not get any share of the profit because of the cumulative equity position of the joint venture and the reclassification of the intercompany portion of management fee income from certain joint ventures and the deferral of income for lots purchased by us from certain joint ventures. Our ownership interests in the joint ventures vary but are generally less than or equal to 50%. In determining whether or not we must consolidate joint ventures where we are the manager of the joint venture, we assess whether the other partners have specific rights to overcome the presumption of control by us as the manager of the joint venture. In most cases, the presumption is overcome because the joint venture agreements require that both partners agree on establishing the operating and capital decisions of the partnership, including budgets, in the ordinary course of business.

 

Typically, our unconsolidated joint ventures obtain separate project specific mortgage financing. Generally, the amount of such financing is targeted to be no more than 50% of the joint venture’s total assets. However, because of impairments realized in the joint ventures the average debt to capitalization ratio of our joint ventures is currently 61%. This financing is obtained on a non-recourse basis, with guarantees from us limited only to performance and completion of development, environmental indemnification, standard warranty and representation against fraud, misrepresentation and other similar actions, including a voluntary bankruptcy filing. In some instances, the joint venture entity is considered a VIE under ASC 810 due to the returns being capped to the equity holders; however, in these instances, we are not the primary beneficiary, and therefore we do not consolidate these entities.

 

18. Recent Accounting Pronouncements - In December 2007, the FASB issued an update to ASC 810. The amended guidance contained in ASC 810 requires a noncontrolling interest in a subsidiary to be reported as equity and the amount of consolidated net income or loss specifically attributable to the noncontrolling interest to be identified in the consolidated financial statements. It also calls for consistency in the manner of reporting changes in the parent’s ownership interest and requires fair value measurement of any noncontrolling equity investment retained in a deconsolidation. We implemented this standard effective November 1, 2009, resulting in a change in the classification of noncontrolling interests on the balance sheets and statements of equity.

 


In June 2009, the FASB issued an update to ASC 810, which amends the existing quantitative guidance used in determining the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity (“VIE”) by requiring entities to qualitatively assess whether an enterprise is a primary beneficiary, based on whether the entity has (i) power over the significant activities of the VIE and (ii) an obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits that could be potentially significant to the VIE and requires enhanced disclosures to provide more information about an enterprise’s involvement in a variable interest entity. This statement also requires ongoing assessments of whether an enterprise is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity. This statement is effective for us on November 1, 2010. We are currently evaluating the impact, if any, that SFAS 167 may have on our consolidated financial statements.

 

19. Effective November 1, 2008, the Company adopted ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” (“ASC 820”), for fair value measurements of certain financial instruments. ASC 820 provides a framework for measuring fair value, expands disclosures about fair-value measurements and establishes a fair-value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value summarized as follows:

 

 

Level 1

Fair value determined based on quoted prices in active markets for identical assets.

 

 

Level 2

Fair value determined using significant other observable inputs.

 

 

Level 3

Fair value determined using significant unobservable inputs.

 

Our financial instruments measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below:

 

(In thousands)

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

Fair Value at

January 31, 2010

 

Fair Value at

October 31, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mortgage loans held for sale (1)

 

Level 2

 

$42,268 

 

$65,786 

Interest rate lock commitments

 

Level 2

 

261 

 

254 

Forward contracts

 

Level 2

 

(587)

 

(702)

 

 

 

 

$41,942 

 

$65,338 

 

(1) The aggregate unpaid principal balance is $41.8 million.

 

We elected the fair-value option for its loans held for sale for mortgage loans originated subsequent to October 31, 2008 in accordance with ASC 825, “Financial Instruments” (“ASC 825”), which permits us to measure at fair value on a contract-by-contract basis. Management believes that the election of the fair value option for loans held for sale improves financial reporting by mitigating volatility in reported earnings caused by measuring the fair value of the loans and the derivative instruments used to economically hedge them without having to apply complex hedge accounting provisions. In addition, the fair value of these servicing rights is included in the Company’s loans held for sale as of January 31, 2010. Prior to February 1, 2008, the fair value of the servicing rights was not recognized until the related loan was sold. Fair value of the servicing rights is determined based on values in the Company’s servicing sales contracts. Fair value of loans held for sale is based on independent quoted market prices, where available, or the prices for other mortgage whole loans with similar characteristics.

 

The assets accounted for under ASC 825 are initially measured at fair value. Gains and losses from initial measurement and subsequent changes in fair value are recognized in the Financial Services segment’s earnings (loss). The changes in fair values that are included in earnings (loss) are shown, by financial instrument and financial statement line item, below:

 


 

 

Three Months Ended January 31, 2010

(In thousands)

 

Loans Held For Sale

 

Mortgage Loan Commitments

 

Forward Contracts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Decrease) increase in fair value
  included in net income
   (loss), all reflected in
   financial services revenues

 

$(473)

 

$6 

 

$116 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended January 31, 2009

(In thousands)

 

Loans Held For Sale

 

Mortgage Loan Commitments

 

Forward Contracts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Decrease) increase in fair value
  included in net income
   (loss), all reflected in
   financial services revenues

 

$2,139 

 

$103 

 

$(1,897)

 

The Financial Services segment had a pipeline of loan applications in process of $314.3 million at January 31, 2010. Loans in process for which interest rates were committed to the borrowers totaled approximately $85.5 million as of January 31, 2010. Substantially all of these commitments were for periods of 60 days or less. Since a portion of these commitments is expected to expire without being exercised by the borrowers, the total commitments do not necessarily represent future cash requirements.

 

The Financial Services segment uses investor commitments and forward sales of mandatory mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) to hedge its mortgage-related interest rate exposure. These instruments involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk. Credit risk is managed by entering into MBS forward commitments, option contracts with investment banks, federally regulated bank affiliates and loan sales transactions with permanent investors meeting the segment’s credit standards. The segment’s risk, in the event of default by the purchaser, is the difference between the contract price and fair value of the MBS forward commitments and option contracts. At January 31, 2010, the segment had open commitments amounting to $26.0 million to sell MBS with varying settlement dates through April 13, 2010.

 

Our financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, receivables, deposits and notes, accounts payable and other liabilities, customer deposits, mortgage loans held for sale or investment, nonrecourse land and operating properties mortgages, letter of credit agreements and facilities, mortgage warehouse line of credit, accrued interest, and the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes payable. The fair value of financial instruments is determined by reference to various market data and other valuation techniques, as appropriate. The fair value of each of the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes is estimated based on the quoted market prices for the same or similar issues or on the current rates offered to us for debt of the same remaining maturities. The fair value of the senior secured, senior and senior subordinated notes is estimated at $839.7 million, $622.1 million and $116.3 million, respectively, as of January 31, 2010 and $788.2 million, $603.5 million and $113.3 million, respectively, as of October 31, 2009. The fair value of our other financial instruments approximates their recorded values.

 


            The Company’s assets measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis are those assets for which the Company has recorded valuation adjustments and write-offs during the three months ended January 31, 2010. The assets measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis are all within the Company’s Homebuilding operations and are summarized below:

 

Non-financial Assets

 

 

 

 

 

January 31, 2010

(In thousands)

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

Pre-Impairment Amount

 

Total Losses

 

Fair Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sold and unsold homes and
  lots under development

 

Level 3

 

$1,642

 

$(629)

 

$1,013

Land and land options held
  for future development
  or sale

 

Level 3

 

$4,629

 

$(2,620)

 

$2,009

 

20. Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc., the parent company (the “Parent”) is the issuer of publicly traded common stock and preferred stock, which is represented by depository shares. One of its wholly owned subsidiaries, K. Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. (the “Subsidiary Issuer”), acts as a finance entity that as of January 31, 2010 had issued and outstanding $797.2 million face value of senior secured notes ($783.5 million, net of discount), $814.3 million face value of senior notes ($812.4 million, net of discount), and $131.3 million of senior subordinated notes. The senior secured notes, senior notes and senior subordinated notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by the Parent.

 

In addition to the Parent, each of the wholly owned subsidiaries of the Parent other than the Subsidiary Issuer (collectively, the “Guarantor Subsidiaries”), with the exception of certain of our financial service subsidiaries, joint ventures, subsidiaries holding interests in our joint ventures and our foreign subsidiary (collectively, the “Non-guarantor Subsidiaries”), have guaranteed fully and unconditionally, on a joint and several basis, the obligations of the Subsidiary Issuer to pay principal and interest under the senior secured notes, senior notes and senior subordinated notes.

 

In lieu of providing separate financial statements for the Guarantor Subsidiaries, we have included the accompanying condensed consolidating financial statements. Management does not believe that separate financial statements of the Guarantor Subsidiaries are material to users of our consolidated financial statements. Therefore, separate financial statements and other disclosures concerning the Guarantor Subsidiaries are not presented.

 

The following condensed consolidating financial statements present the results of operations, financial position and cash flows of (i) the Parent, (ii) the Subsidiary Issuer, (iii) the Guarantor Subsidiaries, (iv) the Non-guarantor Subsidiaries and (v) the eliminations to arrive at the information for Hovnanian Enterprises, Inc. on a consolidated basis.

 


 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEET

JANUARY 31, 2010

(In thousands)

 

Parent

 

Subsidiary Issuer

 

Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Non- Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Eliminations

 

Consolidated

ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding

$15,459 

 

$343,018 

 

$1,269,663 

 

$188,559 

 

$            

 

$1,816,699 

Financial services

 

 

 

 

2,607 

 

51,901 

 

 

 

54,508 

Income taxes receivable
  (payable)

233,218 

 

 

 

(4,238)

 

 

 

 

 

228,980 

Investments in and amounts
  due to and from
  consolidated subsidiaries

(360,101)

 

2,149,056 

 

(1,665,223)

 

(205,545)

 

81,813 

 

Total assets

$(111,424)

 

$2,492,074 

 

$(397,191)

 

$34,915 

 

$81,813 

 

$2,100,187 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding

$            

 

$           (1)

 

$399,120 

 

$8,844 

 

$            

 

$407,963 

Financial services

 

 

 

 

2,194 

 

40,678 

 

 

 

42,872 

Notes payable

 

 

1,760,043 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,760,046 

Income taxes payable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ (deficit) equity

(111,424)

 

732,032 

 

(798,508)

 

(15,337)

 

81,813 

 

(111,424)

Non-controlling interest in
  consolidated joint ventures

 

 

 

 

 

 

730 

 

 

 

730 

Total liabilities and
   equity

$(111,424)

 

$2,492,074 

 

$(397,191)

 

$34,915 

 

$81,813 

 

$2,100,187 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEET

OCTOBER 31, 2009

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent

 

Subsidiary Issuer

 

Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Non- Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Eliminations

 

Consolidated

ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding

$14,752 

 

$449,096

 

$1,285,699 

 

$190,750 

 

$               

 

$1,940,297 

Financial services

 

 

 

 

5,885 

 

78,395

 

 

 

84,280 

Income taxes
  receivable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investments in and amounts
  due to and from consolidated
  subsidiaries

(308,706)

 

2,067,571

 

(1,573,827)

 

(209,735)

 

24,697

 

Total assets

$(293,954)

 

$2,516,667

 

$(282,243)

 

$59,410 

 

$24,697

 

$2,024,577 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding

$             

 

$469

 

$454,718 

 

$7,761 

 

$               

 

$462,948 

Financial services

 

 

 

 

5,651 

 

64,713 

 

 

 

70,364 

Notes payable

 

 

1,777,658

 

121 

 

 

 

 

 

1,777,779 

Income tax payable

55,644 

 

 

 

6,710 

 

 

 

 

 

62,354 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ (deficit) equity

(349,598)

 

738,540

 

(749,443)

 

(13,794)

 

24,697

 

(349,598)

Non-controlling interest in
  consolidated joint ventures

 

 

 

 

 

 

730

 

 

 

730

Total liabilities and
   equity

$(293,954)

 

$2,516,667

 

$(282,243)

 

$59,410

 

$24,697

 

$2,024,577

 

 


 

HOVNANIAN ENTERPRISES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

THREE MONTHS ENDED JANUARY 31, 2010

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent

 

Subsidiary Issuer

 

Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Non-Guarantor Subsidiaries

 

Eliminations

 

Consolidated

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Homebuilding

$4 

 

$(40)

 

$313,275 

 

$40 

 

$(1,240)

 

$312,039 

Financial services